orange black large moth (tomato hornworm moth)

by Michelle
(Clarkston, Michigan, USA)

Unidentified Michigan Moth!

Unidentified Michigan Moth!

Attention entomologists! Larger moth-like insect found on our backyard patio. We live on a small lake in the Detroit suburbs (northern Oakland County). Would love to know what type of insect he/she is! Thanks!

Comments for orange black large moth (tomato hornworm moth)

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Hornworm moth
by: Moni

Michelle
Looks like you have a tomato hornworm moth or similar hawk moth( family Sphingidae).
It looks like it either just emerged from the pupa or when it did its wings did not fill out properly. Usually when they emerge from the pupa case they pump the fluids from their body into the wings to fill them out. Perhaps if you watched this one you saw if it was trying to fill its wings or if it was deformed for some reason.
The caterpillar of this moth is probably the one that feeds on your tomato plants.
The adults may be seen flying during the day time but usually at night resembling a hummingbird as they fly.

orange and black moth
by: pam

I found a pupae at the end of summer 2010. My sons kept it in a container all winter. It gust came out 4-20-11 IT WAS COOL. I've been trying to find out what it was. Thanks Pam

Hornworm moth
by: Moni

Pam
It is great that they got the moth to emerge!
Great Job!
Assume the hornworm moth is what you have?

Large Tomato Hornworm Moth
by: Debbie

I live in Ontario 35 km north of lake Ontario and east of Toronto near Lindsay. I just came across this very large moth and was surprised by the size. I first thought it was a bat. The wings were pumping as the article said it is taking fluid to the wings. It seems very weak at this point so perhaps it just emerged. What a remarkable species.

Moth type
by: Anonymous

Carolina Sphinx Moth ??

Tomato hornworm moth
by: Moni

Anonymous
It might be the Carolina sphinx moth, also called the tobacco hornworm moth, but it is not clear wither it has 5 (tomato hornworm moth) or 6 (tobacco hornworm moth) pairs of yellow spots on the abdomen. The photo is not clear enough at the tip of the abdomen and with the moth not having its wings fully developed - we can not be positive with the ID.
Both moths are in the same genus but different species. The hornworms (caterpillars) are actually easier to tell. The tobacco hornworm has a red tail while the tomato hornworm has a black tail.

Hornworm moth
by: Anonymous

I was digging potatoes and one coming out of the ground. I live in Oakland city in. Didn't know what it was until I seen it on here.

WEIRD BUG
by: Anonymous

I have one that is by my back light at first I thought it was a hornet. Until I saw this I thought it was poisonous. Know I know it wants to eat all of my tomatoes!

South Columbus Ohio Moth
by: BFC

We have a small backyard garden and have not used pesticides since we moved into our suburban home in a tight 1970's subdivision. We noticed something was ravenously eating our tomato, would the Caterpillar of these eat have a fully ripened tomato? We have so many cool bugs. Cicada killer wasps, Bee flies, many bees and wasps, butterflies (we plant to attract) and moths... well spiders too (don't like those so much) The Horn worm moth recently became trapped on our screened porch with a wingspan (guess 3 inchs)it was really huge My daughter captured it with a plastic ziploc lunch container (took pictures) and released it near our autumn climatus vine on the fence he quickly crawled into the darkness. She then told me as an adult they mate and die within a few days (she thinks). Earlier this year we found a Polymorphus moth with those giant eyes on the wings in our lettece (again does not eat as an adult and dies after mating) It was even bigger

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wings and pink stripes (Privet hawk moth)

by Stan Gaunt
(Stoke on Trent)

small wasp size i think, has wings and a yellowish line down its back with pink stripes across each side the full length

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Privet hawk moth
by: Moni

Stan
You say you think it is the size of a wasp, however all the photos I find of this moth say it is large?
The picture you submitted looks like the privet hawk moth.
Privet Hawk-moth
Wingspan 90-120 mm.
Noted as Britain's largest hawk-moth, which is found in the southern half of Britain, and has distinctive pink and black barring on the body.
It is found in woodland and suburban habitats, and flies in June and July, with a single generation.
The large caterpillar is green with purple and white stripes along the side, and a black 'horn' at the rear. It feeds on privet , lilac and ash.

Privet Hawk Moth
by: Anonymous

3 July 2010 Cambridgeshire.
We came home to find 2 of these month mating back to back. took some time tofind out what species they were. Thought at first they were a tiger moth, but pictures seen showed it not to be.
They ave white anteni one probably male twic as long as the other.

please answer
by: Anonymous

i live in sothern usa and found one of these in my yard,are they found in america often

Privet hawk moth
by: Moni

Anonymous
The answer is not that I know of. There are many hawk moths in the same genus - Sphinx - that look similar.
Please send in a photo so we can help you ID your moth:-)

Privet hawk moth
by: Anonymous

Found what I think is the same privet hawk moth in ocean city md. while on vacation it's about two inches in length and has the same pink markings.

In southern california
by: ChrisAnonymous

I found what looks like the one in the picture in Orange California in October. Could that be? I could send a picture. It looks like it got run over in my driveway

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Brown Moth (Nessus Sphinx moth)

by Leslie
(Lindsay, Ontario, Canada)

I Shan't Forget you among the Forget Me Nots

I Shan't Forget you among the Forget Me Nots

Is this a hummingbird moth feeding in the afternoon

Comments for Brown Moth (Nessus Sphinx moth)

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Hummingbird Moth
by: Donalda

Hello Leslie,
That is indeed a hummingbird moth at your forget-me- nots.

Nessus Sphinx moth
by: Moni

As Donalda said, you do have a photo of a clearwing moth. And from the white stripes on its abdomen it is the Nessus sphinx moth. Many of the clearwing moths do fly during the daytime, unlike most moths. They are fast flyers, so you were quick to be able to get its picture!
Great job!

Hummingbird Moth
by: Katy (Middle TN, USA)

Good to know! These big guys, along with the Butterflies and occasional Hummingbird buzz all over my Lantana garden. I never knew what they were - until now. Thanks!

I have a picture of this too.
by: Misty

I live in Riverview, Fl and captured this amazing little creature and was boggled if it was a hummingbird or a moth of some kind. Now I know. My picture is to big to download- I have a amazing picture.

Sphinx moth
by: Anonymous

I just photographed a sphinx moth on my flowers yesterday in coastal southern north carolina. Identified it from the above picture. Very friendly too, just loved finding information on the amazing little hummer. thanks

Nessus Sphinx moth
by: Moni

Anonymous
So cool to know you found one already this spring!
Thanks for sharing your interest of insects!

Keep photographing them...if you have a photo you do not find on this site, you can send it in for ID!

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Brown and yellow (Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly)

by Pat Heitmann
(Owings Mills, Maryland)

Large brown and yellow moth (like colors of monarch butterfly) -- wings are orange-brown near body with dark brown markings and mosly yellow near edges. The outer edges appear white. Near the edge is a row yellow circles outlined in brown. Next to the row of yellow circles are brown dots of varying sizes on the yellow. The underside also has lavender spots on the lower wings.

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Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly
by: Moni

Pat
I believe your fritillary butterfly is the Great spangled fritillary.
They are found in open areas, moist fields, and prairies. Usually seen from June-September.
Adults feed on nectar of many flowers while the lavae feed on violets.

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black Moth Patterned Wings (Tiger moth)

by Charles
(Shiloh IL)

Visiting my Front Door

Visiting my Front Door

I was sitting on my front porch and wow. Never seen anything like it.

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Tiger moth
by: Moni

Charles,
You have a tiger moth at your front porch. The very hairy larva feed on many plants and common weeds.
There are many species of these tiger moths and it is challenging to tell them apart as the patterns of the wings vary by gender. They are common throughout the easter 2/3rds of the US.
It is not uncommon to have them come to lights at night.
Enjoy the bright colors!

Tiger moth
by: Moni

Charles,
After a little more research, this is probably a
Harnessed Tiger Moth - Apantesis phalerata, tho without seeing the underwings, it is not certain.

Kindergarten Insect Lovers!
by: Anonymous

One of my students brought in this insect today and we were all very excited to find it on this site! Thanks for the picture that made identifying it so easy :)

TIGER MOTH
by: Moni

Kindergarten Insect Lovers!
It is wonderful that you have encouraged your students to search for the identification! Thanks for keeping your students interested in nature.

Having just been in the field hunting bugs with 3rd and 2nd graders this week, it was great to see their interest and enthusiasm for insects and all things Nature has to see.

Tiger moth dead
by: Tara Davis

I found a dead tiger moth stuck in my neighbors driveway. It's pretty big I say and before that I found a tiny one dead at my friends driveway.

Tiger moth
by: Moni

Tara
There are several species of tiger moths that look similar, but have a different pattern on the wings. Sounds like you saw a couple different species.

Spotted in Western Oklahoma
by: APRYLL

I also spotted this moth and took a photo of it. Looked for other images on the web and I found yours. Thanks for helping me to identify this beautiful creature.

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orange headed black moth-like (Yellow-collared scape moths)

by Paul Hoch
(Carlisle, PA)

I discovered these two insects on September 7 at 9:00 AM on a small redbud in my backyard in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. They appear to be mating back to back. I disturbed them briefly, and they simply moved to the back of a different leaf where I took this picture

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Yellow-collared scape moths
by: Moni

Paul
You did indeed find these yellow-collared scape moths mating. They look similar to the Virginia ctenucha moths, but have narrower and blacker wings and slightly different coloration around the head and thorax.
The adults are commonly seen in the fall feeding on flowers of many plants, especially goldenrod. They are also attracted to lights at night.
The larva of this moth feeds on grasses, lichens, spike-rushes

Love bugs
by: John Campbell

In Florida where they are very prolific we call them "love bugs" I believe they are the same. Can ruin a cars finish if not removed post haste.

Love Bugs
by: Anonymous

Here in Florida we call them Love Bugs. Once a year in the Spring we get hordes of them. Makes for a real mess on the front grill of your car. Hard to clean off to!

Yellow-collared scape moth
by: Moni

Anonymous
The lovebugs you talk about are not these insects...they are actually one of the March flies not moths. They do cause a lot of problems in FL. These flies do look a lot like the moth from a distance ( and to a non-entomologist :) ).

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(brown fuzzy slug with wings (Tersa sphinx moth)

by Camilo Rodriguez
(Buford, GA 30519)

Fuzzy Winged Slug

Fuzzy Winged Slug

It has a slug looking body, whereas the head is big and it slopes to a point towards the back end. The body is fuzzy looking and it has 6 legs. Its wings are a unique design and are different shades of brown looking like leaves. The bug is about 2.5 inches long and the wing span looks to be about 3 inches long or so.

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Tersa sphinx moth
by: Moni

Camilo
Your moth is a Tersa sphinx. Its shape and coloration is distinctive.
It resides year-round in the southern states and only comes north in warmer months.
The caterpillar can be found in either green or brown forms. Larva feed on Madder Family, Rubiaceae, including Smooth buttonplant , Pentas species, Borreria, Manettia and Catalpa.
The moths feed on nectar in long tubular flowers.

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Red moth like insect with black and clear wings (Scarlet-Bodied Wasp Moth)

by Jessica Kirkpatrick
(Covington, Louisiana, USA)

A Keeper!

A Keeper!

This bug was laying in my breezeway at my apt. It was dead when I found it but it was so pretty I picked it up and kept it to try and identify it. I have never seen one before. It has a Red body with the bottom end of the body a beautiful bright irradescent blue color. In the picture, the whole back end of the bug that looks dark was the blue color, its just hard to make all the blue show up. And the tip of the head the same shiny blue. The Legs were the same bright red as the body and the wings were Black and Clear striped. The see through part was striking against the black and the whole effect of the bug was quite like art.

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Scarlet-Bodied Wasp Moth
by: Moni

Jessica
You found a Scarlet-Bodied Wasp Moth. You are right it is very colorful like a piece of artwork. Nature at its best!
This insect is only found in the very southern states and it feeds on a roadside weed, so enjoy the artwork for us northern folks!

Bugguide reports - These moths display warning coloration, yet the caterpillars host on non-toxic Climbing Hempweed, Mikania scandens, (family Asteraceae), a weedy vine at field margins and roadsides that can completely obscure bushes and small trees. The adult male moth extracts toxins known as "pyrrolizidine alkaloids" from Dogfennel Eupatorium (Eupatorium capillifolium) and showers these toxins over the female prior to mating. This is the only insect known to transfer a chemical defense in this way.
Interesting find...thanks for sharing with us!

Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth
by: Jess

I found one of these at my house. After looking around for hours on the internet I finally found this website which identified it for me. No one I talked to had ever seen one of these before. Thank you for identifying it for me!

BEAUTIFUL, KIND OF SCARED ME THOUGH! LOL
by: Shelia

I was reaching up to turn my sons nightlight on on his ceiling fan and seen this beautiful moth wasp on the edge of the light. It startled me yet it was so gorgeous i was entranced in it. I have never seen such an insect we caught it long enough to find out a lil bout it and than released it outside. I was curious though if anyone has any more info on it such as is it poisonous or no

Scarlet-Bodied Wasp Moth
by: Moni

Sheila
This moth is harmless. It was probably drawn to the light like many moths are and perhaps came in thru an open window or hole in a screen?

These moths mimic wasps but are not poisonous nor do they sting...the colors just help keep predators away :)

same one
by: Ariel

I found the moth on my front porch when me and my sister were out side and it was alive we were wondering what kind of bug it was we live in Florida, Inverness thank you all a lot for the info.

Scarlet-bodied wasp moth
by: Moni

Ariel
So glad that you and your sister got to see this beautiful moth! Thanks for looking it up.

Florida nature
by: Anonymous

Found one of these in the house today! First thought was it must be poisonous because it's so beautiful. Really amazing little critter..

Scarlet-Bodied Wasp Moth
by: Anonymous

I saw one of these up close in the evening flying up against the plate glass windows of the food court at the New Orleans Morial Convention Center. Might inspire a Mardi Gras costume! LOL Another guy at the Morial said he saw one there too. The nearest plants were a bunch of potted holly trees or something similar looking. Scanning the internet, I found a guy in Costa Rica who has seen a few but they were all dead. Would love to catch one for the butterfly place on Canal Street!

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yellow moth orange markings (Imperial male moth)

by Angela F
( Newark, DE US)

My mom found this on our window. We live in Delaware. It has real furry body, all yellow with brown spots on the wings and brach like legs and i couldn't see any eyes.

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Imperial male moth
by: Moni

Angela
Your photo is of an Imperial moth. The more yellow color tells me it is a male, the females have more brown markings. This is one of the giant silk moths in the family Saturniidae. Being so large they do fly rather awkwardly.
The adults come to lights at night. They do not feed.
Larva come in a green or brown coloration. According to Bugguide, larvae feed on leaves of Bald Cypress, basswood, birch, cedar, elm, hickory, Honeylocust, maple, oak, pine, Sassafras, Sweetgum, sycamore, and walnut.
The larva pupate in burrows in the soil. The pupa stage is what overwinters, so the adult comes out in summer.
In Newark you probably only have one generation per year.
They are beautiful moths.


Two in Richmond,Tx.
by: Judith

Two of these were on my door frame of my apartment. I didn't bother them. The next morning there was only one I moved him to a plant on my terrace. The grounds staff would have blown him away with a leaf blower. I think a bird may have spotted his bright yellow body and ate him leaving behind half of his wings. I guess it,s nature, but they were really beautiful.

Imperial moth
by: Moni

Judith
Sounds like you saw a mating pair. If the yellow one was left then it is the male so hopefully the female was out laying eggs in the woods on a tree of choice and did not get to be a meal for the birds.
I have also seen cats eat the bodies of these big moths.
These moths are attracted to lights and then when the sun comes up they will stay in place until night again and fly away.
Thanks for taking care to keep it away from the leaf blower....Glad you got to see them!!

Huge Imperial Moth
by: Neta graves

I am 82 yrs. old and a transplanted Texan. We live innorthern va. I saw this moth last evening on the French door. It is hot, and he had moved to the floor of the porch this afternoon. I can hardly wait for my grandson to get her to show him off. I have never seen anything like it....At first thought it was a brown leaf when on the floor. It's body is so yellow, and looks like fuzzy silk. Excited about seeing something so lovely.

Portage, MI sighting
by: Anonymous

Saw one of these huge guys last week on the exterior wall of the nursing home in Portage, Michigan, right by the main entrance. Never seen one before! Lovely.

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black/white (zebra butterfly)

by Gary E Smith
(Seminole Fl)

black/white zebra butterfly

black/white zebra butterfly

I’m hoping you can help identify this butterfly for me. I am an amateur photographer but I still take my work seriously, and would like to know the proper name of this butterfly
I took this picture in July 2004 in Largo Fl. (West central, St Petersburg Tampa area about one mile from the Gulf of Mexico.) I do not know the name of the bush, It was very active and lighted for just a few seconds.
Thank you
Gary

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Zebra Butterfly it is!
by: Moni

Zebra Longwing butterfly(Heliconius charithonia)also called Zebra Heliconian. It was named the official butterfly of Florida in 1996.
Passion vines are the food source for the caterpillars and it contains toxins that make the adult butterflies poisonous to predators.
The plant is firebush (Hamelia patens)
a common shrub in Florida.
The butterflies are known to fly more slowly than most and sit to feed long enough to photograph. Nice photo you have there!
Any more questions let us know.


beautiful butterfly
by: bryan

Hi, lovely butterfly, and well taken might I add.

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Large Brown Moth (Promethea moth)

by Rushing
(SW Virginia)

Clinch Mountain Moth

Clinch Mountain Moth

2-2 1/2 inches, "fat" body, feathery antennae. Hanging on outside window at my home in Southwest Virginia, Scott county, foot of Clinch Mountain. Many thanks for your service.

Warmest Regards,
Sher

Comments for Large Brown Moth (Promethea moth)

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Promethea moth
by: Moni

You have one of the giant silkmoths that has just emerged...this is the Promethea moth or sometimes called the spicebush silk moth. This looks like the lighter colored female, so let her lay eggs on nearby spicebush or sassafras, wild cherry, tulip, or sweet gum trees and look for the bluish green larva. They are truly beauties when they have first emerged...so bright colored and large.
Enjoy!

this moth
by: Allegan County

I found this moth on my back screen door. Its been in the same spot all day long... Im in Allegan County, MI. Why is it here in Michigan? We have No mountains!!

PROMETHEA MOTH
by: Moni

Allegan County
Promethea moths are found thru out the eastern half of North America, which means MI. They are found where the food source for the caterpillar grows which is not only in mountains. As you read in the bottom most comment they feed on a wide range of tree leaves.
So glad you got to see one! They are magnificent!

promethea moth
by: Anonymous

Found one of these moths and wondered how reare they are and if we should contact someone

PROMETHEA MOTH
by: Moni

Anonymous
They are not rare, but not everyone gets to see one!
So glad you got to see one!

First for me
by: NEL

Found on my drive 15/09/12 moving quickly on block paving, wondered what this was ,and hey now i know.
North Manchester UK. Though Never seen a 6 inch moth round here befor,so catepillar about 100cm [ 4 inch] long is first for me,lived here 55yrs.

Beautiful large brown moth
by: Kim

I've had one of these on my screen door in Ontario, northeast of Toronto all day today. It's beautiful!

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Brown with black strips and stinger (Tersa sphinx caterpillar)

by Tammy
(Meraux, La USA)

I thought that was eyes but after looking at it closer it is spots. It looks like it could be some sort of caterpillar but whats so odd about it is that it has a stinger on it. Also the bottom of him looks like a green color and where a mouth should be looks like circle shape but smashed in.

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Palamedes Swallowtail caterpillar
by: Moni

Tammy
Your photo is of a Palamedes Swallowtail caterpillar. My guess is the reason it is so brown is that it is getting ready to either shed its skin to be a larger caterpillar or it is ready to pupate...I think the later is the case.
These larvae feed largely on Redbay, while the adults feed on nectar from several plants such as thistles, azaleas, and sweet pepperbush.
They are found in wet forests or swamps where redbay grows.
Great find...we do not have these up north.

swallowtail caterpillar
by: Moni

Also the stinger is really a tail. Many caterpillars have them especially the Sphingidae family.

swallowtails
by: Suzanne

I found a green caterpillar with the fake eyes in Minneapolis last year - it developed into a tiger swallowtail that was beautiful. Glad I didn't give up on the caterpillar when I thought it was dead long before it revealed its beautiful swallowtail self.
Your photos are beautiful and what an eclectic assortment. Amazing variety. Thanks!

Caterpillar sighting in GA
by: Anonymous

It's really weird! When I turned it over, it wiggled and turned back to where it has the pattern up. But in Atlanta, GA? Can somebody submit where these little critters live?

RE: caterpillar sighting in GA
by: Anonymous

P.S. Is it poisnous?

PALAMEDES SWALLOWTAIL CATERPILLAR
by: Moni

Caterpillar sighting in GA
These are found in southeastern United States and into central Mexico.
No they are not poisonous.

wierd
by: chrissy

I live in central arkansas and i found one in my carport today. we asked a neighbor what it was and he didnt know so i looked it up. i thought the spots were eyes and the thing on the tail end was a stinger. apparently its spots and a tail.. he was as fat as a tomato worm. never seen one before.

Swallowtails in GA?
by: Deb

September 19, 2011 : Found 2 in my mulch today.. I've never seen them before. Should I try to help them survive or are they ok in the mulch by my driveway?

PALAMEDES SWALLOWTAIL CATERPILLAR
by: Moni

Deb
Since Nature knows best...I would leave the caterpillars in the mulch. They do hibernate for the winter in the pupa stage, but that seems a little early yet for GA...they can be out there til December.
It may be they are just looking for a place to pupate and still have one more cycle before winter. Any way just leave them and see what they do :-)
Thanks for checking.

its not a swallowtail
by: sevlep

it is a Sphinx Moth Caterpillar with False Eye Spots

Tersa sphinx caterpillar
by: Moni

sevlep
Thanks for the correction!!...it must have been a really late nite when I ID'ed that!

Yes, with tail and false eyes it is the tersa sphinx caterpillar.
This caterpillar will turn into a moth. It is found in the eastern part of North America then into the southwest and south to Central America.

The moths fly at dusk feeding on nectar from long tubular flowers. The males are sometimes found at lights at night but usually not the females.
Larvae love to eat Pentas, but also feed on catalpa, Rubiaceae or madder family, Manettia sp., false buttonweed, and Heimia salicifolia - a loosestrife found in TX. These caterpillars can be green or brown. Once they are late stage caterpillars they head to leaf debris or loose soil to turn into cocoons for the winter.


Teresa sphinx caterpillar
by: Anonymous

Found today on south coast Hampshire England

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huge brown moth (Giant silkworm moth)

by tara walker
(ofallon, mo, usa)

wingspan of about 6 inches. huge brown moth with what looks like only one set of upper wings instead of two sets. it was on the wall outside our work window. ive never seen a moth that big before and couldnt find a picture of one looking like this one either. this was in o'fallon, mo.

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Giant silkworm moth - Polyphemus moth
by: Moni

Tara
From your description and the photo my guess is that it is a Polyphemus moth. The size says it is one of the giant silkworm moths family Saturniidae.
The angle and photo thru the window makes it hard to be positive. If you had touched it enough to move it a little you would have probably seen the hind wings have an 'eye' on each wing. They usually sit with the eyes showing so they look like a predator owl.
The Polyphemus has the same coloration and spots near the head on each wing so I am pretty sure this is your moth.
These are common moths thru out North America. They are found near deciduous forests, orchards, some wetlands. Adults are often found coming to lights at night so perhaps this one came in and as happens they sit during the day then fly away the next evening.
The large green larvae feed on leaves of broad-leaved trees and shrubs, including birch, grape, hickory, maple, oak, willow, and members of the rose family.
Adults do not feed.

silkworm moth
by: tara walker

yep i think thats it. i looked at the picture. i actually have a picture i cropped and zoomed in on and you can see the eyes on the top wings...thanks a bunch!

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Big brown moth with leaf like antenni (Polyphemus moth)

by Justin
(Texas)

Moth is big and brown with leaf like antenni. The moth is made up of different shades of brown with a couple spots on it's wings. It was just on my balcony.

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Polyphemus moth
by: Moni

Justin
It looks like you have a newly emerged(from a cocoon) male polyphemus moth. The silkmoths, Saturnid, are the largest of all moths and this is one of the most common. They overwinter in large silky light brown leaflike cocoons. So your weather has warmed up enough for them to emerge. The larva become large green caterpillars.
Since we only see the underside of this moth, I can not be positive what species it is.
It is certainly a beautiful specimen. So glad you got to see it.

Polyphemus Moth
by: Cath

We just had one on our screen for a day. Not the most beautiful creature!

Big Brown Moth
by: Kevinhe

We just spotted one last night at our back door. Still there this morning on screen. Thought it was odd that the wings were together like a butterfly rather than open like a moth. Never have seen one here before and we were amazed at it's size. What would be it's lifespan we wonder.

Polyphemus moth
by: Moni

Kevin
This moth only lives about a week. It does not feed...it lives on the nutrients gathered by the caterpillar stage.

This moth will hold its wings upright...this helps it to hide in a woodland setting looking like bark. If disturbed it will open the wings to reveal the "eyes" to act like a bird or something much larger than it is to scare away bats and other things that might eat it.

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Big brown fly (Sphinx moth)

by Stacey
(Salem, Oregon)

Creepy mystery bug

Creepy mystery bug

About an inch in length, brown, has wings, curled up tail that looks brown and black. Looks kind of fuzzy. On the wall of our house inside, hasn't moved since I saw it.

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Sphinx moth
by: Moni

Stacey
I believe this is a sphinx moth. Without a clearer photo and better view of wing color patterns I am not sure which one. However please look at this photo and see if it is close to the one you found. Please let us know!

Pretty Close
by: Anonymous

that does look pretty similar. my mom took it outside later and it seems to have a bigger wing span than those and much more than it looked like from the angle i took. it had a neat wing design like those pics. thanks for the help

found the same moth in Salem oregon!
by: Katie O'dell

Just this morning we found the same moth, its still alive and it was outside our aptcomplex. He is currently at school with my son on his last day of 1st grade. Have been trying to figure out what it was. Thanks to this post with pic now i can investigate Sphinx Moth futher. Wow two in Salem so far!!!

Northeast Pennsylvania
by: Anonymous

Just found one on our porch by the light. I've never seen one before.

Sphinx moth
by: Judy M

Looks just like the one on my front porch just outside my front door. Hasn't moved since I first saw it this morning. Southern CA - LA County.

Sphinx moth
by: Moni

Judy
Most moths fly at night. This one probably was attracted to lights in the house or on the porch last night and when it got light out would not fly away. It will probably be gone in the morning.
If not, get a good picture of it to send in so we can identify it for you. :)

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Orange-red banded moth (Squash borer moth)

by JWLW
(Atkinson, NH USA)

Found this one on a White Hollyhock, have not seen any others.

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Squash borer moth
by: Moni

Dear John
Sorry to say that this rather nice looking moth is the squash vine borer moth. Next time you see it, squash it!
Time to check your squashes, esp the zucchini for evidence of the borer/eggs. The borers will bore in at a leaf axil then head inside the stem to the root area to eventually pupate. You might want to spray some Spinosad on the stems and leaf axils in late day...try hard not to hit any blossums that might have bees in them.
Good luck!!
Great photo so every one here knows what the adult looks like!!
(Copied this from blog to share with others. Thanks)

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Yellow and Brown Butterfly (Skipper butterfly)

by Shirley
(Calgary, Alberta, Canada)

This month is feeding on a Lavender flower last summer. I have not been able to find out what it is. The wings were the most interesting thing about it as one wing on each side of the moth is at a 90 degree angle to the other.

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Skipper butterfly
by: Moni

Shirley
You have a skipper butterfly on your lavender.
Some skippers do have their wings at an angle. They also have distinct clubbed hooked type of antenna. The caterpillars feed on foliage tho they hide in the folds of the leaves or under some webbing. Caterpillers of this family of butterflies also have rather large heads compared to the rest of their bodies.
There are a few threatened species of this group of butterflies that live in prairies of the Midwest.
Enjoy watching them this summer!

Fiery skipper butterfly
by: Moni

Shirley
After some looking, I believe this is the fiery skipper.
The larvae feed on grasses while the adults feed on nectar from flowers, as seen in your photo.

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fighter jet moth (Banded sphinx moth)

by erica
(ohio)

There were many of these moths flying around the light outside of our hotel at myrtle beach nc. its very large and looks like a fighter jet to me.

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Banded sphinx moth
by: Moni

Erica
Your great photo of the beautiful moth is a banded sphinx moth. The distinct bands on the wings of the moth make it easy to ID.The moths feed on flower nectar at dark.

If you had seen the caterpillar, they are so variable it makes them harder to identify. Some of the caterpillars are plain green, while others have bands of yellow, pink, black with combinations of all!
The caterpillars feed on various primrose plants as well as willow, Oenothera sp and Ludwigia sp in southern gardens. Caterpillars once grown pupate in the soil just under the surface.
As you noted they are from southeastern US over to TX and west...occasionally found north of that. \

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Strange Moth (Mournful sphinx moth)

by Doug
(Shreveport, Louisiana)

A moth I found at work in Shreveport La. It was on a chrome fire sprinkler connection. It had a 2'' wingspan. It was very triangular and its back end looked like its head with eyes.

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Mournful sphinx moth
by: Moni

Doug
Tho the angle makes the ID a little challenging and a positive ID is not guaranteed, I believe this is a mournful sphinx moth.They are found in LA and it fits your description that goes with the photo.

The caterpillars are green with a tail (like tomato hornworms) and feed on grape family plants. Once the caterpillars are fully grown they pupate just under the soil surface. Adults fly during the day, and since they are also seen at lights they fly also at night.
They are very interesting looking especially that tail part!?!
Thanks for sharing this unusual looking moth!

Thanks for the help!!
by: Doug

Thank you,
DOUG

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Brown Butterfly (Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly)

by Grammadot
(Barto, PA)

Mystery Butterfly

Mystery Butterfly

This is a repeat entry. I have improved the picture
showing the top and underwing side for easier identification. This butterfly loves my magenta butterfly bushes, rather than five other colors.

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Brown Butterfly
by: DTown

Maybe a Monarch butterfuly

Brown Butterfly
by: DTown

Maybe a Monarch butterfuly

Not a Monarch
by: MydMo

There are lots of butterflies out there, but I can definitely say this is not a monarch butterfly. Monarch butterflies are bright orange and usually can be found around milkweed plants where they lay their eggs and the young feed on the milkweed plants.

Definitely not a monarch...
by: Korat

It looks like a member of the genus Speyeria - Greater Fritillaries, not sure of the species.

Thanks volunteers!
by: Grammadot

I noticed the similarity to the Fritillaries in my 50 year old, well worn insect book. I wonder why we haven't ever seen them before.

Monarch babies are beautiful. Besides milkweed they also eat fennel.

Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly
by: Moni

Grammadot
I believe your beautiful butterfly is the Great Spangled Fritillary. Thanks so much for showing the underwing. It helps with ID.
These butterflies feed on flower nectar of all kinds and are beautiful to see in the garden.
The larva feed on violets. So you must have some in your yard. Many folks try to get rid of the violets, but they do provide food for the larva if you want to have these butterflies live in your garden.
Thanks for sharing the great photo!

Monarchs are more orange and have a much different black wing vein pattern than fritillaries.

SPECIES ID
by: RON

THANKS FOR HELPING ME ID THIS GREAT WINGED CREATURE. TAKEN SOME BEAUTIFUL SHOTS OF THEM ON BUTTERFLY WEED / (ASCLEPIA TUBEROSA) AT BOWMANS HILL PA.

GREAT SPANGLED FRITILLARY BUTTERFLY)
by: Moni

Ron
Glad you looked it up and found this site. Hopefully we can help with more of your photos needing insect ID.

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Small brown Moth (Indian meal moth)

by Ed
(California)

I am finding these all over the house and cannot identify where they are coming from they are small probably less than half an inch brown and do not seem to go toward light so I am not sure if it is really a moth or if just a similar insect. any help identifying it would be greatly appreciated.

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Ut O
by: Grammadot

My first thought was you better check on your stored woolens, and furs. I think his/her name is Trouble. Upholstered furniture and pet hair in hidden corners can be breeding places. A looong time ago moth babies ate the feather clothing off a carnival doll stored in my closet! Wool, felt and silks are pretty safe in tightly closed plastic bags with some moth crystals added. Clothing moths do not eat and are not attracted to lights.

Indian Meal Moth?
by: Anonymous

It may well be the Indian Meal Moth. T

Check your flour, dried fruit, etc. These problem children will hide in the bottom flaps of brown paper bags, popcorn ceilings, along lips of pans, they will eat through store packaging, find their way inside normal screw top lids etc. I'm still fighting a more than 2 year old battle. I'm ahead, but I haven't won. ;-(

Hope this helps!

Indian meal moth
by: Moni

Ed, tho your photo is not clear nor color bright, I do believe this pest is the Indian meal moth. Moths are nocturnal meaning they come out at night so they would not be attracted to light.
Indian meal moth larvae are the real pest stage. They feed on food stuff in the home. The eggs probably came in on some food you brought into the house...anything from crackers, flours, birdseed, or any of the grains like rice, oats, wheat, etc.
The best control method is to use phermone traps that have a sticky coating. These can be purchased from places like Gardens Alive, tho some local pest control companies carry them. You hang the traps in the pantry or kitchen and collect the moths so they do not lay eggs on any other food products.
It will take a while to have all the current larvae go thru their stages and turn into moths to be caught in the traps. If you can find the source of the infestation, you will get rid of the pests sooner. Go thru all of your food stuffs including dog food, birdseed, etc (indian meal moths do not feed on clothing items) and look for whitish/tan worms about 1/4 to 1/2 inch long...they may be pupating and then you will see netting around the worm.
It is best to put all clean food stuffs in insect proof containers....glass jars work great....then you can watch to see if there is a pest already in the food and with a tight lid, the critter can not contaminate any thing else.
Once you find the infested food throw it out. If you have food nearby that might be infested but you are not sure about. You can save it by putting it in the freezer to kill the pest. However, if the pest is in the egg or pupa stage they will continue to live....so bring the container out of the freezer for two weeks to let the critter continue to develop then put it back into the freezer to kill that stage. You can alternate containers in the freezer if need be.
Hope that helps, let me know if you have any questions.

Finding the mealy moth
by: Lorra

The meal moth will get into anything even remotely connected to seeds or grains. Including, but not limited to; pasta, crackers, cereal, nuts – even in the shell, raisins (trust me, I know), cake mixes, popcorn, etc. Also check any dried flower arrangements. Heating items to 180 degrees in the oven will kill all eggs, larva and moths. Glass jars with a tight rubber seal, or very rigid, air tight plastic is safe for storage. They can go through plastic wrap and bags.

I truly believe that the flour sifter was invented so Grandma could sift them out of the flour she kept stored in that old wooden flour bin. However, do remember that they cause no harm if ingested and even add a bit of protein to the diet.

Moths too
by: Jeremy

I have been finding large amounts of moths around our back door. At first, I thought they were Indian meal moths.. but they're not. I work for a small local pest control company and deal with those on a regular basis. I checked outside and found thousands of them hanging around our linden tree. They are very small, brownish in color, very few dark spots on the wings. I've been trying identify this moth for over 2 weeks now, and I'm not having any luck. From your photo, it looks almost identical. If your not finding them in any of your dry, wheat or grain type stored foods, its not an indian meal moth. The indian meal moth is commonly brought home from the grocery store, so check those unopened items as well. I always check the pancake mix first, they love it.

Photo of moth
by: Moni

Jeremy,

Indian meal moths are usually an indoor or stored grain pest. So I do not think it is the same moth. Little brown moths can look similar and may be related. Can you get a closeup photo of your moth?? Then, perhaps with info on where you live, where the moth is seen, how big it is, what other plants or conditions are around, we can help you identify your moth.
Send us the photo and info.
Thanks

Moth infestation
by: CZANO

I have also been finding hundreds of moths of the identical proportions for about 6 mos. I have just recently learned that they are (the Larva) inside any type of corrigated cardboard. Once they hatch they fly around from room even through dust vents and re-populate other areas. Mostly they have been located in the cardboard, like any boxes that you might have, look at the edge with the holes. If any of the openings are covered it has larva inside the cardboard. peel the cardboard apart to see for yourself.

Indian meal moth
by: Moni

CZANO
If you have Indian meal moths in your house and the source of food is near the cardboard boxes then the larva will crawl in the holes to pupate. Please check for food source and eliminate it. You can also get Pantry Pest phermone sticky traps to collect the adult Indian meal moths to help reduce the infestation. Check with your local pest control company for the traps.
Do you have dog food or other food products near this cardboard?

Hate them!
by: Anonymous

OMG! We had these last year...and they are back again. We hired an exterminator last year and they went away, but apparently not totally. I have no clue what kind of moth. I have not been able to id it either. We never found the "source" either. So frusterating. Those stupid things will make you crazy. Hire an exterminator!

Yucky Moths
by: Anonymous

I've been having trouble with these moths for months! I assume it is the moths you are talking about but I have pictures of them in various stages of development.
They are active day and night, but possibly more so when I turn the lights off. At first they were in my closet so I filled it with cedar and they left my closet a little bit but are now everywhere, including my mouse and dog food.


I probably kill 5-10 adults and as many babies a day in my one room alone, but it doesnt seem to be making a dent. Is there something I could spray in my room to kill the babies and the adults?

indian meal moths
by: Moni

Anonymous - Yucky
As I mention in the comments below yours, the best control is using the pheromone sticky traps.

You can get them at Gardens Alive or check with your local Pest Control company to buy them. They are very effective for collecting the flying moths.
NOTE - before using the pheromone traps, get rid of all the dog and mouse food and anything else that has the worms or pupa on them. As I mentioned, you can put those in the freezer to kill the ones in those items. After doing that and a COMPLETE cleaning of the areas where those products were....and clean out (dispose of or freeze for 2 weeks )then put in glass or hard plastic containers all of your boxed cereals, chips, crackers, flours, nuts, seeds, etc. THEN, put out the pheromone traps.
Sounds like you have a big infestation that has accumulated over time...it will take time and diligence to get rid of them.

peggysue - Sydney, Australia
by: Anonymous

I too, have heaps of these little blighters!! I was wondering if they might also be attracted to the fruit in palm trees, as I have heaps of these trees in my garden, and the moths appear in the spring when there is also fruit on the trees.? I use the moth traps in the pantry and also on top of kitchen cupboards etc, where I catch lots of adults. I have not only thrown out heaps of food, but try to keep most packages in airtight containers. A couple of years ago, I also had my kitchen totally renovated, allcupboards and pantry trown out, but, back they came. Is there no keeping them away?

Indian meal moth
by: Moni

Peggysue
Indian meal moths are known for infesting all cereal food products and whole grains, with the larvae feeding on these as well as a wide variety of foods such as dried fruits, powdered milk, cornmeal, flour, raisins, prunes, nuts, chocolate, candies, health food and seeds, bird seed, dog and cat food, fish food, graham crackers, dried red peppers, pastas, etc. Therefore, maybe they might possibly be in the dried fruits on the trees, but they usually are an indoor storage pest.
They do seem to be everywhere and are a constant problem in warehouses that store not only the raw grain, but the processed products. So, you are constantly bringing them home from the grocery. Many times there are eggs in the cracks of the cartons of cereals, pet food bags, pastas, and all those types of products. Try to check for any signs of an infestation on the packaging before purchase. Perhaps buying smaller size packages so you use the products faster will also reduce the number of insects you see. The best way to control them is putting everything WITHOUT the packaging into tightly sealed glass, metal or hard plastic containers the minute you get them home.
If you find an infestation, you can put the package in the freezer (0 degrees F) for a few days to kill off all the insects. Or for heat treatment put it in a microwave oven for five minutes or in a shallow pan in the oven at 140°F for one hour or 120°F for two hours.
A thorough cleaning of the cupboards on a regular schedule, especially the cracks and crevices with a vacuum followed with soapy water will keep the population down.
You are also wise to use the sticky traps. They really do help. Make sure to replace them when they expire.
Since you have such a warm climate, these critters are going to be more of problem as there are no freezing temps to minimize the population. The life cycle depends on temperature, taking two to six months in temperate zones and three to four weeks in warm climates. Here in the north where we have freezing temps, some of the critters are killed in storage.

Hope the removal of the cupboards was for renovation not just to rid the house of Indian meal moths...that could be very expensive! :-)

Best wishes in riding the place of them!

Moths
by: Kim

I too have these in my house. Not sure witch kind they are. When I first saw them I thought they were sunflower seeds on my ceiling. Don't ask I have teenage boy's! I went to knock it down it scared the crap out of me when it flew at me.. They like the ceiling, and today I saw one in the fish tank. He was not on top of the water he was walking around on the ornaments in the tank. I asked my husband if he ever saw anything like it. Kind of creepy if you ask me!!

Little Brown Moths
by: Mike

This is the first year these moths have been in our house. There seems to be no end to them. They however, are great entertainment for our cats that try to pull them out of the air. They are mostly on the second floor in the bathroom and bedrooms. While in the bathroom they make for excellent target practice with a blast from the can of air freshener. Helps to keep the boredom down if you have to be in there for a while. After reading the other articles about the possible sources I can finally try and look for the nest-s. Thanks for this forum.

I loathe u moth
by: Anonymous

I live in an apartment they started in the pantry then they where gone and spreaded some where else I don't know what to do I'm going insane the apartment exterminator doesn't know how to get rid of them and my husband is to lazy to help me clean and bleach the place I think I'm going to have to give im an old tomatum and the moths too!!!! Last night I killed at least 40 and some of them were trying to reproduce aaaaaaah!!!!!! I hate when they fly beer me I get squimish I don't like them touching me what else will kill them is there any sort of sprays??? Oooooh I need help 😭😭😭😭

Dear Anonymous Re Cure
by: Doug

Please read the previous comments - there's a ton of great advice on how to eliminate these pests. Moni has written some good tips on several posts.

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Red spot on wings (Six-spot Burnet moth)


(United Kingdom)

Black with 2 wings with red spots on each wing

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Narrow-bordered 5-spot Burnet Moth
by: Moni

Your photo is of a Narrow-bordered 5-spot Burnet Moth. This is one of the day flying tiger moths in the UK.
It is one of the most common occurring of this genus in much of England except the south-west, and south Wales. It occupies grassland, chalk downland and sea-cliffs. The larva eats plants such as clover and vetch.
The adults fly in the daytime, visiting various flowers, during June and July.

Thanks
by: Anonymous

Thanks Moni

The photograph was taken by a friend whilst on holiday and she had been trying to identify the moth. I will pass on your comments to her.

Many thanks.

Correct ID
by: RoyW

These are actually SIX-spot Burnet moths not Narrow Five-spot Burnets (or Five-spot Burnets).
Google both species and compare images - but remember that a lot of ID's on the web are incorrect.

The spot near where the wing joins the body (which is divided by a thin green line) counts as two spots - meaning that there are six spots on each wing. Six spots on each wing = Six-spot Burnet.

Six-spot Burnet moth
by: Moni

RoyW
Thanks for your correction!
Looking at the two it is definitely the 6-spot not the 5-spot burnet.
Here are a few details I learned about the Six-spot Burnet. It occupies meadows, woodland clearings and sea-cliffs and it flies from June to August.

The larvae feed mainly on bird's-foot trefoil.

Six spot moth
by: Rob

the description of where the 5 spot is moreacurate for the 6 spot though. as my wifeour children and i were walking along the cliffs nearour home in kentwhen we noticed these for the first time. andit was cliff tops inlong grass where anold pitch and putt course used to be. :)

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brown moth, orange yellow markings (Regal or Royal Walnut moth)

by Jenny A.
(Mansfield, OH, USA)

pretty!

pretty!

Large, very colorful. Came to the lights outside after dark. Thanks for identifying!

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Regal or Royal Walnut moth
by: Anonymous

Jenny
You are quite fortunate to find a Regal or also called a Royal Walnut Moth. This is one of the large silk moths in the family Saturnidae. The caterpillars are called Hickory Horned devils.
These moths are found in the eastern United States: New York to Florida, west to Texas and Nebraska and more common in the southern areas, more rare in the northern range...so in NE OH you are in the northern range!
Larvae feed on leaves of ash, butternut, cotton, gum, hickory, lilac, pecan, persimmon, sumac, sycamore, walnut.
Adults do not feed. Adults of this family are known to come to lights at night.
I am not sure from the photo if the antenna is feathery, if it is it is a male if not a female. Hope it finds its way back to the trees to lay eggs if it is a female.
Great find!


Regal or Royal Walnut moth
by: Moni

Jenny
You are quite fortunate to find a Regal or also called a Royal Walnut Moth. This is one of the large silk moths in the family Saturnidae. The caterpillars are called Hickory Horned devils.
These moths are found in the eastern United States: New York to Florida, west to Texas and Nebraska and more common in the southern areas, more rare in the northern range...so in NE OH you are in the northern range!
Larvae feed on leaves of ash, butternut, cotton, gum, hickory, lilac, pecan, persimmon, sumac, sycamore, walnut.
Adults do not feed. Adults of this family are known to come to lights at night.
I am not sure from the photo if the antenna is feathery, if it is it is a male if not a female. Hope it finds its way back to the trees to lay eggs if it is a female.
Great find!


rip royal walnut moth
by: diva and taz

we were walking through a parking lot when taz looked down and saw this huge beautiful but kinda creepy looking dead butterfly,well we picked it up and quickly saw that it was the strangest looking bug either of us had ever seen. It was much to interesting to leave in the street, so we brought her home and had to check the computer. The saddest thing was that after closer inspection we found that it was a female and there were eggs on her undercarriage just figured we would report our find. It would have been nice to have seen her flying around

Royal Walnut moth
by: Moni

Thanks Diva and Taz for your concern,

Unfortunately with parking lots having large bright lights - the moths are drawn to these and therefore get disoriented and end up run over. It is very sad, it would be great if we could find lights that would not attract these big moths but that has not been found yet...and I do not see "us" turning off the lights!

females get dazed when laying eggs?
by: ANAN. GA Moth

I too found one that seemed kind of half dead and there were 4 eggs next to it, I brought it in and the next morning it had laid like 100 eggs, and was still kind of half dead, but the body seemed fresh and alive, I left the container on my patio earlier, just checked on her and she is getting friskier after birth

Royal walnut moth
by: Moni

ANAN. GA Moth
They do not move much or fast in the first place, but while laying eggs they are focused :-)

Best to put the container of eggs out near a food source so the larvae have a chance to survive when they do hatch. In some places it is listed as a threatened species, so we need to do all we can to encourage their survival.
Larvae feed on leaves of ash, burning bush, butternut, cotton, gum, hickory, lilac, pecan, persimmon, sumac, sycamore, and walnut.
Adults do not feed.

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White-grey moth on Echinacea (White-lined Sphinx moth)

by Sheila
(Parma, ID USA)

I found a couple of these moths flying around in our garden last year and was wondering if you could tell me more about them...??

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White-lined Sphinx moth
by: Moni

Sheila
You had a white-lined sphinx moth on your echinacea. These moths do look a little like hummingbirds as they fly from flower to flower gathering nectar. The straw like mouthparts are long tubes for sucking up nectar...it is fun to see them do so. This particular sphinx moth does fly during the day as well as at night.
Caterpillars of this moth do vary greatly in color, but like most sphinx caterpillars they have a 'horn' or tail on the rear end.
While the moths do feed on nectar the caterpillars feed on a wide variety of plants. They are not considered a pest of any crop.

and the scientific name if you want to look for more information. Hyles lineata - White-lined Sphinx.
Hope you see many this summer!

monsters grey moth in canada
by: a hutch

a few years ago i was bitten by a large grey moth. and have been having trouble ever since.i almost think it caused a seriouse situation. health wise.and it comes back every year i have tries creams that help for awhile perscription creams the one i am using doesn t help anymore .i almost think i have a blood disorderfrom this bite i just hope it isn t doing me more harm then that. it is a very common moth to us .sores erupt through my skin but only at there time of year.if anyone out there has been through this please let me know we can t add email so if you posted your information on line it would be helpful racoon

White-lined sphinx moth
by: Moni

A Hutch
Moths can not bite.
The sphinx moth shown here has a mouth that is basically a straw that sucks up nectar from tubular flowers. Some moths do not even have mouths. Those do not eat.

You need to see a doctor about your skin problem.

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Black Yellow Butterfly (Giant Swallowtail butterfly)

by Gary
(Seminole FL)

Black Yellow Butterfly

Black Yellow Butterfly

I’m hoping you can help identify this butterfly for me. I am an amateur photographer but I still take my work seriously, and would like to know the proper name of this butterfly
I took this picture in May 2008 in Tampa Fl. (West central, St Petersburg Tampa area about ten miles from the Gulf of Mexico.) I do not know the name of the bush, It was very active and lighted for just a few seconds. A fellow there said they like citrus trees and the citrus growers called them "yellow dogs"
Thank you
Gary

Comments for Black Yellow Butterfly (Giant Swallowtail butterfly)

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Giant Swallowtail butterfly
by: Moni

This is the giant swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes). And true to the name it is a large striking butterfly that is very abundant in Florida. And while the adult butterfly is welcome to flower gardens the larva or caterpillar, can be considered a pest because it feeds on the foliage of most Citrus species. The larva also feed on prickly ash and hop trees.
My sources say they are commonly "orange dogs", but like any common name that could vary by location and citrus grower. The larva are yellow-brown(early stage or brown in late stage) with a white saddle and with 2 blotches - one near front and one near rear of the caterpillar. Resembles a bird dropping. It will send out two orange "horns" if disturbed...perhaps where the name comes from?

Looks like your butterfly could be sitting on a citrus plant, but I'm not sure from the photo.

no name butterfly?
by: bryan

Another beautiful macro of a butterfly, even though I do not know the names of any of them, I just love to see the photo side. excellent!

Sigthing
by: Anonymous

I just one of these in my yard - SE Texas

Giant Swallowtail in Arizona
by: elena

I have seen several in my yard. Appear to love my large "Chrintine" lantana bush more than the orange and lemon tree I have. They are magnificent to watch!

yellow dog
by: Anonymous

we saw it here in southern cal.

saw it in oklahoma city
by: oklahoma woman

i saw this butterfly on my zenias 9/12/9 in oklahoma city. its wings never stopped moving and i'm pretty sure it did not ever sit on the flowers, just hovered while eating.

We have these in Texas too.
by: Anonymous

Thanks! I just saw one of these in my yard (Texas Gulf Coast) and was trying to look it up online to find out what it is. Good to know!

Beautiful yet weird...
by: Annabel

This butterfly has been hanging onto the paneling on my front porch since last night. It moved over a little into the corner but it's still there. It's beautiful... but it did scare the crap out of me this morning when I turned to lock the door :)

also trying to identify
by: Anonymous

We just took a picture of the same butterfly in wooded naples, fl.

Spotted in WI
by: Heatheryruth

Yep, just saw one in Northwestern WI as well! Tried to take a pic of it as it fluttered around my Lantana plants. None of my pics turned out as well as yours though cuz it NEVER stopped moving!! :)

Found one
by: Anonymous

I saw that exact same butterfly on my citrus tree yesterday and I decided to keep it and put it in a big jar and it was still alive so I decided to let it go today because it was going to die anyway but I took pics and I like it because it has the exact same colors as the Hawkeyes and it's so gorgeous.

Giant Swallowtail in Marion, IN
by: Anonymous

One of these exact butterflies spent three hours in our vegetable garden this afternoon drinking water off the wet earth and from rain drops caught inside baby romaine lettuce starts. It has been very dry here for over a week and it was thirsty, I guess. May 21, 2012 Marion, IN

Giant Swallowtail in Marion, IN today
by: Anonymous

May 21, 2012 Marion, IN - I had one in my vegie garden for 3 hours today, drinking water from the wet ground and from drips caught inside romaine lettuce starts. It then rested on damp grass cuttings with wings spread open. We have not had a good rain for more than a week and I think it was very thirsty.

Ontario, Canada
by: Anonymous

Just saw one of these in Walter's Falls, Ontario, Canada! I have never seen one of these in the 12 years I've been here! Beautiful.

Saw one in Canada
by: Christine

I live in Sarnia Ontario Canada and as I was pruning the tomatoes earlier today, I saw one of these land in my daisy patch. It hung out in there for maybe an hour. Blessed to have seen this pretty butterfly today!

Swallowtail Butterfly
by: Anonymous

I saw one this weekend in Ottawa, Canada, sitting on the window sill at Zellars, gorgeous. Thanks for identifying it for me.

hatched in November inside in Mass.
by: Joan

I seemed to have hatched one of these Nov. 28th in Massachusetts. I have an orange three that I put out in the summer and I brought it in with caterpillars. I thought I got all of them off and then some escaped and two made chrysalis stage creatures, one while I watched in awe. the other was attached to my door frame , then I found two others. One died and the other formed a chrysalis. On the 28th I found the butterfly in my hall some thirty feet from the tree where I guess it was hidden. It is now in a sort of butterfly cage with net and food ( made appropriate solution , also bought two flowering plants which I add in the blossoms also sprayed with sugar solution as well as the small sponge.libido

wow... first time ever seen by us !
by: Anonymous

I watched this beautiful creature just loving my purple Lilac bush, flitting from flower to flower, for 15 to 20 minutes.Beautiful and fascinating. It was so large..couldn't take my eyes off of it ! Had to look it up on the computer to see what it was. Thank you for solving my mystery. From just north of Hamilton Ontario, Canada, in the rural area.

Seen in PA
by: Anonymous

My husband and I just saw one at our home in Southeastern Pennsylvania. We live in a wooded area and it was the largest butterfly we've ever seen !!!

Found one in Baton Rouge LA
by: Alyssa

I am so thrilled that we found one on our sidewalk.
My dad found it and showed the family. I could not take my eyes off of it! It was not disturbed by us. It could not fly so we tried to help it.

Cutie
by: Anonymous

First time seeing one here in the northern adirondacks in a wild raisen shrub. Seemed spooked by me.

Just saw one of these today near Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
by: Vicki

I will try to attach some pix. She stayed around us fleeting and landing for 35 minutes. Big and
Beautiful
!

Seen in SE Michigan
by: Anonymous

I have this butterfly in my yard. We live in South East Michigan by Lake Erie. What do the larvae eat here? Did the butterfly I see come here from somewhere?

It has been around for about a week or so, and we thought it was Monarch, at first, since I raise Monarchs and let go when they change into the butterflies. But today, as I watched it come to the Asclepias Tuberosa blossoms it seemed much bigger than the Monarchs. I could see the inverted capital "A" on its wings in yellow on black.

Pretty swallowtail. It is one of the largest butterflies I have seen around here.

giant swallowtail butterfly
by: Jmb

Saw one for the first time in my garden in southwest Michigan. Difficult to photograph as it was flitting so quickly. Have been photographing in this area for 15 years and the first one I have spotted.

Took 2 videos of it today
by: Douglas Y

In Pasadena Texas USA just over the city line from Houston near NASA Johnson Space Center. Two of these big butterflies were attached belly to belly but not nose to nose and flying through our yard at about 4:30 PM on a hot day. Video includes them perched. Took a screen capture image. Perfect match with your photo.

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Brown Moth (Walnut sphinx moth)

by Tracy
(Natchitoches, Louisiana)

Just wondering if this is also a Mournful Sphinx

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Walnut sphinx moth
by: Moni

Tracy
This is a walnut sphinx moth not a mournful...tho they are in the same family of moths...great job!
Your moth is found all over the Eastern half of the US and Canada.
They are found in fields and wooded areas. The caterpillars feed on not only walnuts but hornbeams, butternut, hickory, cherry, beech and alder. The adults do not feed.
Down where you are they may be seen year round.
It is said that the caterpillars make a whistle like hiss when handled and jerk their body around when bothered.
Great find and photo...thanks for sharing it!

Confirmation and scientific name for Walnut Sphinx
by: Vernon Antoine Brou Jr.

This species of the family Sphingidae is one of 55 recorded for the state of Louisiana. I completed a 30-year study of this moth family in the state of Louisiana and this is a fairly common species encountered, The larvae feed upon walnut, hickories, pecan, and butternut.

This species has in recent years changed genus from Cressonia juglandis to Lathoe juglandis, to Amorpha juglandis, all these names refer the the same species.
.

Walnut sphinx moth
by: Moni

Vernon
Thank you for all those years of research on the Sphingidae of Louisiana!!!
As an entomologist and scientist I know how valuable that information is for us today and for the future generations that follow us!!

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orange butterfly (Gulf Fritillary)

by Gary
(Seminole FL)

orange butterfly

orange butterfly

I’m hoping you can help identify this butterfly for me. I am an amateur photographer but I still take my work seriously, and would like to know the proper name of this butterfly
I took this picture in July 2004 in Largo Fl. (West central, St Petersburg Tampa area about one mile from the Gulf of Mexico.) I do not know the name of the bush, It was very active and lighted for just a few seconds.
Thank you
Gary

Comments for orange butterfly (Gulf Fritillary)

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Gulf Fritillary
by: Moni

This is the Gulf Fritillary. The butterfly collects nectar from colorful flowers like verbena, pentas, drummond phlox, and lantana. The flower is so well hidden it is hard to say what it is for sure.
And the larva (caterpilllar) of this butterfly feeds on passionflower vines of various species. The mature larva is orange with black spines.
Let us know if you have questions.

nice
by: bryan

Hi, A beautiful and well taken macro photograph of this adorable butterfly!!!

Orange Butterfly
by: Sue

Absolutely beautiful shot, Bryan. I'm into digital garden photography myself.

Gulf Fritillary
by: Carolyn

I have had these flying all over my yard recently and am pleased to know what they are called. I have passion flower vines all over my back yard fence and they are feeding on them. I also saw a few caterpillars on the vines. I tried to get photos but was unable to.

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Yellow/brownish Moth (Southern Flannel Moth)

by Sheila Gonzalez
(Tyler, TX, USA)

strange new bug

strange new bug

I live in Tyler, TX (east TX) and was hanging my windchime when I noticed this little creature. It was outside on the side of our entryway right by our front door. We opened and closed the door several times and it never flew off. It also let me get rather close to take this picture without taking off. It looks a little fuzzy and moth like and is just under an inch long.

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Southern Flannel Moth
by: Moni

Sheila
Your 'still-life' strange critter is a southern flannel moth.
They are indeed interesting looking moths. Be careful not to touch the caterpillars...the hairs can sting the skin and cause problems!
The larva feed on oak, elms, citrus, roses and other plants.
Here is a photo of the caterpillar and info about it.
Puss caterpillar or Southern flannel moth larva
by: Moni

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/furry-grub.html#ixzz0LCRrZUOt&C

Puss Caterpillar
by: Lajuana

I had an encounter with this little fella yesterday. What a pain. I'm not sure how it attached itself to my clothing but at first I thought it was a leaf and tried to brush it off my shirt. My arm looked as if it had been hit by a meat cleaver. I took a benadryl and had an ice pack and when I awoke the swelling had gone. Now, I have the red grid marks left.

Southern flannel moth/Puss caterpillar
by: Moni

Lajuana
Did you have a moth or caterpillar on your shirt?
If it was the moth, then it is as dangerous as the caterpillar!

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Furry head, orange-brown (Prominent moth)

Furry Head, Leafy wings

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Found this one too!!
by: Anonymous

Hi I found this critter this morning in Northern Saskatchewan. What is it???

Prominent moth
by: Moni

This is one of the Prominent moths, Family Notodontidae. When resting, prominents either hold their wings like a roof over the body or roll them, causing the moth to look like a stick . Larvae of some species are oddly shaped and look like parts of the host plant. Others are brightly colored and striped. Some are serious forest pests. Most prominents overwinter as larvae, pupating in a cell in the soil or in a loose cocoon on the ground in the spring .

You did not say where you are located? That may or may not help figure out which prominent species it is .
Thanks for the size compared to lighter...it can be very helpful.

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White spotted moth (Giant Leopard moth)

by Henry Kahnhauser
(Setauket, NY, USA)

White moth with black outlined spots approx 4.5 cm in length. Found laying eggs on my porch. eggs green and sphereical

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Giant leopard moth
by: Moni

Henry
You have a Giant Leopard moth laying eggs on your porch. I am jealous!
This insect overwinters as a caterpillar, then emerges as this beautiful moth in the spring. The larva grows to a long 'fuzzy' black caterpillar that will curl up quickly when disturbed - at that time you see the red bands between the black hairs. These caterpillars become about 2" long. They feed on many broadleaved plants including dandelion, cherry, maple, willow, cabbage. It mostly feeds on non economic plants so it is not a pest at all.
Enjoy watching all the stages as it develops! You could send us photos of each stage...would love to see a photo of the eggs!

Moth, what beauty
by: Nadine

I love it, I wish I had it in my garden. I have never seen one some beautiful before. Wow, I always though they were so boring. Not this one.

Giant Leopard moth
by: Moni

Henry
One other entry for Insect ID was of the caterpillar. So if you look for this title and view the caterpillar of your moth.
"Spikey Black Crawler with Red Rings"

Amazing
by: Cid White

Nature is nothing short of miraculous! Beautiful!

I have one in Pennsylvania
by: p landis

It is beautiful. I didn't know what it was. I let it crawl on me for a few minuets and then put it on a plant. Its about 1 1/2 inches . It's body is a wonderful color too.
sorry ,,, I'm not techy so I can not take a picture.

Giant Leopard moth
by: Moni

P landis
Glad you found one! I have seen the caterpillar here but have not seen the adult yet in Iowa.

Us too!
by: Anonymous

We have one in our neighbors yard in Cranberry Twp, PA. How rare are they?

Giant leopard moth
by: Moni

Anonymous
They are not rare at all. It is just being at the right place at the right time! :-)

Since I have seen the caterpillar in my yard - I know the moth is there somewhere - it is just seeing it when it is around.

i found one too!
by: jewel

my grammy had one on6/19/09!does enyone know what it is called?

Giant Leopard moth
by: Moni

Jewel
Please read the comment on the bottom of the comment page to read about this moth. :-)

found one
by: Anonymous

I found a White Spotted Moth (Giant Leopard Moth) on the parking lot at the aiport this morning. It crawled onto a paper for me, and I brought it home to show everyone and to see what it is.

Leopard Moth left eggs!
by: Dru T

I work in a warehouse and spotted the moth on a tire here. I let her sit there all day and then when I left work for the day took her outside. Today I noticed that she left eggs behind on the tire. Should I clean these up? Will they hatch on the surface that is probably not a normal place for her to lay eggs?

Giant Leopard moth eggs
by: Moni

Dru T
It would be best to put the tire near some plants...a weedy patch or something like that if you can. The caterpillars of this moth eat a large variety of broad-leaved plants, including banana, cabbage, cherry, dandelion, maple, orange, sunflower, violet, and willow. They will hatch soon and move to the plants...then you can put the tire away.

If you try to brush them into the weeds you might crush the eggs.

Thank you for the concern about such a neat critter!

Help!
by: Rin

I live in North Carolina. I found a Giant Leopard Moth in a pool, fished her out, and he seems to be fine other than some wing injuries (she can't fly). I have been carrying her around since yesterday and she laid eggs on my sunglasses. I didn't really know what to do with them, so I tapped them off onto a square of moss in a box I made for her. I have no idea how or what to feed her (she won't eat sugar water or anything) or how to take care of the eggs. Please help me.

Giant Leopard moth eggs
by: Moni

Rin
The female usually lays her eggs on a wide variety of host plants- including violets, plantains, dandelion, cherries, maples, and willows whose leaves are eaten by her larvae. She probably dies soon after laying eggs so will not eat. Since you put her on your sunglasses she was exposed to lights when she needed darkness to fly to a host plant...so she laid them where she was.
It would be best to put the sunglasses out where there are plants that the larvae like to eat. Like put them in a patch of dandelions or plantains. It will not be long before they hatch and you can get your sunglasses back. In fact by the time you read this they may be hatching.

It is best to get them back to the nature where they will survive the best. However, if you are dedicated and want to rear them then you have to provide FRESH food constantly for the caterpillars to grow properly.
Here is a web site about rearing moths and mentions the Giant leopard moth...other sites listed to the right will tell more about rearing moths. - http://www.buglifecycle.com/?page_id=367

Giant Leapord
by: Anonymous

I work night shift at a rehab for kids in E. Tx &
I saw this moth last night at work. It is so beautiful!!!
1st thing I did was come home & Googled Texas moths & found this wonderful site!
I was able to find 4 other species here!
I am going to ask for permission to take pics of all the fantastic nocturnal incest life & mammals we have.
I think it will inspire some of the kids I work with to appreciate the nature around them during their recovery & to focus on a future of science & discovery.
Thank you so much for providing this website!

Giant Leopard moth
by: Moni

Anonymous
Sounds like a great plan...if you send us any photos of insects you need ID'ed we would be glad to help your project.
Insects and nature in general do not judge, so it is a great subject for kids. Perhaps they can do some clean-up or bird feeding projects at a park or nature center?? Sometimes helping "critters" is a way to connect to nature. Good luck and thanks for your efforts!

sooooo coooool
by: Anonymous

My boyfriend and I went outside and ran into this bug.it was truly an amazing sight! thought I had discovered a new species but found out otherwise. Anyway, these creatures are so cool!

Moth Won't Fly Away
by: Krisdee & Milo

We raised a wooly bear caterpillar & discovered yesterday that it has become a Giant Leopard Moth. It would not fly away so we left the lid off of the terrarium it is in overnight, but it is still there this morning. My sensitive young son is worried it will die. We read that it probably does not need to eat, but we would like for it to go reproduce. Is there anything you know of that might be wrong, or that we can do to help it?
Thank you,
Krisdee & Milo

GIANT LEOPARD MOTH
by: Moni

Krisdee & Milo
Moths do fly at night and it might take it a day or two to fill out its wings and get ready to fly away. It might also be waiting for warmer weather, a mate to come by, or other things we humans don't know? :-).
Make sure to put it outside near some plants that the larvae eat... broad-leaved plants, including banana, cabbage, cherry, dandelion, maple, orange, sunflower, violet, and willow.

You could gently have it crawl on your finger and place it on a maple or willow tree...up off the ground so something like a mouse does not eat it. A teaching tool for your sensitive son is that part of nature is life and death...and if this moth is not to fly away then that is what is suppose to happen. (God works in strange ways, we don't understand sometimes)
NOTE - If it dies you could put it in a special box to show and tell at school or keep. They last a long time if protected in a container. I have insects that were collected 40+ years ago! (I do keep mothballs with mine to keep pests from damaging them - dried insects are fragile)

Fantastic job raising it to the moth stage!!!That is a great accomplishment!! Something you and your son should be proud of!

leopard moth
by: Luke

This moth is on my door and has been for two days very pretty.

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moth/butterfly (Blinded sphinx moth)

by miles furrow
(sandy or.)

moth like caterpillar body and huge antenna

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Blinded sphinx moth
by: Moni

Miles
I believe your moth is the Blinded sphinx moth. To be sure...since you have pin in it, I assume it is dead, so look at the underwings to see if it is pink and with an "eye" spot.

Let me know if it is different??
This is a neat moth, and not of economic importance. Adults are nocturnal and attracted to lights at night. They do not feed.
Larvae eat leaves of a variety of trees and shrubs, including apple, basswood, birch, cherry, elm, hawthorn, Hop Hornbeam, Ninebark, Ocean Spray, poplar, rose, serviceberry, and willow.

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moth large like luna but brown, orange, yellow (Royal Walnut or Regal moth)

by Annie
(Duluth GA)

My daughter spotted these two in our backyard in Duluth GA, a suburb of Atlanta. They seem to be engaged in a reproductive activity..?? I have other photos which show their wings all spread out, but the colors weren't captured as well as this photo...

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LARGE MOTH-BROWN, ORANGE, YELLOW
by: Tracey

Spotted the same type of moth today here in Missouri.

1/4 size of the luna
by: Anonymous

found one of these in the Smoky Mountains of NC... very large for a moth, but i have also had Luna Moths here... and it's only about 1/4 the size of a luna. striking colors.

Royal Walnut or Regal moth
by: Moni

Annie
You are quite fortunate to find a Regal or Royal Walnut Moth. This is one of the large silk moths in the family Saturnidae. The caterpillars are called Hickory Horned devils.
These moths are found in the eastern United States: New York to Florida, west to Texas and Nebraska and more common in the southern areas, more rare in the northern range.
Larvae feed on leaves of ash, butternut, cotton, gum, hickory, lilac, pecan, persimmon, sumac, sycamore, walnut.
Adults do not feed. Adults of this family are known to come to bright lights at night.
The females are larger than males. So your pic shows the female on the right and male on left. They are opposite the iron bar so they either finished or have not started mating. For mating one is usually headed one direction while the other headed the other direction with the tail ends together.
Thanks for the great photo showing the size of male and female. Since there is only one other photo in Bugguide of a pair of these moths you might consider adding your photo to Bugguide site! It directs you on how to do that.

Found one in Mississippi as well
by: Anonymous

Found one of these last night here in southern Mississippi, didn't know what the heck it was never saw anything like it before, thanks to this website I now know.

Wow
by: Danielle

Saw one of these this morning on a car. Thought it was beautiful but it flew off before I could get a pic. Oh well...a few miles down the road I looked down and it almost scared me to death! lol It was hanging on my pants leg! I got a pic of it then, before I pulled over at a gas station and set it free. It didn't want to let go, guess it liked me! :)

Regal moth
by: Moni

Danielle
Thanks for letting it go. The reason it clung to your pants was that most moths are nocturnal and only want to fly at night. They do not see well to fly during the day.

moth large like luna but brown, orange, yellow (Royal Walnut or Regal moth)
by: Anonymous

Now in New Jersey also.

awesome
by: Anonymous

spotted one while getting gas today in upstate south carolina.wonderful and awesome creatures they are.

Regal or royal walnut
by: Lindsey

Have one clinging to outside wall today! Beautiful! Been there all day. Would love to post a pic. I live in -Atlanta, Ga.

Royal Walnut moth
by: Moni

Lindsey
You can post a photo on the insect ID page if you want. We do not have it yet on the new website.

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Large butterfly like insect (luna moth male)

by Angelo
(Buford, GA)

BUG

BUG

See attached PIC

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Luna moth male
by: Moni

Angelo
You have a Luna Moth.
These are beautiful moths! They are in the Silk moth family (Saturniidae). The large feathery antenna on this one tells us it is a male, as they use the antennas to pick up the pheromone scent of the female.
The larvae become large green caterpillars, over 2" long. The caterpillars feed on many trees including birch, black gum, hickory, persimmon, sweet gum and walnut.
Cocoons are hidden in leaf litter in the winter.

Large Butterfly-like insect
by: Connie in WV

Your large butterfly-like moth is a Luna Moth. I had one start a cocoon one fall and it wintered out on a gazebo of mine until early spring. Then we watched it unfold to be the beautiful moth that you have pictured here.

LUNA MOTH
by: Jim- OLMSTED TWP,OH

This is a Luna Moth- Absoluting stunning! We have these in Ohio as well as Georgia!

large butterfly like insect
by: Kate G

Looks like a lunar moth. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actias_luna for more info

Luna Moth
by: Anonymous

Luna Moths are stunning, sadly they only live for a few weeks. We have these in NC aswell, I've had the pleasure of capturing one on camera.

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Large Orange Moth (Regal or Royal Walnut Moth)

by Denise
(Youngstown, Ohio USA)

Wings are gray with orange stripes and off white spots.
Head and body is orange and furry.
Found at the front door of our business in a strip plaza.

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Regal or Royal Walnut Moth
by: Moni

Denise
You are quite fortunate to find a Regal or Royal Walnut Moth. This is one of the large silk moths in the family Saturnidae. The caterpillars are called Hickory Horned devils.
These moths are found in the eastern United States: New York to Florida, west to Texas and Nebraska and more common in the southern areas, more rare in the northern range...so in NE OH you are in the northern range!
Larvae feed on leaves of ash, butternut, cotton, gum, hickory, lilac, pecan, persimmon, sumac, sycamore, walnut.
Adults do not feed. Adults of this family are known to come to those bright lights of shopping centers and gas stations at night.
I don't see big feathery antenna so that may be a female...hope it finds its way back to the trees to lay eggs.
Thanks for the great photo with coin for size and the description where it was found. All information is so helpful for ID....tho this was an easy one!

Large orange moth
by: Belair, Maryland

Found a large orange moth in Belair Maryland

Royal Walnut Moth
by: Sue

I found one of these on a sidewalk in Baxter Village, Fort Mill, SC,yesterday. It took me quite awhile to find out what he was on the internet. My 5 year old grandson is thrilled with him.

Royal Walnut moth
by: Moni

Sue
It is so great you can share such a beautiful moth with your grandson. It is so important to share the world of nature with our youngsters, as they are not exposed to it as much as a couple of generations ago!
Thanks for Sharing!

Large Moth
by: Lauren

I was absolutely amazed when i saw this moth on the toolbox of my boyfriends truck which was parked under a Silver Maple tree. I had never seen a moth of those colors or that size. I live n Opelousas, Louisiana and this moth fascinated me...its beautiful!

I saw one...
by: Anonymous

I just saw one of these moths on my neighbors garage door while leaving for work one morning. I have never seen one of these in my life. I live in Fredericksburg, VA. Thanks for details!

royal walnut moth
by: Anonymous

i just found one of these fascinating moths in my backyard in new jersey

just found one
by: Anonymous

got up this morning and seen it on my screen door. i went back to sleep and got up to go out and smoke and its still there been there all day long. i have never seen a moth that big and must say it scared me

big furry moth
by: Anonymous

Me and my son found one on our screen door in decatur TN and took pictures of it last night. I have never seen one like that before thank you for comments they where very helpful.

ohio
by: Anonymous

i work in a shell gas station in strongsville ohio and see an abundant of these moths.i saw three today.i also see luna moths and emperor moths on a daily basis.but thank you i went to college for two years for insects and still never seen one like this

Kohls
by: Cwade

I found one on the wall at kohl's department atore at the Coventry mall in pottstown pa, yesterday! Very large and pretty!

Royal Walnut Moth
by: Moni

Cwade
So glad you got to see these beautiful moths.

Many large shopping centers and gas stations have lights that they leave on all night. When they do the moths are attracted to the lights, get confused by the light...and since they like to fly at night when it is dark...they tend to just stay near the light sitting, waiting for it to turn dark so they can fly away. Well, if it never gets dark by the light then they can get stuck there and are eaten by bats.

Great place to find moths but not good for the moth population.
Thanks for sharing!

Saw one
by: Anonymous

here in Raleigh , NC on the sidewalk. HUGE!

Raleigh, NC
by: Anonymous

We also found one here in Raleigh, NC. We found it in the breezeway of our apartments. It seems to be laying some eggs.

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Very Large Butterfly (Cecropia moth)

by Brian Blunt
(Kokomo, Indiana, USA)

beautiful site in morning

beautiful site in morning

wow I am colorblind but the head seemed to be a bright red the underbody was white it had stripes across itts back the wings spread nearly six inches i am guessing it was furry too

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Cecropia moth
by: Moni

Brian
These are beautiful moths! And one of the largest in the US. You have found a Cecropia moth...one of the large silk moths.
The adults are known to come to lights at night especially the large shopping center or gas station lights. The adults are out now looking for the right tree to lay eggs. You have a male moth because of the large feathery antenna.
Larvae feed on leaves of various trees and shrubs including alder, apple, ash, beech, birch, box-elder, cherry, dogwood, elm, gooseberry, maple, plum, poplar, white oak, willow.
Adults do not feed.
These are found east of the Rocky Mountains, from Nova Scotia south to Florida.

huge moth
by: Anonymous

my son just found one of these in our shed and we had to google it to find out what it was. thanx for the info

My Daughter
by: Julis

My daughter saw one this morning on the banks parking lot. And she wrote something about it on her blog.

Caring and feeding for this moth
by: Anonymous

I found this moth in the parking lot at work this morning and moved it to a flower bed. Albany,NY. I'm not sure if its tired or not. Should I have put it in a tree and take it syrup water?

Man child's catch and release
by: C. Shaw

My son found (cecropia moth) in the afternoon in southeast Idaho today 5/20. Glad to learn more about this beautiful moth.




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Butterfly looking thing (Luna Moth)

by Megan
(Freehold, NJ)

Grren looking butterfly

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Luna Moth
by: Moni

Megan
You have a Luna Moth.
These are beautiful moths! They are in the Silk moth family (Saturniidae) The larvae become large green caterpillars, over 2" long. The caterpillars feed on many trees including birch,
black gum, hickory, persimmon, sweet gum and walnut. Cocoons are hidden in leaf litter in the winter.
Many are seeing these right now....except me...I want to see one too!




Amazing
by: Megan M

I have never seen a moth like this one until just now... my boyfriends father noticed it under the light on the porch hanging out on the house.
It's the coolest thing ever. lol and my bf touched it! that kinda creeped me out a bit. I learned something new today... so cool!

Luna Moth
by: Moni

Megan M
So glad you got to see this gorgeous moth! Tho common, not everyone has ever seen one.

Luna Moth
by: Maggie

'Saw a Luna Moth for first time evening of June 2,2010 in Easton, CT. Big thing and quite pretty. 'Am upset however to know the Luna's larvae feed on hickory trees - there's a stand of old shag bark hickory trees in the area - hope they aren't on the Luna menu.


Luna Moth
by: Moni

Maggie
What little the caterpillar would eat would not damage the hickory in any way. They are not a pest of any sort. So few of caterpillars end up on any one tree that there is no significant damage...for instance...have you ever seen the caterpillar?
Thanks for inquiring

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Green winged bug (Male Luna moth)

by Cath
(sandy Hook, CT)

Here is another angle

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Luna/Lunar Moth
by: Anonymous

Beautiful moth - I always feel lucky when I see one. I've always known them as luna moths - don't know if that is the correct name. Great pic - thanks for sharing it!

Thanks
by: Cath

Yes, it is a Luna Moth - thanks for pointing me in the right direction. It stayed on our screen for most of the day.

Luna Moth
by: Anonymous

this is a Luna Moth

Beautiful Luna Moth
by: Anonymous

You are lucky indeed to have this beautiful moth pick your home. I love to see them, but don't see too many here at my home in Indiana.


Male Luna moth
by: Moni

Yes, you have a male luna moth. The male moths have large feathery antenna while female antenna are narrow and feathery. These large antenna on the males allows them to find the females by sensing the phermones given off by the female.

Beautiful moths. This insect overwinters as a pupa and then the moths emerge in April or May to lay eggs. Larva feed on a variety of plants including walnut, hickory, birch, sweet gum, sumac, alder and persimmon.

green winged bug
by: Anonymous

that is a lunar moth

Unexpected
by: Anonymous

I saw one today was really blown away by the size and the beauty of this insect. Had to look it up. I did not know a moth could grow this large

luna moth
by: Anonymous

We found one of these on my garage door wood trim a couple of weeks ago. very beautiful and interesting... feel privileged to have seen one:)

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colorful moth-like insect (Hummingbird Clearwing moth)

by yab
(Cary, NC, USA)

green head, red wings, red ridged body, fuzzy tail-kind of behind

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Hummingbird Clearwing moth
by: Moni

Yab
Your photo is of the Hummingbird clearwing moth.
Adults feed actively on flower nectar during the day while hovering (look like small hummingbirds-hence the name) at blossoms. Larvae feed on hawthorn, honeysuckle, snowberry, viburnum.
These moths are found from Alaska through central and eastern North America.
Great find!

I just saw one in my yard GEORGEOUS!
by: Belinda

I just saw the clear wing moth sipping on my potted wave petunia. I tried to get a pic but only had a cell phone so "she" is hard to see. My husband regularly sits on our porch and tells me he sees him 2-3 times everyday1 What a beautiful delicate creature! Wish I had a real camera.

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Huge furry moth (Polyphemus moth)

by Lora LaBarre
(Saint Paul Park, MN)

What kind of moth is this?

What kind of moth is this?

What kind of moth is this? What kind of moth is this? What kind of moth is this?

This moth was found clinging to our cedar wood sided garage on 5-19-2012 in Saint Paul Park, Minnesota. It was about 6 inches long, had a heart shaped back (between wing span), was brown and beige, very furry, and had an eye spot on its wings. I have never seen a moth of this size in the 25 years we've lived here.

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Polyphemus Moth
by: Lora LaBarre

After submitting this post, my daughter and I decided to do an internet search on "Moths that look like a tarantula." We found out that this moth is a Polyphemus Moth.

Polyphemus moth
by: Moni

Lora
Yes, it is a polyphemus moth. It looks like you have a newly emerged(from a cocoon) polyphemus moth. The silkmoths, Saturnid, are the largest of all moths and this is one of the most common. They overwinter in large silky light brown leaflike cocoons. So your weather has warmed up enough for them to emerge. The larvae become large green caterpillars.

It is certainly a beautiful specimen. So glad you got to see it. Unless you have bright lights on at night they do not usually show up.

Thank you Moni
by: Lora L.

Thanks for the informative post and link Moni! It was greatly appreciated! I've always been fascinated by the beauty of butterflies, but have always thought of moths as being an "undesired" insect. My view point has changed since seeing this one. :)

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