yellow beetle black dots (Cottonwood borer)

by Taylor Stephenson
(Wyandotte Ok, USA)

??????

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Yellow beetle looking thing with black dots and very long antennas


Moni says It looks like you have a photo of a cottonwood borer.

They typically have black and white not yellow markings...perhaps the lighting made it look more yellow.

The cottonwood borer feeds on cottonwoods or other poplar trees as well as willows.

Adults are reported to browse on shoots of the host trees.

Eggs are laid in August, September. Larvae bore at the base of poplars, willows, and overwinter. Two or three years required for the larva to be big enough to pupate. Larvae may girdle trees.

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wierd
by: tammy bloom

hey there,i found one of these sitting on my van door this weekend and had never seen one before in my life, i searched and searched all day to find out what it was.i live in cushing,oklahoma which i think is rather odd from all the research that i did on the beetle,wonder how it got this far,

Cottonwood borer
by: Moni

Tammy
If you look at the website I listed it does say it is found in Eastern and Central US. Also, click on Data, it will show the states where submitted photos of that insect were found. Oklahoma is listed. These insects are found in more states than listed at that site...but photos have only been submitted from those states to date.
Hope that clarifies...yes OK has them!

Scared
by: Rachael

well i was sitting on my couch and one landed right next to me and i had never seen this bug before in my life so i got rid if it. WHAT IS IT!

Cottonwood borer
by: Moni

Rachael
Assume, that if you found this photo and made a comment that you read what the name of the insect is and the most bottom comment which tells you all about this insect??

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Yellow Furry winged insect (Bee Fly)

by Jeremy
(Victoria, Texas USA)

Small,furry,legs like a spider,wings like a bee, and what looks like something to collect pollen at the tip of the mouth.


Moni saysI would agree with MydMo it is a bee fly.

It looks like a Bombylius species.

These flies are found thu out North America along wooded areas and edges. The adults feed on nectar of flowers of many herbaceous plants.

The larva parasitize larva of solitary bees.

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Pretty bug
by: NellyBear

WOW! I don't know what she is, but she sure is a pretty little thing!

Bee Fly
by: MydMo

This looks like a variety of a bee fly.

Bee fly
by: Moni

Jeremy
I would agree with MydMo it is a bee fly.
It looks like a Bombylius species. These flies are found thu out North America along wooded areas and edges. The adults feed on nectar of flowers of many herbaceous plants.
The larva parasitize larva of solitary bees.

Wow!
by: Kris

I have seen many bugs before, but I saw this for the first time the other day. Very interesting little creature!

Bee fly
by: Anonymous

Saw one of these today for the first time! I was able to get a good look at it while it hovered around infront of me. I live in Dayton Ohio & was at a nature park

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small caterpillar yellow and black (Spotted Tussock Moth larva)

by paul
(glasgow, scotland)

small caterpillar like creature with mostly yellow fur. each end has black fur with white whiskers coming out of it. the yellow body has a black line down it. seen it in stanley park in vancouver.

Moni saysThe moth in your picture is the caterpillar(larva) of the Spotted Tussock Moth.

It is often seen crawing around in the fall looking for a place to pupate.This caterpillar is found all across Canada.

In some parts of Canada it has the black spots down it's back,but in other parts of Canada it can appear with no spots.

The adult moths are drab,and slightly different in colour.They are nocturnal.These caterpillars feed on a wide variety of trees including poplars, birches, maples, willows and oaks,but they never seem to cause any significant damage.

Although the caterpillar is a pretty little thing,care must be taken if you handle it.The hairs can be very irritating to those with allergies. They tend to sting and burn ,much like touching a nettle weed.

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Spotted Tussock caterpillar
by: Moni

The Spotted tussock caterpillar is sometimes confused with the banded wooly bear caterpillar. However, as you noted, the white whiskers on both ends let us know it is a spotted tussock.
Thanks for the thorough discription Donalda.

I just saw one on my deck
by: Cynthia

Have never seen anything like it so I am looking it up - I live on the northeast edge of Omaha, NE.

Tussock caterpillar
by: Moni

Cynthia
Glad you found one!
It is interesting the things that show up for us to see. I have found insects in my yard the last few years I had never seen before and then do not see again. I think many are there we just don't happen to be in the right spot at the right time.

Minnesota has these guys, too!
by: Anonymous

My nephew and I have been watching this cute little caterpillar for awhile. Very cool.

Spotted tussock moth larva
by: Moni

Minnesota
Yes, this moth is found in Southern Canada, western US, and in the US south in the Appalachians to SC and KY.

Glad you found one to watch!

spotted tussock moth larva
by: Anonymous

just saw one of these guys in Oklahoma !

they will strip a apple tree
by: Brad

They do damage !

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yellowish, red marks on back (Two-spotted tree cricket)

by Amanda Sibert
(Cedar Rapids Iowa)

This insect was found by a pond in front of my highschool. I need help to identify it for my biology project. I was thinking it might have been a grasshopper, but i cant seem to find one that resembles it. It was crawling on one of the people in my group that was standing "near" the pond. I live in Cedar Rapids Iowa. It is Yellow with what seem to be red diamonds along the back. Can you please help me identify it?

Moni saysYou have a photo of a female two-spotted tree cricket.

Males do not have the dark spots on the back.

These tree crickets live in deciduous woodlands, edges. The adults are attracted to lights.

Two-spotted Tree Cricket, can be found on a wide variety of plants such as - grapevines, sunflower, maple trees, white pines, apple, oak. They are generally high on tall plants or in trees.

Interesting find. Good luck with your biology project.

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Cross of Yellow/Orange -7mm (Euonymus Leaf Notcher)

Flying insect that is yellow to orange in color with black in tail. Fuzzy. ~7mm in length. Flies around evergreen bush and other bushes. Clings to side of house and windows. Second time we've had them in the Fall in Baltimore, MD area.

Moni says Your photo is of a leaf skeletonizer moth with the scientific name - Pryeria sinica also called the Euonymus Leaf Notcher

Evidently this is a new pest as noted by the Dept of Agriculture in May 30, 2003 -" New Moth Found in Maryland on Ornamentals".They suspect that the way it was introduced to the U.S. was from nursery stock from the Far East.

It seems to be located in Maryland and Virginia as of right now.

The larva of this moth feeds on Euonymus plants and can defoliate the shrub.

The moth lays the eggs on the stems in the late fall, with the larva emerging mid March.

So for control you can try to find the egg masses now, cut them off and burn. Then in the spring if you find the small larva from mid to late March you should spray Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) a bacteria the kills the caterpillars.

It might be good for everyone in those states to destroy/burn all the Euonymus plants to try to prevent this pest from spreading!

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Thank You!
by: Anonymous

Thanks Moni. That expains the invasion of little green caterpillars the past two springs and the reason my hedges on the side of my house were destroyed the past two summers! Since it's a new type of moth, I think I would have had a hard time figuring this one out. Now to go trim those shrubs and destroy the eggs! I have my work cut out for me.

Euonymus Leaf Notcher
by: Moni

Anonymous
Great pun! trim shrubs...work cut out for you!!

Glad we figured it out for you and you have easy organic controls!

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yellow brown fly (Golden Dung Fly)

by Scott Young
(Ontario Canada)

about 1 cm. in length quite common in our garden found on this dead nettle. It landed, but seemed to go from plant to plant in the area not favouring any one type.

Moni says Golden Dung Fly

Do you have a photo of the side or top to show the wings?

here are several yellow flies,such as picture winged flies, robber flies and dung flies.
From the view we have, I think you have a Golden dung fly.

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Flying Yellow and Black Bug at butterfly bush (Snowberry Clearwing moth)

by Lloyd Bloom
(Ann Arbor, MI)

Side view

Side view

Side view View from the back

To me, this looks like a cross between a butterfly, a bee, and a hummingbird. It has a proboscis that curls up like a butterfly's (not shown in the pictures). I think it has 6 legs, but only 2 look articulated like a bee's. And, it hovers like a hummingbird, never coming to rest. The bug is about 2" long. First time I've seen anything like it. I have not seen one this summer, just last summer.

I live in Ann Arbor, MI. This was taken in August of 2009. The plant is a butterfly bush.

Sure would love your help in ID'ing this.

Thanks,

lloyd

Moni says Snowberry Clearwing moth

They typically have all black legs where yours look like the front legs are white (hummingbird clearwing has all white legs...the markings do not fit that moth otherwise) - my guess is the lighting affected the color.

This moth and its relatives are in the sphinx moth family with the common name of hummingbird moths, which fly during the daytime and at dusk hovering like hummingbirds.

The snowberry clearwing moth feeds on nectar of many flowers as you saw. The caterpillar of this moth feeds on snowberry, honeysuckle, dogbane, and bush honeysuckle plants.

They are found thru out North America.

Neat to see and hard to get a clear photo as they fly so fast!

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Thanks, Moni
by: Lloyd Bloom

Moni,
I wouldn't have guessed that this was a moth, as it is so big and its markings so formidable. Pretty impressive insect and I sure appreciate your responding so quickly.

Cheers,
lloyd

NOT a bee fly!
by: Linnie

I had one of these in my butterfly bush as well.
I was told it was a Major bee fly. Thank goodness I found your website and now know exactly what this wonderful creature is!!!
Avoca, MI

Snowberry Clearwing Moth
by: Anne

So glad to find out this is what I saw yesterday in my yard in Texas! I have never seen anything like it before...quite amazing!

Snowberry Clearwing Moth
by: Joyce

Thank you for your picture of this moth. I have a Butterfly Bush and everyday I have at least 4 of these on my Butterfly bush. I was so glad to find you picture of the insect, as I couldn't figure out what it was. Again, thank you.

Snowberry Clearwing Moth
by: Anne

We have a butterfly bush in the front yard, and have had these insects for a few years! I just thought they were odd bees! We saw them close up this morning and decided to investigate further! Very interesting ! We're about 7 miles from Philadelphia, PA.

mystery solved
by: kim

I love your website! Couldn't identify this interesting creature until now. Thanks

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Long yellow insect, black spots (Goldenrod soldier beetle)

by Dawn
(Richmond, VA)

Close up of single bug

Close up of single bug

Close up of single bug From the side Angled Mating

Each autumn my cockscomb plumes are covered with these insects mating for a couple of weeks. There doesn't seem to be any damage to the plants and they don't sting people. They have an elongated shape, yellow with black spots.

Moni says This is the goldenrod soldier beetle.

They do feed on nectar of flowers and are very common in the fall...especially on goldenrod but also many other flowers.

The larvae of this beetle are predators in mostly woodland areas...so they are beneficial in that they feed on other insects.

They are found thru out central and eastern North America.

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Yellow with spikes (Squash lady beetle )

by Donna
(Talking Rock, GA)

Yellow approx. 1 cm. with spines all over. It was eating my squash and gourd vines.

Moni says Your insect is the Squash lady beetle.

This insect is found in the eastern half of the US south of MA.

This spiny larvae will feed not only on squash and gourds, but also on cantaloupe, cucumbers and other cucurbits.

The adults will feed on the foliage of these plants also but do not eat quite as much as the youngsters.

This beetle is known for the chemical defense from an oily secretion which is especially deterrent against ants.

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Thank you
by: Anonymous

Thank you for the identity of this fellow. I sprayed down my vines with sevin and that seems to have gotten most of them.

Squash lady insect
by: Anonymous

I found an insect that appears to be this one in our beans. But I live in utah

Found in Georgia
by: Kyle Rollins

Thanks for help with the ID. I just went on a weeks vacation in mid June to come back and find these destroying my squash and cucumbers. Any idea what their natural predator is as we are trying to go organic. Do lady bugs eat them?

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large insect yellow body and black spots (Milkweed assassin bug)

by Mitch
(Palm beach,florida)

this insect i found walking on a bush with leaves in florida. it is large and narrow with a light yellow body and black spots and long black legs and antennas also appeared to have wings that were tucked in. if you could tell me what this is i would appreciate it. thank you

Moni says Your bug is a milkweed assassin bug because it looks like another bug called the milkweed bug.

It can also be called the long-legged assassin bug.

It is a generalist predator feeding on a wide range of soft bodied insects in the garden...such as flies, mosquitoes, cucumber beetles and caterpillars. This is a good bug :)

It is found all across southern North America. They overwinter as adults.

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orange-yellow insect furry (Bee-like robber fly)

by Chris Witham
(Brogue, PA, USA)

I saw this furry orange-yellow insect that looks much like a wasp, but with no stinger when I was hiking back in June on the Mason-Dixon trail near State Game Lands 181.

Moni says You have found a bee-like robber fly.

These flies are found all over North America.

The adults are predaceous on flying insects..meaning they feed on flying insects including bees, and other robber flies.

Most robber flies are considered beneficial since they do eat some pest insects.

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Bee-like robber fly
by: Chris Witham

Thank you Moni. This insect really intrigued me, and I am so glad you were able to ID it. I never considered it to be a fly; this is so amazing. Thanks again for your research on this, and your hard work on all the requests that come your way.

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Tiny, bright yellow insect in clusters (Oleander aphids)

Tiny, teardrop-shaped, bright yellow in colour, with minute black legs. There are clusters of them on only one plant in my garden, that being my milkweed. They are on the un-opened seed head pods, and they appeared at the end of the summer. I live in a wooded area (Charleswood) in Winnipeg, MB.

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Oleander aphids
by: Moni

Winnipeg
Your yellow/orange insects are the oleander aphid. They are native to the Mediterranean but are now all over North America.

This aphids feed on plants in the dogbane family which includes milkweeds, oleander, and vinca. These aphids also feed on plant in the Crassulaceae and Solanaceae families.

Aphids in this family reproduce without males giving live birth. Since they feed on milkweed, these aphids carry the toxic substance of the milkweed plant. Predators like lacewings and lady beetles that eat these aphids have problems developing properly. A braconid wasps have been seen laying eggs inside these aphids.

To control these aphids it is best to hose them off with strong spray of water. No chemicals should be used as the insecticide would kill monarch caterpillars also feeding on the milkweed. Also, the aphids tend to be on the pods not the foliage of the plants...where the monarchs need to feed.

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Tiny, yellow insect w black dots (Spotted cucumber beetle)

by Karen Smith
(Harker Heights, Tx, USA)

Primarily yellow insect black dots. I counted nine dots. Tinier anvil shaped black head. Resting on the finger pad at a gas pump. Six legs, two antennas.

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Spotted cucumber beetle
by: Moni

Karen
Your beetle is the spotted cucumber beetle, also known as the southern corn rootworm beetle. These are found all over North America except in the northern Rocky Mountain regions.

It overwinters as an adult in southern states. Eggs are laid in the soil at or below the base of plants. Larvae hatch in 7 - 10 days and feed for three to six weeks. Larvae feed on roots. While adults feed on corn silk, nectar, and other flowering plant parts. The larvae pupate at the base of host plants and emerge as adults in 1-2 weeks.

This insect is a pest on many field and vegetable crops including corn, squash, cucumbers, and beans. The adults can transmit bacterial wilt of cucumbers.

To control, remove all plant debris each fall. Then cover any crops effected with floating row covers. If covering vining crops, you will need to remove the cover once the crop starts to flower to allow pollination. Beetles can be trapped in the new blooms after the blooms close. Smash or put collected beetles in warm soapy water.
There are many beneficials in the garden that eat these beetles including spiders, ground beetles, soldier beetles, tachinid flies, and braconid wasps. To encourage beneficial insects and spiders to your garden, grow a variety of flowers.

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Yellow and black w/ four wings (Stonefly)

by Brian Q
(Church Hill, TN, USA)

This insect was part of a swarm that was covering my house one night as I went out to retrieve items from my car.
The insect is primarily yellow in color with black accents, six legs of course, 4 wings each about the length if the body transparent and sectioned off with veins.
It has round black eyes, straight antennae, a soft under belly and two antennae like appendages on the rear of the body.
They were found covering my house at night and swarming a security light.

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Stonefly
by: Moni

Brian
Congradulations! You have stoneflies in your area. They are indicators of clean streams and rivers!

Stoneflies tend to mate in swarms. The adults do not feed. They fly at night. The adult stoneflies emerge late spring and summer. The females lay several masses of eggs by flying over water or sometimes crawling up to the water. Depending on the species it takes 1-3 years to mature.

The young of this insect lives in clean clear streams, lakes or rivers. As young nymphs they feed on algae, diatoms, mosses, or other small aquatic insects.

Cool find! Thanks for sharing!

Thank You
by: Brian Q

Fantastic ! I am pleased to not only know the identification of my insect, but that they are an indication of a healthy local environment.

Thank You, very much.

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yellow insect with black spots ( Goldenrod soldier beetle )

by Lynn James
(Hickory, NC)

Glenn Hilton Park, Bug

Glenn Hilton Park, Bug

Bug having early morning breakfast.

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Goldenrod soldier beetle
by: Moni

Lynn
Your beetle is a goldenrod soldier beetle.

These are common beetles to see on fall flowers especially in meadows, open fields, roadsides and gardens that have lots of flowers. The adults feed on pollen and nectar as you noticed. They do love goldenrod as the name suggests, but are also seen on asters, ageratum like in your photo, and most fall composite family flowers.

The larvae of this beetle feed on grasshopper eggs, insect larvae, cucumber and related beetles. So they are a good insect for the garden.

The goldenrod soldier beetle is found in eastern North America.

This beetle will not bite.

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