VERY small white furry insect with clear wings (wooly aphid)

by Lauren
(Saddle Brook, NJ)

VERY small white furry insect with clear wings and beady eyes flying around outside...almost looks like pollen

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Wooly Aphid
by: Moni

Lauren
You have a wooly aphid. These aphids have a waxy substance on them to give them that wooly look. Like all aphids they suck juices out of the host plant.
Not sure which one you have as you did not mention which plant you found it on...or what was around the area.

We love the wooly aphid...
by: Anonymous

We tell our nieces that these are Fairies. It keeps that fascination and inocense of childhood going for just a little longer. And what little girl doesn't want to see a Fairie. =)

fuzzy white faerie bug
by: Anonymous

i saw one for the first time tonight. it was so pretty, like a little faerie. now i know what it was

wooly aphid so pretty
by: Anonymous

I live in North Florida and have the tiny little fuzzy creatures in my yard and garden. I think they look like tiny fairies, too. That's what I will tell my grand-daughter. Kids do grow up way too quickly now days. These cute little bugs are just the thing to brighten a child's day.

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White "furry" beetle or spider (Nymph of Masked Hunter bug)

by Rick D
(Montreal, Quebec, Canada)

Small, white, flat-ish beetle that looked like it had been sprayed with ceiling stucco. Really! I thought it was a small piece of tissue paper at first. Dark or black shiny eyes (just two I think). Maybe it had six legs, maybe 8, I couldn't tell from my pictures and I didn't examine it closely enough (I just wanted it out of the house!). Found it at end of July inside the house, sitting on a wooden table near some of my motorcycle clothes on the ground, so it probably hitched a ride the day before while riding off-road through an open field of tall flowers near irrigation water. Scooped it up with a piece of paper, it didn't run fast nor fly away, and I deposited it outside in the garden.

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Nymph of Masked Hunter bug
by: Moni

Rick
I believe your insect is the nymph stage of a true bug called masked hunter. This is in the assassin bug family so they are predators on other insects.

Nymphs exude a sticky substance that causes dust, lint, and other small particles to adhere to the surface of their body. This camouflage may help the nymph avoid detection by both predators and prey.These nymphs can bite humans in self-defense when mishandled. The bite is said to be very painful.
Both the adult and nymph are predators. They prefer dry habitats and if found in the house there are never very many. They are said to feed on woodlice(think pillbugs or rolly pollys that do not roll), lacewings, earwigs,and bedbugs
Hopefully you just brought it in.

Aaaack!
by: Rick D

It bites!?! Ahhhh!

Only this one found, haven't seen any others since. (It bites! ...Ahhh!) I didn't think of nymph stage for identifying this one and now that I know what the "adults" look like, I can definitely say that I've seen these flitting outside around the lawn and garden.

Thank you for the ID, Moni!

-Rick D

Fuzzy insect spider looking thing
by: Anonymous

I seen one today in lakeside never seen one before in my life...funny looking thing!!!!

eek
by: Anonymous

I just found this thing in a bag of clothes in my suite:| Was terrified!!Thanks for having a picture so I could find out what it was!

Masked hunter nymph
by: Moni

Eek
Glad you found out what it was. Now to figure out where it came from? :)

SE Idaho House "friend"
by: Barbara

We have these darling little creatures in our cabin in SE Idaho. Thank you for identifying them for me! They seem to always be on a carpeted surface and THEY HAVE NEVER BITTEN ANY OF US. If these little guys morph into the dark winged "beetles" that also live in our cabin, that's okay too. I caught one of the dark beetles for my kids science class and introduced a wasp into the same bottle. The beetle jumped the wasp and ripped its head off! Because we live in a log cabin we have annual incursions of bees and wasps so the beetle does a great favor. In my house, guests must remove---not kill---all insects and spiders, or ask me to do it. No killing of beneficial insects. I actually only kill flies, wasps, and hornet invaders because they inflict such a painful sting or bite.

Masked hunter nymph
by: Moni

Barbara
These are true bugs so they are not beetles, but what you call 'beetles' may be this insect. You can look up the adults on the internet. A good reference is bugguide(dot)net for photos and info.

Glad you found out what it was. You can always send in photos if you have an insect you do not know.

CUTE
by: Nan

My assistant supervisor found one at our Nursing Home Facility also at the end of July. She put it in a cup in my office. Not so happy about that..now that it bites...and is painful..

Two in SE Idaho
by: Anonymous

Thanks for posting this. We found one in our cellar on the wood shelving, and another in our office on a piece of wood. It seems pretty mellow but I tried to vacuum the one in the cellar up with our high power Central Vac and it held tight onto the wood, I had to pry it off the wood to get it to suck up. That scared me! I put the office one in a jar for further examination.

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little white nautilus shaped insect (Cottony cushion scale)

by Darlene Cepeda
(Stockton, CA, USA)

White nautilus shaped insect

White nautilus shaped insect

This tiny little creature is killing my lilac bushes and now it is attaching itself to my rose bushes...EEK! What is it and how can I get rid of it?
It has already sucked the life out of one of my lilac bushes. I dug it up and disposed of it and hoped that would be the end of it but the pest is back this year. I have been spraying it off weekly but it seems to be persistant.....Thank you a zillion times over for any help you can give me. And even though I don't know you Moni I think you do an awesome job!

Comments for little white nautilus shaped insect (Cottony cushion scale)

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Cottony cushion scale
by: Moni

Darlene
Sorry you lost your lilac, they are so fragrant and special. The critter you have is a scale insect called the cottony cushion scale.
It is quite famous for being the first and best success story for biological control. When the scale was found destroying citrus in CA (brought in from Australia in late 1880's) folks went back to Australia to find something to control it...that is when the vedalia lady beetle was brought in and did a super job of controlling the scale on citrus.
Good luck!

Thank you for your kind words.

GREAT BIG THANKS TO MONI
by: Darlene

Can't express enough appreciation for your help in identifying this pest and the referral source to further assit me in getting rid of it.

You provide a valuable service. Keep up the good work!

Tried this
by: Plant lover

Thank you for the pictures. Now I know their names. I used vinegar, salt and water solution to spray on my jade plants. I had my jade plants inside the house. I used three treatments three days apart . I also wipe the solution off and let the jade plants to get a couple hours of direct sunlight.
Hope your plants are okay. :)

Scale control
by: Moni

Plant lover
You need to be very careful putting vinegar and salt water on any plant...as you read in Doug's weed control posts...it will burn foliage and can kill weeds ...or your favorite plants. I can not recommend it for scale control even tho it may have worked on your jade plant.

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3" white insect with claws (Chinese praying mantid)

by Sarah Borrasso
(Northern California)

Approximately 3" long, white, with claws in the front and what appears to be some sort of pinchers in the back. Huge eyes, almost alien like.

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Praying Mantis
by: Paul

The insect in your picture looks like a Praying Mantis. When their front two legs are up and together they resemble hands held in the "prayer" position. They do prey on other insects and are benficial to have around. They don't bite people and are not agressive. Here in New England I've seen them range from green in color to light tan.

Chinese praying mantid
by: Moni

Sarah
As Paul said this is a praying mantid. Since it does not have long wings, it is a young mantid and will molt another time or two. The adults of the Chinese mantid have wings that extend to the end of the abdomen(tail end). The wings are tan with green along the outer edge on both sides.
These mantids are found thru out North America and are from the egg cases that are available thru biological supply companies.
These are beneficial insects for the garden feeding on other insects...tho if you find them on your butterfly bush they will also eat butterflies, which is a concern to those growing butterfly gardens!:-)

An interesting note is the large eyes are dark brown at sunset while tan after sunrise and the rest of the day

Mantis or Mantid
by: Lynn

My daughter had one in a bug keeper, it would turn its head & look at you. It did like to eat bugs & was swift in doing so. They did release it after awhile.

Praying mantid
by: Moni

Lynn
The official terminology is mantid...tho it is commonly referred to as mantis. bugguide.net uses the most up-to-date classifications and terminology so that is where to check if in doubt.

Mantid is the correct term for all insects in the Order Mantodea, family Mantidae... However the Genus Mantis would be the exception where you would call it a mantis.

Thank you for encouraging your daughter to study the fascinating world of nature, esp insects!!

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translucent ground bug (Beetle pupae)

by Aaron, Dan and Molly
(Seattle, Wa)

My friends found this in their garden in Seattle, Wa. It's been raining a lot this May. I think the insect is about an inch long.

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Beetle pupae
by: Moni

Aaron, Dan and Molly
Without seeing it in person or rearing it out I am not sure which beetle this pupa will turn into.
It is a pupa of a beetle...and perhaps since it was found in the soil it is a ground beetle, family Carabidae, but can not say for sure.
Here is an example of a beetle pupa that was reared to figure out what it was.

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Gray and off-white beetle larvae/grub (scarab beetle grub)

by Shauna Samford
(Kingsville, Texas (USA))

Larvae/grub compared to a dollar bill and a tablespoon.

Larvae/grub compared to a dollar bill and a tablespoon.

I saw the dark gray rear-area sticking out of my plant on my front porch. It was quite large, about the diameter of a large hotdog. It measures approximately 3-4 inches in length and has 3 sets of legs on the front segments. It also has coppery spots running down the majority of its body. I placed it in a jar and am curious as to whether there may be more in the pot. The plant it was in was a "moon plant" that only blooms for about 6 hours once a year in the morning hours. Should I be concerned and what is this? I looked up rhinoceros, dung, ox, and hercules beetles, all to no avail...Any help is greatly appreciated. We are planning a garden and just planted flowers in a flower bed near where this was found. Should we reconsider?

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Scarab beetle grub
by: Moni

Shanna
You are correct in what you think it is. Without having the grub in hand to key to species, it is one of the large Scarab beetle larva. There is no record of the Hermit flower beetle in TX, so it has to be one of either the ox (genus Stratgus) or Hercules (genus Dynastes) beetle grubs.
They are not a pest as the larva feed on decaying organic matter like rotten logs or potting mix.

So, plant the garden and do not worry about them....they sure are big critters!!
Thanks for the great description and photo size comparison.

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small transparent looking centipedes (millipede)

by John Stout
(Salt Lake City, Ut 84120)

Centipedes clustered on a squash seed

Centipedes clustered on a squash seed

The small centipedes are about 3/8 inch long and seem to gather in clusters in and around decaying wood and debris. I have found them clustered around newly planted squash seeds. Will they prevent the seeds from germinating or growing?

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Millipedes
by: Moni

John
Not sure from the slightly out of focus photo if your critters are centipedes or millipedes but I think they are millipedes. The other reason is that millipedes eat decaying plant material, and centipedes eat insects. If they are centipedes, they like to eat dead bodies of bugs.
If they are millipedes they eat decaying plants so unless your squash seeds have rotted then they will not bother them.

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White fuzzy Thing (Mealybug)

by Connie Greenfield
(Freeport, Illinois)

Spreding to the joints of the plant and on the leaves

Spreding to the joints of the plant and on the leaves

Spreding to the joints of the plant and on the leaves On the stems.

I have many kalanchoes, china doll plant, easter cactus and an asparagus plant that have developed this, I don't know what to call it. Tried a few things, mostly natural such as cooking oil mixed with muphy oil soap and water to get rid of it but nothing helps. I hope you can help with. Thanks so much, Connie

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White Fuzzy Thing?
by: Evelyn

This is something I have had on my tomatoes this year. They are on the part that connects the tomato to the plant so I was able to cut that part off. I just figured it was some type of mold. I sure hope someone does know what this is.

mealybugs
by: Moni

Connie
Your houseplants have mealybugs. Mealybugs eat many different plants and are commonly found on houseplants.
Mealybugs are covered with a white waxy coating.
Since they feed by sucking juices out of plants if you have a high infestation then they can damage your plants turning them yellow and causing the leaves to curl.
If they are only on a few leaves or branches, prune out those infested. Mealybugs are attracted to plants with high nitrogen levels and soft growth...so if you have fertilized heavily the plants are more prone to infestation.

For control use a labeled insecticidal soap. It will break the waxy surface tension of the mealybug so it dries up and dies. The oil will coat them but if it is not horticultural oil labeled for that use it is not designed to properly suffocate them. The soap is better for their waxy coating.
You could also try alcohol on cotton swabs to coat them and remove them, but for a big infestation that might be too time consuming.


HELP WITH FUZZY WHITE BUGS AND FLUFFY FUZZY WHITE EGGS
by: THE PLANT FAIRY

looks like fuzzy white mealy bugs, what specifically can be used to extricate them from plants in a pre-school setting, non-toxic ??

mealybugs
by: Moni

Plant Fairy
Please see the comments right under yours...that I wrote to Connie, about how to control mealybugs. The insecticidal soap, horticultural oil, and rubbing alcohol are to be put on the plants according to label instructions - not for children to eat or play with. When used according to the label, they are no more toxic than if you used soap, oil (paraffin) or alcohol in other ways in the classroom.

white fuzzy spec like fur or looks like little pieces of styrofoam at at distance
by: Cynthia

Im in Island Lake Illinois Today was the first time Ive seen this bug. Very mysterious and strange. They are on a door mat and decorative bird house. It will be interesting to see what they are like tomarrow.This picture was the closest description to what they look like. I will take a picture tomarrow if they are still there. Weird moving fuzz!

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small fuzzy white (mealybugs)

by Jeff Walker
(Garland, Texas)

I recentley found these small white things on my tomato plants. When I took a closer look I noticed that they were a small oval shaped worm with fuzzy white stuff all over them. I have never seen them move except when I scrape them off the plant. I have read several articles that have similiar descriptions to this insect but not any pictures that give me a posative id. I now have them on my orange tree and there are always ants crawling all over them.

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mealybugs
by: Moni

Jeff
Your photo is of mealybugs. They can be found on many different plants, tho I think the one on citrus is a different species than the one on tomatoes.
Mealybugs are covered with a white waxy coating.
Since they feed by sucking juices out of plants if you have a high infestation then they can damage your plants turning them yellow and causing the leaves to curl.
If they are only on a few leaves or branches, prune out those infested. Mealybugs are attracted to plants with high nitrogen levels and soft growth...so if you have fertilized heavily the plants are more prone to infestation.
For control you can try to hose them off. If that does not work then use a labeled insecticidal soap. It will break the waxy surface tension of the mealybug so it dries up and dies.

The ants are crawling on them to get to the 'honey dew'...the droppings of the mealybug. The honey dew can also encourage sooty mold to form....leaving a blackish mold on the plant.

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six-legged with white body with black and orange stripes (lady bug larva)

I found several of these guys walking on my 'Portuguese hot pepper' plant.
When I first found them, it was on one leaf--there were several white eggs and tiny little ones around them. I picked the leaf off and got rid of them. A week later now, I have many adult versions of the tiny guys I originally saw. It is interesting because they have 6 legs, but the body is soft and worm-like and they can bend it under them or tilt it upwards toward the sky.
I cannot tell if they are beneficial or not, and that is why I am trying to figure out what this is. I cannot find any information at the local nursery or online.
When I observe the insects on the plant, I just notice them crawling and cannot tell if they are sucking or eating anything. I do notice that some of the leaves have turned brown, but I am not sure if that is from the insects or not, as I had been gone for 2 weeks and the self-watering container faltered.

This is on Oahu, Hawaii

Thanks for any help!!

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Lady bug
by: Kurt

I am pretty sure that is a lady bug larvae. Google it and see what you think!

very close
by: Anonymous

Thanks Kurt!
I have been looking at the ladybug larvae because it does look very much like that. The reason I was not sure was because it doesn't seem to be as "spiky" as those in the photos. It has more white on the body too, so I'm trying to find photos of different species in larval form.

Are there any other insects that could look like this? Because if not, then it is a ladybug larvae! :-)

lady bug
by: Kurt

I noticed many pics of similar but different versions. I'm pretty sure just based on the body type.Good luck!

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

From Oahu
Your critter is a lady beetle larva. There are many different kinds of lady beetles and therefore the larva are different colors. Some are more spiky than others...it also depends some on the stage of larva it is.
These are beneficial so please enjoy them in your garden and do not get rid of them!

Thanks!
by: Anonymous

Thank you moni and Kurt! Unfortunately, because I did not know what they were and they were so numerous (and quite frankly kinda scary!) I sprayed soapy water on them. Being in Hawaii, I was scared they were some sort of invasive species since nobody knew what they were (yet) and I didn't want the native populations to be in jeopardy!! But now i know that these are my friends, for future knowledge.
Again, I truely appreciate your knowledge and, as we say here, your kokua (help)!!!
-Kristina

white/black bugs w/6 legs & orange stripes
by: N.M. Resident

I do not like bugs, but was surprised to read that these bugs were found in Hawaii as well. I saw one of these bugs on my bathroom counter wall & got rid of it & hubby says there were more on the porch. Went out & cleaned the porch with hot water & vinegar. But those bugs came back after drying off & started to crawl back toward the front door. I do not care for bugs in general,..so does anyone know what they're called.

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

N.M. Resident
Did you read the title of this area where you commented?
The photo shown with the comments show lady beetle larva. These are beneficial...good bugs!!!

If this is the insect you have, please do not kill them!!

If this is not the insect you have then please send a photo so you do not kill good bugs...they will keep the 'bad' bugs out of your house and garden :-)

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White Spongy cocoon? (spider egg case)

by Deb
(Calgary, Alberta)

Hello, I found several of these at ground level while cleaning up my delphinium perennial garden this spring. I opened one up and found small black flecks that looked like pieces of ash: certainly not like any sort of eggs. Last year my delphiniums were ravaged by aphids or at least I think that is what did the min. the leaves never spread out and eventually died back as did the buds that never bloomed. Could these be aphid homes? Or maybe even better, could they be ladybug homes? Thanks for you help. Hugs, Deb

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Milk Weed Pods??
by: Jennifer Way

Deb, to me they look like Milkweed Pods, but to be honest, I have never seen them before in Alberta - last I saw was in Ontario, and it has been a while since I have been there now...

Keep me posted if you happen to find out what they are - I am now very curious!! :)

Cocoon
by: Moni

Deb
Not sure yet what moth/caterpillar formed your cocoons. The black specks may have been a little frass or droppings from the caterpillar as it turned into a pupa. Anyway the spongy cocoon is not from aphids nor homes for lady beetles.
The aphids or perhaps a stray caterpillar may have damaged the buds so they did not emerge into flowers. Also moisture, sun, temps and soil problems can cause the leaves to dry up...so it might not have been and insect if you did not actually see any on the plant. If you see something this year, take a pic and send it in!
There are very few pests of delphiniums...mostly aphids and spider mites.
Will keep looking for an answer to just what might have formed the cocoons.

Cocoon
by: Moni

Deb
As I asked others who work with insects what it might be, it was suggested you could put a couple of the cocoons in a jar, add a stick for the moth to climb up on to expand wings, cover with cloth tied to keep tight and allow it to breathe and a wait to see what emerges. Take photos and then we can see what made the cocoons!

Here is a website about insect life cycles and how to rear them (click to link on rearing insects on right side bar) http://www.buglifecycle.com

Let us know what you get!!!

Cocoon
by: Jo

Praying Mantis pod. They will rid your aphids. My neighbor was destroying them until I told her what they were. Last year I was lucky enough to get some real good pictures of them hatching.

spongy cocoon maybe spider egg case
by: Moni

Deb
Please compare these images on Bugguide to your cocoon and see if it matches. Looks similar to me but you have the cocoon in hand to compare it to.


Jo, it does not look like the Carolina nor the Chinese praying mantid egg case to me...it is too smooth of texture.

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white Insect/bug looks like mold (Lacewing larvae)

by Britt Watson
(Georgia )

I have no idea what this bug and or insect is, but it looks like it's covered in mold or fungus that grows on trees.
It was found on the deer stand in the woods. What is it?

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Insect?
by: Moni

Britt
The photo does not look like an insect to me. It looks like lichen (I know a lichen specialist if that is what it is). For this to be an insect you are going to have to provide a lot more information.
What makes you think it is an insect? there are no wings, legs, head, antenna visible.
What does the underside look like? Can you provide a photo of the underside?
Does it have legs? what do they look like?
How long has the deer stand been in place?
What kind of tree is the deer stand in?
Is this the only spot on the deer stand?
Was this seen in the last few days? How long has it been there?
How fast does it move?
What other habits have you noticed about it?
Thanks

Insect?
by: Moni

Forgot to ask, were there lots of other spots or just this one?
What size is this spot? length, width, depth?
Thanks

I've seen these too
by: Anonymous

I have seen several bugs over the last few years that I call Lichen on Legs. I would have thought they were lichen, except that they move, and when I look closer, I can see little legs underneath.

Lacewing larvae
by: Moni

Britt and Anonymous
Well, after both of you had see this, I did more research and found that this is truly an insect.
Lacewings larva are great predators on aphids and other insects. This is a lacewing larva that covers itself with lichen as camouflage. This allows it to get into aphid colonies "undetected". This was discovered by biologist Thomas Eisner - see story at web site noted below.
Adult lacewings are also great predators and good to have in the garden.
Don't forget to look at all sides of the insect, especially the underside of a lichen that moves.
And then send more information about the insect, such as size, color of actual insect, habits, distinquishing characteristics like type of legs, antenna, pinchers, etc.

great!
by: Anonymous

I was so glad to find this article! My kids found the exact kind of bug as pictured here on our back deck today! Several of them...I can't wait to show them this site!! Thanks for the information!!

thanks for the perfect description!
by: Katie

I found one of these crawling on my leg and thought it was neat, I'd never seen anything like it. Expecting to spend 15-20 minutes looking online for what I could only describe as a "bug that looks like mold", I googled that exact phrase and your article popped up immediately. Thanks!

mold bug
by: Anonymous

I found a bug just like that! I thought it was a peice of mold but then it started moving and i started looking and its and actual bug! I was wondering what is is also....

mold monster
by: Logan

I found it at the doctors office. I wondered what it was and i searched it and found out what it was. one more thing do you know what it eats?

Lacewing Larva
by: Moni

Logan
The lacewing larva eats aphids and other insects as I mentioned in this comment section. "Lacewing larva are great predators on aphids and other insects."
Glad you found one also.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/white-insectbug-looks-like-mold-lacewing-larvae-comments.html#ixzz0ZnBiePb8

big white grub
by: Anonymous

I am happy to know about the big white grub. My twins sons have to study about the kind of insects ,plants and non plants in 4 square yards of land.We found ants, amall insects that we cannot recognise if flies or moths. I am happy I saw your page in facebook and it help me a lot.
thanks a lot.

I found one too
by: Anonymous

I found one here in Richmond Va. at a park. It has 4 legs a tiny tail, two antennas and has a face that resembles a ant. I took pictures and a video of it.

I have a video
by: Connie

I happen to have a video of this little insect. How can I load it for y'all to see?

Adding a video
by: Doug

Sorry Connie - there's no way to add a video to this system.

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Big White Grub

1 inch crub of some kind. Found in 1 foot of soil in Los Angeles.

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Grub it is
by: Moni

This is the c-shaped larva of a beetle in the Scarabaeidae family. The grubs usually are in the soil feeding on plant roots, tho some feed on dung, or organic matter like dead trees. Of the many grubs in the soil, some are significant pests while others do little damage. The adults are known as June or May beetles, chafers, Japanese beetles along with many others.
Depending on where you found it, may help determine which grub it is and wether it is a pest or just a helpful decomposing insect. When you say in the soil was it in the grass, mulch, flower bed, wooded area, veggie garden?? Did you just find it this week? Is 1" curled up or stretched out length?

Many scarab grubs can be identified by the raster patterns on the tail end looking from the underside. A photo of the tail end from the underside would help me give you a more precise ID if you need it.
You provided a great close up photo!


little bugger
by: Anonymous

... has a hairy butt

Big Grub
by: Brian Ross

Thank you Moni! I think you nailed it! We do have a lot of June bugs around here in the early summer, and I agree that this may be one. I found it March 20th in a flower garden with potting soil and mulch. It was 1" long uncoiled. You are the best!

thanks
by: Anonymous

idk, but i have rhinorcourus bettles in my area..and they look similar ( not really) but it has the same clear outside and a blackish inside, but i was to grossed out to look carefully...but thanks for imputing that picture into my head so i can dream about that thing mutated and eating me!

Rhinoceros beetle
by: Moni

Anonymous,
There are several beetles refered to as Rhinocerous beetles in the U.S. The adults especially the males have large 'horns' resembling a rhinoceros. These are scarab beetles also and so the larva looks like the one in the photo, tho much larger when full sized. The most common is probably the Hercules beetle. The larva of the Rhinocerous beetles do feed on rotting wood and are not found deep in the soil.

Huge Grub Worms
by: Anonymous

Just South of San Antonio, Texas, in the small town of Jourdanton, this past weekend, we turned over an old decaying log and found two of the largest grub worms I've ever seen. They were about three inches long and as big around as a thumb. We usually see the smaller ones while digging in the soil, but these two were on the ground surface under the log. I was so fasinated, I took pitures.

Big white grub
by: Moni

Anonymous
The larva/grub you found is probably also from the superfamily Scarabaeoidea, which includes the Stag beetles, hercules beetles, hermit flower beetles and others all of which have very large grubs that feed on decaying wood.
You could send in a photo, but without me actually seeing the grub in person to put it under a microscope, it would probably be difficult to tell you just which grub it was.

Neat to know nature makes such amazing creatures!:-)

White Grub
by: Char

Thanks for your articles. I think my problem is the white grub.. It is in my vegetable planter box. How can I get rid of it?

WHITE GRUB
by: Moni

Char
In a vegetable box there are a couple of things you can do. One is to wait for the grub to turn into a beetle and it will fly away. Second is to sift thru your soil to remove all the grubs.
To sift set up a 1/4-1/2" hardware screen over your wheel barrel and put the soil on the screen to sift out the grubs.

If left in the box they might eat some of the vegetable plant roots...tho not sure how much or if they will eat them. It depends on what kind of grub you have.
Hope that helps a little.

Big White Grub
by: Anonymous

I'm from Nebraska and we find a lot of similar looking grubs. They can be anywhere from penny-size curled-up, to fitting quite nicely in the palm of your hand. In my area, I believe they are June beetle grubs. They can be a pest in your garden, as they eat roots, but since we aren't particularly avid gardeners, we just leave them alone. One word of caution though, the big ones can give a quite surprising bite, although it isn't painful.

White Grub
by: Miki

I found a dozzen white grubs in my garden too...and I'm located on the west coast of India in a state called Goa. ..just for knowledge so you know these things are found all over the world. I have pictures but can find any means of uploading them there.

Thanks

Found thousands of the same grubs in a stump
by: James

I just found 1000's of these in a stump i had in my yard for decoration. They turned a maybe 85 to 90 pounds dump into dust. The entirety of the stump and mess that was left after wait maybe 10 pounds. There was thousands and thousands of them. The stump was only in my yard for 4 or 5 years

Just found one of these in my potting soil
by: Anonymous

Yeah, I just found one of these in my potting soil. I've never seen one before and I've had many varities of bugs in my soil. It has to be a beetle larvae because that's the only living creature in my apartment. I had four beetles flying around in my apartment and now I don't see them anymore.

I was checking the fungus gnat population and noticed this. I smashed it and it 'crunched' very loudly.

It's truly disgusting given it's indoors with me.

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White and orange (Ailanthus Webworm Moth)

by Robert Pollock
(Bridgewater, NJ)

It has what look like orange elytra that have white circles bordered in black that are in band like configurations.

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Ailanthus Webworm Moth
by: Moni

Robert
Your insect is a moth...Ailanthus Webworm Moth.
They are found over most of eastern North America.
The adults feed on nectar of various flowers. The caterpillars are found in webs in Ailanthus (tree of heaven) and paradise trees. The caterpillars may also feed on other deciduous trees and shrubs.
The Ailanthus tree is not native and invasive, while the insect is native...so it has learned to like this invasive tree....a good thing!

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White Furry insect on Peony pod (Hopper)

by Cid White
(Middle Georgia / Laurens County)

Tiny

Tiny "White Furry" fury

In late June 2008, after the petals had started to fall off my peonies, I noticed this "piece of lint with legs"! I've no idea what kind of insect it is; is it a spider, a flea... no idea where to even start researching it. It's extremly tiny, maybe 3/8 of an inch from nose (?) to tip of tail. The "covering" was very much fur-like. Couldn't tell for sure how many leg, but I think 6. It was very alert to my taking it's picture and I had to keep turning the plant as it would back around the pods. A couple of times it raised it's fuzzy little tail and flicked it in a ferious "warning" manner. Any idea at all what this is? I do have a couple more pictures, but not as well focused.

Doug says - I've put this through even though the insect is pretty small just in case Moni can see it (cause it's easy). If not, we'll have to ask you to get a closer view this summer. I note it's pretty hard sometimes for Moni to id things that she can't see clearly.

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Thank you Doug
by: Cid White

Yes, it is definately a tiny 'critter'! I do have one other relatively clear image from a different angle, if needed. I look forward to finding out what this is!
Cid CW

?Plant or treehopper?
by: Moni

Cid
It would be good to see some of the other photos even if they are not as focused...sometimes a different angle helps. It is hard to see the critter, even when I zoom in on it.
Thank you for the WONDERFUL description! It helps a lot. From your description, it sounds like a hopper of some sort. They will "hide" from you. Since you mentioned it also raised it's tail it could be a young or immature true bug.
Most plant or treehoppers feed on plant leaves or stems. Only when the numbers are high or when they carry a disease are they an economic pest. Sounds like you did not see too many, so for that I would not worry.

Thank you Moni!
by: Cid White

Wow! You are good! I have been searching for for information on this little critter since I first saw him. The "Nymphs (Acanalonia bivittata Nymphs)" group of photos is amazing... they are definately kin to my little critter. The ones with brownish bodies are very, very close... but none of them seems to have as much "fur" on the body as my 'critter'. How can I another photo or two to you?

Photos of Two-striped Planthopper nymphs
by: Moni

Cid,
So glad we are getting close!

Just put the photos in like you did the original photos unless Doug says otherwise. If you want put a similar title saying follow-up or something like that.
Thanks
Moni

Sorry for absence...
by: Cid White

Sorry about my absence; holidays, school, work... all very pressing. I will post the other pictures soon (hopefully). And I've a new "bug" for you to look at, which I will also post soon (hopefully).
T'ankx all!

WHITE FURRY INSECT ON PEONY
by: ANNIE

I'M ALSO INQUIRING ABOUT THIS BUG..ALONG WITH THE FURRY THING, I ALSO SEE A WHITE SMALL MOTH-LIKE INSECT ON THE SAME BUSH. THEY ALWAYS APPEAR TOGETHER AND IF YOU SHAKE THE BUSH, THEY FLY LIKE PIECES OF COTTON. THEY ALSO SCATTER TO THE BACK OF THE STEM TO GET AWAY FROM ME. WHAT IS IT AND WHAT HARM DO THEY DO?
ANNIE

Whiteflies on Annies bush
by: Moni

Annie
It would be good to have a photo of both the insects you are seeing! Are these insects on peony bushes? Where are you located geographically?
From your description, I would say your tiny white moth-like insects are whiteflies. The common name “whiteflies” comes from the fact that the wings and bodies of the adults
are covered with a fine, powdery white wax.The young stage look mostly like tiny oval discs on the back side of a leaf. When you shake a bush, whiteflies do fly all over and sometimes heavy infestations fly in your face.
Whiteflies are related to leafhoppers, aphids and planthoppers. Whiteflies feed on the juices of plant leaves. They are commonly a problem in greenhouses as well as on plants in the solanaceous family...like tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, Nicotinia.
The populations can become so heavy that they can destroy the foliage therefore killing the plant. If these insects are in a greenhouse the controls are a little different than if they are outside. Since the other furry insect was on peony and you did not specify otherwise, to control whiteflies on peony, you could try to hose them off with a blast of water. Next if that does not work is spray with neem or insecticidal soap. Finally, since peonies are perennials that die back in the winter, you should make sure you cut off all the old foliage in the fall and get rid of it. One other possible thing to try next year would be to put out yellow sticky traps. Yellow sticky traps attract many flying insects, especially several pests like whitefly. You put the traps hanging just above the foliage to trap the insects. Then there are fewer to feed on the leaves.

not whitefly
by: Anonymous

after looking up images of a whitefly, I have to dissagree..I have just found 2 bugs with the same flea like look with feather like things on its butt. I have no idea what they are but whitefly is not the answer

2 bugs in disscussion
by: Moni

Anonymous
Cid asked about the bug in the photo.....while Annie asked about another insect that is whitefly.
Perhaps you have another insect....please send in a photo so we can ID it for you.

Not a white fly...
by: Jennifer Killinger

I just posted a pic of a bug that is similar to yours. After reading your description, I think it may be the same critter. I don't think it is an Acanalonia bivittata Nymph either. Did you ever ID it?

I sent more pics
by: Claire

This looks exactly like my mystery bug! I just sent some more shots. Was told it's a mealy bug but it looks different to me.

Acanaloniid Planthopper nymph
by: Moni

Claire
Will look forward to seeing you photos.
The insect in the photo from Cid is one of the Acanaloniid planthoppers...not sure which but we are as close as we can get for a photo of a nymph.

Photos are challenging for identification of some things, especially young stages of insects. So we are glad we can even get that close.

Same guy hope this is still active
by: Anonymous

Found him walking the railing outside. Wanted to add that it was nighttime and after taking a few photos he I guess hopped with great force and surprised us very much took us maybe 20 seconds to find him but we found him walking up the railing back towards us from the bottom of the stairs . I found this and tried to take a better photo but couldn't focus on it very well neither in video or camera mode . would love to know what it is. Took a good look at him the tail looked like two feather s next to each other kinda going outward..distance.. I guess it was one flight of stairs that he hopped

Acanaloniid Planthopper nymph
by: Moni

Anonymous
Not sure what you are asking about the insect on the railing but the insect in the photo where you commented is the Acanaloniid Planthopper nymph.

If you need another insect identified please send a clear photo. Thx

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Growth on dwarf lilac bushes (White scale)

by Linda S.
(New Jersey)

White substance on lilacs

White substance on lilacs

There is a soft, thready, white substance that has appeared on my dwarf lilac bushes in the last week or two on the northfacing side of the bushes. The most recent rainfall was three nights ago, rainfall has been sporadic, brief thunderstorms that are normal for this time of year in NJ.

The white material rubbed off easily when I tried to remove some and the bark beneath was softened and stained my fingertips a light color. There was what appeared to be spider silk-like threads between my fingers afterwards, but no visible insects or arachnids that I could see. The photograph was taken last night which is when I originally submitted my question. Doug suggested I upload the picture here instead.

Any ideas what is infesting my lilacs? How do I remedy this and save the bushes. The lilacs were just gorgeous this spring.

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Lilac problem
by: Moni

At first glance I would say you may have a scale insect pest such as mealybug or white peach scale, tho it could be a plant disease...which I am not so familiar with. Usually, scale insects build up over time, tho with the right conditions, populations can "explode". Perhaps they were there before but just recently built up to be seen??
If it is scale insects, you can spray with a summer horticultural oil, per the instructions. This suffocates the insect.
I will continue to look for other possiblities.
Let me know how the oil works.

Wooly Aphid
by: Anonymous

I had this on some of my hollies. There is a white bug hides in all this white stuff and when you try to wipe it off there is a white bug that jumps. I called my county agent and was told it was a wooly aphid.

White stuff
by: Moni

Well, it is possible that it could be woolly aphid. They feed on leaves, buds, twigs, and bark. Aphids leave a waste product that is sticky, called 'honeydew'. This can then develop a fungus that is black called sooty mold. Fortunately, heavy woolly aphid infestations only occur periodically and are usually controlled by natural enemies.

The photo does not show the white stuff to be as puffy or insect parts/bodies that I would expect to see.
Linda - do you see twisted or curled leaves, yellowed foliage, poor plant growth, low plant vigor, or branch dieback?
Also do you see any sticky substance under the infestation?

Please let us know what you see, you are our eyes to solve the mystery.
Thanks


Yes on the curling leaves
by: Linda S.

Leaves at the tops of both lilacs are beginning to curl along their long axis, around the midrib. The affected leaves are lighter green in color and the curling is toward the underside of the leaf. I can upload another picture if my description isn't good enough.

I removed some of the white material looking for obvious insect activity and found a very tiny black insect. Much less than a mm in length. No idea if that wee guy is in the "wrong place at the wrong time" or the actual culprit.

Have not yet had the chance to try the oils as described.

Tiny black bug
by: Moni

If you only found one little black bug then it is not it...there should be many. It would be good to have a photo of the leaf curling...is there white stuff on the leaves??
How much of the plants have white stuff on them?
Thanks.

White scale
by: Moni

Wow, after identifying your scale problem, I have found some on some of my shrubs while out pruning. Not a big problem, but interesting to see!

Success!!!!
by: Linda S.

Thank you to all who left comments to help me get my lilac bushes healthy again.

I took your advice and used an oil I picked up from the garden center, that application was about two weeks ago. There hasn't been any build up of the white fluffy material on the lilac's bark since and I'm also noticing that some of the curled leaves are beginning to uncurl and regain some darker green color.

Again, thank you so much!!!

Looks like mealy bugs
by: Anonymous

Looks like mealy bugs. Look up mealy bugs.

Growth killed plants
by: Linda

One of the two dwarf lilacs did not survive the attack of whatever it was that caused the white, fluffy stuff. The second bush, while not completely dead, only has leaves, lilac blossoms and new growth on about a third of its branches.

Sadly, I'll be removing both shortly.

Lilac bushes
by: Moni

Linda
Sorry to hear you lost your lilac bushes. Makes me wonder what all happened. One year of a scale infestation should not kill an established lilac.
As I reread your description from last year, I wonder if when you said "remove some and the bark beneath was softened and stained my fingertips a light color" that there was a soft rot in the wood. So perhaps you had a weakened bush that attracted scale (just like if our immune system is low we then catch a cold). Two pests attaching the bush was too much??

Hope you have better success with the next planting. Make sure the area is well drained and plenty of air movement to keep the bushes healthy.


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White Wooly Aphid? no (Planthopper nymph)

by Corey Jones
(Whiteville, NC, USA)

This has got to be the most adorable insect that I've ever come across. I found him outside of the carport at my Grandparents house this past summer. They live about an hour from the North Carolina coast. My best guess is that this is a type of Wooly Aphid. Wanted an educated opinion/guess!

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Planthopper nymph
by: Moni

Corey
It is a cool looking insect...nice photo!
It is the nymph stage or young of one of the Acanaloniid planthoppers. In the nymph stage it is hard to tell which one it is as they tend to all look alike. Once you see an adult then we know for sure.
Planthoppers feed on juices from shoots and leaves of plants, mostly trees and shrubs. the nymphs are known by the waxy filaments that stick out the back end. These do not feed enough to be pests.
They do look like wooly aphids, but have that long waxy tail. Good guess on your part!

Thanks again Moni!
by: Anonymous

Thank you :)

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White Newly hatched insects (katydid nymphs)

by james
(Maitland, FL, Orange)

Newly hatched

Newly hatched

This is from the same location, Maitland, Orange County, where the Broad-Necked Root Borer came and was posted a week ago. The little seeds where the (two-hundred or so) insects hatched from have been there for several weeks and I didn't know what they were. The seeds were attached to a black net that resembles the same shape as the seeds themselves. The seeds appear as some kind of insect-creation... a seed-looking fungus maybe; but I didn't think anything living was about to hatch out of there.... Until a week ago when I noticed all the fuzz over the seeds, and saw the little cricket-looking insects standing up there, waiting and moving their tentacles, but not jumping, flying or running away from me. That black net is located on a tennis court, and they were about 50 feet away from grass & nature. The things were there for several days and nights. Don't know how they survived under the heat during the day because there is no shade in that area. I didn't know if there was a mother insect that feeds those things, or if not a mother insect, then were they hatched at the wrong place, far away from food and nutrients, and waited for their rescue? Or, hatched away from nature maybe was a good thing for them, as they were safe from predators. Then the rain and wind finally came, and they weren't seen anymore; if they weren't able to escape prior to that, then perhaps they perished.

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katydid nymphs
by: Moni

James
Since these critters are so new it is hard to know for sure but they look like katydid nymphs. The eggs are laid in clusters usually on a host type tree or shrub.
If you had a storm go thru perhaps they were blown to a host plant so at least some survived.
Katydids feed on various plants, but are not pests of the garden.
Cool photo!

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White Fuzzy Tailed (Hopper Planthopper nymph)

by Kat
(Chester, Virginia)

I only ever see one and only in the Summer when I put my Orchids out and only on the one Orchid. It hops like a flea but with better accuracy, white fuzzy tail that flicks, rocks back and forth like a mantis and has red/orange eyes. The plant that I find it on doesn't seem to be suffering any ill effects.

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Planthopper nymph
by: Moni

Kat
Your fuzzy little guy is a planthopper nymph. There is no common name for your planthopper known as Acanalonia servillei. The nymph looks similar to others in the same genus but the coloration helps to separate them. Usually nymphal ID is not possible as many look the same, but in this case I think this is the one you have. More angles are always helpful for positive Id when trying to identify from photos.
It is found in eastern US. The nymphs and adults feed on a wide variety of trees and shrubs. Not sure why you only see it on your orchid. They can be found in fields, wooded areas, gardens, and in most areas of herbaceous plants from summer into fall.
And you are right...they are not considered a pest.

Tiny white moth
by: James

I live in northern Illinois and have seen these itty bitty white moths, I think they are moths, every year for ten years. At first I though it was ash flying around but noticed that it had a flight plan. I have never seen a photo of these little guys. I only see one at a time. I've seen some that look similar, but not the same. I will try to catch one and photograph it, but it is soooo small I'm not sure I can get a good focus on it.

Micromoths
by: Moni

James
Please try to get a photo...and we will see what we can figure out. There are many tiny moths called micromoths.
The Peterson Field Guide series has a moth book by Charles Covell...which shows several of the micro moths.
There is also another source which might or might not help - Illustrated Checklist of the Lepidoptera of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, Vol. 3C: Micro-Moths and Geometroids
By Ed Knudson & Charles Bordelon. 2008.

The micromoths are not studied by very many folks.

Itty Bitty Moth
by: James

Didn't see one today, but I'm re-tired so I'll try tomorrow. Maybe it's a nymph, we'll see. It just about floats in the air where it wants and has direction. It's neat!!

Itty Bitty Nymph!
by: James

Sorry but it is not a planthopper, it is smaller and more fizzy and pure white. I'll try to get a photo.

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Small White Fuzzy-Tailed Insect (Planthopper nymph)

by Lou
(New Jersey)

Small white insect with fuzzy tail found in Central New Jersey.

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Planthopper nymph
by: Moni

Lou
It is the nymph stage or young of one of the planthoppers. In the nymph stage it is hard to tell which one it is as they tend to all look alike. Once you see an adult then we know for sure.

Planthoppers feed on juices from shoots and leaves of plants, mostly trees and shrubs. The nymphs are known by the waxy filaments that stick out the back end. These do not feed enough to be pests.
They do look like wooly aphids, but have that long waxy tail.

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Silver lady bug (Common willow Calligrapha )

by Kat
(Hibbing, mn, USA )

I saw this bug in a backyard in northern mn it is bigger then a lady bug, but is the same shape. It is metallic silver with black spots.

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Common willow Calligrapha
by: Moni

Kat
You found a common willow Calligrapha.
This insect is found in most of North America. And as the name suggests it feeds on willows.

There are several species of beetles in the genus Calligrapha that look similar, but the markings are distinct for this species. There are some variations in coloring

Cool looking beetle!

Thank you
by: Kat

I had never seen one before, it really is a cool looking bug!
Thank you

Silver beetle
by: Sandi Walters

Thank you for sharing a link. Much appreciation. Such fun looking for little bugs in the woods in my area of the northwest Arkansas Ozarks. Buggies and wildflowers are abundant.

I just found one too here in Kansas
by: Linda

I am in central Kansas and had been working outside in the yard and garden. About an hour after coming inside, I noticed a silver jewel on my arm and thought I must have brushed against one of the grandkids artwork and picked up one of their "sticky jewels" but I was wrong! When I went to pick it up, it crawled away!! It lots like a miniature silver ladybug. Fun!! (No willows nearby. Hmm... Wonder where she would like me to return her to.)_

Saint John, NB
by: Anonymous

Just saw one today in southern NewBrunswick, thank you for this page, was a fast search. Beautiful little fellow.

I saw one too!
by: Nate

I work in a lumber yard in western Washington and stumbled upon one of these little guys when I was opening a unit of wood. Cool looking little bugs!

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white/ cream color grub (Scarab beetle larvae)

by josh
(indiana)

Not sure what it's is. Found it laying at the base of a maple tree. Located in central indiana.

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Scarab beetle larvae
by: Moni

Josh
Your insect is the larvae or called grub of one of the large scarab beetles. Not sure how big it is, but looking at the size compared to your finger I would guess about 2"?

It could very easily be the larvae of a Hercules beetle (there are 2 species). This beetle larvae can get to be 3 1/2" long before it pupates and turns into an adult beetle. These are found in temporate North America.

It is also possibly the larvae (grub) of one of the Osmoderma flower beetles (there are 3 species) another scarab. The larvae of this beetle usually is not much longer than 1 1/2". These beetles are found in eastern North America.

The larval grubs of both look similar to the eye, but would need to have it in hand or key it out to know which species it is. It takes 2 years for the egg to mature into an adult beetle. Both larvae feed in decaying wood, while the adults feed on rotten fruit or sap and fruit juices.

That it was at the base of a maple tree...it was probably feeding on the decaying heartwood inside of the tree or nearby stump.

The Hercules beetles are the largest and heaviest beetles found in North America.

thank you
by: josh

Thank you so much Moni.

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completely white, chunky looking, angular plates insect (Masked hunter bug nymph)

by Dieter Heinrich
(Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada)

Owen Sound, Ontario, 2014-Sept-18, found in house near shoes. 3-4mm. Looks to have angular plates all over body and legs. Squarish head, thick antenna bases, In the first photo, the head is at 5 o'clock.

Dieter

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Masked hunter bug nymph
by: Moni

Dieter
Your insect is the nymph or young stage of a true bug called masked hunter. This is in the assassin bug family so they are predators on other insects.

Nymphs exude a sticky substance that causes dust, lint, and other small particles to adhere to the surface of their body. This camouflage may help the nymph avoid detection by both predators and prey.
Caution: These nymphs can bite humans in self-defense when mishandled. The bite is said to be very painful.

Both the adult and nymph are predators. They prefer dry habitats and if found in the house there are never very many. They are said to feed on woodlice(think pillbugs or rolly pollys that do not roll), lacewings, earwigs,and bedbugs.
Hopefully you just brought it in from outside.

Thanks!
by: Anonymous

Thanks for the ID Moni! So now I'm wondering where it picked up all the nice white lint or powder. I gather they aren't actually white. Pretty weird little critter for these parts.

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Tiny insect with fuzzy white ball on its back (Green lacewing larvae)

by Lisa Bowling
(Flagler Beach, FL 32136)

Tiny insect with fuzzy white ball on its back

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Green lacewing larvae
by: Moni

Lisa
It is the debris-carrying lacewing larva. Amazing the camouflage they use to sneak up on aphids!

These are very beneficial insects for the garden. The larvae eat lots of aphids and other pests like caterpillars on cabbage, potatoes and other plants in the garden.
The adults are lacy looking green flying insects. They also feed on pest insects but do not eat as many as the growing larvae.

They can give off an unpleasant odor when handled. They can pinch/bite if mishandled.

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Spider Looking bug with fuzzy white tail (Woolly aphid nymph)

by Alicen E
(Gladwin, Michigan )

My husband and I found these while cutting down firewood on our property. We live in Michigan, and these were found on Sept. 18.


They look like they have 6 legs, a white body with a brown/black rear. It also has a fuzzy, cotton looking tail or rear end. They are small, but can be seen with the naked eye. They look like their back tail is dancing when they move. What are these little guys?

Comments for Spider Looking bug with fuzzy white tail (Woolly aphid nymph)

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Woolly aphid nymph
by: Moni

Alicen
The insect your husband found while cutting wood is one of the woolly aphids (subfamily Eriosomatinae). It really looks like the beech blight aphid which can be in your area.

The woolly aphids form large clusters of individuals that are covered with a wax coating and wax feathered secretions...like the tail end of your insect in the photo.
The 4th instar (stage of nymphs)are very active...which is what your insect looks like.

The beech blight aphid feeds on beech. There are several species of woolly aphids. Some only feed on one plant species while others feed on many plants. Though these are aphids they do not have or they are very reduced...the 2 rear appendages called cornicles (on other aphids they look like stovepipes sticking out of either side of the rear end).

Eggs are laid to overwinter. Some of the species form galls on plants when the eggs are laid. If one of the aphids you saw have wings it would be an adult. The adults do not feed, the nymphs suck juices out of the plant host.

These insects do not bite nor cause a rash.

Thank You Moni!
by: Alicen E.

Thank You so much Moni! I couldn't figure out what these little guys were! I can't wait to tell my husband!

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