black and orange fly (common sawfly)

by Judy
(Wimauma fl)

It flies and lands on my trees. flies , orange or red body, black and white stripped face, white rings around eyes. Black wings

Comments for black and orange fly (common sawfly)

Click here to add your own comments

common sawfly
by: Moni

Judy
Your insect is probably one of the common sawflies. They are actually related to wasps not flies.
Though these are in the same order as bees and wasps they do not sting.

The adults are commonly found on flowers. There is one generation per year and overwinters as a pupa or cocoon in the ground or under debris.

The larvae of these insects feed on foliage of plants and trees. The larvae look like caterpillars but will coil the back end over a leaf and when disturbed will stick there rear ends up. They usually hatch and live in clusters...many times you see several larvae on the same leaf. Some sawfly larvae are serious pests.

You did not say what kind of leaf they were on? What size are they?

Sawflies are found through out all of North America.

These are not big and it is hard to get a close up photo but that would help with ID.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Orange and black gila monster like (Lady beetle larva)

by William Gamble
(Eliabethtown, PA )

back

back

A number of these insects congregated on the brickwork in an area on my house. Black with orange stripes that ran the length of the body and a few yellow dots. The body seemed to have spikes on it and the 6legs are solid black. I live in south central PA. One had it tail against wall and was bobbing up and down another seemed to be either in a web or spinning it I was unable to tell.

Doug says Not sure you can see this well enough Moni - but I'm putting it through 'cuz I think you've already done it before ??

Comments for Orange and black gila monster like (Lady beetle larva)

Click here to add your own comments

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

William,
You have lady beetle larvae. They are great predators, so leave them in the garden to eat aphids and other pests. Yours looks like it may be large enough that it is about to pupate. The pupa case may be the webby stuff you are seeing. They kind of shrink up and turn into a harden ball much the same color but roundish. The pupa is there on the wall for a couple of weeks then the beetle will emerge. When the beetle first emerges it will be very soft and light colored until it hardens. Once the outer wings are hardened, the adult beetle is ready to feed on more aphids and such in your garden.
A nice find!

Reply
by: Bill

Thanks Moni
I am glad I let them be till I knew more. I have a few dozen around my front porch. I was surprised to say the least by the answer. After looking up the life cycle of the lady bug I realized why I had never seen them before with them only;y being in this phase for a couple weeks.

Lady Beetle Larva
by: sue

My worries are over as they are friendly bugs that have settled on my hedge rose and plum tree!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

orange and black, with the batman logo (Tomentose Burying Beetle)

by Jeremy
(st.catharines, Ontario Canada )

found this guy in my moms back yard in st.catharines, Ontario a few years back and forgot I had the picture after a few weeks of fruitless attempts at identifying him (her?) stumbled on this site tonight trying to id a tiger bee fly (thank you btw) and thought it might be a ladybug larvae but it's WAY too big and not all spiky like they are. any help?

Comments for orange and black, with the batman logo (Tomentose Burying Beetle)

Click here to add your own comments

batman bug
by: Mydlars

Carrion beetle

Tomentose Burying Beetle
by: Moni

Jeremy
As said by Mydlars, it is one of the carrion beetles, family Silphidae, but more specifically it is one of the sexton or burying beetles called the tomentose burying beetle. This beetle is distinguished by the yellow hair on the mid section (thorax) just behind the head...all other sexton beetles have black thoraxes.

The sexton beetles are known to bury small animal carcasses, while this particular one just makes a shallow pit and covers the dead animal with litter. This species of beetles are also known for unusual parental care...after laying eggs on the carcass, they stay to feed the larvae on regurgitated carrion.

These beetles are found east of the Rockies in North America.
Many times you will see tiny mites on these beetles. The ability of these beetles to fly attracts symbiotic mites to attach to the adult beetles. Then, the mites feed on fly eggs that might be on the carrion that compete with the beetle larvae for food :)

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Orange Bodied Insect with Black Legs & Long Black Antenna (Leaf-footed bug nymphs)

by Doug
(Frisco, TX )

Hi Moni! I have a small family of these orange & black insects on my Bell Pepper plant. I have the feeling that they are eating other insects & worms but just want to clarify that they are in fact good for my garden. They are living in a Bell Pepper plant in a horse trough that I have converted into a vegatable garden that also contains red onions & potatoes. Thank you very much for any help you can give it is greatly appreciated! Frisco, TX

Comments for Orange Bodied Insect with Black Legs & Long Black Antenna (Leaf-footed bug nymphs)

Click here to add your own comments

Baby box elder bugs
by: Anonymous

Baby box elder bugs!

Leaf-footed bug nymphs
by: Moni

Doug
These are leaf-footed bug nymphs...Not boxelder bugs. One species of this group of bugs, called Phthia picta is known to feed on plants in the solanaceous family (nightshade or pepper family). But unless we see the adult we will not know for sure, as the nymphs can vary and some species look similar. These are found in the southern tier of states.

Unfortunately they are not the assassin bug that would feed on other insect pests in your garden, these are actually the ones that would feed on your garden plants. They suck juices from foliage and fruits leaving a stippled spot of damage. If they feed on young fruits they can be deformed.

This is the young stage which molts several times before coming an adult. The later stages and the adult might have a "leaf" like flat spot on the hind leg giving it the name leaf-footed bug.

If they are still on your peppers you could try knocking them into a bucket of warm soapy water to get rid of them. Would guess you do not have them on multiple plants.

This insect is not known to bite.

Thanks Moni!
by: Doug

Thanks Moni I appreciate it!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.








Want A Stunning Garden? Click Here For Your Free Lessons