spider (fishing spider)

by crystal seymour
(new hartford, ct)

found this on my ceiling in new hartford, ct

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Fishing spider
by: Moni

Crystal
The photo looks like a Fishing Spider from the genus Dolomedes it is probably Dolomedes tenebrosus.
They capture prey with small claws and inject the venom when they bite.
These spiders are can walk on water and then dive below the surface where they can sometimes even catch small fish, hence the common name. Tho large, they are not dangerous to humans. They are big spiders.

To Lisa Roberts
by: Ellie, age 11

This is a Tropical Orbweaver, Eriophora ravilla. They are nonvenomous, nocturnal orbweavers.
Sarasota,FL

Fishing spider
by: Moni

Ellie
On this one I disagree. The size is too big for the orb weaver. And the color pattern and body shape, leg dimensions are not the same.



Thanks so much for the work you are doing studying spiders! Keep up the great work! Love it that you are working on spider ID. We need more folks interested in spiders and insects at your age!

Cross spider
by: Naz

This is a cross spider, as you can see the cross pattern on its abdomino. Its a garden spider that actually helps keep the bug population down in your garden which turns out to be a healthy garden.

Fishing spider
by: Moni

Naz
When we use common names, not the scientific name it can be very confusing. This is because in one part of the country or even part of a state, folks call a plant or insect by one common name while others use a different name. If we all used just the scientific name we would all know for sure what the critter is, but that is not what most folks want to do.
Therefore, I try to use the commonly accepted name that Bugguide uses because it follows the most accepted name by scientists across the country.

This is a fishing spider. If you look up cross spider online you will probably find the cross orbweaver, a smaller spider in a different family.

All spiders are considered "good bugs" of the garden.

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Black and Brown Striped Spider (fishing spider)

by Cheri
(Morgantown, WV)

Apx. 4" long. Fuzzy and hiding under my deck.

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Fishing spider
by: Moni

If you look in the Insect ID section there was another question titled "Spider" that is the same kind of spider. Do you also live near water?

The photo looks like a Fishing Spider from the genus Dolomedes.
These spiders are can walk on water and then dive below the surface where they can sometimes even catch small fish, hence the common name. Tho large, they are not dangerous to humans.
They are big spiders.

Same here!
by: Candace

I have the exact same spider that I found in my lower level garage. I took pictures of it as well and long behold after almost 30 minutes of searching, I came to this website with an actual picture of the creature that had me frantic!! I hope that by saying I have nothing to worry about, that I really don't! Because this boy is a big one and although I have 4 other boys that are much bigger than this guy, I do worry about bites.

Fishing spider
by: Moni

Candace,
Well, I understand not wanting to be close to large spiders...they are not my favorite either.

That said, they can bite. Fishing spiders' propensity to bite varies with species and other factors. In some cases, an individual may strike at a person in order to defend itself if it feels threatened, or it may bite in defense of its egg sac. However, the normal encounters that put people and fishing spiders close together, they want out as much as you want them out. They should not be considered 'aggressive.'
If they should bite it is not poisonous or serious(unless you have a really rare allergic reaction), but it can hurt.

Hey i have the exact same spider!!
by: natalia

My mother and I an my children live in southeastern ky an we found one of these huge spiders on our shower curtain we bombarded it with raid. We also live right near a river so i hope i finally found my answer to our big spider question!!!!

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Brown Spider (Cross orbweaver spider)

by Jane Martin
(Oshawa, Ontario Canada)

My daughter saw this spider outside her bedroom window and I had to go out and take a picture of it. There is a picture of it from the top. If you could help me identify it I would be greatful. I do have a picture of its underbelly but I could only upload one picture.
Thanks

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Cross orbweaver spider
by: Moni

Jane
There are several orbweaver spiders that kind of look like yours, but the cross orbweaver spider looked a lot like it. Yours is either in genus Neoscona or Araneus. The cross orbweaver is in the latter.

The orbweavers are common spiders found in gardens, barns and most outdoor spaces.
Bugguide says this about the two genus's "Several species of Neoscona and Araneus that are considered "barn spiders" can only be identified by examination of the carapace groove (fovea).

Neoscona have a longitudinal groove on the carapace (parallel with the long axis of the body), whereas Araneus have angular (transverse) grooves. However, an apparent problem is that in Araneus the groove may appear as little more than a dimple, making it tough to tell. "

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shade of green (green huntsman spider)

by bryan
(france)

who says green isnt beautiful?

who says green isnt beautiful?

This spider was found in our house and it is only the size of a quarter of a coffee bean, what is the latin name as well as a name we know? Thank you

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beautiful emerald green
by: Anonymous

Wow, it is beautiful. It looks similar to our grey wolf spiders but smaller and green! I don't know what it is but thanks for sharing.
Jennifer- Ontario Canada

Georgeous!
by: Grammadot

I want one!

Green spider
by: Moni

Checking around my best guess is that your spider is a green huntsman spider (Micrommata virescens), tho the size does not fit. Most green huntsmans are 7-10mm male or 10-15mm female where you said your spider was 1/4 of a coffee bean (less than 5mm). It could be a young spider which would reduce the size.
Otherwise the markings, shape, color, looks all fit.
I assume since you list France that the spider was also found in France?

Entomology
by: bryan

Hi, yes it is where I live and there are many a variation in co lours, and if your interested in entomology I have hundreds and can download a few more?

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Very tiny spiders (yellow garden spider)

by Paul & Carolyn
(San Rafael, Ca.)

We found a thin, almost invisible web over a portion of siding next to our front door, covered with many tiny spiders. We've lived at this house for 5 years and have never noticed spiders like these before. Can you identify this spider? We live in San Rafael, Ca.

Best regards,
Paul & Carolyn Hacker

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Tiny Spiders
by: Moni

Paul & Carolyn
First to be honest...I am an entomologist not an arachnologist...therefore I do not know spiders very well...only the most common ones.
With these tiny spiders being in a cluster indicate they might have just emerged from an egg sac. In that case they are too small to identify well. If you see larger ones that look the same then perhaps we can id them better.
Sorry but I can not help you more.

Tiny spiders
by: Moni

Paul & Carolyn
Since my first response did not go thru I will write it again.
Not sure what these baby spiders are. Spiders are not my specialty as an entomologist, they are arachnids and that is a specialty of it's own. Also, since they are so small and there are so many it looks like they have just hatched from an egg case. Since they are immature and so small it is hard to ID them. As they grow bigger and you have a close up photo perhaps we can tell better what they are.
Spiders are known for being good for the garden as they eat insects.
As long as you leave them alone they will not bother you.
Let us know if you see them when they are more mature.
Thanks

yellow garden spider
by: Moni

Paul & Carolyn
Look what I found -
http://bugguide.net/node/view/7163
They look just like your tiny spiders and were on the screen door!...
Read what it says about your spiders...
"near the end of fall, after they hatch, they get back inside the egg sac to protect themselves from winter"

Tiny Spiders
by: Paul & Carolyn

Thank you so much for identifying our little baby spiders. We really don't know how they will be able to fit back into their egg sac. We assume they will grow a little bit between now and then.

Thanks again.

yellow garden spider
by: Moni

Paul and Carolyn
If yours hatched this spring they are probably coming out of the egg sac that they had crawled back into last fall. Most certainly they will grow and be good bug catchers in your garden. :-)

your spiders
by: sherry

i have the same thing here...(thanks for sending them my way..lolol..)only they are on my screen door handle..and i walked right throught them...(didn't see them...lolol)..they look harmless...n didn't bite me(had some of them on me..lol)...i'm thinking there a spider mite of some sort...i live in nova scotia..and we don't have any harmful ones...so i wouldn't worry...i took a board and paper towel..and moved them from my door...they'll help in the garden i'm sure..most spiders are good for the inviroment...n i don't like killing any...i repeat any spiders...lol..i don't bother them n they don't bother me...is my moto...good luck with your babies...

Same thing in London,uk
by: Sean

I came across the very same thing today. There must be about 200 all clumped up in bunches of
20 or so. They look like suspended frog spawn- as they are hanging stationary On a fine fine 3d web. I have never seen anything like this before.

YELLOW GARDEN SPIDER
by: Moni

Sean
As the spider hatch from the eggs they are in a group like that. They will spread out as they grow.
Cool stuff!
Thanks for sharing.

We got them on front garden on bin
by: Shannon Leigh Ellis

We've got these spiders on front , what are they?

YELLOW GARDEN SPIDER
by: Moni

Shannon Leigh Ellis
If you have the same spider it is the yellow garden spider young.


"near the end of fall, after they hatch, they get back inside the egg sac to protect themselves from winter"

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/very-tiny-spiders-yellow-garden-spider-comments.html#ixzz1M4Ie4x28

tiny yellow spiders
by: Anonymous

I have them on the side of my house here in Saugus, MA. Cute

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This Spider Keeps a Messy House

by Suzy
(Southlake, TX)

DO NOT DISTURB!

DO NOT DISTURB!

The distinguishable red hourglass shape confirms this menacing monster is the Black Widow. It collects paper and leaves to make its disorganized, tangly web.

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confused
by: Anonymous

I thought black widows only had the hour glass on the underside.

pixels
by: Anonymous

this photo would be good under macro and more pixels!

Black Widow
by: Anonymous

Last week I picked up my rack and a large shiny black spider with red on it's back was on it with an egg sack. I immediately killed it and squshed the sack on the ground. Are widow now having red spots on their back as well as on their underbelly or is it another kind of spider.

Different species of black widow
by: anonymous

I live in NC and grew up in the eastern part of the state where black widows are very common. These black widows never had red on the back.
I now live in the western part of the state where I see black widows with red spots down the back. Our local nature center told me there are two varieties known as the western and eastern varieties. The line of red spots disappear as the spider matures.

confused
by: lynn

I too am confused, the back or belly, which is it.

widow
by: Daniel

The black widows with red spots going down the back are northern black widows. They've been seen in the south more over the last 10 to 15 years.

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spider with white head (Funnel-Web Spiders)


(connecticut)

This rushed out of a clothespin while I was hanging laundry. Spider with a white head and a small second body segment, mostly brown in color. Likes lurking inside the clothespins (shown on a 1cm wide clothespin). Some webbing around on the line and clothespins, but it does not appear organized and it's not clear it belongs to this spider.

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Funnel-Web Spiders
by: Moni

CT
Identification of spiders is not my specialty. Spiders can be tricky to ID from one photo, as it is important to see the number and location of the eyes as well as the mouthparts. With that said my guess is the Funnel-Web Spiders, Family Agelenidae. This family would be easy to ID if you see it in its web since as the name suggests - it is on the ground or in foliage in the form of a funnel - very tightly webbed. But from the clothesline that could be a challenge.
Here are some images to look thru to see if you have a better idea from seeing the critter in person.

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spider with red around head (Jumping spider)


(connecticut)

Found on my bedroom wall. Body around 1cm long, brown and black patterned body with chevrons on the back end. Reddish circle around the equator of the head. No sign of a web.

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Jumping spider
by: Moni

CT
Spiders are not my specialty. But after much searching I will guess it is a jumping spider and more specifically Platycryptus undatus.

As with most spiders being able to see the number of eyes and mouthparts are especially important in Id. Neither of which could be seen well here.

Like all spiders they feed on insects. However this family of spiders do 'jump' rather than walk or run to move around.

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White Spider (Crab spider)

by Trish
(Iola, Tx)

This spider reminds me of an octapus... What kind is it?

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A crab spider
by: Donalda

Your white spider appears to be a crab spider.Crab spiders,often called "FLOWER SPIDERS", do not spin webs to trap prey, but hunt on the open ground or on vegetation or flowers. Some change their colour between white and yellow,depending on the flower it is resting on.
Crab spiders have short, wide, flattened bodies. The first two or three pairs of legs are longer than the rest and are normally held out from the sides of the body as a crab would hold its claws.
Crab spiders are predators that lie in wait to ambush their prey,and remain with the immobilized prey until they have sucked it dry .

Crab or flower spider
by: Moni

I agree with Donalda. That is a complete and thorough description.

which?
by: bryan

lovely photo, but more emph on the spider, I think its more important, but still dont know the name, would like to see a macro of the spider please!

Crab spider
by: Moni

Bryan - Noted your commets, but am not sure what info you are looking for. The family name for the crab spider in question is Thomisidae.
Within a given species there seems to be a lot of variation. It could be genus Misumenoides or Misumena or Misumenops. Only someone who studies spiders (Arachnidologist) would be able to get you a more specific name.
Hope that helps.

White Spider
by: Jacqui B

I just found the same type of spider on my old picnic table. I have never seen one of them before today. I actually thought it was albino, that is how white is was. My question is are they poisnous to humans?

Crab spider venom
by: Moni

Jacqui
Crab spider venom is not dangerous to humans.

Crab spiders are beneficial to humans because they feed on flies, mosquitos, moths and other insect pests. It is believed that some of the crab spiders have more toxic venom than other spiders so they can quickly paralyze their prey.

Your spider may have gotten knocked off of a flower as they usually blend color-wise with their background. They are not fast movers so they need to hide from those critters that prey on them!?
Hope that helps.

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Spikey red, black and white (Spinybacked Orbweaver)

by Sara
(Boca Raton, FL)

Its just nasty!!! See picture!

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Micrathena spider
by: Moni

Sara
Beautiful!!
Looks like a Micrathena spider. There seem to be several spined spiders but from what I can tell from your photo, it is a spined Micrathena. Sites say it is the primary web spinner in woodland areas and like most spiders it is beneficial...an insect predator. The only problem it causes humans is when you get a web caught in your hair.
Leave it in the garden to take care of pests and it won't bother you.

thanks!
by: Sara

i killed it already...that was a dead picture of it!

Spikey Red, Black and White
by: Anonymous

I think that it is beautiful whatever it is.

Spikey red, black and white
by: Anonymous

Sara: Why would you kill it, they love eating aphids, which love eating the flowers and veggies in gardens? I have a wasp and bee that circles my back yard and leave both alone, they will protect my maters from horned catipillars and pollinate my cucumbers and other veggies for me. Now spider mites is another thing, they get a dose of fertilome triple action plus every time.
joy

OMG
by: Nikki

i was looking on Google today to figure out what type of spider that was because my friend and i found that same exact type of spider in my old Elementary school and he got killed so i wanted to know so THANKS!!

Love the micrathenas!
by: Ann

Weve got one of these guys at our front porch ... gorgeous!

NOT a Micrathena
by: Ellie, age 11

This spider is a female Spiny Orbweaver, Latin name Gasteracantha cancriformis. I agree with whoever thinks they're pretty. You SHOULDN'T have killed it; Spiny Orbweavers are harmless, beneficial and CUTE. Many live in the pool lanai at my house. I love spiders, and the image of a dead spider makes me sick. They eat flying (and sometimes destructive) insects. I've never been bitten.

Spinybacked Orbweaver
by: Moni

Ellie
Thank you for the ID!
It is indeed the Spinybacked Orbweaver. It is found in the southern tier of states in the US. They live in woodland edges and shrubby areas.They are commonly found in the fall.
The spinybacked orbweaver does not live long.

It is great to have your help with spider ID...it is not my area. Glad to see you so interested in the little critters at your age. My first insect collection was in 4th grade. We need your help making sure others your age/generation have insects and spiders to enjoy!

Thanks for the great information and knowledge! Keep it up!!

unique spider
by: kylla

the spider is very pretty.i have one in my back yard. my mom and me toched it with a stick.it moved around.i think they are cute. i dont think any one should try and kill it. i'v gottin bit by a spider befor when i was sleeping when i woke up i saw a spider bite on my leg. but not that kind of spider.i wonder how long they live? and if you dont want masqetios the spiders will eat them for you. so i say DO NOT KILL THOS SPIDERS

I had one in my Van...
by: Anonymous

When I opened my back doors to get the cot I noticed him hanging on a web in the middle of the opening. I normally don't kill spiders however I did grab the web from above and swooped him onto the ground. I could't find him after that. I am sure he will be happier where i left him with all the wooded areas and open natural. Since he was not the only type of spider I have that resides in my work vehicle I wish I knew he was safe to keep.

Florida in August

spinybacked orbweaver
by: Moni

Florida in August
If it was the Spinybacked Orbweaver. It is found in the southern tier of states in the US. They live in woodland edges and shrubby areas.They are commonly found in the fall. It does not live long and is not harmful to humans...they eat insects so are beneficial to have around. Tho not sure what insects are living along with the spiders in your work van? :-)

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Spider (Orbweaver Spider)

by Heidi
(Joliet, IL, USA)

This spider is an inch in diameter and was found making a web between our bird feeder and its pole. It is mainly out at night. We live in Illinois, but not near water. It has made several fairly large webs.

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Orbweaver Spider
by: Moni

Heidi
You have an orbweaver spider probably a Spotted Orbweaver, but I would have to have the spider under a microscope to positively ID.
The common name comes from the web-spinning behavior of these spiders - they make the classic, round "orb" web that most people associate with spiders.
According to Bugguide " When measuring the size of a spider, only the body length is measured (do not include the legs)." "Orb weavers are very docile, non-aggressive spiders that will flee at the first sign of a threat (typically they will run or drop off the web). They are not dangerous to people & pets, and are actually quite beneficial because they will catch and eat a lot of pest-type insects."



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Spider(s) in my kitchen (Common House Spider)

by Eric
(GA, USA)

My house has a lot of spiders. Earlier I found a small tan spider attacking a larger dark brown one, and I'd like an ID on either or both. This scene took place in my kitchen, along the floor under the edge of my cabinets. I have a couple more pictures of the spiders from other angles - the small one was moving around a lot so there are more angles of it.

The small one seems to mostly eat larger spiders - we find lots of dead ones stuck in webs under my cabinets. Trying to determine whether it's better to kill them or leave them be. We vacuum up the webs and they reappear in a day or so.

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Common house spider
by: Moni

Eric
I believe the small spider is what is called the common house spider.

Here is what Wikipedia says about the spider -
"These spiders are not aggressive. They are not known to bite people frequently, nor is their venom known to be dangerous to human beings. When removed from their webs their poor vision and body type renders them helpless. Their only concern seems to be to find and return to their own web or build another one. They do not wander around inside houses except to find a secure place to build a web. Since these spiders are harmless and their diet consists of pests such as flies and mosquitoes, as well as other small invertebrates found in houses, tolerating their presence in human homes is beneficial."



The second dark brown spider might be a Sheetweb Spider. I am not very good at spider ID and do not know my spiders well at all. Since many spiders come into our homes by accident...it could be one of several types.

Spiders are beneficial, feeding mostly on small insects and other arthropods. So it is best to move them outdoors out of your way, or you could leave them to catch other insects in your house.

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Crazy spider

by Ellie
(Cambridge, Ontario)

Yellow Beauty

Yellow Beauty

Look closely. This spider has taken on? the colour of the flower it's sitting on. Was out in my garden taking pictures, trying to be really creative and doing close ups, and had I not had the camera 2" from from him I don't think I'd have spotted him. Thought he was cool!
Thanks for taking the time to look at this!
Ellie

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Crab spider
by: Moni

Ellie
You have taken a photo of a crab spider or also called flower spiders. They are usually brightly colored since they are found on flowers. They sit and wait on their prey rather than catching them in a web. Some of these spiders can take on the color of the plant they are on. They are good spiders to photograph as they sit still for long periods of time waiting for an insect to come by.
Crab spiders are beneficial to humans because they feed on flies, mosquitos, moths and other insect pests. It is believed that some of the crab spiders have more toxic venom than other spiders so they can quickly paralyze their prey.

orb weaver
by: Anonymous

Can this spider change to any color ?

Crab spider
by: Moni

Anonymous
According to this website from the Univ of Ky "Some flower spiders are able to change color to become camouflaged on different kinds of flowers, although the color change may take a few days."

Therefore to answer your question, they can change color but perhaps not to any color. :-)
They are usually yellow or white with pink or brown markings...have never seen blue or purple ones.

Green. And yellow spider
by: Janice redden

Found a green spider with yellow stripes on it's under side,
It was living in one of. The leaves of my hoster plant. I've never seen one like it before, it was so well camouflaged it's only when it moved that I saw it. But have tried to identify it but nothing matched

crab spider
by: Moni

Janice
If this spider does not look like yours you could send in a photo for ID.

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Brown spider black spots (Brown Widow)

by Brooke Derby
(Bokeelia Florida)

Brown spider with egg sac

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Cobweb Spiders
by: Moni

Brooke
I believe your spider is a cobweb spider. Spiders are not my specialty...they are not insects.
Cobweb spiders are common house spiders, but also include the black widow. They are similar to orb weaver spiders but their web is messy rather than and even circular web.
Cobweb spiders are common and can be found almost anywhere that they can find weeds, fences, trees, walls, or other upright structures to build their webs. Cobweb spiders are predators, and eat anything that gets trapped in their webs. Most web-building spiders, including cobweb spiders tend to have poor vision. They can "feel" prey when it gets caught in their webs.
Hope that helps.

Brown widow spider
by: Moni

Thank you Anonymous for the great website.

It does look like this cobweb spider is a brown widow spider. The egg sac having spikes is a great identifier.
To clarify, yes the brown widow does have more potent venom than the black but it is considered less poisonous as they do not inject as much venom as the black widow.
" According to experts at the LSU AgCenter, brown widow spiders can be found in brush piles, crawl spaces, and under chairs, flower pots, eaves and porch railing. However, brown widow spiders are shy, less likely to bite and deliver less venom in their bites than black widow spiders."

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ghostly flying carpet (Spiny Orb Weaver Spider)

by Paula Fye
(St Petersburg, FL)

Vibrating ghost cocoon

Vibrating ghost cocoon

Guessing that this is some kind of cocoon, but it was vibrating suspended in midair under some creeping myrtle. (Location: Sawgrass Lake Park, St Pete, FL) I used a tiny stick and it was not attached by any strand detectable, it was vibrating at a steady rate, because when I took a burst of photos, every other one was a clear photo. The rate for too fast to see the object clearly with the naked eye. What is this????!!!
I have two more views if you need to see them.

Doug says maybe the twilight-zone bug. :-)

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Ghostly Flying Carpet
by: Paula

I see now that I have examined all the photos (I took 22 burst shots), that this is probably a stabilamenta pattern of an immature Florida argiope web weaver spider. You can actually see the spider, like a ghost on the web. She was vibrating the web so fast that she could not be seen with the naked eye, but when the camera caught her between shakes, she could not hide. :-)

At least, this is my idea. I would appreciate any comments and to nail down what kind of spider it is exactly.

Thanks!
Paula

Spiny Orb Weaver Spider
by: Moni

Paula
Great job figuring out what you saw. I was going to say a spider web before I read you last comment. A little research says it is a Spiny Orb Weaver Spider.


What an interesting find! Amazing critters we have out in nature!

response to Moni
by: Paula

Actually, you can see the spider in the web, and it is not a box shape, but a regular spider body. (look close at the photo). What I thought was a design in the web (the darker areas) is actually the spider.

Thanks for your comment. :-)

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yellow-brown pseudoscorpion? Arachnid resemblence. (wind scorpion)

by David Jones
(Sierra Vista, AZ)

light brown in color, striped thorax, eight legs, two feelers and four mandibles. Found in Southern Arizona.

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Wind Scorpion
by: Moni

David
Your photo is of a wind scorpion. It is an arachnid. The classification of this order (Solifugae) is currently under revision.
These critters are nocturnal. They live in warm and arid places - mainly deserts and sandy places, but some species are found in forests and grasslands.
These are predators: eating invertebrates(insects and insect relatives) and small vertebrates. They will hunt for dead creatures as well as live prey.

The strong jaws of these critters can inflict a sharp bite in self-defense if handled. They do not have venom. The most common species are small and can hardly be felt except for a slight "pinch". Larger species have been known to draw blood, which should be immediately disinfected as you would treat any bite.


Wind scorpion
by: Anonymous

I ran across one of these in the desert to the east of Yakima, Washington, in about 1986. Had no idea what it was. Put a small knife down in front of it and let it grab on. I could definitely feel the power of its jaws through the blade of the knife. I let it go its way, and I went mine.
Cool to finally know what that was.

Wind Scoripion
by: Anonymous

I found this crawling on my carpet after bringing a big old box in from the garage. I was very alarmed and worried. In Lubbock, Texas.

are u sure thats a spider?
by: Anonymous

Looks a lot more like a potato bug, i mean; to the tee. Im probably wrong but compare to a pic of potato bug and you'll see what i mean. ( im prolly wrong though..

Wind Scorpion
by: Tatom

Found on in my bathroom at 04:22 6-1-14
Never seen one before and nearly half an hour wasted trying to identify before I started to use google to search for traits.
In the same family as the infamous Camel Spider, lives in desert climates and hot tundra climates. Non-venomous, but possesses a powerful bite. Generally harmless in all, will be releasing the one I've caught sometime tomorrow.

wind scorpion
by: Moni

Tatom
Glad you found the ID here. We have found that traits do help with ID...color and outstanding characteristics.

It is an interesting critter!

Not a spider
by: Anonymous

That's not a spider that's a Jerusalem cricket aka potato bug

Not a potato bug
by: Rachel

Found one of these in my house tonight. Definitely not a Jerusalem Cricket. We have those here too and I caught one and had it in my freezer for a long time to show my brother who was doing a bug project in his science class.
This thing freaked me out as it doesn't seem to have a head, just the 4 mandibles and a long black body. Glad to have found a place that had an ID!

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Cool web spider (yellow garden spider)

by Penny
(Lithia, FL)

This little spider is living in the doorway to my house- thought the web was neat- day and night the spider seems to be in the web. We live in Florida.

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cool web spider
by: Anonymous

looks like a banana spider to me

garden spider
by: Lin

Looks like a garden spider. I usually have a few around my plants in the summer. I try to help them out by feeding them grasshoppers or crickets.

yellow garden spider
by: Moni

Penny
Yes, Lin is right this is a garden spider. With a little searching I believe this a young A. aurantia female.

As it develops it will turn black and yellow. Let us know if yours turns darker!


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Large redish spider (Orbweaver spider)

by Lisa Roberts
(Greensburg, Pa, USA)

When I came home and went to unlock my front door this guy caught my attention. As I was waiting for my daughter to bring me something to try to kill it, I snapped a quick pic. I live in southwest Pennsylvania and it was around 5:00 pm. I realize it would be easier to ID if I had a picture of the top of it, but this is all I could stomach! It was busy spinning it's web which made it harder to get the pic, but it was larger than a quarter, maybe half- dollar size? It is red and I cannot find a similar spider pic anywhere. Some think it's a brown recluse, but I do not see a resemblance. Please help me! I have two small children and if it is venomous I do not want it in my house!

Doug says this is a tough angle and spiders can be tricky - I'm going to pass it through to Moni but no guarantees on this one at all.

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Orbweaver spider
by: Moni

Lisa
This is one of the orbweaver spiders. They make the classic round orb webs that most people would draw if they were told to draw a spider web. Think Charlotte's Web type of spider. :-)

They come as small as a 1/4 inch to over 1".
NOTE - When measuring the size of a spider, only the body length is measured (do not include the legs). Not sure what size you mean.
This family of spiders very a lot. Usually the females are larger than the males.

As with all spiders they are beneficial so they should not be killed...just move them to an out of the way location in the garden.
Bugguide Remarks about this spider say it best -
"Behavior:
Orb weavers are very docile, non-aggressive spiders that will flee at the first sign of a threat (typically they will run or drop off the web). They are not dangerous to people & pets, and are actually quite beneficial because they will catch and eat a lot of pest-type insects.
Being Bitten:
Being bitten by an orb weaver is very uncommon, and typically the individual was "asking" to be bitten. Orb weavers will only bite if they feel threatened and trapped without a chance for escape (e.g. - like trying to pick them up). A bite is often compared to a bee sting, and for most people, is nothing serious. However, it is recommended to observe them in their environments (e.g. - on their web) and not to pick them up."

thank you
by: Lisa

thank you! I've searched online for hours and just cannot find anything that looks like it. Someone said maybe just an ordinary orb weaver, but I'm not sure... I appreciate any help!

YAY!
by: Lisa Roberts

Thank you so much Moni! I really do appreciate you taking the time to tell me that it's not a harmful spider! I was so scared all day about this!

Killing Spiders
by: Lynn

I really don't understand why some folk's first instinct is to kill a spider. Some are really beautiul & they do live outside. (Don't come in my house, the rules change then!) I have seen an ant about 3/8" long, blood red and fuzzy. He was alone too. The guy I was working with wanted to kill it! I'd never seen one before & I suggested since neither one of us had seen this lone spider before (we are old people too) we should not hurt it. I won;

why kill? first
by: don

am sorry to hear when people are afriad to live and let live i understand when a known danger is present we must protect our children but when we encounter something we do not know why is kill the first thing we think of. what if this defenseless little spider was one of the last of its kind? and we kill it because we are afraid of it? why not start the new year off with a new attitude? lets identify before we murder what we do not know.

Orbweaver
by: Peg

I found one last night while we were by the fire, I too killed it. Sorry...thanks for the info, next time I will relocate it. I have a great pic if you are interested in having it. Thanks, Peg

Orbweaver spider
by: Moni

Peg
If you want the spider Identified or if it is a clearer photo than the one you found for helping you ID yours then send it in. As you found this site to help you Id your spider, others use the site to ID their insects...so if you think it will help...then submit it.

All spiders are great predators, so it is best to relocate them :)

Thank you.
by: Anonymous

I have one outside my door right now, left my camera at a friends house. I have been searching for what type of spider it is, thank you very much. While watching it, what appeared to be, cocooning a victim of its, it flipped over and that's the exact same markings on saw on the underside of the abdomen. Thank you again, I'm in CA.

Type of Orb Weaver
by: Anonymous

Try looking up Western Spotted Orb Weaver. That's what it appears to be to me.

THAT's the belly pic we needed!
by: Mary & Louise

Thank you soooooo much for the great picture of the underside of your spider. I stumbled across your shot & BLAM, that's OUR SPIDER! No question about it. My friend Louise saw the spider stretched across her front door way. Being that she had NEVER seen anything like it, in ALL her 86 years, living here in Northern California, decided to put it in a jar so we could identify it. Thanks to you we did! She is quite the country girl to be catching spiders at HER AGE. Thanks again. Mary and Louise in No. Calif.

Orbweaver spider
by: Moni

Mary & Louise
So glad you took the time to find out what it was...isn't nature cool!

We are never to old to learn new things...keeps us all young!

You two can always send in a photo of any other insects or spiders that you find and we will do our best to figure out what they are! The more photos we have of different insects - the more we have for folks like you to have available to help you learn what it was you(or others) found.

Red Velvet Ant
by: Cam

This is for Lynn - in response to your comment, "I have seen an ant about 3/8" long, blood red and fuzzy." Good that you left that one alone! It sounds like you saw a type of wasp commonly called a "red velvet ant" (See http://lancaster.unl.edu/pest/resources/cowkiller.shtml for more info). Their sting can be quite painful.

Also thanks for the id of the red orb weaver - I ran into one of them, still on their web, this AM as I was walking my dogs. Gray-ish/pink-ish in color in the morning woodland light...I'd never seen one quite like it. Glad to have an idea of what it was!

Orbweaver
by: Heather

This is one of the few spiders I can appreciate the beauty of. We get them in our backyard, ranging from tiny to pretty big, but I've only seen them in brown. I love the cute mask-like face on the underbelly, and watching them build their webs in the evening.

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lime green spider with yellow spots (Orb weaver spider)

The insect we think is a spider was sitting on a balloon at our party. It was very hot outside but there were no plants in the area it was found.

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Puzzled
by: Anonymous

The shape resembles a black widow. Could it be a mutation?

Lime Green Spider
by: Rodney

Looks like a Crab Spider

Orb weaver Spider
by: Moni

My best guess is your spider is an Orb weaver spider. It might be one of the few Araniella species. You did not say where you are from which would help id it also.
The common name comes from the web-spinning pattern of these spiders - they make the classic, round "orb" web that most people associate with spiders. The orb weaver spider family is one of the most varied (in size and appearance) of all the families of spiders.
Bugguide states:"For most orb weavers, the ability to classify a specimen to species level often requires a microscopic inspection of the genitalia. A genus level identification is considered a good ID for most of the orb weavers."

Orb weavers eat any small insects they catch in their webs.
Being bitten by an orb weaver is very uncommon, and only bite if mishandled or threatened.

lime green spider
by: Anonymous

I live in New Hampshire and saw the same spider. It's cool looking but creeped me out. It was not big at all.Is it poisonous

lime green spider
by: Anonymous

I live in New Hampshire and saw the same spider. It's cool looking but creeped me out. It was not big at all.Is it poisonous

Orb weaver spider - Araneus cinqulatus
by: Moni

Anonymous From New Hampshire
As I stated in my comments...see below
"Being bitten by an orb weaver is very uncommon, and only bite if mishandled or threatened."
I can also add the bite can be compared to a bee sting, and for most people, is nothing serious. They are not considered a poisonous spider.


???
by: Anonymous

Are you sure that is not a green lynx spider?

Araneus orb weaver
by: Moni

Anonymous
Yes...it is Araneus cinqulatus.

Lime Green Spider
by: Grace

The picture of the spider is exactly like the one I have. I found it in my bed!! I was quite surprised and curious. I have it in a jar to look at it more closely; now that I know
it is harmless, I will release it into my flower garden. I am from Massapequa, Long Island, New York. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to share this little critter;I am off to release it!

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Green spider with big abdomen stripe (Green Lynx spider)

by Tom Garcia
(Santa Barbara, CA)

We found this greed spider with a big striped abdomen in Santa Barbara, California on a Mexican Sage plant.

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Green Lynx spider
by: Moni

Tom
Spiders are not my forte but I believe this is a green lynx spider. The western variations look a little different than the eastern ones. And the abdomen looks a little large but it could be a female about to lay eggs. This type of spider is recognized by their distinctive eyes, numerous spines on their legs, and bright colors in some species.

Like most spiders they feed on other insects. They are found on grasses, shrubs, and trees. And as the name implies they are quick to jump on their prey.

Bugguide says "Lynx's are very protective of their egg sacs, guarding them avidly. Many will not eat while guarding eggs, and often die of starvation as a result."

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brown aggressive crawler (Sun Spider)

by Steve
(Carlsbad,CA USA)

2 images of it.

2 images of it.

We think this might be a baby Jerusalem Cricket, but doing internet searches, it looks like a small camel spider. We (our cats) have found 2 of them in our house going back about 4 months. Should we be worried? Any help is appreciated. The critter is about an inch long. Thank you for your time!

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More info
by: Steve L.

After further searching, I have discovered that this lil guy is a Sun Spider. I don't know much more, but if you know about these guys, please let me know. Thank you.

Sun Spider - SOLPUGIDS
by: Moni

Steve
Great job on your ID.
Here is what Univ of CA, Riverside says about your spider.
"SOLPUGIDS - Families EREMOBATIDAE and AMMOTRECHIDAE
Solpugids, also known as Solifugids, "Sun Scorpions", "Camel Spiders", "Sun Spiders", "Wind Scorpions", and other similar names, are a type of nocturnal arachnid (not insects at all) somewhat related to scorpions, but representing a distinct evolutionary lineage. They are especially common in desert regions of the world, including Southern California, where various species in genera such as Eremobates and Ammotrecha regularly surprise and bewilder people encountering them for the first time. With their huge jaws (chelicerae), they are fearsome in appearance [see images below], but have no venom, and if they bite humans (requiring provocation) nothing will happen (despite some rather wild urban legends told by Desert Storm veterans). They are voracious predators of small arthropods, however, using the force of their jaws to kill their prey rather than venom. Some stories of them clipping hairs off the faces of sleeping humans do seem to have credible sources, but the only speculation as to why they might do this is if females use the hairs as lining for the burrow where they lay their eggs (a big IF). Since they are harmless to humans and many of the arthropods they consume are pests, Solpugids can be considered beneficial, and should be left unmolested."
If you need more information, let us know.

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orange-brown Spider with a "face" (Spotted orbweaver spider)

by Tammi
(Norcross, GA)

This spider is round and compact, not long-legged. It is about an inch long. I could not get around to see his back, but his belly looks like it has a face on it. It is orangey-brown and black, with two white dots underneath and it looks like it is fuzzy. His web is in my backyard, there is nothing special about his location. It is spun from the wall to a bush. The web looks pretty standard, no fancy "writing" in it. I don't know anything else I can add.

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Spotted orbweaver spider
by: Moni

Tammi
Your photo is of a spotted orbweaver spider. The orbweaver spiders have the neatly woven webs that look very precise and organized. They are all over the woodlands, especially in the fall. They hang with their heads down.
As with most spiders they are predators on other insects.
This fall we have seen literally thousands of these along the roadsides.

Thank you
by: Anonymous

Thank you, Moni. I was hoping he was not a nasty fellow. I appreciate your reply.

round furry spider in web on wall
by: Anonymous

the little critters become pets!

Thanks
by: Me

Not going to be a pet in THIS house, lol!

spotted orbweaver
by: Anonymous

yes i caught one of these spotted orbweaver spiders and i was gonna let it go but it had babies/ egg sack on the side of the jar wat do i do??

Spotted orbweaver
by: Moni

Anonymous
Just put the jar outside and let the spiders crawl out on their own.
A spider expert just wrote to say if you see small things floating in the air near trees, they are tiny spiderlings that are dispersing. So this is the time of year they move into wintering places.

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Green Spikey (Green lynx spider)

by Amina
(Kingsland,Ga,USA)

Green, body is almost a inch long, long legs, think it used to have four legs on each side, but has only 4 on one side and 3 on the other. Looks like it has eyes like a spider. Has cactus like spikes coming off of the legs!

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Green lynx spider
by: Moni

Amina
You found a green lynx spider. They are known for being fast runners and great at jumping at prey. They do not use a web like many spiders.
They have great eyesight also to find, stalk, chase or ambush prey. Six of their eight eyes are arranged in a hexagon-like pattern which puts them in a special family of spiders.
This spider is found on many kinds of shrub like plants throughout the southern United States and is the largest North American lynx spider.

Like most spiders they are great predators on insects and are considered great helpers in many field crops. In the garden they are not always so helpful as they also eat lots of our beneficial insects like the bees and wasps.

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Some Kind of Spider (Spinybacked Orbweaver)

by Trish
(Iola, Tx)

Can you tell me what kind of spider this is? It looks like it has spikes on its side... This is the first year I have seen one.

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Spiny Orb Weaver
by: Donalda

Your interesting spider appears to be a spiny backed orb weaver .It is quite harmless and it is a beneficial preditor.It builds large clusters of webs ,one on top of another.

Spined Micrathena
by: Moni

There seem to be several spined spiders but from what I can tell from your photo, it is a spined Micrathena. If you google 'spined micrathena' you will see several that look similar to your spider. Sites say it is the primary web spinner in woodland areas and like most spiders it is beneficial...an insect predator. The only problem it causes humans is when you get a web caught in your hair.

Re: Woodland Spiders
by: Grammadot

In the Fall, in Eastern PA, a stick held ahead of one walking through the woods is handy to keep from walking smack into one of those webs. The spider with a crown on his/her back is always right in the middle ......... face high!

It's a Micrathena sagittata!
by: Anonymous

Hello, your spider is a Micrathena sagittata, which is a harmless orb weaver. I found one on my forsythia last year and investigated by looking at LOTS of pictures of spiders on the internet.

To Trish
by: Ellie, age 11

This is a Spiny Orbweaver, Gasteracantha cancriformis.
Sarasota, FL

Spinybacked Orbweaver
by: Moni

Ellie
Thanks again for correcting my Id...it is the Spinybacked Orbweaver - Gasteracantha cancriformis.
The six spines and rounded body show that it is the orb weaver not the Spined Micrathena. The spinybacked orbweaver is found in the southern tier of states in the US. They live in woodland edges and shrubby areas.They are commonly found in the fall.
The spinybacked orbweaver does not live long compared to most spiders.

You seem interested in spiders...and that is not my area of expertise...so I really appreciate your help! Thanks!
Keep up the study of spiders and insects, we need your interest and enthusiasm!

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Green spider with spikes and red dots all over its legs. (Green Lynx Spider)

by Pradeep Kumar R.V
(Mysore, Karnataka, India)

Green Spider

Green Spider

I found this peculiar looking arachnidae while i was searching for insects near my house.

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Neat spider
by: Moni

Great photo!
It looks like a neat spider. Since I am in the States and do not have a book of spiders in India, I am not sure what it is. However most spiders are great predators and great for the garden!

macro
by: bryan

Hi,nice macro close up of a beautiful spider, mai touche pas!!!!!

Green Lynx Spider
by: Pradeep

I got to know the name of the spider, Its called Green Lynx Spider.. It is also referred to as farmers friend.. Google it on the name u will find more abt it :)

Cheers
Prad

Green Lynx spider
by: Moni

Pradeep
Thanks for the ID. It is a beautiful spider...for a spider that is.:-)
Glad to hear it is a help to farmers!

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Green headed spider with striped abdomen (Green lynx spider)

by Pam
(Bryan, TX)

This spider was seen on my fence in Bryan, Texas. It's body length was about 2 1/2". I have never seen anything like it. What is it?

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green headed spider
by: robert

i have seen them here in midlothian, texas. i killed it...

Green lynx spider
by: Moni

Pam
Your spider is a green lynx spider - the eastern variation. Their name comes from their quickness in chasing prey.
This type of spider is recognized by their distinctive eyes, numerous spines on their legs, and bright colors in some species.
Like most spiders they feed on other insects.

They feed on the pests as well as some beneficial insects. They blend in well with its background since they are found on grasses, shrubs, and trees.

These are found in the south from MD to FL and west to CA.

Bugguide says "Lynx's are very protective of their egg sacs, guarding them avidly. Many will not eat while guarding eggs, and often die of starvation as a result."

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Green And Black Spider

by Jodi
(Erin,Tn)

SCARY

SCARY

I saw this spider on the bottom left corner on the outside of a window seal.It was cold outside,too.The spider had bright greenish yellow stripes on its back.Its legs were pretty long,too.The web it spun was big and very distinctive.Lets just say if this thing was to crawl on me i would pass out...

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Garden spider
by: Moni

This is what we call the yellow(or black and yellow) garden spider.
They do a great job keeping the grasshopper and other insect populations down. Not sure how cold you have it in TN. However, in the upper Midwest, by now the spiders have died and left the egg masses for overwintering.
They do spin webs in gardens and near buildings and homes, especially on the south side. They are not dangerous to humans.

The green and black spider
by: greta

I was in the garden yesterday and seen this same exact spider just inches away from my head. I had bent down to pick tomatoes and stood back up and there it was. I got out of the garden pretty quick and refuse to go back. I will pay someone to pick tomatoes for me with the understanding that there is a ugly looking spider in my garden. I had to have been 5 inches long.......I have searched the internet and finally found the spider I was looking for here. Thanks....

Garden spider
by: Moni

Greta
Sorry the spider scared you so. They are great to keep grasshoppers and other pests out of the garden.
These spiders do not bite unless they are handled and messed with. So it is safe to pick your tomatoes. You could throw it a bug or two to keep it busy while you are picking!

ALL over four wheeler trail.
by: Jessica

LOL. The first time I saw one of these it was inches from my face also. Apparently they like to spin webs between two big trees across trails, because as I crept along the trail at a snails pace, thankfully, I came across about 5 more. HUGE and SCARY but apparently harmless. I still dont like harmless spiders, so I knocked each web out of my way and got out of there. I would also PASS OUT, right on out, if I ever saw one of these on me or heaven forbid, got one on my face as I drove along the trail!

Garden Spider
by: Paul

These spiders were very common when I was growing up in Rhode Island in the late sixties and early seventies, but unfortunately it has been many years since I've seen one in this area. I remember them "shaking" their webs to scare us away if we took a close look at them. Your picture brings back great memories.

Common Name: Writing Spider or Garden Spider
by: Holly Ellison

Your photo is of a Black and Yellow Argiope (Ar-guy-o-pee). I have several around my home, in fact I name them! Hazel is just outside my breakfast room window. She's now formed 2 egg sacks (appear to be brown paper balls) and I so look forward to their appearance every year! Watching her vibrate her web is really an interesting spectacle! I've gotten inches from her to take photos and she never seems to mind, though I tend to leave her to her own~

Common Name: Writing Spider or Garden Spider
by: Holly Ellison

In reference to the last comment...I'm in Conroe, Texas, USA, 40 miles North of Houston.

Garden Spider
by: Autumn

Me and my brother and sister used to love to toss bugs into the webs of these things (And I still do! I'm only still 14.). They are very interesting, and don't seem to be too aggressive unless you go poking at them with your hands. They do enjoy being fed, and even though they look big and scary, I'd rather be near one of these than most other spiders.

Another one in TN
by: Anonymous

I just found one today at my house in Tennessee.

Yellow Garden Spider
by: Anonymous

I live in Conroe Texas and for the past month have seen close to 10 of these spiders (maybe its the same few moving to different locations). I have a sever phobia of ALL spiders and do not do well seeing them or even being told that one is around. I have lived in my home for 19 years and have never seen them before... my son knocks the webs down and then a few days later a new web is build in a new location. Just about every tree in my back yard has a giant web and huge spider on it! So scary for me. I have ran screaming more time than I can count because I cant just stay in doors as I have animals to care for!

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spider with stitch-web (yellow garden spider)

by Michelle McFadden
(Peoria,IL)

This Yellow Garden was in a flower area in my driveway. I have seen this spider before but much much bigger. I was wondering how big do they grow?

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yellow garden spider
by: Moni

Michelle
the size of the yellow garden spider according to Bugguide.net the "female: 14-25 mm
male: 5-6 mm (sizes do not include legs)".

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Dorm Spider (Windscorpion)

by Malyssa
(Odessa, Texas)

I found this spiderlike insect in the kitchen of my dorm. It is very odd and unlike anything I've seen in this area. Its back is furry but the rest is not. The legs look like grasshopper legs. And it rubs its two sides of fangs together when bothered. It also has a two jaws, one for each fang.

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Windscorpion
by: Moni

Malyssa
You found a windscorpion in your dorm kitchen. The do sometimes find their way indoors.
Thanks for the great photo and description.

They feed on dead and living insects, spiders, and other small creatures. They are usually active at night. During the day they hide under stones and other objects or in burrows. Adults live less than a year. They live in warm arid desert, and sandy areas.
They are harmless to people except they have been known to pinch if disturbed, but are not poisonous. Those found indoors should be caught and released outdoors. To catch one, place a jar over it and then slip a piece of heavy paper between the jar and floor to form a lid, then take it outside and release it.
It has quite a scary appearance.

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spider

by Colaizzi
(Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971)

IMG_0420

IMG_0420

velvety- black and brown striped (argyle?) . The same markings on lower body but solid color velvety black on the upper part.
4-5 inch leg span
Spotted at 2AM on stucco wall of my house near the porch light

Comments for spider

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Fishing spider
by: Moni

The photo looks like a Fishing Spider from the genus Dolomedes.
These spiders are can walk on water and then dive below the surface where they can sometimes even catch small fish, hence the common name. Tho large, they are not dangerous to humans.
They are big spiders.

Makes Sense
by: Mary Sue

Moni: I live on the Rehoboth Bay.
THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR TIMELY RESPONSE.

spiders
by: Carla

yuck!
I know spiders can be good, but I detest them so, they give me the creeps mainly because unlike a bug they seem to think....
[shudder]

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orangish spider with green head and horns (Arrowshaped Micrathena)

by Jason R.
(Pennsylvania)

What type of spider is this?

What type of spider is this?

My friend Dawn found a spider in our home-state of Pennsylvania. It has an orangish body and a green head with black and red horns.
Any idea what it is?

Comments for orangish spider with green head and horns (Arrowshaped Micrathena)

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Arrowshaped Micrathena,
by: Moni

Jason
Dawn found a female Arrowshaped micrathena. This is an Orb-weaver spiders. Spiders in the Micrathena genus are known for their distinctive spikes and vibrant colors. The Arrowshaped Micrathena are about 1/2" long and are common in meadows, along the edges of forests, and along wooded trails. All of these spiders are notorious for weaving their webs at face-level along trails. They do not pose a danger to humans... if they are threatened or trapped and happen to bite it is no worse than a mosquito bite.
They feed on insects that come into the web and are beneficial in the garden.

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Identifying a spider/Ants in potted tree (orb web spider)

by Athena
(Portland, OR)

Photo by Athena M. Wollin

Photo by Athena M. Wollin

I was hoping you guys could identify this type of common garden spider. I see them all the time and would like to know what species they are. The photo is mine.

Also, I have a small tree in a pot on my balcony. It was given to me unknowingly with an ant colony nested inside. Though the winter seems to have killed a large percentage, I still see an occasional scout cruisin' around. I was wondering if there was any natural way to elliminate the remaining soldiers. Seeing as it's not a massive infestation, I don't want to invest in poisons or silly things like that (I'm a poor college student, you see).

Is the best thing to do simply to soak the soil multiple times and cast the drowned critters away?

Thanks in advance.

Comments for Identifying a spider/Ants in potted tree (orb web spider)

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Orb web Spider and colony of ants in a pot
by: Moni

Athena
From your photo I think you have an orb web spider. (Spiders are not my forte, I am an entomologist which is the study of insects and spiders are relatives of insects but not insects.)

These spiders usually bite their prey first and then wrap them with silk when the prey is paralyzed. These spiders do vary a lot in coloration.

Ants in your pots. The only suggestion I have is to use very soapy water to water the soil to wash(not a pun!) :-) out the ants. Do not put regular soapy water on the foliage of your plants it might burn, just the soil.
Good luck with that...and college!

BTW: it's not an orb spider
by: Zee Spall

I just wanted to let you know that I disagree with the other person.........this is NOT an orb spider. This spider has very close to a diamond shaped marking on it's belly but not exactly the same as black widow diamond--- from far it can also appear as if it's human torso no head........ strange--- on the top and legs have tiny hair but in brownish color........

Marbled orbweaver spider
by: Moni

Zee
Sorry you are having a problem. If it was indeed a spider...the bite area turning black sounds more like the bite of a brown recluse spider. As I said previously I am not a spider expert nor a doctor so please seek treatment. Brown recluse do not form webs in the back yard.

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In Ground Web (Tube web spider web)

by Melissa
(Atlanta, GA)

Cool spider web covering a small hole approx 1-1.5cm in diameter. Could see the spider at first, then he/she scooted further down the hole when I intruded to take the picture. Just thought the web was especially neat and wanted to share. It was made under a juniper bush in front of my office in Atlanta, GA

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Spider of the web
by: Anonymous

What did the spider look like?

Tube web spider web
by: Moni

Melissa
At first glance I thought it was the web of a funnel spider but since I am and entomologist and do not know spiders very well (spiders are not insect but arachnids) I asked a good friend who studies spiders.
His best guess without seeing the spider is it is a tube web spider family Segestriidae.

If you see the spider please send us a photo :-)

If it is a tube web spider, live in tubular retreats - holes in walls and bark and sometimes under stones. They are fast rushing out to grab prey and drag it back into the web. The first three pairs of legs point forwards to help them back into the tube.

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Red and gold spider (Oxyopes lynx spider)

by Kristal
(Winston-Salem, NC)

I found this spider in my Winston-Salem, NC kitchen this morning. The abdomen looked to be a golden, almost metallic-looking color to me. The spider was lowering itself via its thread from a piece of gardening equipment we had brought in from outside. Other than the thread, I did not observe any web. Thank you for your help!

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Red and Gold Spider
by: Anonymous

After looking at about 3,000 spiders (in photos, luckily!) I haven't found an exact match but the class of orb weaving spiders seems to have the bright colors and shape of yours. If you have a chance, look at pictures from this group. They are amazing with their colors, patterns, and even the shape of the spiders.

Interesting fellow
by: Anonymous

I used to live in Winston Salem, I live in Honolulu, HI, been all over Europe...seen alot of strange spiders, but never one that looked like that guy. Wish I useful info to give ya.

Oxyopes lynx spider
by: Moni

Kristal
Your spider is in the genus Oxyopes.

Many of these spiders are called the lynx spiders because they are fast at catching prey, but not sure of the species - would have to look at it under a microscope. The lynx spiders are known to protect the eggs...not common in the insect nor spider world.

These are found thru out North America tho mostly in southern states. Like most spiders, they are beneficial and eat the pests in the garden.
The Osyopid spiders are distinctive with spines on the legs and bright coloration. They also have what looks like a flat face :-)
These spiders are found in vegetation on grasses, shrubs and trees. Perhaps it was hiding in the equipment you brought in the house.

Thank you!
by: Kristal

Moni (and others),

Thank you so much for taking the time to look at my picture and share your knowledge with me. Moni, I'm excited to learn the type of spider and appreciate your response! My husband and I thought it was such an interesting-looking insect and we are glad to know more about it.

Thanks again,

Kristal

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BIG spider (Black and Yellow Argiope)

by nancy
(annapolis, md)

This very colorful spider made a web on a fence - you can see the 4x4 post just behind it, showing how big the spider was. Any idea what it was?

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Big Spider
by: Anonymous

I looked up some yellow and black spiders on the web (no pun intended) and came across one that looks very much like yours. It is called "a black and yellow garden spider." It is also called an Argiope. I hope you have a male which has a 1 and 1/4 inch body and bright colors. The female is supposed to get twice as big with duller colors. They aren't supposed to be particularly dangerous, but personally I stay away from all spiders that I am not sure about. The design on the abdomen reminds me of the skull designs the kids have on their clothes, and is very dramatic.

thanks
by: Anonymous

Wow, thank you. I almost didn't believe it was real when my son showed me the picture on his phone - he said it was as big as his hand.

Garden spider
by: Paul

Harmless to humans and good to have around to help control insect pests.

more on the spider
by: Stuart

We had one of these spin a web last summer outside a window overlooking our rose garden. We left her alone and she stayed for several weeks. Before she left us, she deposited 3 dime-sized spherical brown egg cases and we are waiting to see her progeny. Sometimes called a "writing spider" for the zig-zag pattern of silk in the center of the web, this is the species that served as the inspiration for the title character of E.B.White's immortal children's book, Charlotte's Web. Some spider!

Spider at work
by: Anonymous

If you want to see one of these big spiders at work, just catch a grasshopper or cricket and put it in the web. You can't believe how fast these spiders can dispatch and wrap up the catch for later.

Black and Yellow Argiope
by: Moni

Nancy
As everyone has said your spider is the Black and Yellow garden spider. It does go by many names, such as writing spider, yellow garden spider, yellow garden orbweaver, etc.
This is a common garden spider that is black and yellow tho there is some variation in color patterns. They are found thru out most of North America in gardens, meadows, and old fields.

They sit posed upside down to catch prey. They also vibrate the web to test for captured prey!
This spider can regenerate legs if they lose one.
Since this is a large spider with a round abdomen...it is a female. The males have a longer narrower abdomen.
This spider is not a threat to humans...tho it can bite if provoked. As with most spiders, these eat insects that get caught in the web. The zigzag seen on the web is reinforcement of the web so it is strong enough to catch grasshoppers, crickets and other large insects. They are most commonly seen in late summer or fall.
These are beneficial critters to have in the garden.

Zipper Spider
by: Anonymous

It looks like what we call a "Zipper Spider". They are harmless orb weavers. Fun to watch. My uncle likes to tickle their feet (yes, hes a nut)! Lol

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Brown Spider (Cross orbweaver spider)

by Tifanie
(Racine, Wisconsin, USA)

The front of the spider

The front of the spider

The front of the spider The back of the spider

This scary, creepy looking spider is in my garage. It has gotten bigger and bigger in the past month. It makes a orb-like web in a window in the garage at night and sits in it at night. During the day, the web is not there and the spider is laying in the windowsill (on the inside of the sill on the side of it). It seems like it takes its own web down during the day and makes a brand new one at night. It also captured a big dragonfly and consumed it. I already have major arachnophobia, and this spider makes it worse! I'm just wondering what kind of spider this is, is it poisonous, and does it bite human. Thanks.

Comments for Brown Spider (Cross orbweaver spider)

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Brown Spider
by: Miriam

It looks like a garden orb weaving spider. They can get quite large, but are not dangerous to humans. Their webs are usually large, too, and look different than the usual spider web.

Cross orbweaver spider
by: Moni

Tifanie
There are several orbweaver spiders that kind of look like yours, but the cross orbweaver spider looks most like it. The cross orbweaver is found over most of North America.

The orbweavers are common spiders found in gardens, barns and most outdoor spaces.

They are not poisonous.

Spiders do not intend to bite humans...however if you mishandle them, squeeze them, or otherwise come in very close contact, they can bite. But only if irritated to do so. They are just hanging in the garage for some dinner...which are insects. They will keep the insect pests out of your garage and garden :-)

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Spider with black & white banded 'fuzzy' legs. (Orb weaver spider)

by Pam Schwarz
(Chesterland, Ohio, USA)

Found amongst my lilys in September 2011 - Northeast Ohio. The picture is the bottom of the spider. On the round body, the top is a beige color with some gray markings. Almost looks like a clam shell. Thank you for your help with this. About 3 weeks earlier we had a black and yellow garden spider in the same place as this one. That one must have 'washed away' after we had a very bad thunder storm.

Comments for Spider with black & white banded 'fuzzy' legs. (Orb weaver spider)

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Orb weaver spider
by: Moni

Pam
Your spider is one of the orb weaver spiders, but with out a photo of the other side it would be hard to figure out which one.
For most orb weavers, the ability to classify a specimen to species level often requires a microscopic inspection of the genitalia. A genus level identification is considered a good ID for most of the orb weavers.

All orb weavers spin some sort of web consisting of concentric circles. This family ( Araneidae ) of spiders is the most varied of all spider families. The round ball type abdomen indicates it is probably a female...the male abdomens are narrow.

I have one too!
by: christy

I live in Michigan and I found that spider in my flower bed while weeding. I was admiring the web and I must have startled him/her because it came out of some dead leaves on the plant the web was anchored too and stopped in the middle of the web and I am sure my neighbors heard the screams!!! Don't get me wrong, I love them, just don't like them sneaking up on me!! Anyway, mine is tan/beige and had small darker spots on the top in a kind of circle, reminded me of a sesame seed bun with just a few seeds in a circle. Had the same general shape and the black and white striped legs. What do you think? Thanks

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black & white fuzzy spider with red middle (Jumping spider)

by Ben
(Venice,CA USA)

black & white fuzzy spider with red middle

black & white fuzzy spider with red middle

black & white fuzzy spider with red middle that moves in tiny jump or hop like movement About 3/4" and found inside of my home office while cleaning.

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Jumping spider
by: Moni

Ben
Your photo is of a Jumping Spider, probably Genus Phidippus. Without more photos from different angles I can not ID further.
They can bite humans and it is said to hurt but not be poisonous.
This spider like most jumping spiders are great garden predators, so put it out in the garden to eat grasshoppers and other pests.

I Just found one too.
by: Anonymous

Just found one of these in my house. It is now in a jar. I will try to take some pictures of it before I let it go. Very pretty, but I don't want it in my house.

spotted in Burbank, CA
by: Anonymous

I've never seen one like it until today! Took a photo! very hairy with striped legs! Fascinating. I put it back in the potted plants after capturing it on the table.

Saw one releasing eggs
by: Victoria

Saw one right by my door in Santa Barbara, ca
It was doing something like releasing some gooey yellow

I saw one!
by: Anonymous

Just saw this for the first time as well today here in Encino Ca. It was moving quickly! glad to here they are not harmful :)

Beautiful! But better in a glass jar!
by: Beazzer

Found one in my car while driving in Santa Monica, CA. Freaked me out! First time ever seeing one. It crawled between my dashboard and windshield. I really hope it doesn't find it's way out or shoot through my air vents :/ Very beautiful but better in a glass jar than on my dash.

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