Bug in Daylily Seeds (Twiced stabbed stink bug)

by Amy
(Wingham, Ontario, Canada)

I spotted this little critter in the seeds of my yellow daylily, and thought he was a very pretty little bug. If anyone knows what he is, please share!

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lil bug in Daylili
by: Anonymous

very odd, kinda like a Lady bug! very good picture!

Tortiseshell beetle
by: MydMo

It looks like it might be some variety of tortise shell beetle.

Twiced stabbed stink bug nymph
by: Moni

Amy
Your critter is the nymph stage of the twiced stabbed stink bug. The adult is mostly black with red line over the shoulder and two red dots (stabs) on the rear top. These are small stink bugs usually found on flowers with seeds in the fall. I find them often on my Obedient plants.

Adults suck plant juices from many different plants: thistles, mints, goldenrods, ragweeds, columbines and other perennials.

Here are some photos of nymphs and adults.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/6433/bgimage

Thank you!
by: Anonymous

I have seen these little critters around before, but never knew what they were till now. So thanks very much for the info and your time! :)

Twiced stabbed stink bug
by: Moni

Just found a nymph and adults on my lambsear flower heads. Hope my photo turns out as good as yours.

Western spotted cucumber beetle
by: G. Wan

Cucumber beetle possibly

Twice-stabbed stink bug nymph
by: Moni

G. Wan

It is the twice-stabbed stink bug nymph, as written previously.
If you look at the photos posted on bugguide you will see they match.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/6433/bgimage?from=24

For more information about the spotted cucumber beetle you can put that in the search box at bugguide.net. The cucumber beetles have much longer antenna, a more distinct head, and are more yellow-green in color.

Insect identification
by: Gardemer

The photo is of an immature "leaf-footed bug" (not a true "bug" but a real nuisance nonetheless...) They are piercing-feeders which makes them almost impossible to eradicate with conventional (poison) methods. They will ruin any type of fruit....beans, peppers, tomatoes (especially!) you-name-it.
Best advice is to "git on 'em" early. Their defense mechanism is to drop straight down, so if you hold a container of (diesel, gas, oil, whatever) under them and disturb them they will drop into it ...or at least SOME of them will. Once they have wings to fly they are VERY difficult to kill. Gooooood Luck!

identification forinsect
by: Anonymous

this is most likely a young stinkbug or harlequin bug. If so, it may be feeding on the sap of the plant or the seeds. both can cause major damage similar to aphids if their number grows too large.

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Red and orange spiky bug! (Lady bug larva)

by Ani
(Norfolk, England)

It is about 5 mm long, no visible antennae, black with orange stripes on its abdomen and lots of balck spikes! It came in from the garden in my hair so no idea what plant it came from... have asked everyone and no-one seems to know what it is!

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Lady bug larva
by: Moni

Looks like you are in luck. From the photo it looks like a lady bug(beetle) larva. He loves to eat the pests in our garden and he can eat more than the adults. So put him back out in the garden and let him get back to work for you!
Happy gardening.

orange stripy
by: Anonymous

I found one of these on a rose just the other day. is this what it is? a ladybug larva? that is amazing! they are amazing! =]

Black/red bugs
by: Rocc

I have these black and orange/red spiky bugs all over my plants outside my house. there are about 100 of em crawlin everywhere. From what I can see, all they do is eat my plants. They dont bite from what I can tell but Im not going to be a guinea pig for them either. Im in Wesley Chapel Fl.

Rocc

lady-bug???
by: Slightly concerned gardener

I hope that the previous contributor who said that these bugs are good to have in the garden is right 'cos I have seen loads this spring/summer all over my plants. I've never seen them before and am concerned that they will suck the sap from the plants as opposed to eating the bugs which do! Any ideas where they have come from and do they turn into anything else?

Lady Bug????
by: Betty (Michigan)

I have these all over my front yard and am wondering what they were. So I typed in black and orage bug, it took me to this website where I fould it's picture. Let me tell you these bugs DO BITE and it hurts. I have no idea what they are but it doesn't look like a ladybug to me! Does anyone know for sure what it is? Or is it just a guess that it is a Lady Bug Larve?

these bugs
by: Anonymous

these bugs are all over my house

what is it?
by: SumguyintheOR

After first googling the general appearance, and arriving here, I noticed that there are still questions about this critter. I then googled ladybug larvae, and all the images show exactly this bug. To note a few things: if it eats other bugs it will probably bite. If you have a lot of these, there has to be a lot of food for them to thrive. They may not be the culprit in the case of your plants being eaten, rather, there food is likely the cause. So glad I left the one I saw alive after this little bit of research. And that I didn't try to pick it up, yikes! Thanks for the info all :-)

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

SumguyintheOR
Yes, if you pick them up they could bite...they do have chewing mouthparts to eat aphids and such.
Glad you found you answer here.

They are good bugs in the garden. And you are right there has to be enough food (insect pests) for them to eat, which means that the pests they are eating are probably chewing on your plant. Plants can take some damage so don't spray...just leave the lady beetles and larvae to take care of the pest population.

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Long Orange, Yellow & Black Flying 4inch Insect (Giant ichneumon wasp)

by JenFrey
(Lancaster PA USA)

patterned orange 4 inches long insect

patterned orange 4 inches long insect

4 inches long, patterned body in orange yellow & black, resembling a huge mosquito or wasp

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Giant ichneumon wasp
by: Moni

JenFrey
Your photo is of a giant ichneumon wasp. This family of wasps are beneficial insects.
The long tail like appendage at the end of the wasp is the ovipositor. This is what the female uses to lay its eggs. This long ovipositor is needed to insert through the bark of dead deciduous trees to lay eggs in the tunnels of the pigeon tremex another wasp larva. Larvae crawl along the tunnel until encountering a host larvae on which they feed.
Adult wasps often feed on body juices of hosts while the larvae feed in on immature stages.
Neat and unusual looking wasps!

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long legged with wings and a orange stinger (Wheel bug)

by Tammi
(Mooresville, North Carolina, USA)

Long legs like a spider with wings but was not flying. orange stinger in middle of head and ridges on top of head. stung my daughter near the pool which is near the lake and the woods.

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Assassin bug
by: Moni

Tammi
Your photo is of an assassin bug. I think from your description it might be a wheel bug, or perhaps spined assassin bug. You do not say how long it is. The wheel bug has a ridge of spines that look like half of a wheel with spokes on the thorax(middle section of the insect) or some might say it looks like a chickens comb.
Not sure what the orange spike is?
Wheel bugs or other assassin bugs feed on pest insects, so they are great for the garden. However, its bite can be more severe than a bee sting, and both nymphs and adults should be avoided. Since your daughter was bitten, that suggests also that it is a wheel bug.

Here are websites to photos of wheel bugs.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/454/bgimage

stinging?
by: Anonymous

Assassin bugs dont sting. They have sucking mouthparts, but no stinger. It may have bit you , though, because they do suck blood.

Wheel bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
As I mentioned previously here, that is correct...they do not sting but bite. :-)
However, wheel bugs and most other assassin bugs do not suck blood from people, just from insects!

To be totally clear - The exception to the rule of no blood sucking assassin bugs (Family Reduviidae) is the Genus Triatoma known as the Blood-sucking Conenose. There are 11 species found north of Mexico. See images here - http://bugguide.net/node/view/4789/bgimage

The female has a blood meal generally on mammals, but avian, reptilian and amphibian hosts are recorded. The most common hosts are wood rats (Neotoma) but other common hosts include armadillos, opossums and raccoons, and possibly skunks. Some species may feed on livestock, pets and humans. It also feeds on bed bugs and other insects.
It does sometimes bite humans. The bite can cause severe allergic reaction in many people. The bite and defecation into bite can transmit Chagas disease.

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long insect with orange body, black tail/stinger (Wasp)

by Ailsa Cunningham
(Carluke, South Lanarkshire, Scotland)

Found this fly on my living room floor. Its wings were buzzing but it was not flying. It has a long orange body with black end, black head, clear wings and black legs. Please help! This is the 2nd one I have found.

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Wasp
by: Moni

Ailsa
From the photo it looks like a wasp of some type. However a photo of the top or side of the insect would help narrow it any closer.

Many wasps nest in or near homes in paper or mud nests. Your wasp may have found a hole such that a nest was made inside the structure of the house. This spring they are out and about looking for prey to put in with their young. Perhaps these 2 found a way into the house rather than to the outside. Many times they wear themselves out and die in the house then.

For more information please send a photo of the side and/or top view.
Thanks

Wasp like insect
by: Sandi

This bug stung my finger hurt like nothing I've ever felt in my life. My finger is swollen red and hot. Hurts up to my elbow like it hit a nerve. Just happened about an hour ago but hurts like it just happened. Don't know exactly what it is but interested in finding out.

Wasp
by: Moni

Sandi
If you send a photo we can ID the insect that stung you.
Wasp stings do sound like your description. It is best to put baking soda paste on it then ice. It will feel better soon after that.
If you are allergic to them and swelling occurs you should quickly see a doctor.

Orange body wasp-
by: Sarah Cz

Not sure from your picture- but may be the 'Great Golden Digger' wasp?... I think we have them burrowing in our driveway in western MA, USA!

Wasp
by: Moni

Sarah
It does look very similar, tho the photos I found for the Great golden digger wasp showed yellow/orange legs while the wasp in this photo have black looking legs.

I do not have access to Scotland's wasp species so can not ID further.

Thanks so much for the suggestion!

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orange body brown winged bug (Soldier beetle)

by Sandra
(Mountain View, CA)

I live in Mountain View, CA, and found a lot of these bugs in our back yard for the first time this year. We have a Japanese Maple that has just started sprouting leaves and we found an infestation of what we thought were aphids, but know I'm wondering if it's the larvae of this bug.

Thank you for your help!

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Soldier beetle
by: Moni

Sandra
There are a few of these flying around CA. This is the second photo we have gotten.
Your photo is of a soldier beetle.
The adults feed on aphids and other insects, while the larva feed on soft bodied insects. So this would be a beneficial insect.
The adults of some species are seen on flowers in the fall where they help with pollination.

Good bug
by: Timo

I found one today in Santa Clara. From what I can find they were probably eating the aphids.


Freaked me out
by: Anonymous

I swear this thing stalked me. After the lights went off at night, I heard this weird sound, and suddenly felt this thing jump on me. It didn't sting or anything, but geeze... I turned on the light — no sign of anything. Lights off, and AHHH! It was back on me in a flash.. So, it had to die.

I have never seen this bug before, and I've lived here for over 25 years... location: San Gabriel Valley foothills.

Soldier Beetle
by: SumguyintheOR

I've seen plenty of these in southern OR. Generally they hang out near their food, and I've seen them argue with various ants on occasion over who's food it is. (I had a lot of time for this when I was 5). Neat to find out what they are.

Thank you for the ID
by: Shannon

We are in Saratoga and found them all over our Japanese Maples--thank you to all of you for the information!

citrus
by: Anonymous

i live in menlo park and they were all over my lemon tree hopefully eating all the whitefly that was also all over it.

Soldier beetle
by: Moni

Citrus
If you have whiteflies on your lemon then that is probably what they are doing! Isn't it nice to have help getting rid of the pests, and you do not have to do anything :-)

I think I found this bug in my house NEW
by: Anonymous

I think last night we found this bug in our house. I was packing to move and picked up a bag and it ran at first I thought it was a cockroach my boy friend said no that's got to be a Beatle. Later in the night my dog attached it killed it but we put it in a cup to look at it as he then thought it was a cockroach but I showed it to my sis she said no cockroaches just have a head an then thier shell and their heads aren't usually like reddish so I started googling and this is closest thing I'm finding. It has like a reddish kinda head and a neck then a dark shell I live in wasaga beach Ontario mountain are close bay is close and lots of different trees. Not to close but there are apple trees in the semi area.

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Orange with white mosaic design (Ailanthus Webworm Moth larva)

by Ronald Defenbaugh
(NW MO)

Orange bug mosaic thoracic

Orange bug mosaic thoracic

We found these two bugs on a hosta plant. They have a mosaic design belting the exposed part of the body. The belt is white and black. The black being a border for white "spots" - one sequence of "spots" depicts a butterfly design. I wish I had had my 5D camera instead of only the NexusOne cell.

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Ailanthus Webworm Moth
by: Moni

Ronald
Your insect is a moth...Ailanthus Webworm Moth.
They are found over most of eastern North America.
The adults feed on nectar of various flowers. The caterpillars are found in webs in Ailanthus (tree of heaven) and paradise trees. The caterpillars may also feed on other deciduous trees and shrubs.
The Ailanthus tree is not native and is invasive. The insect is native...but it has learned to like this invasive tree....a good thing!


Pittsburgh, PA
by: Anonymous

We found this same bug and used your website to figure out what it is. Thanks for having such an informative website. We have never seen a bug like this before.

Nantucket Island tourist
by: Anonymous

I found one of these guys on a tour of mi casa Nantucket. Snapped a quick picture & been wondering what it is since. Thanks for the info. They're pretty neat looking, and popular island visitors!!

finally
by: Anonymous

Thank you so much. For your info i found one in my house in brantford ont never seen anything like it before

Found One
by: Anonymous

I found one today on the glass to of our office building in Shreveport, La. Your web site was helpful in finding out what kind of bug it was.

Strange beautiful bug
by: Anonymous

I just found one of these in washington illinois! So strange, lived in this area for many years and have never seen one! Thank you!

Finding Nemo bug
by: Anonymous

I just found one here in North Hampton Ohio Awesome looking bug!!!

St. Louis, MO
by: Anonymous

Found one of these this week on the doorframe. Really cool looking close up, and I'm not a bug person...just found this site trying to ID it since I'd never seen one before. Thanks!

Good site!
by: Anonymous

Found this little guy on my milkweed plants and, loving photography, had to get his pic. I also like to know what they are to post with the pic. Being in Grand Island, Nebraska, it appears these little guys travel quite a distance. Our Backyard Farmer TV show by the University of Nebraska just tonight had a person write in about (no less than) the Tree of Heaven and she was told to cut them off with the mower and that they are a weed tree. I thought, gee, maybe we could give her some of our bugs! Great site that's now in my Favorites!

Found one
by: Anonymous

There is one on my screen door in Northeast Alabama. Its spots look like soccer balls to me.

pretty bug
by: Anonymous

Thank you for the info i found one in my room in nj and never saw one before beautiful i let it go outsdide

Yeah!
by: Anonymous

I snapped a picture of one of these 4 years ago and FINALLY know what it is. Thanks so much. Great site!

found one in south eastern Connecticut
by: Anonymous

I found one last year on my cucumber and then never saw it again till recently. Beautiful.

Thanks
by: Anonymous

Just found this bug in my room I'm New Jersey and I was so scared.

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bright orange with black spots, (Milkweed Bugs)

by Carol
(Baltimore MD)

lunch time

lunch time

Never seen these before. They are all over the butterfly weed seed pods but sure aren't butterflies! Also seem to like the pink zinnias nearby.

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Milkweed bug nymphs
by: Moni

Carol
You have milkweed bug nymphs (youngsters) on your butterfly weed(which is in the milkweed family). They feed by sucking juices out of the plant and since milkweed is not of 'economic' value they are not considered a pest. Because this is a nymph it is not easy to know if it is a small or large milkweed bug. It does also resemble the boxelder bug nymph, but since it is feeding milkweed we know it is the milkweed bug. The adults are also reddish orange and black and are very striking in color.

Only special insects can feed on milkweed as the plant contains toxins. These toxins give any insect that feeds on this plant protection from predators. Other insects that might feed on butterfly weed would be monarch caterpillars or milkweed tiger moth caterpillars.
Thanks for the great photo!

thanks for the information
by: Carol

Thanks Moni. After your identification, I did some reading on these little critters and they seem to be pretty harmless. Since the plants die back each winter, am I right in assuming they will do no permanent damage? They are really pretty cool looking!

Milkweed bugs
by: Moni

That's right they will not do permanent damage, especially at this time of year. If they were there when it starts to flower they could damage the flower head. But you will not loose the plants from the little feeding they do.

Thanks again Moni!
by: Carol

That's good news.

New bug to my eyes and new weed
by: Katie

I have found this, new to my eyes, bugs on the silk weed pods. At least that is what one of my friends said the vine is as I didn't plant it here in my yard I did not know the name of the bug or the weed. Thanks for your info.

Milkweed bugs
by: Moni

Katie
The silkweed is another common name for milkweed...the seeds inside the pods have silky fuzz that carry the seeds in the wind off to find a spot to grow. We would all have to use scientific names to get around all the common names there are for plants. The scientific names are Latin and universal around the globe. The scientific genus name for the various milkweed, silkweed, and butterfly weeds is Asclepias.

Found several of these on my milkweed pods this week, also. They move to the other side of the stem/pod if they see your shadow hovering over them.
Glad we could help!

no monarchs
by: Anonymous

Could these bugs be eating monarch eggs? I'm growing the milkweed to attract monarchs, but never see them, but I do see lots of orange bugs with black spots on the milkweed. Thanks

Large milkweed bugs
by: Moni

Anonymous
The milkweed bugs do not eat monarch eggs...they only feed on the milkweed plant.
Due to severe storms this past winter in Mexico where the monarch butterflies overwinter, there are fewer monarchs around this year.
Here is a great website to learn more about monarchs...what they eat, where they go in winter, etc
http://monarchwatch.org/

no monarchs
by: Anonymous (Becki)

Thank you for your information. Is there a way to get rid of the milkweed bug in a non-toxic way? I have neighbors who are finding monarch eggs and caterpillars on their milkweed, but they don't have the milkweed bug infestation. Thanks, again

Large milkweed bugs
by: Moni

Becki
The best way to get rid of the milkweed bugs without affecting the plant should there be monarch eggs on your plants, is to knock them off into a bucket of soapy water.
Usually the milkweed bugs are on the seed heads which makes them easier to get to...you could cut the seed heads off also and put them in the soapy water or a plastic bag.
Monarch butterflies usually lay eggs on the leaves not the seed heads. Also Monarchs will usually lay eggs on the more tender leaves in the area not the old tough leaves.

no monarchs
by: Becki

Moni -

Thanks for the information. I will try that. There are lots of milkweed bugs on the seed heads.

Becki

beetles eating aphids?
by: Linda

I wondered if the bugs were eating the aphids. I had a huge problem with aphids and when the beetles showed up, the aphids were gone. Could anything like the beetles be causing the spots and rusty color turning up on my milkweed?

Large milkweed bugs
by: Moni

Linda
Milkweed bugs just suck juices out of the plant not aphids. Perhaps the wonderful beneficials in your garden ate the aphids. Lady beetles and their larva eat them and parasitic wasps lay eggs in them.

Aphids can transmit some plant diseases but I do not think they can transmit rust. It was probably due to the temperature and moisture conditions in your garden that helped the rust to develop.

Aide to removing milkweed bugs
by: Pat in PA

I have raised butterfly weed for years, used to have many cats. but since milkseed bug started visiting, not so many even though plenty of moms are laying eggs. I don't like those red and black bugs so use my dustbuster and vac. them off. Works great!

milkweed bugs
by: Yvette

The insects I have in my garden look like the Milkweed bugs but they are feeding on my sedum. Is this the same insect?

Milkweed bugs
by: Moni

Yvette
If they are really feeding on your sedums, then they are not milkweed bugs. However, my guess is that they are not feeding on the sedum...something else might be?

You might also be seeing boxelder bugs on your sedums, tho they are not feeding on them either. Since you are sending this in Oct. many insects are gathering in and around buildings, mulched areas, or areas with lots of leaves to hibernate.

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Tiny orange bug (American spider beetle)

What the heck is this????

What the heck is this????

I keep finding these tiny dark orange bugs in my daughters bed and only my daughters bed. I don't think they are bed bugs. At first I thought they were spiders but they are not.
The are very small, the body a little bigger than a pencil tip.
The body is a hard shiney shell.

Any ideas?

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orange bug
by: Anonymous

It does sound like a bedbug

Bugs
by: Anonymous

They are not bed bugs!I have never seen the bug before.Why don't you google bed bugs for a look see.

tiny orange bug?
by: Anonymous

send the pic to the entomology dept at Univ of Nebraska or Clemson Univ. They will be able to tell you what it is

American spider beetle
by: Moni

Great photos!! Great description!!They really help to get a good ID.

As you thought it looked like a spider, you were on the right track. It is a beetle that looks like a spider.
This beetle is like larder beetles and pantry moths, being a pest in homes eating grains, leather, and all kinds of pantry crumbs.
Not sure why they are in just your daughters bed unless she is eating crackers under the covers! :-) Perhaps she and her dolls are having a tea party at night! :-)
Rather than writing all the info here please see the following website. It has great info for this beetle.
http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2117.html
If you want more information than this let us know.


Relieved: not a bed bug!
by: Mycroft O'Doyle

I've been wondering about these guys! I've seen them in my home too. I thought at first it might be a bed bug. But they neither look nor move like bed bugs. To find one crawling on my bed can still give a quick scare though.

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Thorny Orange Body with six black & white striped legs (Assassin Bug)

by Mary
(Maryland)

Orange Six-Legged Bug with B/W Striped Legs

Orange Six-Legged Bug with B/W Striped Legs

Saw this bug on a hibiscus plant in late August in mid-western Maryland. The body was kind of bulbous and thorny. He liked having his picture taken. Can you identify him?

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Assassin Bug
by: Moni

Mary
You have an assassin bug. This one is young and does not have its full wings yet. There are several species of assassin bugs - this is probably Pselliopus barberi since you are in SE US.
Assassin bugs prey on other insects. They have a long mouth that resembles a straw to suck the juices out of their subject. They are found on many plants and flowers and overwinter as adults.
It does have such great character and color!

Thanks!
by: Anonymous

Thank you for your identification! I have the same bugs in my garden and was searching for what they are.

Aha
by: Anonymous

I'm in Arkansas and had one of these land on my arm. Weird looking things. I had a all black and white one land on me later the same day.

me too
by: Anonymous

i saw one with its full wings yesterday... i saw, what i think, the same one 2 or 3 times before in late august.

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Orange Ladybug look alike (Squash beetle)

by Sean
(Lake Grove, NY, USA)

Ladybug imposter

Ladybug imposter

Hi
This bug has caused damage to my zucchini year after year, thinking it was a ladybug I was to late in treating it--This year I've spotted a few already, Can I get rid of this bug without a heavy pesticide, Thuricide is only good for moth type worms ?

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Squash beetle
by: Moni

Well, you are correct that it does look like a ladybug. The squash beetle (Epilachna borealis) is one of two beetles in the lady beetle family that feed on plants. The squash beetle feeds on cucumbers, squash, and melons. The other is the Mexican bean beetle that feeds on soybeans as well as green beans.
For control, clear crop vines and residues after harvest and till the soil. Next, you can use floating row cover to keep the beetles off...the catch is to let pollinators in. And you can always hand pick and drop into a container of alcohol or soapy water. Rotenone can be used and is considered 'organic' ... better to use early in season.
Commercial growers in the NE United States use a parasitic wasp, but it does not overwinter and is expensive to use.
Good Luck!

I have these
by: Anonymous

I have this thing .Noticed it for about 3 years.Twice the thing got on me and was sucking blood from me .Lat year.I killed it .I had forgotten about the inicdent until I felt this stinging on my arm and pulled another one of these off this year.It was very quickly sucking blood from my arm ,again.This was a couple weeks ago .I kill everyone I can find .You know ,got kind of paranoid behind this incident .

Squash beetles eat plant leaves!
by: Moni

Sorry, Anonymous, but squash beetles eat plant leaves not peoples blood.
Some beetles in this family, like the Asian lady beetles are known to pinch with their small manibles,what they use to suck juices from aphids, but these mandibles are not strong enough nor designed to suck blood from humans. The pinch is usually not even hard enough to leave a mark let alone draw blood.

Not sure what you saw or thought you saw but it was not this little beetle.

These bugs sting
by: Anonymous

I felt something sting my neck and when I put my hand there I pulled one of these off. It is still mildly stinging. What is the deal? Can these bugs hurt you??

OR IS THERE ONE THAT LOOKS LIKE IT
by: Can this beetle sting?

IS THERE A BUG THAT LOOKS LIKE IT THAT DOES STING AND POSSIBLY LEAVE A SMALL MARK?

Imposter ladybirds
by: Mohan Udiavar

I found them feeding on the tender leaves of egg plants. Any solutions ?

Asian lady beetle
by: Moni

Dear 'Can this beetle sting'
You did not say where you were from or when you thought you got "stung"???

The Asian lady beetle kind of looks like this beetle (they have white heads with black markings and the bodies are usually redder in color). And the Asian lady beetle has been known to bite...not sting. The lady beetles have mouthparts called mandibles that are like minature pinchers...these are what "bite" us and bite aphids that they feed on in the summer. They are a nusiance especially on warm fall or winter days when they not only pinch us on any bare skin, but fly in and around our faces when outside.
They might leave a small red spot where they pinch but this is not something that breaks the skin surface or lasts.
Hope this helps clear up the lady beetle 'stinging' question.

Unknown beetle...Squash beetles eat squash
by: Moni

Mohan
Not sure what beetle you have eating your eggplants. Would you please send in a photo of it?
Let me know more about your beetle...size, how many, feeding on upper or lower leaves, color, any larva? Where are you located to have small eggplants growing this time of year? Are they in a greenhouse?

Squash beetles eat plants in the squash family. Egglplants are in the Solanaceous family along with tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, so they would not be a plant of choice.

As mentioned, lady beetles eat aphids not plant leaves.

imposter lady bugs
by: Anonymous

eveery one has a something to say bu not solution. what is used to kill thems imposters?

imposter lady bugs
by: Moni

Anonymous
You asked about control for the squash bugs. Please look at the very bottom of this page to the first note I wrote about squash bugs and it says what to use.
You might also try Spinosad, a new organic material that controls many beetles. Please follow directions for use and do not spray areas where beneficial insects are or butterfly caterpillars.
Thanks
Moni

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Insect w/tail, spikes, orange and yellow blots over black (Lady beetle larva)

by Stephen
(Middle River, MD, USA)

It just keeps staring up at me angrily...

Location: Outside Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America (North America)
These insects have been showing up around our deck. Although I suppose it could just be the same one and it gets around a lot. No visible wings.

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Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Stephen
This is a lady beetle larva. A good bug of the garden. It feeds on aphids, caterpillars, and other bad bugs of the garden. So, enjoy having them around the deck. They are probably eating aphids on a bush near the deck. There are a few stages of the larva as they grow larger and before they turn into pupas and then into adults. The adult lady beetles are also great helpers in the garden.

don't worry
by: Anonymous

JUST RUN AWAY AFTER YOU K___ THE oh my !!

creepy bugs
by: catlover7777

They are all over the side of our swimming pool! They get big! They look just like the picture.

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Catlover777
You are fortunate to have lady beetles in your garden...even if they crawl on the swimming pool...perhaps they just needed a spot to sun! or a drink of water?
They are good bugs of the garden. Enjoy!!

Spike bug
by: Anonymous

I had just found one of these bugs crawling On my arm. I would like to know the name of this bug and where it is commonly found? Please tell me. I hate bugs, mass

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Dear Spike bug Anonymous
Please read the entry at the bottom of this comment page and you will see what this insect is.
Also note this is a beneficial insect. So, tho I realize not all people love 'bugs' like I do, this is a good bug and are great to have in our gardens.

These look awful
by: Anonymous

Just found one of these in our shop, in Bath, England. Initially we thought it might be a BITER but after reading all the comments, we have released it into next door's garden.

They're here too!!
by: Jillian

I just saw this same bug here in Rogers, Arkansas. Looks like something from Star Wars. It was extremely fascinating to watch. It has a definite pattern of yellow and orange perfectly spaced in a square on its back. It's beautiful!! Bugs are so awesome..

Kinda cool
by: Anonymous

Spotted this bug in Germantown MD creepy but pretty.

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Bright Orange Insect with black legs (Leaffooted bug nymph, Dallacoris spp)

by Eric
(Melbourne, FL, USA)

We were harvesting hot peppers yesterday (9/6/2010) and found one pepper completely covered in these bright orange bugs with black legs. They started to scatter after we disturbed the branch, so we quickly dumped them into this small cup of water. What should we do next time we see these? Thanks.

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Orange with legs
by: PeleeJoe

Hi,
I have those same insects as well. Mine are on the milkweed plants. They are some kind of plant sucking bug . . . no threat to humans that I am aware of.
Joe

Leaffooted bug nymph, Dallacoris spp.
by: Moni

Eric
Any bug in the nymphal stage is hard to Id, however my best guess is these little bugs are the young stage or nymphs of the leaffooted bug called Dallacoris pictus. They are known to feed on plants in the Nightshade (pepper, tomato, potato, eggplant) family. They are found on these plants across the southern states.
The orange pattern can be highly variable on this insect.

Milkweed Assassin look alike?
by: Rachel

I found this looking to identify a bug that I believe is the same. I thought it was a milkweed Assassin but they are on my pepper plant. My question is: are the benefiting the plant or harming it?

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orange/red tiny bug (Velvet Mite)

by Bethaney Rylee
(Jasper, AR)

I came across this bug on Round Top, a popular hiking trail in Jasper, Arkansas. The trail has been closed due to mountain sliding.

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Velvet mite
by: Moni

Bethaney
Your photo is of one of the thousands of species of velvet mites. They are a relative of insects. It is more closely related to spiders - note 8 legs. These are beneficial critters.
Larvae are parasitic on insects. Adults eat insect eggs and small insects.These mites are found in the soil and litter in and on the soil surface. I see them mostly in my garden in the spring or fall while tilling or planting seeds.
Great critters to have around.

Great photo....wonderful close up pic!!

Thanks!
by: Bethaney

thank you, very much for the information!

by Ogden Nash
by: Anonymous

The great big bugs have little bugs
upon their backs to bite'm.

The little bugs have lesser bugs
and on ad infinitum.



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orage and black striped (Citrus root weevil)

orange body
4-6 black stripes
small all black head

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Citrus root weevil
by: Moni

This photo of what looks like a beautiful beetle is a very damaging pest known as the Citrus root weevil. The adults feed on foliage while the larva feeds on roots. This is a pest not only of citrus but many ornamental trees, fruit trees, and agricultural root crops in Florida. Infected plants were brought into FL in the '60s from Puerto Rico.
A single female may lay as many as 5,000 eggs during her life of three to four months.
Larva just hatched burrow into the soil, and begin to feed on fibrous roots, then feed on larger roots as they mature. After feeding, they pupate in the soil, emerging later as adults.
The length of time spent in the larval and pupal stages varies from several months to more than a year. Thus, the life cycles result in overlapping generations.
Might want to step on this one after taking its picture!

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Orange Beetle (Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs)

by Thom
(Youngsville, NC, USA)

Beetles?

Beetles?

Found in North Carolina's Piedmont region on a garden hose post. Hose post located near hydrangeas and lariope. Large orangish-red abdomen, shiny blue thorax and head. Front four legs perpendicular to body, rear 2 legs backwards in cockroach fashion. Two antennae, upright. Moving about in swarm fashion in a group of about 20. VERY active. The post in this photo is 3.5 cm square (~1.375 in).

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Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs
by: Moni

Thom
You have Fl predatory stink bugs or also called Halloween bugs. Thanks for the great description and all the info!
They are "good" bugs as they feed on other insect pests like caterpillars, leaf beetles and planthoppers. Both nymphs and adults feed on insects.
They are just found throughout all SE US.
They are known for their metallic blue/green thorax with red abdomens. The adults look similar.
The nymphs are known to congregate together...sometimes this is to attack large insect prey together. Otherwise they sometimes are found together at night.



THANKS
by: Anonymous

Thanks! They were wonderful to watch as they zipped about. Very colorful.
Thom

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Strange orange bug (Assassin bug)

by Rebecca
(jacksonville NC USA)

Orange bug with black end and black and white striped legs and antenae found in North Carolina

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WOW... very cool looking bug
by: Steve L

I have no idea what this is, but it's a very cool looking lil guy!

Milkweed Assassin Bug
by: christy o

This is a common bug found all over the USA. It is called a Milkweed Assassin Bug.. You can find more pictures of it and the scientific name on Google Images.

Assassin bug, Pselliopus barberi
by: Moni

Rebecca
Well, I agree that it is an assassin bug, but disagree with christy o on the species. The striped antenna and legs with the bright orange color make this P. barberi. Sorry, it does not have a common name.
The assassin bugs are predators and feed on pest insects in the garden. So this is a good bug.

Here are some other images of P barberi
http://bugguide.net/node/view/47500/bgimage
Here are the milkweed assassin pics:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/4832/bgimage

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orange kind of bee (Clearwing moth)

by Carol
(Baltimore MD)

Looks like a bumble bee, but longer and skinnier with a fan shaped black tail and long black antenni. I found it browsing on a butterfly bush and then it moved over to a rose campion plant.

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Hummingbird moth
by: Donalda

There is a group of daytime flying moths referred to as Hummingbird moths. These moths are members of the Sphinx or Hawkmoth family.Your mystery bee is one of these.From your picture ithis one appears to be a Clearwing Hummingbird Moth. Flight action is similar to that of a Hummingbird in that they have the ability to hover and while feeding extend their proboscis for the purpose of gathering nectar. They tend not to be nervous about having people present,and are good subjects for photography

Thank you
by: Carol

Thanks Donalda! I never would have guessed it was a moth as it is so "beelike". I'll be on the lookout for a return visit.

Clearwing moth
by: Moni

Well as the others have noted this is a clearwing moth, not a bee.
From the photo it is not clear wether it is a Hummingbird clearwing or a Snowberry clearwing, but it is a clearwing moth.
They do look like hummingbirds in many ways. Many of the Sphinx moths only fly at night but the clearwings can be see during daylight especially at dusk.
Thanks Donalda for such a thorough description.

finally!
by: painted heather

I've been searching for an answer to this riddle~I love watching these moths at our home ....and now I know what they are! Thank you!
(As I'm typing this a gorgeous hummingbird was hovering right in front of me ! Must be my lucky day!)

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winged orange big eyes (Cicada)

by Laurie
(Cornwall Ontario Canada)

This bug was found on a tree trunk of a maple tree. It has green tipped wings and crawled at a steady rate.

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orange big eyes
by: Audrey in Baltimore

This looks like a cicada that has not dried out completely since emerging.

Cicada
by: Moni

Laurie
Audrey is correct. This is a cicada that has just come out of the pupa case and has not dried and developed its full color and firmness yet.

Thanks Audrey!

Keep watching
by: Anonymous

This is a cherry nose cicada. The colours chnage dramatically when it has dried to black, ornage and red.

cicada
by: Moni

Keep watching
The cherry nose cicada does not occur in North America...so that is not which one it is.
Until the cicada has dried it would not be identifiable by the photo.

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Orange and long legs ( Milkweed assassin bug)

by Daria Ratliff
(Katy, TX)

This insect has been on our lime tree for 3 months and we sprayed some insect killer bought in a local store for general insects. We had some results for a little while but they're slowly coming back. You can see the insect in the picture very well. Also, the leaves have black spots that look horrible. I hope this insect is a good one and we don't need to exterminate it. Thanks a lot!

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Milkweed assassin bug
by: Moni

Daria,
Your critter looks like the nymph or young stage of the Milkweed assassin bug. The angle does not show the mouthparts, but it should have a "beak" on the underside of the head. This beak is for sucking the fluids out of prey. The little black specks on the legs must be litter of some sort...tho it if they are part of the insect we would need a clearer and closer photo.

The assassin bugs are predators, so they feed on other insects and worms. This is called the milkweed assassin bug as it looks like milkweed bugs. If it has been on your lime tree for several months, then perhaps you have another pest on your plant that is causing the black spots...and the assassin bug is eating the pest. What other critters have you seen on your plant?
It could very easily be that the black spots are caused by a disease. The assassin bugs are just keeping insect pests off of your lime. If you have a closeup photo of the leaves that might help.

In either case it would be best not to spray the lime with any insecticide as you will kill your helpers. Should you find another critter on the lime get a photo and perhaps we could help if control of something is needed.
Enjoy those limes...we northerners are jealous!

vegetarian assassins
by: Micah in Katy

I live in Katy and I am having the same issue with my lime trees. These little red buggers are everywhere. I have a garden next to my lime tree and they infested the garden in late summer to the point where we had to get rid of all the cucumber plants. I left the so called assassins be thinking they were benoficial but I think that they have decided to become vegetarian. Is this possible? Any information would be great. Thanks.

Assassin becoming vegetarian
by: Moni

Micah
It could be that the insect on your cucumber was a relative of the assassin...being a squash bug. There are many true bugs that feed on plants and many of their young are reddish in color.
You said you are from Katy...would let me know where that is so I can research better what true bugs are in your area that might feed on cucumbers??
Thanks, Moni

Orange to Brown Assassins
by: Bruce

I'm in Central Florida west of Orlando. I've found insects similar to this on my new Blueberry plants in just the last few days. The small ones are very orange and they become a brown color as they're growing. They do have the proboscus so must be Assiassins.

Assassin pic
by: Moni

Bruce
If you want to send a photo of the orange and brown stages we can take a look and see if they are the same?

mockingbird food
by: Melissa

these bugs are all over our tree cactus. mockingbird frequently snack on them.

Same
by: Eric

I too have seen this bug, not often, only twice, once it was fairly big compared to the one in this picture, i couldn't get a good picture, and the second time just now, until this time i wasn't able to identify it because i just now caught it sleeping. the first time it was darting through cut up branches i was dragging into the woods from my yard, thanks for identifying this for me, i was friggin curious and no one knew

good or bad ?
by: Houston

Looks like what I have on my hibiscus & boxwood. Hibiscus blooms drop before opening. Is this guy good or bad ? I've been mashing them when I can. They drop into the bush when alarmed.

Assassin bugs
by: Moni

Houston
Assassin bugs are Good bugs. Perhaps what is on your hibiscus is something else.
Please send photo.

orange and long legs
by: Esmo

I also came across this insect on my window screen. I have a picture but need to know where to send it.

Thanks

Orange insect
by: Moni

Esmo
To add a photo, go to the Insect identification page and follow the instructions for adding the photo and any information you have about it.
Thanks

Assassin Milkweed Bugs
by: Anonymous

Do Milkweed Assassin bugs have stingers?

HELP PLZ
by: HELPPLZPLZPLZPLZ

i found these bugs on my plant i cant take good pic please help dont khow what to do thanks
.



HELPPLZPLZPLZPLZ
by: Doug

Please read the comments for info on dealing with this insect.

Assassin bug
by: Moni

To Anonymous - no assassin bugs do not have stingers. They do have piercing mouthparts so if you mishandle them they can bite.

To Help - The assassin bugs are predators, so they feed on other insects and worms. Not sure what you want help with? Assassin bugs are good bugs to have in your garden.
If you need help taking a photo...we can't help with that. :)

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orange pods (Lady Beetle Pupa)

by Laurel
(San Diego CA)

There are these orange podlike things that have attached themselves to the outside of my garden containers (half wine barrels). I hope they are some sort of pre-ladybug beings. Here is a picture.

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beetle pupa
by: Moni

Laurel
I would also guess that they are lady beetle pupa...certainly a beetle pupa. Did you see a lot of lady beetle larva in your containers?

Re: orange pods
by: Kathy

That's exactly what they are! Soon you'll see them moving back and forth, and eventually you'll have a bigger "alligator-like" ladybug pupa or a ladybug. Congratulations! I had less this year than before, but they're fun to watch and definitely good to have!

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Orange body, 6 black legs and 2 long antennam(Milkweed assassin bug)

This insect has a body type of an ant but doesnt fit any other catagories. Legs and antenna are long in relation to the body. There also , after enlarging the picture, appears to have undeveloped wing and very small white dots on the tail. Pretty active and relatively fast. They are prodominantly on my Passion vines but also may be on the other plants and flowers in the yard. The pictures I am sending will better discribe it than me. I live in Bradenton Fl. 50 mi. south of Tampa.

Clyde

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name of orange bug
by: Anonymous

assassin bug don't know Latin name

Milkweed assassin bug
by: Moni

Clyde
Your critter is the nymph or young stage of the Milkweed assassin bug.

These insects are found in southeastern US. It is found on many trees and shrubs from spring to fall.

The assassin bugs are predators, so they feed on other insects and worms. It is known to feed on armyworms, earthworms, rootworms, cucumber beetle adults and other soft bodied insects. This is called the milkweed assassin bug as it looks like milkweed bugs. They overwinter as adults.

Here are photos of adults and other stages of the nymphs - http://bugguide.net/node/view/4832/bgimage

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