Shiny green insect (Pale green assassin bug nymph )

by Rachel Meadow
(Joppa, Al, USA)

Alabama

Alabama

Small 1 cm long gold and shiny with red tip butt and 6 legs and 2 antenna

Comments for Shiny green insect (Pale green assassin bug nymph )

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Water skimmer
by: Jewles

Not sure that's the scientific name?? We always called them skimmers. They skim the surface propelled across the suface like a tiny jet pack is in their back . I googled that an found some similar looking bugs. Good luck hopefully this helps.

Pale green assassin bug nymph
by: Moni

Rachel
Though your insect is small and hard to photograph, from the image you submitted, it is probably the pale green assassin bug. Since it is only about 1 cm long and because there are no wings developed, it is a young nymph. The adults are about 14-16mm. There are 5 stages of the nymphal part of the life cycle. The 5th stage overwinters.

There are many species of assassin bugs that look similar that it could be and in the nymphal stage it is hard to know for sure, but since the pale green assassin bug is common in your area that is a good guess.

Assassin bugs feed on other insects, so they are a good bug for the garden. Even this little one is a helper by feeding on small caterpillars, small flies, wasps, or sawflies. This assassin bug is a predator of insects that occur on leaves of deciduous trees and shrubs. Often they wait in ambush resting on a leaf.

This insect will not bite.

Jewles - Water striders are in the same order as assassin bugs (Hemiptera) but are only found in water. And tho they have 6 legs, when they are 'striding' on water, unless you see them really up close, you would only see 4 legs. Thank you for your suggestion.

Thanks
by: Jewles

Thanks for your info, I really like this page. When I was young bugs fastened me. My dad would say get the bug book. We'd look it up. That was about 50yrs ago & my dad isn't with us anymore. You've kinda taken his place. This is a lot more informative than my book printed in 1964. Thanks again for your info.

Pale green assassin bug nymph
by: Moni

Jewles
Glad you enjoy the Insect ID pages!

In 1964, when your book was written, I was taking my first insect collection into elementary school for show and tell :) And my mom, like your dad, was the one to go get the book out to help us learn what the various bugs around the farm were.

Please send in any insect photos you have that you want to know the ID.

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