Green 6-legged Insect (Conehead katydid nymph)

by John W Beene
(El Dorado, Arkansas, USA)

This insect was found inside the kitchen windowsill in in my home in El Dorado, Arkansas, USA. It is green with a whitish underside, and has 6 legs and 2 attenas. The body is appx 5/8 to 9/16 inch long. The back legs are about twice as long as the other 4 legs. At the end of the tail there appears to be a pincer. It does not have wings. The photo was taken of it's underside as it was clinging with its feet to the glass jar I have it in. All the feet have the capability to adhere to the glass and move independently.

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Conehead katydid nymph
by: Moni

John
Your insect is probably one of the conehead katydid nymphs. Nymphs are the young stage of katydids, grasshoppers, stink bugs and other insects with that type of life cycle development.

The long flat looking face means it is probably a conehead katydid, tho there are other katydids it could be. We need side and top photos to ID any better. There are 23 species of conehead katydids. An adult would be needed to know which yours is.

The pincers you describe on the tail end indicate it is a male. The females have a long blade like appendage.

These katydids are found thru out North America east of the Rockies. They are found in grassy meadow areas. They typically feed on seed heads of grasses.
This insect does not bite or sting.

Is it possible your katydid came in on plants you brought in for the winter? Or it is possible that eggs laid on plants you had outside this summer, but brought in for the winter...have hatched! Not sure what the temperatures are where you live, but if you still have green plants outside you can put the katydid outside. If it is cold like it is here (below 40 degrees) then you could try to keep the katydid alive by feeding it sprouted wheat, maybe lettuce or other various green plant materials (see what it will eat).




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Bright Green Caterpillar in my top soil (Cutworm)

This bright green caterpillar, between 1-2 inches in length, is nesting or hanging out in my top soil on my flower farm. I was weeding a bed and started to uncover multiple caterpillars. As I said, they are bright green and have ridges of dots down their back. I farm in Petaluma, CA and have not seen these in previous seasons. I have been farming on this property for 4 seasons. Thank yoU!!!!

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Cutworm
by: Moni

Petaluma, CA
It is hard to tell for sure what your green caterpillars are as the photos do not show the ridges of dots clearly enough. The 2 yellow ones show it the best. These caterpillars are some kind of cutworm...probably the large yellow underwing - Noctua pronuba.

Cutworms live just under the surface of the soil feeding on roots and shoots of young plants. They feed on a wide variety of crops, vegetables, and grasses. So, that would fit your flower garden scenario. Cutworms come in all colors with lines, dots, and spots of various colors. Your description fits the large yellow underwing cutworm caterpillar, tho in many states they only see the brown version.
The adult moth varies in general color from tan to dark brown with all colors in between! Then there are specific markings if it is the lg yellow underwing. If it is the large yellow underwing, they would have a distinct yellow under wing with a black band at the outer edge.

These are pests of the garden. If it is the large yellow cutworm, they were introduce from Europe in 1979 and are now found all over North America!

In a large general flower bed they should not be much of a problem. Your best control would be to smash the ones you see.

For someone with a vegetable garden who has seen these worms or has had them in the past, they would want to put collars around any seedlings that are planted out. The collar can simply be the cardboard part of the toilet paper or paper towel roll, cut to about 3" long. After transplanting vegetable seedlings, put the 3" roll one inch into the soil around the plant leaving about 2" above ground. This prevents the cutworm from coming along right at soil level and cutting off the plant [that is where it got the name :)].

You can not spray for these cutworms as they live below the soil and nothing would hit the worm!

These worms do not bite or cause a rash when handling them.



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greenish-black or brownish-black insect,(June beetles

by Anonymous

I found two dead bugs in my garage today (5/27). The curved back is greenish-black or brownish-black. The underside is brown. The six legs are a glossy russet brown and the front part of the underside (=the portion nearest the head) is lighter, almost beige in color.

The garage is dusty and sooty. There are some old things (furniture, cardboard boxes, clothing) stored there, as well as the car and the trash bin. Just outside the garage is the driveway/garden/patio area.

Our homeowners' association handles the landscaping. One week ago, there was a guy outside spraying the driveway/patio area for ants. (We have never had ants in the house. I have noticed anthills on the driveway, but didn't think it was a concern.) I mention this in case the antspray might have driven these bugs into the garage.

Also, we've had a lot of rain recently.

I've had the house for 20 years. I've never seen these bugs before. I only found the two. The only other bugs I've ever seen in the garage have been box elder bugs.

Thanks! I don't want them in the house. :)

St. Paul, Minnesota

Comments for greenish-black or brownish-black insect,(June beetles

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June beetles
by: Moni

St Paul
Your beetles are what is commonly called May or June bugs. They are closely related and can not be identified further without having the insect in hand.

The beetles do no harm. They are attracted to lights so if you have outdoor lights on the garage or porch, that would attract them to your yard. They would not come in the house unless you have an open window or door with lights nearby. They could have been killed by whatever was sprayed for ant control. Sorry anyone feels the need to kill ants in the yard. They do no harm and most are beneficial.

The larvae of this beetle is called a grub. White grubs do feed on grass roots. But the grubs of this insect are never in high enough populations to do any harm...unlike the white grubs of Japanese beetles.

These beetles are found throughout North America.

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Small, Green, Long Hind Legs (Katydid nymph)

by Liz
(Fort Wayne, IN)

Found crawling around in the kitchen - about 1 inch long. The caudal-most pair of legs are seemingly disproportionately long - looks like they allow this insect to jump quite a ways. Did not see any wings. Perhaps a Katydid Nymph?

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Katydid nymph
by: Moni

Liz
Yes, you are right it is a very tiny katydid nymph. Not sure how it got in to your house. Perhaps on some flowers you cut from your garden and brought in?

It is too small to even guess what kind of katydid. There are 243 species in our area.

Most species eat vegetation, but are not pests.

I had one hatch in January from eggs laid on a houseplant I had put out for the summer. It ate lettuce and flowers from my hibiscus and grew to an adult! Unfortunately it was way too cold to put it outside. It is in my collection to share the story with school kids when taking insects into the classrooms.

Identified: Katydid Nymph in Fort Wayne, IN
by: Liz

Hi Moni,
Thanks for the identification! I don't often see adult katydids around here - maybe once in a while, but if I am reading and understand correctly, I believe I hear them singing at night. I have seen what I think are angular katydids occasionally during the summer. One time there was one that gave me a surprise as it was inside my car (I had left the window cracked open) perched on my sun visor. As you know, they aren't exactly tiny like the nymphs are, and it scared the crap out of me to see this big insect sitting there. Thanks very much for taking the time to get back to me!
Liz

Identified: Katydid Nymph in Fort Wayne, IN
by: Liz

Also to Moni-
You mentioned that you didn't know how the insect got into my house. I know exactly how - my kitchen, which is where we found it, has a sliding glass door leading to the backyard, and when the weather is warm, I leave the door open so that the dogs can come and go as needed. Unfortunately, bugs do the same. I tried putting up a mesh to limit that, but it tore away from its mounting within less than seven days, so I gave up on that.
Liz

katydid nymph
by: Moni

Liz
Good to know how it got in! :)

That nymph could be an angle-wing katydid. The shape is right as is the body to leg ratio, but it is too young to know for sure.

They are great to hear singing in warm summer nights! :)

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fat green grasshopper like insect (Angle-wing katydid nymph)

by Alexandra Dodonova
(Orlando, FL)

I found it in the central florida woods, south east of orlando

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Angle-wing katydid nymph
by: Moni

Alexandra
Your insect is one of the angle-wing katydid nymphs. In the nymphal stage, from a photo, it is hard to know which one, but would guess the lesser angle-winged katydid...Microcentrum retinerve. The adults will have wings that extend to the rear of the insect (cover the abdomen). The short wings in your photo show it is a young or nymph...it will go thru a few more molts before being an adult.

The angle-wing katydids are found thru out North America. The lesser angled-wing katydid is mostly found in southeastern US.

These insects are found in deciduous forests, singing from the tops of the trees. The various katydids can be recognized by the 'song' they sing. They do come to lights at night.

Katydids overwinter as eggs hatching each spring. In FL there are many generations. Almost all stages can be seen thru out the summer.

Katydids eats leaves of trees. The broad-winged (or greater angle-wing) katydid can cause damage to young citrus trees. There is a parasitic wasp that feeds on katydid eggs that help keep it controlled. Most other katydids are not of economic importance...their songs just remind us of summer :)

This insect does not bite or sting.


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Quarter sized green bug. (Green stink bug)

by Christine
(Chicago area)

What am I and am I harmful to plants?

What am I and am I harmful to plants?

I found this quarter sized bug crawling on my plant. It didn't seem to be harmful but I have some leaves that are dying. Just wondering if this little guy could be the reason. He flew away before I could catch him but I did get a good picture first!

Comments for Quarter sized green bug. (Green stink bug)

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Green stink bug
by: Moni

Christine
Your insect is the green stink bug.
These bugs are common and found thru out North America in woodlands, meadows, woodland edges, gardens and cultivated fields.

Both adults and nymphs feed by sucking juices from leaves, fruits and flowers of a wide variety of plants. They can be a pest of cotton, fruit trees, soybeans, and many vegetables.

The adult lays 'keg-shaped' eggs that hatch into nymphs (there are 5 stages of nymphs) before they turn into the adult stage. The nymphs are not all green but are mostly black around the head and thorax with striped abdomens.

The green stink bugs are not known to bite, but with piercing-sucking mouthparts they might if squeezed or mishandled.

Thanks
by: Christine

Thank you so much! I won't let it stay around if I find it in my flowers again. :)

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This green bug is the size of a mosquito. (Assassin bug nymph)

by Bernadette
(Ohio)

Lime green and size of a mosquito. I live in Ohio and have had 3 in my house in 24 hours???

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Assassin bug nymph
by: Moni

Bernadette
Your insect is one of the assassin bugs. Since it is in the young or nymph stage, it would be hard to know for sure which one. However, it does look like it is probably in the genus Zelus.

This insect is found over most of North America.

These are good bugs for the garden. They prey on a wide range of insects including leafhoppers, bollworms, corn earworm, and other caterpillars that are pests of vegetable gardens, cotton, soybeans, alfalfa and fruit tree crops.
They have a unique way of capturing prey - they secreet sticky substances from unique glands on front legs, which are smeared onto hairs that resemble leaves with dewdrops. Pest insects are attracted to the 'dew' and caught!

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Green Bug With Leaf-Like Wings (Greater angle-wing katydid)

by Kristina
(Fort Collins, CO, USA)

green leaf-winged insect

green leaf-winged insect

My boys found this insect crawling on the patio in Fort Collins, Colorado in August. It has a short, fat green body with a couple of points at the rear, and its wings look like green leaves. Its wings were curled in an odd way as if it might have recently emerged from a cocoon. Thanks for helping to figure it out.

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Greater angle-wing katydid
by: Moni

Kristina
Your insect is a katydid. Like you and the boys figured out, the wings are either deformed or not fully filled out.

It is one of the angle-wing katydids, but with deformed wings it is hard to know for sure. Many Greater angle-wing katydids are found in CO so that is probably what you all found.

Katydids are found thru out North America. They are found in deciduous trees and shrubs in gardens and yards. They typically feed on a variety of plant foliage. The eggs are laid overlapping like shingles...on the edge of a leaf or stem.

Glad the boys want to know what cool critter they found!

This insect does not bite or sting.

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