Little Green bug (Buffalo treehopper nymph)

by Michelle Horne-Pozniak
(Claremont, Ontario Canada)

LIttle green bug

LIttle green bug

We live in Claremont, Ontario and when we were sitting out in our back garden, I noticed this little green bug which I think looks like a chameleon crawling across the arm of my chair. Naturally I took a million pictures, but it's so small that I was only able to get a few. I thought it was an aphid but from the pictures online it doesn't seem to be one. Anyone know what it is?

Comments for Little Green bug (Buffalo treehopper nymph)

Click here to add your own comments

Crowned Slug?
by: Bev C

The closest pic I could find is a crowned slug caterpillar. I don't think this is it though but I wanted to comment as that seems to be the only way of getting email updates of the correct ID.

Little Green Bug
by: Connie

Maybe an early instar of some sort of Leafhopper?

Buffalo treehopper nymph
by: Moni

Michelle
Your critter is a treehopper nymph.
Connie was close guessing a leafhopper.

In the nymph or young stage it is hard to tell which species it is, but I believe it is in the buffalo treehopper genus Ceresa.

These insects have large humps on their backs as adults. Most feed on host-specific trees or shrubs...meaning that each species feeds on specific trees or shrubs. Do you know what plant it was feeding on?

Most are not considered pests...if so it would be due to the damage of egg-laying.
This insect overwinters as eggs, which hatch the following spring. Some species co-exist with ants.

You did get a good photo of this little guy!
Thanks for sharing!

Back yard Chickens
by: mag

Found hundreds behind nesting boxes of chickens also thousands in coal shed . What will discourage them entering building.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Green flying insect (Cicada )

by Mike
(Fairfax, CA)

Found this flyer stuck on a window screen in Fairfax, Ca.


Thanks for all you do Moni. I scrolled through all the brown insect photos and didn't see this flyer. In the natural light it looks slightly redish brown. It looks more green in the photo.

Comments for Green flying insect (Cicada )

Click here to add your own comments

Cicada
by: Moni

Mike
Your insect is an annual cicada. These insects are known for their songs that tell us it is mid summer...and therefore they are also called "Dog-Day Cicadas".

The adults feed on various plants while the nymphs or young feed in the soil on sap from perennial roots.
There are several species ranging in colors starting with green, then pattern come in black, brown, and grays.

Dry fly
by: Anonymous

When I was young we often found a fly similar to this one our mm called it a dry fly it lays in sun and drys out and when it is finished it leave a dry outer Skelton of it self. Is this the same insect

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Small Green/Black/Golden Beetle (Goldenrod leaf beetle)

I live in Northeast Wyoming in a very old house. It seems like in the late spring and late summer, my house gets infested with these beetles. They are fairly innocuous, it seems they just crawl around on my walls, windows, and ceilings. They eventually they just fall dead to the floor after a short time. But it's very annoying having them crawling all over the walls every time I come home. It seems they come out of my ceiling and through the cracks around my window frames.

Comments for Small Green/Black/Golden Beetle (Goldenrod leaf beetle)

Click here to add your own comments

Goldenrod leaf beetle
by: Moni

NE Wyoming
Your beetle is one of the leaf beetles in the genus Trirhabda. It is probably the goldenrod leaf beetle.

They are found from southern Canada south into TX. The adults and larvae feed on goldenrod as the name suggests.

They overwinter as eggs which emerge in the spring when the larvae will start feeding on goldenrod leaves. There is one generation per year.

If they are coming into your old house,perhaps there are holes in vents, windows or doors where they are getting in. They do not want to be there as much as you do not want them there :)

These do not bite or sting.

Thank you!
by: Adrian in wyoming

Thanks so much for the quick response!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Big Green 6 leg Beetle and smaller black with yellow stripes (green stink bug)

by Lori Anderson
(PEI, Canada)

The Green 6 leg Beetle with Antennas, hangs around my deck where there are 2 big American Linden/Basswood trees. Also there are smaller beetles the same shape but are black with yellow stripes. They all hang around the same area. Never seen them fly just crawling.

Comments for Big Green 6 leg Beetle and smaller black with yellow stripes (green stink bug)

Click here to add your own comments

Found My Bugs
by: Lori

Found them on the computer after allot of searching. They are called Green Stink Bugs / Nymph.

green stink bug
by: Moni

Lori
Great job!
Yes, your insect is a green stink bug and it's nymph or young, not a beetle. There are 3 species of green stink bugs.

These bugs are common and found thru out North America in woodlands, meadows, woodland edges, gardens and cultivated fields. They suck juices from leaves, fruits and flowers of a wide variety of plants. They may be a pest of cotton, fruit trees, soybeans, and many vegetables.

The adult lays eggs that hatch into nymphs (there are 5 stages of nymphs) before they turn into the adult stage.


Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Tiny Green Leaf-like Winged Bug (Planthopper)

by Joanna
(Potosi, MO)

From Southeast Missouri, I found this little guy on my porch rail this morning. He's been there most of the day. Seems to be pretty mellow.

Comments for Tiny Green Leaf-like Winged Bug (Planthopper)

Click here to add your own comments

Planthopper
by: Moni

Joanna
Your insect is a planthopper, to be more specifically Acanaloniid planthopper.

Planthoppers are found thru out North America. They feed on plants, but are not pests. They are seen in fields, shrubby areas, on trees or herbaceous plants from summer til fall.

While the adults are green like your little guy, the nymphs are usually brownish,no visible wings with white fluffy 'tails' made of wax.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

3/4" Bright green and black insect w/reddish eyes (Soldier Fly)

by Letha
(Keller, Texas)

Bright Green

Bright Green

This 3/4 " insect was on a leaf of a plant in our back yard pond approximately 12" above the water. It's coloring was very bright green with black on each of the 4 sections of it's abdomen with reddish eyes. The back of the thorax was mottled brown with black. The wings were almost translucent, tinged reddish brown. It's belly was solid bright green. Very fast flyer.

I'd love help with identifying this insect as I've not been able to find it online (yet). It didn't buzz or seem aggressive like a bee/wasp and is the only one we've seen.

Comments for 3/4" Bright green and black insect w/reddish eyes (Soldier Fly)

Click here to add your own comments

Cicada
by: Anonymous

I believe it's a type of Cicada.

Found it!
by: Letha

It's a odontomyia cincta or soldier fly. The adults feed on nectar and lay eggs in shallow water.

Thanks for having such a great website!

bad guy or good guy?
by: Anonymous

but is it a bad guy or a good guy?

Good
by: Letha

It feeds on nectar so he's not going to harm anything.

Soldier Fly
by: Moni

Letha
Yes, as you learned it is Odontomyia cincta. If you have a great photo like that, bugguide is a great place to post insects to get ID'ed.

These flies are really cool looking!

For anyone else who might see one, they are found in spring and early summer in North America near woodlands and meadows that have water nearby.
Adults feed on nectar from flowers like butterfly weed, asters, yarrow, black-eyed Susan, and goldenrod.

According to an Ohio study eggs are laid on reeds, stalks or dead branches in the water. The larvae are found crawling over the mud or living in plant debris near water.

Thank you, Moni!
by: Letha

That's exactly how I found out. Great site but I like this one too :)
Thanks for the help!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Chartreuse tiny insect (Acanaloniid planthopper)

by Eva
(Lake Geneva, WI)

It's a very small insect, about a half inch in length. It looks like it's made mostly of flat wings folded down to the side.

Comments for Chartreuse tiny insect (Acanaloniid planthopper)

Click here to add your own comments

Acanaloniid planthopper
by: Moni

Eva
Your insect is a planthopper, to be more specifically Acanaloniid planthopper.

Planthoppers are found thru out North America. They feed on plants, but are not pests. They are seen in fields, shrubby areas, on trees or herbaceous plants from summer til fall.

While the adults are green like your little guy, the nymphs are usually brownish,no visible wings with white fluffy 'tails' made of wax.

They do not bite or sting.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Greenish Mosslike ball insect (Green lacewing larva)

by Monica Heitman
(Galveston Texas USA )

Mosslike creature that moves

Mosslike creature that moves

Mosslike creature that moves 2nd picture

Please help us by identifying this I creature. found near Tomatoes and lemon trees. Thought it was just moss Til it started crawling.
Galveston Texas area.

Comments for Greenish Mosslike ball insect (Green lacewing larva)

Click here to add your own comments

Green lacewing larva
by: Moni

Monica
It is the debris-carrying lacewing larva. Amazing the camouflage they use to sneak up on aphids!

These are very beneficial insects for the garden. The larvae eat lots of aphids and other pests like caterpillars on cabbage, potatoes and other plants in the garden.
The adults are lacy looking green flying insects. They also feed on pest insects but do not eat as many as the growing larvae.

They can give off an unpleasant odor when handled.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.








Want A Stunning Garden? Click Here For Your Free Lessons