big red insect (Jerusalem Cricket)

by xorsiz
(San Diego, Ca. )

swollen looking red head, abdomen red with black stripes, about 2-3 inches long

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Jerusalem Cricket
by: Moni

This is a Jerusalem Cricket.
They feed on other insects, roots, and decaying vegetation. Sometimes found eating potatoes.
They are found in burrows and under rocks and logs. Sometimes they wander to the surface at night. To produce their sound they strike the ground with their abdomen to produce a drumming pattern.
Some say the bite hurts.

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red spiked ant (Coreidae or Reduviidae nymph)

by Regina
(Somerset County NJ)

spikey ant

spikey ant

The ant bug has long tentacles and a spiked midsection. I located it on my deck walking across the wood.

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Coreidae or Reduviidae nymph
by: Moni

Regina
The photo I believe is of a Coreid nymph . These are the leaffooted bugs. The other possibility is an assassin bug family. With new tiny little nymphs it is hard to know for sure, but the antenna on yours makes me think it is a Coreid...would be great to see photos as it matures so we can positively ID it.
The Coreids are bugs that suck the juices of plants, but a few are reported to be predaceous.
Coreids often give off an unpleasant odor when handled. A few species of Coreidae are agricultural pests.

If it is an Assassin bug they feed on insect pests such as caterpillars, beetles, leafhoppers, aphids and such.

wilt
by: Anonymous

I just saw one of these on a blueberry plant. This is a plant that has been looking awfully wilted--maybe this is why!

Coreid bug nymph
by: Moni

Anonymous
If your blueberries are wilting it is not due to this insect.
Wilt means too much or not enough water or a disease in the root system. Since blueberries like moist soil....I would guess root disease.

Spikes ant
by: Anonymous

Is it venomous?

Coreidae nymph
by: Moni

Anonymous
No they are not venomous.

Coreid bug
by: Anonymous

My puppy just ate one! Are they poisonous?

Coreidae nymph
by: Moni

This insect does not have a venomous nor poisonous bite. There is no scientific information one way or the other.
Have you seen any response from your puppy after eating it? Watch the dog and if it shows signs of poisoning, take it to your vet.

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Reddish bug (Cicada)

by Sean Stiles
(Long Island NY)

ugly

ugly

I've been picking bugs of my zucchini and saw this monster bug.

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cicada?
by: Anonymous

I'm no expert, but it looks like a cicada getting ready to molt. I don't know what they eat, but they aren't normally considered pests...

ugly bug
by: Anonymous

If you find brown empty husks that look like that bug, then I'd say its most likely a cicada. They hatch out of the ground and then crawl up the nearest plant, bush or tree. Once they "molt" they can fly and look like a huge fly [sort of]. They make that high pitched whine you hear this time of summer.

Cicada it is!
by: Moni

Great job identifying this everyone!

Great photo of the last nymphal stage of the cicada. The adult does emerge from this skin by a slit in the back.
Cicadas can be a pest in a nursery situation, because the adult lays eggs by slitting a hole in the branch of small trees or limbs and inserting the egg. They leave a long line of slits in a row which damage the limb and can deform nursery trees.
In our regular vegetable gardens they are not a pest.

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red body with blue head ( Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs)

by misty
(Priceville, Al )

bug with red body,blue head

bug with red body,blue head

very tiny bugs with 6 legs, blue heads, red back.there were about 50 of them huddle together. They stayed together until i got close enough to take picture then scattered. We have never had these in our area before and I have never seen anything like it before. These were found on our back porch.

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blue/red bugs
by: Anonymous

how big are these bugs? dime size?? smaller? bigger?

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs
by: Moni

Misty
You have Fl predatory stink bugs or also called Halloween bugs on your porch. They are "good" bugs as they feed on other insect pests like caterpillars, leaf beetles and planthoppers. Both nymphs and adults feed on insects.
They are just found in the SE US.
They are known for their metallic blue/green thorax with red abdomens. The adults look similar.
The nymphs are known to congregate together...sometimes this is to work together on a food insect. Otherwise they sometimes are found together at night.

Superman stink bugs
by: Michele Mo.

I have these on my porch too. I thought they looked a lot like stink bugs. Glad to know they will help eat the bad bugs! Thanks for your information!!

STINK BUG NYMPHS
by:

We just found these on our patio. We had no idea what they were. I am glad I found this website to let me know. Previously it was said they were only in and around Florida. Just wanted to let you know we live in northern Arkansas (must be migrating)?? Thanks for the info...

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs
by: Moni

If you look at the range from bugguide.net they have been found thru-out the whole SE US.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/2716/data

this is good as the are beneficial bugs!

Stink Bugs Galore!
by: Redhead

Glad I found this post. We have a huge group of them on the side of our deck. I was worried they might be some kind of tick as they are really bad here in VA. Guess if they eat "bad" bugs we will leave them alone.

red body blue/green headed beetles
by: Nancy in N C

I live in Western N C and found them on our deck railing this PM. They were gathered together at first and ran like the devil when approached. Looked a lot like lady bugs until close enough to see the blue/green heads. They really are beautiful. Even more so now that I know they are helpful and not harmful to our yard. Does anyone know if good around vegetable gardens?

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs
by: Moni

Nancy
These are good bugs for any place in the yard or veggie garden. They feed on other insect pests like caterpillars, leaf beetles and planthoppers.
Cool that you have them!

Red an blue nymphs.
by: Jante

I'm in N. Ga. Found a group of these on my porch rail this evening. They are beautiful. Glad to know their good bugs. I blew on them lightly and they stood real still for a few seconds.

glad to know they are safe
by: gina in Virginia

they looked like a radioactive tick to me. They were in my iris bed and there were lots of them. Hopefully, they are doing good. Glad to know they are beneficial.

garden
by: Anonymous

can I transfer these bugs from my basketball goal to my rose garden to help get rid of the other bugs?

FL predatory stink bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
As mentioned in the comments -
"The nymphs are known to congregate together...sometimes this is to work together on a food insect. Otherwise they sometimes are found together at night."
So...if you have nymphs like in the photo and they are eating some insect on the basketball goal (can't imagine what it would be??) or if they are only there at night...otherwise...sure...move them to the rose garden. They will find something to eat in the garden :)


Pretty bugs
by: S Lunsford

I found them in my perenial flower bed in clumps. I have stella dora lillies and irises and other colorful day lillies they seem to prefer the stella dora lilly. There are lots of ants crawling on the lillies. Hopefully the nymphs will eat them all. I am going to try transfering some to my fruit trees. Thank God they are beneficial. I panicked when I saw so many of them. This is only website I found info on. Great Info
Thank You

FL predatory stink bug
by: Moni

S Lunsford
Glad you found out what insects you had. If you find other insects that you do not know, you can always take a photo and send it in for identification.

Chapel Hill, NC
by: marcia

Thank you for posting this picture. I just saw a large congregation of these nymphs near my neighbor's porch and had never seen them before. They are going up and down and around a single branch of a nandina. They're not in my Audubon Society insect book so I was so happy to find the picture!

FL pred stink bug nymphs
by: Moni

Marcia
Glad you got them identified so you know they are a good bug! :)
Thanks for checking!

Getting further north
by: Gigi

I just discovered these for the 1st time on a flower pot around Yorktown Virginia. I've never seen them before but they are stunning. Good to know they are a good bug. Thanks for having this site so I could look them up easily.

Yay!!!
by: Anonymous

Found a pack of these guys today!... probably 3rd instar... looked just like this picture. Thanks for the great picture to identify.

Have a congregation on my front steps
by: Lil Ash

I am in central Ar and my husband found them and called out for a look. They r amazing. But some were going between a tiny slit between the wooden bottom of door frame and the bricks. So I killed 3 of them now I feel horrible knowing they were here to be helpful. I am glad I did leave all the rest unharmed and hope they stick around.
Thanks for all the info and identification of these little stink bugs!

Stink bug nymphs
by: Teri

I (like the other comments above) have searched many sites trying to find out what those critters were!! I have been spraying them with water thinking they were some new species if spider or something!! I am so glad to know they won't kill my flowers!! Thanks for posting that pic and letting me know not to kill them!!!

cool nymphs
by: Peggy Kirby

So happy to find this identification so quickly. This is the first time I've seen this insect nymph. I have a cluster of them on my 'Hearts-a-Bursting' shrub.
Aug 15, 2015, Decatur, AL

Predatory Stink Bug nymphs
by: TammyK757

I saw a Predatory Stink Bug nymph entertaining a monarch butterfly on a mirrored external wall of a tall medical building. They were 15 feet above the doorway to the building. I quickly pulled out my camera (which I always keep in my purse) to try to capture a close up picture. I also video taped a small amount of time with them. The Predatory Stink Bug nymph had a yellow "sword looking stick" extending from it's mouth area. It almost looked like the butterfly was playing with it. I had a Doctor appointment and had to leave, so I do not see the ending of their encounter. After reading this blog, I hope the butterfly was able to fly away. I was happy to be able to capture the moment.

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Red & Black Bug (Western boxelder bug)

by luann kinney
(cumming, georgia)

Red bug with a black heart pattern on its back.

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Western boxelder bug
by: Moni

Luann
Your insect is a western boxelder bug. These are usually seen further west than GA, but the markings are distinct for the western not the eastern boxelder bug.
The nymphs and adults feed mostly on boxelder and maple tree flowers, seeds and foliage, but will also feed on ash, rose family trees like apple, pear and plum. They are not considered a garden pest, but are a nuisance when they come into homes in the fall for hibernation.

Also in Roswell
by: Anonymous

I'm in Roswell, just south of Cumming. We had these start showing up in the summer of 2010. I had a truck load of wood chips delivered and they came in with them. They don't seem to cause any real problem other than there are a LOT of them and they like to concentrate on sunny surfaces. When that sunny surface is the side of my wife's car, , , well then it becomes a real problem ;-)

Nvr seen these bugs before!!!
by: Jenn

now..that is my concern...since they are in mulch againist my home...what slould i do (come fall hibernation) as they will find a way in ..im sure of it..plus..I live in Michigan...yet they arte the Western Boxelder??

Western boxelder bug
by: Moni

Jenn
It is the eastern boxelder bug...they do look similar.

There are a couple of things you can do now. When you see them in clusters - vacuum them with a shop vac. You could try spraying with an insecticidal soap.

Be sure to close, cover, caulk any holes in the house that might let them in. Put screens over vents, caulk any slits in and around doors, check screens for holes, and keep screens in doors and windows tight.

They are a nuisance but do not hurt anything. If they do get in the house just vacuum them up.

These bite or sting
by: Anonymous

These bite and or sting and it really hurts, feels like a burn to me!

Western Boxelders in CT.
by: Bill

We've had a hatch of this western boxelder here in CT. for the last 2 weeks???

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Bright red beetle (Boxelder bug)

by Jane
(Camden East Ontario)

Red and black insect

Red and black insect

These insects were massing on a pile of lumber and around and on a nearby tree (dont know the kind) at the end of September in zone 5.

There appeared to be several life stages at once. Some were smaller with just a hint of black and others were larger and more like a harlequin bug in shape.

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box elder bug
by: Anonymous

Seems to be a box elder bug. apparently they dont do much harm unless you are a maple or box elder seed or flower. But they will try to overwinter in your house and can be a nuisance.

They closely resemble a milkweed bug as well but am pretty sure these are box elder bugs

Boxelder bug nymph
by: Moni

As suggested, you have a group of boxelder bug young or nymphs. The nymphs of the boxelder bug have what looks like a yellow spot on the center back of the abdomen while the milkweed bug develops a couple of black spots there in the larger nymphal stages. Boxelder bugs do like to congregate together...and they are probably under a boxelder tree.
Does the tree have a maple like leaf, three leaflets to a leaf?...Then it is a boxelder tree.

Many thanks
by: Jane

Thanks to Moni and the other person who commented. So they are no danger to any of my elder bushes? I have black lace elder, sutherland gold elder and another variegated one. I havent seen them near these bushes but they are not in bloom or seed.

Boxelder bug
by: Moni

Jane
Boxelder bugs only eat boxelder trees. Your Black Lace, gold and varigated elderberry is a different plant and they are not interested in those.
The bugs are a nuisance when they manage to come into our homes in the fall. They crawl around leaving reddish droppings on walls, floors, and curtains.

Is it a beetle or Boxelder Bug?
by: Brenda

I was happy to finally find a picture of our bug we found, but I'm not sure if it's called Bright Red & Black Beetle or Boxelder Bug. My boys found it outside today and drew a picture of it and we're trying to find out what it's called.

Boxelder bug
by: Moni

Brenda
Thanks for checking. This insect is the nymph or young stage of the boxelder bug. These are in the order Hemiptera known as true bugs. True bugs are soft bodied and have three life stages:egg, nymph(several moltings before they are adults), and adult.
Beetles are in the order Coleoptera. Beetles have hard shells as outer coverings. There are four life stages: egg, larva or worms, pupa and adult.
So the boys can label it boxelder bug. If they are old enough to use the computer they can look for it online. Then they can draw the three body parts, six legs, two eyes and two antenna!
Have fun and thanks for helping the boys to learn about the animals(insects) with the largest number of species in the world.

we like bugs
by: kristen

we actually enjoy them very much. its fun to see the tiny tiny baby bugs alongside the little bit bigger bugs, and the adult beetles hanging out as well. at our house they eat the helecopters that fall from maple trees and while we have a pretty huge congregation outside every year ive never had more than a few beetles find their way into the house so i dont think of them as a nuisansce at all.

Lots of Box Elder Bugs in Central FL
by: Anonymous

I live in central Florida and it is now February. I have thousands of Box Elder Bugs at the base of my Lantanas, rain trees, etc. Also, there are several hundred on the side of a plastic planter at my neighbor's home.

boelder bugs gone wild...in Northern California
by: Anonymous

Northern california inendated with BoxElder bugs...hundreds if not thousands on house..driveway & in windowsills..vacuuming every other day to rid of...theses are common here and multiply as you can see on house..
they are a nuisance...as sooo many in area of my home cant even get mail out of box...eeek...

help
by: diana

these boxelder bugs are all over the side of the house where the sun shines on them. How do you get rid of them?????

Boxelder bug
by: Moni

Diana
As the maple and boxelder trees come out in leaf the insects will disappear...so just be patient. They do not do any damage to your house.

Boxelder Bug huh, so now I know!
by: Mike

I use the fall leaf raking as a natural mulch in my flower gardens, mostly maple leaves, some oak, and of course, the maple seed helecopters. I first found these little guys while cleaning out my gutters here in NE Ohio. They love to breed on the white, sunny side of my shed. Now I have them all over my yard, but they only seem to be interested in eating the dead seeds and leaves. They gather in small groups, always with at least one larger one amongst them. In areas where there are many groups, I've noticed that there is always one or two larger, and usually a bit darker ones, that seem to be standing a vigilant guard.
I've let one crawl on my hands a few times. At first they kind of freak out, like an ant, then they calm down and I can look straight at them while they wave their antenna in a curious investigation of me. So cool!
They also wander around on their own just as ants would do in search of whatever it is that bugs determine to be a significant search item.
I have yet to find one in the house, and they have not damaged anything in my yard. The dog doesn't seem to be affected by them other than to feel a tickle when one crawls across her.
I suppose if they were a problem, I could wipe them out with some sort of chemical, but I like to think that maybe they are actually a benefit, like ants and bees, in spreading pollen from plant to plant and aiding in the overall beauty of my city burdened back yard.

Bright Red Beetle
by: Anonymous

I have 100's of these outside, they are foreging on my evergreen shrubs (killing them), they are not bothering anything else but do crawl all over the side of the house and drift wood. I have never seen them before, this is the first year. I live in mid-state Kentucky. Don't know if I should spray or not??

Boxelder bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
Boxelder bugs do not eat evergreens. They do eat plants in the maple family, but none of them are evergreen.
Please send a photo of you insect in so we can ID it and then let you know what to do about it.

You probably have another insect eating the evergreen but because the boxelder bugs are so abundant and colorful that is what you see.

Sawfly larvae are common this time of year on mugo pine shrubs.

Getting rid of these bugs permanently
by: Anonymous

The box elder bugs are devouring my black lace elderberry bush. How do I get rid of these guys permanently.

Boxelder bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
Boxelder bugs do not eat foliage...they eat seeds. Therefore, whatever is eating your elderberry it is not the boxelder bug.

If you want to know what it is and how to control it please send a photo of the insect found eating the foliage. If you see boxelder bugs on the shrub it is probably because you have a maple, ash or boxelder tree nearby. They do not eat elderberry.

You do not say where you live.

There is probably a beetle feeding on the foliage that drops when you come nearby.(they drop when shadows come thinking it is a bird looking for lunch :) )

That said there are several elderberry longhorn beetles in CA that feed on elderberry...this includes one called the valley elderberry longhorn beetle that is considered threatened and should not be killed..

The female of this beetle does kind of look like the boxelder bug.

Please do not kill unless you know it is a pest...please send in a pic and we can ID and provide more info to you.

First time visitors!
by: LizH

I think that every garden I have ever had contained at least one box elder tree yet this is the first time I have ever seen them - and my garden and house are inundated with thousands of them! I was happy when I looked them up, to find out that they are indeed harmless, but I can't help wondering if their sudden & prolific appearance, this year, relates to changes in climate etc. Also wondering if they have any beneficial characteristics other than amusing my indoor cats when they sneak into the house. I live on the shore of Lake Ontario - several miles along the road from Doug Green and would love to hear that they like to prey on spiders or mayflies!

Boxelder bug
by: Moni

LizH
Sorry but boxelder bugs are plant feeders not predators on spiders or mayflies.

Spiders are beneficial and will feed on insects around them. So they are the ones you want inside :)
Mayflies live for only a day and have no mouth parts so they are certainly not pests. They actually tell us the water the young live in is clean!
Every year is different so not sure why you have them this year...could be the warm winter along with some of the strong winds that have come up the east coast the last couple of years perhaps blowing them into the area.

Red Shouldered Bug
by: Anonymous

Looks like you might have Red Shouldered Bugs

All over my deck
by: Anonymous

We have noticed these for the first time this year. They are all over the side of the house and the deck. Now that I know what they are, it explains a lot. We have two large maples in the back yard. I love the trees, but hate the seeds. I had an empty planter on the deck that had accumulated a ton of seeds. We I looked in it, it was full of these little buggers. I guess I need to be more diligent removing the maple seeds when they fall.

would the Dalai Lama kill a boxelder bug?
by: Mary Krauski

I used to think they were harmless as well.
Obviously if you think this, you have never had an invasion.
10 are fine.
50 are okay.
100 not so bad.

We had about 6,000 of them in our home and in our glass studio about 4 years ago and it was a living hell.
I mean literally SIX THOUSAND.

I used to count while I was vacuuming them off the walls, ceilings, floors, work tables, sheets of glass and everything else you can imagine.
they shit everywhere by the way.

It was 4 or 5 years ago.
Ultimately I made a piece of glass work entitled
Would the Dalai Lama Kill a Boxeleder Bug?

Because I felt bad, but they had to go.
Something was out of balance and they just invaded big time.

Once again, too much of anything is not good.

I am seeing the babies everywhere in the garden and worrying about what will happen in the fall.

Boxelder bug
by: Moni

Mary K
Perhaps you need to seal the holes in the house where they are getting in?

There here in WV too
by: Anonymous

This year for the time I seen these little bugs they gather in little groups on my mailbox. I don't think I'm getting all my mail now, is there a way to safely get rid of them?

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Red white and blue beetle (Giant Mesquite bug nymph)

by Tom Peal
(Dallas Texas USA)

Tom Peal red beetle

Tom Peal red beetle

Beautifully photographed red white and blue stink bug with spatulate antennae obsrved on door of structure near Ruidosa TX 6-15-2005. Estimated length one inch from nose to tail.

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Giant Mesquite bug nymph
by: Moni

Tom
Your patriotic bug is a Giant Mesquite bug nymph.
They do feed on the sap, tender leaves and green pods of Mesquite. They do not do any significant damage to the trees so are not considered a garden pest.
This insect is found from Mexico thru the Baja CA area into Az and now into TX.

Neat looking leaffooted bug!

Thanks
by: Tom Peal

Thanks from Dallas TX for the ID and add'll photos! Does the nymph change to an adult? Change it's looks?

Giant Mesquite bug nymph
by: Moni

Tom
Yes, this nymph will molt a few times and then change into the adult. If you look at the photo link in the comments I made you will see several black looking bugs...these are the adults.

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Red & Black Bug (small milkweed bug)

by luann kinney
(cumming, georgia)

What is this bug?

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Small Milkweed Bugs
by: Lin

These are Small Milkweed Bugs, Lygaeus kalmii, and they are perfectly harmless. The insect feeds on the pods of Milkweed Plants. It normally feeds on the pods, stems, and seeds of the milkweed. As this plant seems to be declining locally in the face of human progress, the insect will no doubt become increasingly rare.”

Small milkweed bug
by: Moni

Luann
As Lin said, this is the small milkweed bug. The more western specimens show the white band around the hind wings like yours...tho I would not say you are western!
The adults and nymphs feed on milkweeds, but also on flowers and especially seeds from various herbaceous plants including weeds. It is not considered a pest.
These insects are found over much of North America.


bug research
by: noel tiu

these bugs are cool. they're my favorite colors. I also like how its harmless. its so very cool. and it also looks like an ant.

Milkweed bug partner behavior
by: Ran

I live in Los Angeles, and I noticed yesterday morning (06 May 2015) a line of ants on my rear garden path. They led to a dead milkweed bug. Nearby was a live milkweed bug that was staying away from the ants and not being bothered by them.

Later in the morning, I noticed the ants were gone. The corpse of the bug remained, as did the live one that I presumed was a mating partner. (I have seen many mating pairs the last month or so, and we do have milkweed growing along the concrete path where I spied the dead bug.)

Throughout the day, the live milkweed bug remained with the dead one, often not even scurrying away as I stepped over them. In the late afternoon, I finally stopped to investigate. The live one ran to the edge of the concrete and turned, standing high on its legs and watching me.

The dead bug was intact—at least its exoskeleton and wings were—but it was stuck to the concrete as if something had been squished out of its abdomen.

This morning (07 May 2015), and just minutes before I wrote this, the live one (presumably the same one all this time) remains with the dead one. No more ants, although they are nearby along the edge of the concrete.

I had to comment as this behavior appears remarkable. Are these milkweed bugs monogamous, or perhaps cannibalistic, or what? I find it odd that for more than 24 hours, the live milkweed bug has remained at or near the dead one's side.

Milkweed bug
by: Andy B(ugh)

We started one milkweed plant and now have dozens in our yard in suburban San Diego. The plants are just now sporting these bugs in large numbers here. Only saw a few last year. Interesting observation about the possible monogamy. Only see them outside and not in the house, garage or barn.

Questioning it's diet.
by: Joey

I first notice the milkweed bug (more than a handful) this past Sat the 13th of June. Leading up to this, about a week or two ago, I thought it was peculiar I have seen lots of Monarch butterflies, just no larva.
I'm curious if they could be carnivorous also.
Just sayin'.

Butterfly weed
by: Nancy

I have a butterfly weed garden that has developed over the past couple of years. The garden faces south and has thrived.right now the plants have developed their seed pods but the majority of pods have yellow to orange "eggs" on them....hundreds of them. Just now i found a pair of , I think, milkweed bugs mating. Could these "eggs" be milkweed bug eggs?

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Red & Brown, Flying, 1.25" long (soldier beetle)

by Karen
(Menlo Park, CA, USA)

Red Flying insect, over 1 inch

Red Flying insect, over 1 inch

Appears orange-red, mostly red to the naked eye, except for the wings & lower body of the insect -- that part is medium-to-dark brown. Photo makes red parts appear more amber brown (which may be accurate, but I don't see it like that with my naked eye).

Landing mostly on long grasses: my non-native Oat grass & papyrus, and my native Festuca californica. Sometimes seen on a couple other plants (native & non-native), but much less frequently.

Noticed first in March, & they continue now (April 2010). Right now they are mating. Otherwise crawling up along the grass stems. When they're on the Festuca, they are found on the blooming stems (ones producing seeds).

Let me know if picture is not good enough.

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Soldier beetle
by: Moni

Karen
Your photo is of a soldier beetle.
The adults feed on aphids and other insects, while the larva feed on soft bodied insects. So this would be a beneficial insect.
The adults of some species are seen on flowers in the fall where they help with pollination.


IBeetle bug
by: Anonymous

I had one on my screen door last night .beetle

do they or are they venomous or poisonous
by: venorik velve

I do recall a beetle of this type when handled secreting a almost acid like defence

soldier beetle
by: Moni

venorik
Not sure what you read.

Blister beetles can cause a blister on your skin if you crush them...NOT soldier beetles.

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weird red-tail (Wheel bug nymph)

by Lauren
(Troy, OH)

This insect has a weird, red, scorpion-like tail and was found in the kitchen. Not sure what it is; it resembled a spider in the way that it looked and walked. There were also little hook-like things on the end of its legs.

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wierd red tail bites!!
by: Anonymous

ok i've been trying to figure out what this bug is also. I was stung by one over a week ago, and still have a huge welt. What are they

Wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

Lauren
Your photo is of the wheel bug nymph.
It is considered a beneficial insect. It is scouting for insects to eat in your garden. So this is one to watch as it controls any insects that might be a pest in your garden.
As it grows it will molt a few times and turn into a large gray bug with a spiky looking 'wheel' on its backside behind the head.
They evidently can bite with its long piercing sucking mouth parts and if so it is said to be very painful.

why is it in florida
by: Anonymous

i live in florida and me and my family have seen these bugs three time in 5 years it is just the beginning of spring and from what i have been reading about these bugs they come from kentucky we are trying to figure out why is this bug here? also when they are in kentucky they dont even come untill late summer.

Wheel bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
Have no idea where you read about this insect coming from only KY. It lives all over most of the US.
If an insect is not native to the US and many times even if it is, do move to other states. They sometimes move slowly, other times rather quickly as folks accidently transport them in plant material. They do not jump from KY to FL. Some insects are transported in the trade winds in early summer to the north.

Found on in Missouri/Kansas area
by: Sarah

I just found an insect that resembles the "wheel bug numph" crawling on my tv screen. I thought it was a spider at first. Glad to find this post to help identify what type insect it is. Never in my life have I seen it at this stage of its life cycle. It must be very young. It's red abdonmen is not quite at the scorpion looking stage yet, it is just small, round & red. It was difficult to take photos but have a few. Wondering what I should do with the insect now.

WHEEL BUG NYMPH
by: Moni

Sarah
Put it out in your garden so it can help control your aphids and other pests in the garden!

posionous?
by: Anonymous

Are they posionous?

Wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

Anonymous
No, they are not poisonous.
They can bite if provoked.
They are beneficial to the garden, just do not handle them...leave them in the garden to eat the pests :-)

adams red tailed bug
by: Anonymous

KINSTON NORTH CAROLINA MY SON TOOK A GOOD PICTURE OF THIS RED TAILED BUG IT WAS ON MY PORCH WE DONT HAVE A GARDEN BUT SOME PLANTS AND FLOWERS

Molting
by: Anonymous

I have had one hanging around on the outside of one of my windows for a few days now. Small and black with a red wheel like pattern on it tail. It walks very slowly. I just witnessed it molting into the next stage. It came out bright bright orange and is now changing color slowly heading towards grey it appears. How should I go about moving it to my garden without getting bit?

wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

Anonymous - Molting
To move the wheel bug you can either put on gloves and gently pick it up and move it Or you can carefully tap it into a paper cup or jar and take it to the garden...then tap it out onto a plant.
Great idea to move it where it can do some good.

It was cool that you got to see it molt and to see it darken in color as its 'skin' hardened to the final gray color.

Assassin Bug
by: Humblebee

I know this bug as the Assassin Bug... and yes, it is a wonderful beneficial in the garden.
I have no problem picking them up and carrying them out into the garden. I think they are a bit like bees in that they will only bite if cornered or feel that they are being threatened.
I allow them to walk onto my hand and then carry them to a branch somewhere.
From the first instar through to adulthood they go through very drastic changes in colour, texture and shape.
However, they all have a distinctive long rostrum that is normally tucked back under itself. When they ambush their prey (other insects) they stab them with their rostrum and inject an enzyme rich saliva that allows them to suck the insides out.
They are not poisonous but it can be quite painful if you happen to get a bite and some may have a reaction to the saliva.

Wheel bug nymph
by: Andy B(ugh)

I've see these in the inland valleys of the San Diego County. Not sure if they are also on the coast or in the mountains and deserts here. Never seen them in the house.

New to the country
by: Jeff Mac

Just moved to the the woods around dalton, GA a couple years ago and have seen some of the craziest looking insects. Saw this one just yesterday and had to look it up. It was in flowers we got from our local high school plant sale and weeks later still haven't planted them. It was probably already up here and found an nice spot to hang out. Now that I have found this site, I will check back with the next interesting critter I find! Want to find this one again and move him to my new garden site now that I know how helpful it would be. Thanks so much

Wheel bug
by: Moni

Jeff
Yes, they are good bugs to have in the garden!

We will look forward you your submissions of any cool new insects you find.
Be sure to look thru the photos of those already Identified to see if it is already there. If not please send us the photo.

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Flying red insect long legs (Horntail wasp)

by Elva
(Manzo)

Found in Atlanta, GA

Found in Atlanta, GA

Hello,

I found this insect stuck on the window of the home we were staying at in Atlanta, GA this weekend. It is very scary looking. It is red-orange with black wings and a long stinger.

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flying red insect
by: Judi

It loks as though it belong to the Wasp family. I'm not quite sure. Hope someone tels us soon.

Horntail wasp
by: Moni

Elva
Your photo looks like a giant horntail wasp. The long stinger looking part is an ovipositor used to pierce wood to lay eggs.
Female horntails lay their eggs in trees. The larvae bore into the wood and live in the tree for up to 2 years, possibly more. They typically migrate to just under the bark before pupation.

How long is this wasp?
Do you have a photo of the top side of the wasp? It would be very helpful to better identify what species you have.
Thanks


wasp
by: Anonymous

this is exactly the same kind of insect that i found bumping into my windows at home!

just found one of these flying in my house
by: Anonymous

I caught it under a mason jar on my dining room table. We left the door open all afternoon and found two bees and this insect. Is it dangerous?

Horntail wasp
by: Moni

Anonymous
If what you had in the house under the mason jar was a horntail wasp, they do not sting. If it is a paper or mud-dauber wasp then it could sting.

It would be best if we had a photo of the back side and side view of the insect to know if it will sting or not.
If you did not take a photo then caution on the side that it might sting. :-)

saw one too in puyallup wa
by: Anonymous

never saw one like this. Big, red with a huge stinger lookin thing. Wondering if it can sting. It really wanted to hang out in a tree that looked like a tall growing juniper. obviously not a juniper, just looks like one.

Horntail wasp
by: Moni

Puyallup
As mentioned in the previous question, if your wasp is a horntail it will not sting, but if it is one of the other wasps it can.

Female wasps do have a long appendage on the tail end that is what they use to lay eggs into wood or other things. Sometimes this appendage (called an ovipositor) can sting, but in horntails it does not sting. Error on the side of caution since we do not know what insect you saw.
Several species of horntail wasps young or larvae feed in evergreens like you described.

You can send in a photo if you have it and we can perhaps give you more information.

Be careful around all wasps, esp if you are allergic to their sting.

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pink body clear wings (Two-spotted tree cricket)

by michelle
(ohio )

what is this

what is this

pink in color with clear wings head shaped like alligator 6 legs yellow to transparent

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Two-spotted tree cricket
by: Moni

Michelle
You have a photo of a female two-spotted tree cricket. Males do not have the dark spots on the back.
These tree crickets live in deciduous woodlands, edges. The adults are attracted to lights.
Two-spotted Tree Cricket, can be found on a wide variety of plants such as - grapevines, sunflower, maple trees, white pines, apple, oak. They are generally high on tall plants or in trees.
Interesting find.

As I was looking for your critter I noticed that in July 2009 a really bright pink katydid (similar critter to yours) was found in Mansfield, OH.

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6 legged red winged insect (Truncated true katydid)

by L. Walter
(Spring Branch, Texas)

Red winged insect

Red winged insect

These began showing up approximately 2 weeks ago and have been found mostly in trees although they've been everywhere.

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Truncated true katydid
by: Moni

L. Walter
Your photo is of a Truncated true katydid, also called Central Texas leaf-katydid. They are found in Central Texas in oak woodlands.
They feed on oaks.
According to bugguide.net. "during outbreaks, they are known for defoliating Post Oak (Quercus stellata) and plateau live oak (Quercus fusiformis).
Katydids normally sing only at night, but during outbreaks they sing day and night (and how!!!)"

Park Service Specialist Myakka River State Park
by: Lisa Bramlage

Saw one of these for the first time today 7/16/2010 at the park along the outer edge of a cypress dome oaks close by. Beautiful Rose/Red coloration.

Truncated true katydid
by: Moni

Thanks for the report....glad you got to see one!

Katydid
by: Anonymous

Thank you for the info. I never realized they were anything but green. I also didn't know they defecated everywhere! And yes, they have been constantly chirping day and night although the nites are worse.

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Red and black spotted (Boxelder bug nymph)

by Pablo Rayes
(Raleigh, NC, USA)

Red and Black spotted

Red and Black spotted

I can't determine what kind of insect i have here. Can you please help identify?

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Boxelder bug nymph
by: Moni

Pablo
Looks like your insect is an immature or young boxelder bug. The young insects of the true bug order Hemiptera are also called nymphs.
Did you just find them? Usually boxelder bugs overwinter as adults, not sure how you found nymphs this time of year, don't think you are that far south.
These insects feed on mainly boxelder trees and other maple trees. They are not considered an economic pest. They can be a nuisance when the adults come into homes in the fall. They do not do anything in the house except crawl all over everything.

Box Elder Bugs
by: KATIE

We cut down our Box Elder trees to try and get rid of these bugs. We also have to clean up garden wastes in the fall.

We still have a few bugs but they are not as bad as before.

Outside they leave bright yellow droppings all over the side of our white house. Yuck!!!!

I also mix dish soap and water and spray around the base of the house where they like to winter.







Red Shouldered Bug
by: Anonymous

Pablo,

Looks like you might have Red-Shouldered Bugs. They are relatively harmless, but they do tend to congregate on walls and sides of buildings in great numbers. If they are Red-Shouldered Bugs, they have bright red bodies and bluish-looking wings. Order Hemiptera, Family: Rhopalidae.

Boxelder bug nymph
by: Moni

Anonymous
The insect here and the other one you tagged are boxelder bugs not red-shouldered bugs.

Red-shouldered bugs have red eyes and do not have the yellowish dot on the abdomen of the nymphal stage...which these have.
This particular photos is not clear enough to really see the eyes or the spot...but if blown up it is pretty clear they are boxelder nymphs.

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A red-legged bug (Leaffooted bug nymph, Acanthocphala spp.)

Could someone identify this please? The picture was taken in Houston, Texas. I've tried to find it online with no success, though it does look a bit like a wheel bug nymph? But the legs are red... Thanks for you help!

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Leaffooted bug nymph, Acanthocphala spp.
by: Moni

This insect is the young stage or nymph of a true bug known as a leaffooted bug. Nymphs of the true bugs usually look much like the adults, but do not have full length wings.
They are normally found on brush, shrubs, or small trees in woodlands and old field areas.
Leaffooted bugs in this genus feed on plant juices, tho are not a pest.

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black and orange flying (Eastern Boxelder bug)

by ByGeorge
(Rochester, New York)

red/orange outlined bug

red/orange outlined bug

orange/red eyes and orange/red edge around body. Able to fly - found in large numbers on sunny side of house. Fall 2010 at my daughter's home in Ithaca, New York

The body is black/brown with red/orange lines marking body segments.

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please help
by: vtl

I have these bugs too. They are all over my garden phlox and can do enough damage to keep them from blooming. I've tried bug spray but they keep coming back in force. They seem to overwinter and spread like crazy.

What's the best way to control them?

boxelder bugs
by: Anonymous

boxelder bugs can be quite annoying

Thanks
by: ByGeorge

Thanks Anonymous for identifying this insert. In this case, identifying is the key that unlocks the door to understanding. I appreciate your taking the time and making the effort to help.

Eastern Boxelder bug
by: Moni

ByGeorge
Yes, your bug is a boxelder bug. In the fall they migrate to find overwintering sites and houses provide an insulated, out of the wind, warm spot to spend the winter.
Boxelder bugs overwinter as adults, then in spring leave the hibernating locations under piles of boards, rocks, leaves, grass and other debris close to the house.
Females begin laying eggs in crevices of tree bark, stones, leaves, grasses and on other objects near boxelder trees. Bright-red nymphs appear about the same time new tree leaves develop.
Boxelder bugs feed primarily on the seed-bearing boxelder trees by sucking sap from the leaves, tender twigs and developing seeds. They do little damage to boxelder trees. There can be one to two generations per year. They are not a garden pest.

Control measures in yards and gardens are best handled by prevention. Since boxelder bugs feed and reproduce on seed producing (female) boxelder trees, remove these trees, especially around the house, and/or planting male trees would eliminate nuisance populations. Adults can fly 2 or more miles to hibernate. Eliminate possible hiding places such as any boards, rocks, leaves, grass and other debris close to the house. Rake leaves and grass away from the foundation, especially on the south and west sides of the house. Be sure to caulk and close off any openings where boxelder bugs could enter the house. Screen all windows, doors, crawl spaces, exhaust and roof vents and louvers.
In fall when clusters of the bugs are seen, either vacuum with a shop vac or carefully pour boiling water over them.


Thanks to Moni
by: ByGeorge

Thanks for that helpful and full answer. It is much appreciated.

mutation?
by: Anonymous

I found some bugs similar to these on the sunny side of my house (western North Carolina), they were crawling up under the siding. The wing span looks like this picture but no red eyes & the body is bright red. Could this be the same bug but with some mutations?

Boxelder bug
by: Moni

Anonymous - mutation?
This bug overwinters as an adult and they look pretty much all alike. When you say the body was bright red?....well the body - abdomen is bright red, the wings are not. You would have to look close at the eyes to see red...it may be dark red after this long winter....assuming you have just seen these recently??

bugs
by: Anonymous

these bugs are covering my house and tend to make their way inside i thought they were a type of stink bug but was not sure!!! any way of getting rid of them??????

Boxelder bug
by: Moni

Anonymous-bugs
vacuum with a shop vac

Effective way to keep them out of the house?
by: Anonymous

We get hundreds of them, and since the winter's been extremely mild here in Georgia we still have about a hundred on various parts of the front of the house!
Earlier it was them and ladybugs covering our house, but the ladybugs seem to have died out.
I wouldn't mind them so much if they would stay outside!

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Tiny Red Bugs (Scentless plant bug nymphs)

by Carol
(Baltimore MD)

These tiny little critters are on a sedum plant. Could they be baby ladybugs?

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Scentless plant bug nymphs
by: Moni

Carol
The photo is not very clear, however they are not baby lady beetles. Lady beetle larva are spiky - see this photo and comments about the lady beetle larva - http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/black-and-orange-spiky-bug-lady-beetle-larva-comments.html
Because the insects are clustered and are not on milkweed, then they are probably one of the scentless plant bug nymphs or a leaffooted bug (coreidae) nymph of some sort.
They kind of look like boxelder bug nymphs except they only eat boxelder trees and related maple trees.
If you find an adult insect, we would be able to identify it, but so many of the nymphs(young) true bugs look similar.

Thanks Moni
by: Carol

You are amazing! Can't imagine how you do it. Thanks again!

They are box elder bugs
by: Anonymous

These are box elder bugs. They start eating box elder and maple seed pods, then move on to Sedum and astilbe. They come and destroy lots of perennials in my garden each year after multiplying like crazy when eating the silver maple seed pods. The only think I have found that gets them back in control is releasing lots of lady bugs in the yard. I believe the lady bug larvae will eat the box elder nymphs.

Tiny red bugs
by: Anonymous

I think these are the same bugs that are ALL over my texas mountain laurel. There is also a sticky residue and they seem to be eating the blooms.

scentless plant bug
by: Moni

Anonymous w/ texas laurals
The tiny red bugs you have may be aphids if there is a sticky substance. Send in a clear photo please.

Tiny bugs on my butterfly bush
by: Sylvia

These look like the bugs I found on my butterfly bush. They were clustered around what used to be a bloom. I have two butterfly bushes and I noticed one wasn't blooming. Then I found these little red bugs.

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Red colored ant-like bug (Leaffooted bug nymph)

by DonnaW
(Winter Park, FL, USA)

I live in central Florida and I found these bugs on my cherry tomato plant and they were gone by the next day. Haven't seen them since. What are they?

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Leaffooted bug nymph, Leptoglossus spp.
by: Moni

DonnaW
The insects on your tomatoes are Leaffooted bug nymphs - Leptoglossus spp. This is a bug in the Coreidae family.
They probably had just hatched and moved on to other plants to feed or perhaps a bird got them?!
These insects feed on plant juices, but are not considered a pest of the garden.
Once they become adults they are much easier to ID to species.

They're eating my melons
by: Vicki from Florida

They enjoyed my cantalopes last year. This year they are in my watermelons. They seem to show up when the rainy season starts.

Leaffooted bug nymph
by: Moni

Vicki
Are yours red like these? There are gray ones that look similar that are squash bugs that are pest of all kinds of melons and squash plants.

same red bugs
by: Anonymous

found them on my cherry tomatoes this a.m. Do they bite??

LEAFFOOTED BUG NYMPH
by: Moni

Anonymous
If they are the leaffooted bugs in the photo they eat plants not people so they do not bite.

leaffooted bug nymph
by: ocean garden

thanks for the info! i had the same bugs on my cherry tomatoes in cocoa beach fl.

Bugs on window
by: Anonymous

I have about twenty of these congregating on one of my windows in a circle pattern, very odd. Could they be mating?

great to hear they are not a pest.
by: Gavin

Thanks for the info.....just noticed a small cluster of them on a fruit bearing tree.....so from what I am reading they are not an Ant? I assumed the were Ants, but there was no trail to a nest. Cool! non biting, not considered a pest....I leave them to it then.

Leaffooted bug nymph
by: Moni

Gavin
Thanks for checking to see what insect you found!

Only 1% of insects are pests, most are either good bugs or just there for other reasons...some are just plain beautiful. Of course insects are the food source for many other animals like snakes, birds, frogs and toads.

Weird
by: Jordan

These guys freaked me out last year because of the way they ate my nasturtiums. They would congregate in a cluster around a stem and sit in one spot until it dried out.
They're on my cucumbers this year and are much more mobile. I've just been prodding them off of my plants.

Leaffooted bug nymph
by: Moni

Jordon
This bug does not eat foliage, so they could not have eaten your nasturiums. However, they can suck the plants juices and cause them to dry up like you saw. They are not considered a pest but in some cases of high populations could cause small plants to dry up.

You might want to use a water hose at high enough pressure to knock them clear away from the plants...or pick them off into a container of warm soapy water so they can not damage your cucumbers.

On my Tomato Plant in Southern California
by: Debby

I just found a group of these on my tomato plant (I'm in Southern California). They were on a large tomato, and I was worried they would hurt it, but the next day they had moved to another stem and I could see that the tomato where they had been before was unharmed. At first I thought they were gone, until I spotted them on the other stem. Thank you for telling me what they are, and how to get rid of them if they start sucking my plants dry :)

Sac, Cali
by: G&C Johnson

my mom has 5 tomatoe plants and they slowly have moved from to 3 of the sane cherry tomatoe plants. every couple weeks i see a new 'batch' of these lil red bugs and they grow into rather large greyish/brown or black/red bugs (like beetles) that can fly.

we havent been able to get rid of them completely.
Sacramento, California

Leaffooted bug nymph
by: Moni

G&C Johnson
If there are still a lot of this particular insect and they are feeding on your tomatoes you could try to knock them off with a strong spray of water. Or you could shake them off into a bucket of warm soapy water.

Red insect on cherry tomato plants
by: Anonymous

Just found some (30) on 1 of my cherry tomato plants. Houston, tx.

They were on my rose leaves.
by: born2worship

I noticed these little red insect on one of my rose leave this morning. I tried to identify it but couldn't so I went back out to take another look, that is when I found what appears to be squash bug eggs on the bottom of that same leaf. I recently had 2 Japanese beetles on the rose beside it. Now I am wondering if it was a squash bug? I have noticed people saying these are infecting their garden type plants do they also affect roses?

Leaf-footed bug
by: Moni

born2worship
If you have the leaf-footed bug they will perhaps suck a few juices from your rose leaves. But usually do not cause major problems.
These are different than squash bugs. Squash bugs only feed on squash family plants. Roses are not in the squash family.

good to know
by: Anonymous

Thank you so much! These were on my growing watermelos and I have just been plucking them off with hopes they werent pest. I guess they look more harmful and scary than they are. This was very insightful thanks a million

leaf footed bug
by: Delray Beach FL

I noticed a group of these things at the base of my young, coconut palm tree here in south Florida.

The Natural Solution
by: Crystal Contreras

It WORKED!!!! I just have to share this. A friend told me to use neem oil and insecticidal soap to get rid of the red ant-like critters you see in the picture. I googled how to make my own insecticidal soap, then added the neem oil with it in the sprayer. Shake well, and spray all over your fruit and veggie plants. I sprayed yesterday evening and they didn't seem to like it, but still crawled around some. This morning, I couldn't find even one live bug.
The neem oil is a concentrate formula and takes between two and four tablespoons per gallon. (I used three.) I bought mine at Lowe's for $10.99, since the local feed and seed was selling it for $19.99 for the same size. You can buy the ready-to-use, but it's a better value to buy the concentrate.
The insecticidal soap was made by leaving a bar of ORIGINAL Ivory soap (which is pure and natural) in a gallon of water for several hours. You can actually do this at night before bed and leave it overnight. Take out the bar of soap after soaking it, and the remaining soapy water is your insecticidal soap.
Apply your mixture using a sprayer like I've got pictured or just a clean spray bottle. Apply it to the tops and undersides of leaves, and always be sure to reapply after a rain (which seems to be happening quite a lot lately!)

Repel them from tomatoes?
by: Anonymous

I've tried for years to grow tomatoes here in Houston; FINALLY succeeding this year! However, lately I've noticed these leaffooted bug nymphs on some of my green tomatoes. Glad to know they're not harmful. I've just been squirting them off with the hose, but would like a simple, natural (i.e., no pesticides) solution that will get rid of them. I don't particularly care to kill them, just repel them. Any suggestions?

Leptoglossus phyllopus
by: Alan Sexton

Little reddish brown spider/ant looking bugs the body the size of a red ant or so.
Sits there on my tomatoes and sucks the juice and leaves spots on them if you dont kill or get them off and will multiply.
I used soap and veg oil. 3 tbls each to a gallon and sprayed them and it did the trick. Probably only works on contact. Im in Atascocita, north of Houston and its May 25th 2015.

Multiply like rabbits!!!
by: Jan

I saw these "little leggy ants" in my garden on the cherry tomatoes but ALL OVER the crooked yellow squash!!!!
Sprayed with Dr Earth so will see. . . .

Annoying
by: Anonymous

These little thing aren't really pest but they are all over my pot plants

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fat, chubby, rolled up, reddish (grub)

by kayla
(San Antonio, Texas)

fat nd rolled up

fat nd rolled up

fat and chubby, is rolled up and has a red head

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chubby redhead
by: Gary

Looks like a Grub Worm

Grub
by: Moni

Kayla
Your picture is of a grub as Gary suggests. This is the c-shaped larva of a beetle in the Scarabaeidae family. The grubs usually are in the soil feeding on plant roots, tho some feed on dung, or organic matter like dead trees.
Depending on where you found it, may help determine if it is a pest or just a helpful decomposing insect. Many scarab grubs can be identified by the raster patterns on the tail end looking from the underside. If you want a better ID you will need to send more information about where you found it, how big it is, what growth or plants are nearby, and perhaps a photo of the tail end from the underside.
The color of you photo shows it as red...not a normal color for a grub.

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Small red body with black legs massed (Aphids)

by Michelle
(Simsbury, CT USA)

There are hundreds of these little tiny red bugs with black legs on my black eyed susans. They are all over the stems, some have wings. It looks like they are babies and some are bigger. I can't figure out what they are. I live in Northern CT. If you can help me, I would be so grateful! Thank you in advance!

I can't make the picture suffix jpg rather than JPG. Am I doing something wrong?

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Aphids
by: Moni

Michelle
You have aphids on your Black eyed Susan plants. They suck juices out of the plant. As I believe Doug would tell you, take the garden hose and knock them off!

Lady beetle larva and adults love to eat aphids, so any you see put them on that plant and they will gobble up the aphids also.

Aphids
by: Moni

Michelle
You have aphids on your Black eyed Susan plants. Some are winged so they can go to other plants, others just don't have wings...they will stay and eat your plant! They suck juices out of the plant. As I believe Doug would tell you, take the garden hose and knock them off!

Lady beetle larva and adults love to eat aphids, so any you see put them on that plant and they will gobble up the aphids also.

Thank you!
by: Anonymous

Thanks so much, Moni! I am going to hose those buggers down tomorrow, and see what else I can do about it too. I really appreciate the identification assistance!

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red body beetle with black head/legs ( Boxelder bug nymphs)

by Shelly
(Sarasota, Florida USA)

red bodied beetle with black legs/head

red bodied beetle with black legs/head

there are millions of them, they seems to like staying in groups and around my wood pile. They are quick. Some are more black than red, but most are bright red.

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Boxelder bug nymphs
by: Moni

The photo is not very clear nor very close up but it looks like you have boxelder bug nymphs, which are the young of the boxelder The nymphs of the boxelder bug have what looks like a yellow spot on the center back of the abdomen. Not sure about how many generations of boxelders in Florida. Boxelder bugs do like to congregate together...and they are probably under a boxelder tree or maple.
Does the tree have a maple like leaf, three leaflets to a leaf?...Then it is a boxelder tree.
As expected they feed on boxelder trees, rarely causing any economic problem. They can somtimes be observed feeding on ash, maple, plum, cherry, apple, peach, grape and strawberries, where they can damage the fruit. They are known to be pests in the fall as they accumulate on the sides of homes. They also seem to manage to come inside in the fall also...which is a nuisance. The time spent in or on our homes they are not causing a problem.
If these are outside then you really have no problem. When they become a problem in our homes here in the North we just vacuum them to get rid of them.
Let me know if you want more information.

Box Elder Beetle
by: Gary

In Abilene,Tx these guys congragate on native Soapberry trees too ( china berry).

box elder bugs
by: Jerry in Ottawa IL.

I read some where you can rid your house of box elder bugs outside by spraying them with a mild mix of dishsoap warm water in a hose end sprayer

boxelder bugs
by: Moni

Jerry in Ottawa IL.
You can use the soap and water...insecticidal soap is the prefered product as it is made for insect control. These insects do not cause economic damage to trees or houses. They are just a nuisance. If you feel you need to control them you can spray, tho I prefer using a small shop vac and dumping the bugs in a plastic bag, sealing it, then tossing it in the trash if I have a huge pile of the bugs. Usually as long as they stay outside of my house there is no need to do anything.

Boxelder bugs
by: Don Snellen

I have thousands of these bugs congragating on my pool inclosure and the side of my workshop in St Augustine Florida. They are located under a Rain Tree and seem to be very friendly with fire ants. They are mixed in with fire ants on the move and neither bothers the other. Very interesting to watch.

red bugs (boxelder?)
by: Peg

I have juniper ground cover and it is infested with these red bugs. Will it hurt the juniper to use bug spray or soap?

Doug says that in order to tell this information, you have to read the label on the product. Sorry but we can't be responsible for changes in product registration.

where the bodies go.
by: infested

I have these bugs at my house outside and they do like my wood pile. I spray them with soapy water and they look like they die, but a little later or the next day the bodies are gone. Is this really killing them or are they just stunned, or are the live one coming in and picking up the casualties.

boxelder bugs
by: Moni

Infested
either you killed them and something ate them...like a spider, or you did not kill them and they crawled away. If they are outside they are not a pest so just don't worry about them.
In the fall they will hide in the wood pile to hibernate for the winter.

Red Bugs
by: Brad

I have many red bugs with black legs and a light colored small dot on the back. They are eating pine needles on our evergreen bush. They live in the rocks of my flower bed. I sprayed them with store bought spray and thought they were gone only to find them several days later moved to another rock bed. I have 2 boxelders but I don't see them around those two bushes. How to get rid of them.

Boxelder bug nymphs
by: Moni

Brad
What you describe sounds like boxelder bug nymphs, however, they do not eat pine needles...they only suck juices from boxelder or maple leaves. Therefore something else is eating your pine needles or these are not boxelder bug nymphs.

You could send in a photo of what you see for ID.

Probably what has happened is you see boxelder bug nymphs on your pines (they just sit around) but something else is feeding on your pine :) and you do not see it. It may have been sawfly larvae and they are gone.
You should not spray if you do not know what you have! You end up killing the good bugs not the bad bugs and end up with more bad bugs....

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Tiny Red Insect (Leaffooted bug nymph)

by Darrin
(Southeastern U.S.)

Nice color but waaayyy too many of them!

Nice color but waaayyy too many of them!

Found two groups of these tiny Red insects on my Gutters. Each one has 6 legs and 2 antenna, and are a very bright red. They weren't crawling around but were clustered in a group.

They were in the same place on the gutter except on different sides of the house, right on the joint of the gutter pipe leading down from the roof.

Very small, but a lot of them.

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red bug
by: Lin

That looks like a young assassin bug.

little red bugs
by: Anonymous

I think these are box elder nymphs, which will become black with orange edges (gives them a "V" on the back) and about 1/2 inch long, maybe a little bigger. I have a brick house with a vinyl garage and wood fence, and they loved the sunny sides of the garage and fence where they would pack in large numbers in warm hard-to-reach places. I checked out the Colorado University dept. of Entomology web site and it may be worth looking at. I hope this helps.

Leaffooted bug nymph, Leptoglossus spp.
by: Moni

Darrin
Your photo is of the nymph of a Leaffooted bug, Leptoglossus spp. This is a bug in the Coreidae family.
These insects feed on plant juices, but are not considered a pest of the garden.
Once they become adults they are much easier to ID to species.

It is not a boxelder bug nymph because there are no black wing pads on the back of these bugs. Boxelder bugs are in the family Rhopalidae and feed on boxelder trees and maples. \

Thankyou all!
by: Darrin

Thanks to everyone for helping me find out what these are!


!
by: Kaitlynn

We recently discovered these on the inside of our window pane, after finding out the window was open for a week. We didn't know what they were! Thank you@

Leaf footed bug nymph on tomato plants
by: Larry

Will they destroyed my tomato plants and how do you get rid of them

Tiny red bugs cluster
by: Anonymous

Sam them on a brick just before the door. They also saw me.
They stopped moving and arranged themselves in a rounded pattern. I put some bleach on a paper towel and smothered them. I hadn't seen that before and I grew up on a small farm.
Baffeled.

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Red/Orange Flying insect (Hanging-thieves Robber fly)

by Audra
(St John,Kansas)

red/orange flying insect

red/orange flying insect

red/orange flying insect

We found this insect on our garage door handle last summer and were quite intrigued by him (or her). We do a lot of gardening and last summer was the first time we have seen a bug such as this. Actually we never saw more than just this one but that doesn't really mean much. He didn't seem to mind our attention or having his picture taken although he refuse to have a picture taken of his face.

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Hanging-thieves Robber fly
by: Moni

Audra
Your insect is a Hanging-thieves robber fly. They are one of the beneficial insects of the garden since they feed on other insects that are pests. They get their name because they hang from their front legs while they consume their prey.
These are found in central and eastern North America in woodland or open areas nearby.
The larvae are also thought to feed on critters in the soil.

This genus, Diogmites, usually has green eyes...tho as you said you could not get it to show you them.



Thank You!
by: Anonymous

Thank you so much Moni for taking the time to look at this! So good to know that he/she is a beneficial insect. I will look for more of them next year.

?
by: Audra

Not sure why I showed up as annon in my last comment. Anyway, I wanted to make sure you knew it was me thanking you. What you provide is an extremely wonderful service. I searched high and low and couldn't figure out what he/she was.

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red-brown insect (Smooth Spider beetle)

by John
(DC, USA)

This critter is about a 16th of an inch. Dark red to brown. Pretty slow moving, no wings that I could see. I thought it was a spider beetle until I saw your picture of a spider beetle. Maybe a juvenile? Mostly found on the upper floor of our house in DC.

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red-brown insect
by: Anonymous

looks like a red mite.

Smooth Spider beetle
by: Moni

John
You are correct it is a spider beetle. Yours is probably the smooth spider beetle which looks a little different than the American spider beetle. There are about 70 species in the US.
Like most spider beetles, the adult and larvae feed on a wide variety of dead plant and animal materials...being a stored product pest. Some of the products they feed on are grain products, seeds, dried fruits or meats, wool, hair, feathers, rat and mouse droppings, insect and other animal remains, plant and animal museum specimens, books, dried mushrooms, animal feeds and sugar.

Control of spider beetles, like most stored pest insects, is to find what they are feeding on and throw it out. It is good to clean out pantries and other food storage areas with a vacuum. Washing with soap, bleach or such products do NOT help. To prevent further infestations, store any susceptible products in tightly closed containers.

You can put any products/items you have that might be infested in the freezer for a few days to kill any insects that might be in them.

help
by: Anonymous

this red-brown smooyh spider beetle is eating my roses what do I do

Spider beetle
by: Moni

Anonymous- help
These beetles do not feed on live plant material, so you must have a different beetle or something feeding on your roses. Please read the comment describing this insect above your comment.

Please send in a photo of your insect so we can help.

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Tiny red bug (Black-legged Tick )

by Jason
(Long Island)

This little red bug was found crawling on my arm today at work. Not sure if it was from home (shirt I was wearing) or from work. I am worried that it might be a bed bug because I have noticed a few tiny red itchy bumps on my body.The bug was put under a digital microscope and magnified. Please help to identify so I can call a professional if needed. I've been itchy all day just thinking about these little bugs. Thanks in advance!

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Be ready to scratch
by: Stuart

Your picture looks like a portrait of an adult chigger, which is pretty much harmless in and of itself. The larval stage, however bites and will cause the itchy, red welts you are describing.

Another possibility
by: Jane B

Take a look on line at spider mites also.

The itching might be just psychological.

Black-legged Tick
by: Moni

Jason
Tho at first glance this may be a mite...and tho you have the magnification you do not give the actual size of the insect. It is not a bed bug.
But, of more concern is that it may be a deer or also called black-legged tick. Your description fits.
I would take the specimen to your county extension office to have them send it in for positive ID. Black-legged ticks carry Lyme disease and that is not something you want!
If it is a blacklegged tick and it bit you, it takes 24-72 hours of feeding to infect you with lyme disease. A few weeks of an antibiotic can control the disease if caught in the very early stages of infection.

Itching may be from just finding a bug on you but it is best to get positive ID on this critter.
Martha's Vineyard is known as a hot spot for Lyme infected ticks, as is much of the NE US.

Thanks
by: Jason

Hi all,

Thank you for your help. After doing some research, I found that this is a Clover Mite. Harmless.

I think they were on a picnic bench at work.

Thanks again!

-Jason

Tick?
by: Anonymous

I agree with the earlier posts, it's not an insect, it's some sort of arachnid because it has 8 legs, insects only have 6. It looks very much like a tick of some sort. If it's a deer tick, it could possibly carry lime-disease or other form of tick fever.

Tick or Mite
by: Missy

I just found one of these in my bathroom! Never seen one before, im in NSW Australia in the bush. I freaked out thinking it was a tick.

Mine had 8 red legs, the body is greenish black like a Green Ant color. Looked like a spider crossed with a tick. But the legs were curly not pointy like a spider. And i seen the mouth part identical to yours.

Hopefully its just a Clover Mite like you said and clover mites like to feed on grass so if theyre in your home they wont stay for long :)

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Red Body, Green Head (Florida Predatory Stink Bug)

by D. J.
(Richmond, VA, USA)

These guys were found hanging from a loose piece of screen about 5 1/2 feet off the ground in Richmond, VA

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Florida Predatory Stink Bug
by: Moni

DJ
Those are the nymphal or young stage of the Fl predatory stink bugs or also called Halloween bugs on that screen. They are "good" bugs as they feed on other insect pests like caterpillars, leaf beetles and planthoppers. Both nymphs and adults feed on insects.
They are just found in the SE US - north to PA thru MO.
They are known for their metallic blue/green thorax with red abdomens. The adults look similar.
The nymphs are known to congregate together...sometimes this is to work together on a food insect. Otherwise they sometimes are found together at night.

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gray and red bug (wheel bug nymph)

by John Armstrong
(Conyngham, Pa. US)

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Gray body, red tail tilted up, six legs, and about 3-4 cm long. I found it crawling on my grill cover. I live in NE pennsylvania.

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wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

John
Yes, it is a wheel bug nymph.
It is considered a beneficial insect. It is scouting for insects to eat in your garden. So this is one to watch as it controls many insects that might be a pest in your garden.
As it grows it will molt a few times and turn into a large gray bug with a spiky looking 'wheel' on its backside behind the head.
They are found in much of North America into Central America.
They evidently can bite with its long piercing sucking mouth parts and if so it is said to be very painful.

Wheel Bug
by: in NC

You say they are beneficial, but evidently you have never been bitten by one. It's bite is worse or as bad as a Yellow Jacket sting. I don't like them at all.

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large, red, winged (newly molted wheel bug)

by cyndi
(state college, PA)

We found this at Penn State's main campus.

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Wheel bug
by: cyndi

We discovered that this is a newly molted wheel bug.

newly molted wheel bug
by: Moni

Cyndi
I knew it was an assassin bug that had newly molted. But the angle did not show the wheel. The red color is because it has freshly molted and not fully developed its grey color yet - freshly molted grey and black bugs are often pinkish or red.
Thanks for the great lesson on molting to share with everyone!


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reddish/orange dragonfly (Meadowhawk dragonfly)

I found this on some grasses in a rural roadside ditch in Southwestern Ontario in July. Can't seem to find out anywhere what it is.

thanks

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Meadowhawk dragonfly
by: Moni

Ontario
You have one of the meadowhawk dragonflies. It could be the ruby, red-veined, or maybe the cherry-faced meadowhawk ...not sure without photos from other angles.
Dragonfly Id is not easy. It is usually necessary to have photos of the side, face and tail to know the species....and they do not usually sit still for a thorough photo oppt :-)

Most dragonflies are found thru out North America near water.
Adult dragonflies are predators or good bugs as they feed on other insects. The nymphs of dragonflies live in water feeding on small insects like mosquito larvae.

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reddish cricket type bug with long antennae (Carolina leaf-roller cricket)

by david gaskins
(weirton wv)

Jumping reddish colored with very long antennae

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Carolina leaf-roller cricket
by: Moni

David
You did not say what size this cricket was nor where you saw it, but my guess is it is a one of the raspy crickets also called leaf-rolling crickets. The only species found in the US is the Carolina leaf-roller so that would be the one you have.
The antennae are up to five times its body length.
Its common name is comes from Australia and the distinctive leaf-rolls created by adults that serve as a shelter during the day.
Adults are active only at night, during which they hunt and prey on aphids.
These are found in the eastern region of the U.S., from Indiana to New Jersey and then south from FL to MS.

location
by: Anonymous

Can this animal be found in missouri?

Carolina leaf-roller cricket
by: Moni

Yes, they are found in MO :) Did you find one? They are great beneficials as they eat aphids!

wheeling, wv
by: Hannah

I just found one and called my dad down not so much because I was scared but because I never saw one before! My dad was thinking possibly a grasshopper nymph because it was almost transparent. I googled that and it didn't look like a match so orangish insect long antennas and the picture and I scrolled down to this and saw Weirton, WV.... it all makes sense!!!!!

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bright red bulb body (Boxelder bug nymphs)

by Jessica & Sam
(Royal Palm Beach,Fl)

This unidentified insect was found near Atlanta,GA.

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Red bulb bug
by: Anonymous

Looks like box elder bugs to me.

Boxelder bug nymphs
by: Moni

Jessica & Sam
You have boxelder bug nymphs, which are the young of the boxelder bug. The nymphs of the boxelder bug have what looks like a yellow spot on the center back of the abdomen. Boxelder bugs do like to congregate together...and they are probably under a boxelder tree or maple.

As expected they feed on boxelder trees, rarely causing any economic problem. They can somtimes be observed feeding on ash, maple, plum, cherry, apple, peach, grape and strawberries, where they can damage the fruit. They are known to be nuisance pests in the fall as they accumulate on the sides of homes. They also seem to manage to come indoors in the fall...which is a nuisance. The time spent in or on our homes, they are not causing a problem.
If these are outside then you really have no problem. When they become a problem in our homes here in the North we just vacuum them to get rid of them.

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Red and Gray insects (Cotton Stainer)

by Sharon Stilwell
(Near Naples, Florida-Collier County.)

Red and Gray Bugs

Red and Gray Bugs

These bugs were about 3/4 inch long. They had beautifully patterned red and white bodies with a bit of yellow-green accenting dots on the sides of the abdomen. The wings were gray with a lighter geometric line pattern. These were found in Collier County Florida on Dec. 11, 2011 at Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary.

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Cotton stainer
by: Moni

Sharon
Sorry I did not ID this sooner it got lost in the holiday emails.
Your bug is the cotton stainer, also known as one of the 'red bugs' in FL. It is found in southeastern US.
This bug feeds on many plants especially in the cotton family (Malvacea) such as cotton, hibiscus, okra as well as ornamentals, vegetables, and fruits like oranges. There are several generations a year.
It is a pest of cotton and got its name from staining the cotton brownish/yellow. It can also be a pest in oranges.

First line of control is to keep host plant debris cleared away. To control existing bugs shaking them into soapy water or spraying with insecticidal soap.

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Red-orange and black beetle (Squash vine borer moth)


(New York)

This little red-orange and black guy or gal was found in a garden in Rockland County, NY. The shape and antenna make me think "beetle," but I could be wrong about that, as I don't have insect ID experience.

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I found out what it is!
by: The original poster

I have learned from another identification site that it's a squash vine borer, and that my poor brother has a lot of work to do to get rid of them if he wants healthy squash this year!

Squash vine borer moth
by: Moni

New York
Yes, it is a squash vine borer moth.
Next time your brother sees it, squash it! (Pun intended)
These are found in eastern North America.
Larvae feed by boring into the stems of squash, gourds, pumpkins, i.e. Cucurbitaceae.
Adults fly during the day...looking a little like wasps to feed on nectar. You need to monitor your squash for these moths from mid-June through early August.

Time to check your squashes, esp the zucchini for evidence of the borer/eggs. The borers will bore in at a leaf axil then head inside the stem to the root area to eventually pupate.

Now the the moths are flying it is harder to control them. In the future, your brother can put floating row cover (tightly bury the ends into the soil) over the squash plants until they start to flower. Then the row covers can be removed and the plants will be sturdy enough they are not as apt to have eggs laid. Another prevention is to wrap foil or row cover fabric around the stem of seedling plants covering the soil around the plant and then up the stem. This prevents the emerging larvae from boring into the stem.

Since the moths are flying and laying eggs, then your brother could try spraying neem or Bacillus thuringiensis. Research has shown weekly sprays at the base of the squash plant will help kill larvae before they can enter the stem. Read and follow label directions for any product you might use. And be careful to spray in early morning or late day to keep from spraying and killing those great pollinators like honey bees.

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