green and purple/black (Annual Cicada)

by Mike Sr
(West Newton, PA USA)

unknown, plz help

unknown, plz help

i seen this up at my dads house late at night, around 10pm. in a small town called West Newton,Pa. this thing landed into the ground. been looking for a wk now on site and still cant find out what it was. its in a wooded area. its green and purple/black striped. it has 4 or six lefs i wanna say and i think it had a glitter to it. again it was at night but got a decent pix of it tho. plz. would really like to know what this is and if its any kind of danger to my kids. thx

Comments for green and purple/black (Annual Cicada)

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Cicada
by: Anonymous

it is a cicada

Annual Cicada
by: Moni

Mike
Your critter is a cicada and it will not sting or bite your children. Many kids like to hold them, especially fun when the insect shakes its wings.
The female cicada lays eggs along twigs of trees. Therefore it can be a pest as the slits made for laying the eggs damage and destroy young trees.
Once the nymphs have emerged from eggs, they drop to the ground and burrow into the soil near the trees. The nymphs feed on root juice, using their strong front legs for digging.
When the nymphs are ready to emerge into adults they crawl up the tree, split the shell, and emerge as adults....like the one you saw.
Cicadas are the insects that sing a loud song in late summer which gives them another common name 'dog day cicada'.
Wikipedia website has a video of a nymph emerging into an adult that your kids might enjoy seeing. There are probably more videos on the internet also. Here is the Wikipedia site.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicada

cicada
by: Anonymous

this is an insect that live under ground for 17yrs, then emerges, finds a limb, or tree, then emerges out of its encased shell

Green and purple/black(annual cicada
by: Melinda Winn

In West VIrginia it is called by many a jar fly or a locus

Cicada
by: Anonymous

I remember the Cicadas but I didin`t know their names in english was cicadas cause my parents used to call them chicharras ,they make a real loud sound and only come out around summer but you don`t see them anymore around the area of San Antonio Tx like we used to when we were little I am 50 yrs old so I guess they`re dissapearing from the face of the earth but we used to tie a string to the body and just let them fly once on a while and we used to keep them in a shoebox with little grass and twigs to let them change their shell they`re safe ,they don`t bite

catydid (probably another name for cicada)
by: Anonymous

they aren't dangerous . I was letting one crawl around on my hand a few nights ago. Just dont let them sit still on bare skin for to long or it's legs will dig in.

Bug...
by: Sherrie

I just saw one too was looking to see what it is and found your post.. I'm in Virginia Beach....

chjild's plan
by: Marce

Cicada were one of the favorie summer "toys". In the 30's and 40's, we would tie a piece of thread on the bug's torso, above its wings, and let it fly around like a kite on a string. Contests would determine which sister had the best critter. A summer evening in southwest Missouri.


9/1/2013
by: Anonymous

just saw a cicada in my back yard, it is huge. never seen one before in CT wich prompted this web search

Cicada
by: Anonymous

Your picture is a Cicada which is not a Katydid. Totally different species.

Annoying lil things!!
by: Anonymous

Orange, California

They are very loud and won't let you sleep!!! :(

sara
by: Anonymous

Found one in Dallas Texas

Cicada also lives in motown
by: Anonymous

I live in Detroit, Mi and I've seen them the last 2 or 3 summers. I was curious so I brought 2 dead ones inside & started to search the web for pics of large flying bugs. Bingo. I found it on the 1st search. It also seems that they are prey to a larger wasp type bug that dig as deep as the Cicada itself.

Cicada
by: Jason

I found one outside my office this morning. Took a picture and tried to find out about it. I touched it and it made a god awefull sound flying away. Scared me actually. I then found this site and this post. Thanks for the clarification on what it was.

Btw. It's an ugly critter.

Cicada killer
by: Anonymous

A person mentioned that it is the prey of a cicada killer whic h is correct , we hsve both ( and different kinds of katydids here as well and this is NOT a katydid!! Totally different species as someone said). Anyhow look up cicada killer images and you'll see what we have flying over our yard all summer every summer , they look like a huge hornet but they dont bother us they're just constantly on the search for cicadas which they sting them and carry it to their nest /hole in the yard ground ... Growing up in Louisiana they called cicadas jar bugs when I was a little girl , had one cicada "change" on my porch one night last summer and before it was dry and hardened , it just sat there and was the most beautiful bright sea green/blue color I've ever seen , was just gorgeous ! PLEASE all of you , try not to be afraid of animals and insects , they all have purposes in our lives and are so fascinating to watch and PLEASE teach your children about them Anx let them explore outside !!

I found a big cicada....
by: Stephanie

While wondering the yard, I was pulling dead branches down. I noticed some BEETLE LIKE SHELLS on the trunks of trees. I remember from my youth, they looked like "June Bug" shells.
A little later, I found a
L housefly looking bug (2"?) I pulled the little branch off he was clinging to. Thought it was dead, no just slow, I took many photos, then I stuck him on my 45' Blue Spruce,

DID I MAKE A MISTAKE???

The Drunk Bug....
by: DebrahAnna

Last night out on my deck and I kept hearing.."Bang", "Bang" I noticed where the sound was coming from this huge flying bug hitting the light on my garage. WHAT THE HELL IS THAT??
I have a sun setter on my deck and it was opened out and this huge flying bug was flying under it, it kept banging into everything the house, the sun setter, anything like it was drunk LOL, then it flew into my Moonflower vine on my deck and it didn't come back out so I got up and looked to see if I could see what this drunk bug was from reading your article I now know it was a Cicada!!
What a funky looking critter...

Cicada
by: Cheryl

A Cicada flew in to my motorcycle helmet and frightened me terribly. When I released this awful looking insect it went into the grass and did not come out. If my sunshades were not on I really believe it would have damaged my left eye because the impact was so hard when it hit my shield fell completely down.

The particles were lefted on the outside of my left Len, because the Cicada touched my face is there a danger that I should be concerned about?

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Green beetle with black markings (Four lined plant bug)

by Nancy
(Southern Ontario)

Beetle eating mint leaves

Beetle eating mint leaves

I am in Southern Ontario. This colony of beetles have been eating the leaves of my mint, shasta dasies, purple coneflower, black-eyed susans, and even the lavender in my garden. I'd like to find out what they are ... and suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Comments for Green beetle with black markings (Four lined plant bug)

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Four lined plant bug
by: Moni

This is a four lined plant bug. Most plant bugs feed on plants sucking the juices out of the leaves leaving spots, scratch-like markings, blotches or other marks. The spots you see on this leaf are probably from this bug. If you look at it you can see a black dot in the center of each brown spot that is probably where the bug put its mouth parts in to suck out the surrounding juices. Some of the plant bugs inject a substance that kills the surrounding tissue.
Most of the damage by plant bugs does not look good but does not kill the plant. Organic control is mostly from beneficial insects like lady beetles, green lacewings, spiders, etc. You could also try Doug's favorite :-) - hose them off, but since the adults fly they will probably come back.

i have them too
by: Anonymous

I am in southern ontario and i also have an infestation of these - never seen them before.

I have them, too, here in Ohio
by: Carol from Granville

HELP!! I have these beetles, too. They are eating up my butterfly bushes. I would love to know how to get rid of them in a safe way.

perth, australia
by: Anonymous

I found your post on google images. Our mint and other herbs all have the same markings. Unlike you I have not been home to see the what is doing it. I not sure what to do, but at least I have better understanding what could be doing it now. Cheers for spending your time to create post. Russel, Perth, Australia.

In Texas Too
by: Anonymous

I am so glad to see what is causing this. I need to get some predators out there. :)

how do you get then to leave
by: Anonymous

how do you kill them

Have these
by: Suzette

I'm in Nova Scotia Canada & we have these little lime green, leaf loving devils here as well.It's good to know they don't kill our plants ,but they sure make them look nasty!Its not sounding like theres an easy way to get rid of them!,unfortunately!!

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green dragonfly type bug (Common green darner)

by Mary P
(Saginaw, MI)

8-14-09
This bug flew into the side of my house today near my rose bushes. I have never seen a bug like this before. It was about 3 inches long and it stayed there for about 1/2 an hour. I live in Saginaw, Michigan. Is it harmful to my roses or veggies? Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Mary P
Saginaw, MI

Comments for green dragonfly type bug (Common green darner)

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dragonfly
by: Anonymous

it IS a dragonfly, not harmful to your plants as far as I know

Common green darner
by: Moni

Mary
Yes, your bug is a dragonfly called the green darner. I suppose the darner refers to the way it loops around as it flies.

Dragonflies live near water, tho can fly some distance away. Both the larva(nymphs) which live in water and the adults are predaceous meaning they eat other insects.

Therefore being a predator of insects, it is not harmful to you nor the roses and is beneficial to have in the garden area.

Great find! Beautiful insect to watch in your garden! The eye on the back of the head is common in both the male and female of this species.

dragonfly bug
by: Mary

Thanks so much for your responses. I had never seen a dragonfly that looked like that. I thought it was pretty neat looking.
Thanks again!

dragon fly
by: brinda

this pic is a wonderful depicting his wings and body ... love to see this ... ms brinda ..

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Very small beetle-like insect; light green with red stripes (Red Banded Leafhopper)

by Sandy
(Eastern Ontario)

Solitary and found on quite a few of my hosta leaves. I would certainly appreciate some of your ID time to ID this. I'd like to know whether there's a chance it could be making the little pinholes we see in hostas around this time of year. Thanks.

Comments for Very small beetle-like insect; light green with red stripes (Red Banded Leafhopper)

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Red banded leafhopper
by: Moni

Sandy
I believe this is the red banded leafhopper also called the candystriped leafhopper. However there has been some discussion on one of the other Insect Id photos just which species it is. It may be one of the other species, but they all do the same type of damage.

They do not chew holes they suck juices from plants, so it is not the one feeding on your hostas. Could your feeding be from slugs?

Here is the discussion from the other photo of a critter like yours:

I was going to say red banded leafhopper also but as you mention there are several that look similar. I think that may be what yours is.
One that looks similar on Bugguide is G. fennahi but it is only found on Rhododendrons. Since you found your leafhopper on on cuke it is not that one(unless you have lots of Rhodo's nearby?) It could also be G. teliformis.
Good luck with your search! Let us know what it is?



Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/green-and-red-with-yellow-head-flying.html#ixzz0PjFQEJT3

Thank you
by: Anonymous

Thank you, Moni for identifying this insect for me. The reason for my request was to determine whether they could be another culprit causing holes in the hosta leaves besides slugs. You have kindly given me that information too. Thanks again!

Hungry bugs
by: Minnesota

Both my vegetables & my flowers have numerous small holes in leaves but have had trouble seeing any bugs. I just saw some red & green striped insects on my sunflower plant. Could this be the culprit?

holes in leaves
by: Moni

Minnesota
No, the leafhoppers have mouthparts that suck juices not chew holes. The hole chewing is either a beetle, grasshopper or a caterpillar.
There are probably several culprits since few insects feed on all flowers and veggies. You may have a few flea beetles and leaf beetles on the veggies as well as a few flowers.
I have seen several on mine here in Iowa. Also I am seeing lots of fuzzy caterpillars feeding ... probably Virginian tiger moth caterpillars.But none of them have eaten much, so I leave them or move them to a weedy meadow.

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baby praying mantid green

by Grammadot
(Barto, PA)

Mini Manti

Mini Manti

These guys are rarin' to get to work in my gardens. They all look like tiny editions of Mom and Dad!! We were lucky to be there when they came scrambling out of their winter egg case! Envy us. We put at least a half dozen in protested places in the Fall.

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Mantid March
by: Moni

Great photo of the little guys marching to protect your plants!

Mini-Manti
by: Connie

How can we get them big enough to eat Japanese Beetles in time to actually do so?

Mantis babies...
by: Leslie

How neat! I've never seen baby mantis before!

Thanks!
by: Grammadot

Thanks to all who checked out the Manti. They evidentaly hatch at different times, since we keep bumping in to different sized helpers all Summer. What a busy season; no rain / lots of rain, many jars of canned veggies and meatless meals! Lost weight! Thanks manti!

They eat aphids
by: Anonymous

We found one baby mantis on window glass. We cut the lily leaves with many aphids underneat for it.

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green see-through wings (Green lacewing)

by Denise
(Baltimore)

Tim

Tim

tiny, long bright green insect. Flies pretty well, has veined transparent wings. very beautiful, i believe it eats plants but im not sure.

Comments for green see-through wings (Green lacewing)

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Green lacewing
by: Moni

This is a green lacewing. It is the adult of a very beneficial larva. The larva eat lots of aphids and other pests like caterpillars on cabbage, potatoes and other plants in the garden.
They are rather fragile looking adults but do a great service to us in the garden.
This is one to encourage! And it is beautiful too!

Green Lacewing
by: Liz

Just found one of these beautiful insects at work. He's sitting on my paperwork. Beautiful! It's cleaning itself. Stinker just pooped on my paperwork!

In my room!
by: Anonymous

There is one on the wall in my room and i didn't know what it was:s
It's kinda cute up close though, moving its little anteannae:3

PRETTY
by: Anonymous

we found it on our closet door; probably came through the window (:
It was very pretty.

:))
by: tonii

me and my partner found one of these on our bedroom ceiling, we didnt know what it was so we caught it in a container. now i know its nothing bad i will let it fly away :)) bless it, just wanted to say hello i guess :P

I FOUND THAT BUG
by: sweetboy121

i found it on our ceiling .me and my brothers caught it and thought it was ppoisonous .we scared my lil brother with it

GREEN LACEWING
by: Moni

sweetboy121
No it is not poisonous...it is one of the beneficial insects.
You do not sound sweet if you are teasing your little brother.

bug
by: Anonymous

had one in our house for weeks not done any harm so its just been left ... keep spotting it in different places, cant catch it to let if go free as it lands high up but it is a cute looking bug

Aws
by: Anonymous

I had one land on me today at school. It stayed on my pant leg for like 3 hours. I put it on my plants when I got home. Cute little thing :)

What do they eat?
by: Anonymous

I have fed the ones i´ve seen with sugar, as they tend to fly around in rooms during the winter... it seemed to like it :) Though I believe they like something more natural and "green".

Green lacewings
by: Moni

Anonymous
Larvae eat other insects as mentioned below.
Some adults are predators, others take liquids such as honeydew, and some feed on pollen. You would have to know which species to know which you have flying around.

beautiful but mean.
by: Stacey

I had one land on my neck last night and it bit me. now I have a huge lump on the side of my neck. I have seen these many times but have never been bit by one and I don't ever want to be again. it's painful.

Green lacewing
by: Moni

Stacey
Interesting. The larvae do have large pincers and the adults and larvae are good predators for the garden so they have to have the mouth parts to eat other insects...so guess they could bite.
Sorry...good to know. Thanks

Poisonous
by: Anonymous

Is it poisonous? I am deathy afraid of bugs, my mom opened the window in my room. I don't wanna sleep cause it might be harmful. Is it?

Green lacewing
by: Moni

Scared Anonymous

There are lots of good insects and this is one of them. They will not hurt you nor are they poisonous.

Right off the top of my head I can not think of a poisonous insect. There are poisonous spiders, but they are not insects. Insects have 6 legs, 3 body parts with adults having antenna and usually wings.

The blister beetle can cause blisters if you smash them on your skin and some spiny caterpillars can cause a rash, but none are poisonous. Some folks are allergic to bee or wasp stings, but that is not poisonous. Some insects can bite, which really hurts, but is not poisonous.

Insects are very cool, beautiful, and interesting animals to observe. Enjoy the beautiful green lacewing. :-)

the third time spotting it
by: Anonymous

ive seen it at my school twice the strang thing is that the third time i saw it it looked advanced its legs were thinker the wings were longer it looks like it had a tail the eyes color were red and its body was big like a arthropod like three spines or something well that all i have to say.

Green lacewing
by: Moni

Anonymous
Perhaps it was a different insect that you saw if it had a tail. Perhaps what you saw was a mayfly?

Without a photo it is hard to say what insect you saw.

Driving buddy
by: Mal

This little guy rode with me all the way to work on the windsheild of my car. At red lights he would walk around and as soon as we started moving again he would get into his perfect aerodynamic position. He made my morning. =)

Green lacewing
by: Moni

Mal
Nice to have a friend along for the drive :)
Too bad it does not count as extra folks, so you can drive in the commuter fast lane.

You must live in the south as it is too cold up north for us to see them now.

THE LACEWING!!!
by: Anonymous

I agree with everyone, Its a very beautiful insect... BUT has anyone ever notice a VERY PUNGENT ODER these insects give off!!!

Green lacewing
by: Moni

Anonymous
Yes they are known to give off an unpleasant odor when handled.
They are a great insect to have in the garden!

green bug
by: Anonymous

This is my favourite home fly bug

ouch
by: Anonymous

I got bit or stung by one last night and I started seeing spots afterwards. and now im sickish.. what does that mean?

lacewing
by: Moni

Ouch
This insect might bite if mishandled but will not cause the effects you mentioned. So, must be something else.

Send in a photo of your insect, then perhaps we can help.

tornado
by: Anonymous

we found it flying around us while making popcorn, it looked like a mini bug tornado! Almost killed by mistake now its in my pocket and soooooooo pretty

I think I saw one.
by: Anonymous

I think I saw one in my living room this morning. Do they
flutter when they fly?

It bit me
by: Anonymous

I had one bite me on the back of my arm. I thought something was burning me. Very painful, hopefully I'm not allergic

the smell
by: Anonymous

one landed on my bed and i got scared and smacked it because i didnt know what it was and it gave off a desgusting smell that gave me the worst headache ever and i feel very light headed but im still not sure if this is the same bug as this one


Killed one.
by: Anonymous

Killed one.

Cute!
by: Cassie

I woke up and noticed this little guy on my coffee table. He has barely moved, but he is alive. I was going to kill him, but decided to google it first. Now I will let him chill.

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Green, triangular head, leafy wings (Praying mantid)

by Christine
(Van Nuys, Ca)

as above.
Southern California, Van Nuys.
I captured, put in bottle and here is the best shot. Bug was soo smart..I tapped on the glass and she turned her head to look.. too cuuute. I don't know what kind she is..?

Comments for Green, triangular head, leafy wings (Praying mantid)

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Bug
by: Nadine

I believe this is a praying mantus. At least that's what I think, I am no bug expert but have seen many of them here in New Hampshire.

Praying mantid
by: Moni

Christine
You have a praying mantid. It looks like a female Carolina mantid as the wings do not cover the abdomen and the males are much narrower in the body.
The large 6" long brown mantids with a green stripe along the sides of the wings are Chinese mantids.
These are beneficial insects as they eat the bad bugs of the garden, so please put it back out in the garden. Some folks get frustrated when the mantids get on their butterfly bushes catching the beautiful butterflies. When that happens, just move them to a part of the garden where you are have other insect pest problems. They will eat those insects instead.

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Small green leaf-like bug (Keeled Tree Hopper)

by Lindsey
(SoCal)

Little green leaf-like fellas on eggplant

Little green leaf-like fellas on eggplant

I have been searching for a similar pic of this kind of bug on my eggplant, peppers, and tomatillos with not avail. Can someone tell me what it is? I don't think it is a katydid, but I could be mistaken. They're about 1/2 inch long

I am in coastal socal.

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Keeled Tree Hopper
by: Moni

Looks like you have Keeled tree hoppers. They do seem to like to live on and eat plants in the Solanaceae family...eggplant, tomato, potato.

The nymphs or young of the Keeled tree hopper are spiny. This treehopper seems to be only in southern California and south of there. The nymphs and adults suck the juices out of tomato plants, so you need to control them to prevent damage or killing of your plants.
Best control is insecticidal soap on the nymphs, but if you have adults you will need to spray with Neem.
One other item commonly mentioned with this insect is that there are usually ants around them. The ants feed on the "honeydew" or liquid droppings of the treehopper.
Hope that helps.

Small green insects
by: Mary Jo

I also live in Southern California (Rancho Palos Verdes) and have had a big problem this year with these insects killing my tomato and egg plants. Yes, the ants love them. I live tried to pick them off, but the just come back later in the day. I have also tried to get rid of them by spraying with the water hose, but that does not solve the problem for more than a day or two. I also have peach, fig, orange, and lemon trees on the property, but these insects don't bother my trees that I am aware of. I would like to be able to get rid of them without using poisons.

Keeled treehopper
by: Moni

Mary Jo
When you pick them off drop them in soapy water, they will not be back. Secondly, rather than spraying with water, which knocks them off so they can return, spray with Insecticidal soap or better yet Neem (both are organic). Using one then waiting a week or two and then spraying with the other may also help. You might also check the label of Spinosad, another organic product, to see if it will control the treehoppers. I know it works well on beetles and caterpillars...it is a bacteria that kills those insects. Be careful to not spray it on your beneficial insects.

These treehoppers feed on tomato, potato, eggplant and peppers. They do not feed on citrus. So, you need to control them in the veggie garden only.

My little buddy! LOL
by: Gregory

I saw this little green leaf-like bug fly into this meter box on my corner (I'm a sign spinner) and get knocked down to the ground... I was kidding around and talking to it and said out loud to the bug jokingly, "you can't sleep and fly at the same time", and the bug flew up and landed on my shoulder! He sat there for a minute or so, and chatted to it for a bit, and then flew off! This is in Del Mar CA. Cute little thing! Seemed to have a personality!

Keeled tree hopper
by: Moni

Gregory
Glad you found someone to chat with while spinning your sign! Insects are so cool!!

Thanks for info on the tree hopper
by: LA Gardener

I've been looking for information on this bug for three days. First found the nymphs clustered on the lower stems of my tomato plants comingled with a lot of ants. Figured the ants might be farming them--they looked like bristly spiders. Put out Grants ant bait. Today I found adults and nymphs and captured a few. Wasn't sure if they were an invasive species or common; beneficial or harmful. Never seen these little guys in the garden before. Now thanks to all of you, I know what they are! So far the tomatoes don't look stressed.

Simple bug remedy
by: William Copp

2 Gallon Sprayer with 3 to 4 drips of dawn dish soap and 3 table spoons of dark Molasses this will send them packing But you can eat your tomatoes and it won’t hurt you or your plants....... or like Doctor Oz’s Said “put a table spoon of Molasses in your morning coffee and you'll run around in circles without the weight gain”!

Discover Keeled for the first time on my pepper
by: Alejandro

Today was the first time I've seen these guys on only one of my bell pepper plants. I just plucked them off and toss them into soapy water. And while most let me do just that, I felt like the others saw what I was doing and started moving and flying away as I approached them. Some even flew straight at me and then away, I believe they were trying to fight back. And while doing all this I could only imagine what they were think. All happy on my plant sucking away at it's juice and then some giant (me) comes and starts plucking them away one by one wrecking their world. Well, these plant sucking vampire bugs should fine another plant, in another yard, and leave mine alone lol! I've may of won this battle, but I'm sure the war is not over lol!!

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Find the Preying Mantis

by Grammadot
(Barto, PA)

Large, well camouflaged predator.

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Wonderful Friend, terrible spouse
by: Anonymous

I spy with my little eyes a handsome Preying Mantis!
You can buy eggs of these in some seed catalogs. My father bought some when we first moved to Georgia and he wanted to farm. Unfortunatley, there did not seem to be many viable hatchlings as we did not seem to find an abundance of them.
Over twenty years later however we have a serious over abundance of lady bugs! It makes me sad to know I don't have my father to ask if he is responsible for this freaky population explosion. :)

Praying mantid
by: Anonymous

He's right in the middle

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Three inch green leaf like insect (Katydid)

by Alicia
(Reno, NV)

Reno, NV. This insect's body looks exactly like a leaf. I can't tell if it has wings but it has two antennae you can't see in the picture. It has been hanging out by our front door, where lots of bugs accumulate around the porch light. When I took this picture, it was on the ceiling.

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Katydid
by: Moni

Alicia
You had a katydid on your ceiling and door. They do seem to be attracted to porch lights in the summer. The green leaf-like parts are the wings. This helps them to not be seen while feeding on foliage of trees and shrubs.
They are related to grasshoppers and crickets and tho they have long legs they prefer to walk than hop. They are usually heard not seen. There is a book(don't remember the name of it or the author) to identify cricket sounds that also has a few of the katydid calls. They make their sound by rubbing the wings together.
They are fun to watch as they walk around.
Thanks for sharing the photo.

Thanks!
by: Alicia

Thank you so much for the information, Moni. This is definitely the most interesting insect that I have seen in the Reno area. We don't grow them very big here.

I know what that is:
by: Anonymous

thats a katydid

Katydid
by: Anonymous

I just had one on my back porch on an arm of a lawn chair I took great pictures of it! I live in Colorado Springs

i saw one on my porch
by: Eve

thank you so much for showing this picture. I finished painting my porch when this insect landed on the railing. my porch light was on. I was so shocked when I saw it. I never seen anything like it. I walked closer to it. it didn't seem to be afraid. it just stood there. I thought maybe it was stuck to the paint. when I turned off the porch light, it flew away. I must admit, seeing this insect highlighted my day. it was so beautiful. I am so happy that I found this web site to learn the name of this insect.

thank you.

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green leaf like insect (Keeled treehopper)

by Justin Stoltz
(Kahului, HI, USA)

different stages clustered together with ruler on tomato branch

different stages clustered together with ruler on tomato branch

different stages clustered together with ruler on tomato branch from the top and side cropped from top and side front view

1.5 mm in length, I think I have the insect photographed in two stages of its life cycle. The first stage being orange black and spickey; the second mostly green with an arched back. It has white spots on its sides and a dark line down the ridge of its back; also with white spots. From the front it's shape looks like a witches hat.

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Keeled treehopper
by: Moni

Justin
Great photos!
You do have the nymph or young stages as well as the adult Keeled treehopper.
They live on and eat plants in the Solanaceae family...eggplant, tomato, potato.
The nymphs or young of the Keeled tree hopper are spiny as you show in your photos.
This treehopper is a pest in southern California and south of there, besides in HI. The nymphs and adults suck the juices out of tomato plants, so you may need to control them to prevent damage or killing of your plants.
Best control is insecticidal soap on the nymphs, but if you have adults you will need to spray with Neem.
One other item commonly mentioned with this insect is that there are usually ants around them. The ants feed on the "honeydew" or liquid droppings of the treehopper.


Thank you Moni!
by: Justin

Thanks so much for the identification and the advice as well as the compliment Moni! I was hoping they were good bugs. Time for battle!

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Green Beetle adult (leaf beetle)

by Bronwen Leslie
(Aylmer, Quebec, Canada)

Adult

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leaf beetle
by: Moni

The best guess with this photo is a Chrysomelid leaf beetle. Without seeing the antennae and having a clearer and closer photo of the legs and shape that is the best I can do. There are several green beetles it could be.
Another possible beetle is a ground beetle in the family Carabidae.
Please send a clearer closer photo for better ID.
Would you also send information on the size, where it was found, what it was feeding on or any thing else that would help with the ID.
Thanks

Coenorrhinus pauxillus
by: Anonymous

This is a green snout beetle! They feed mainly on birch.

Green beetle
by: Moni

Anonymous
It could be a green snout beetle in the Genus Polydrusus. Those do occur in northeastern North America.

Do not think it is the species you mentioned as those do not appear to be found in North America.

Without a closer more magnified and clearer photo we will not know. So unless Bronwen has a better photo we will not be able to ID further. Sorry.

Thanks for the suggestion!

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green 4 legged creature with antenna 1 inch long (Wheel bug nymph)

by Shirley
(Marion, South Carolina, USA)

This insect is on my pole beans, does not frighten easily and will become aggressive when bothered.

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aggresive bug
by: Anonymous

That would be a wheel bug.

Wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

Shirley
This is a wheel bug nymph which is considered a beneficial insect. It is scouting for insects to eat in your pole beans. So this is one to watch as it controls any insects that might want to eat your beans!
As it grows it will molt a few times and turn into a large gray bug with a spiky looking 'wheel' on its backside behind the head.

They evidently can bite with its long piercing sucking mouth parts and if so it is said to be very painful.

Response
by: Shirley

Thanks for all the help.

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green-gray beetle eating squash (Squash bugs)

by jeanne
(Valley Springs CA)

I hope this works

I hope this works

this beetle infestation in Valley springs California is driving us mad it eats up all the squash and pumpkin family and we get nothing, I'd be so pleased if you could identify it and advise me on how to control it

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Squash bugs
by: Moni

Jeanne
You have squash bugs. These are a problem for all of us that grow squashes of any kind. Being in the MidWest, I find them heading to the garage to overwinter!

Squash bugs
by: Moni

Jeanne
Forgot to mention...You have a huge infestation so start smashing them right away. They do give off a distinct odor when you smash them. If you prefer not to smash, you can drop them in a bucket of soapy water. They are hard to catch as they drop to the ground or hide on the back side of the stems, fruits and leaves(large tweezers may help). Sorry you have this problem...they are a problem for every gardener I know. Just keep after them.

Squash bugs
by: Doug

I was told not to squish them as the oder attracts more of them. We drown them. Also look both on top and bottom side of the leaf for the eggs and rip that part off and drown them too.

Squash bugs
by: Anonymous

Inspect, monitor
Check the undersides of the leaves and squeeze the life from the eggs.
IMO, its futile to kill the adults.
One year I outsmarted the bugs by planting the squash really late.
But these bugs are a very hard to solve problem.

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Green Leaf like bug (Luna Moth)

by JHR2
(NJ)

winged white/green cocoonish fat body and the size of a small bat, 4 brown stick like antenni and 4 legs.

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Luna Moth
by: Bill B

Looks to be a Luna Moth

moth
by: Carla

I agree, it looks like a Luna moth to me also. Moths have fuzzy antenna, I can't tell much by this photo, but I'd bet it is a Luna

Luna Moth
by: Moni

It is indeed the beautiful green Luna moth. So, if you would look close you would see that only 2 of the 'sticks' are antenna and the other 2 along with the 4 legs noted are the 6 legs of an insect.
This view is from the underside. The body may be large because the moth has just emerged from it's cocoon.
Luna moths are in the Silk moth family. The moths are large, fly at night, and the caterpillars of this family make a silken cocoon. This insect does not cause any harm, it is one that we can enjoy for it's beauty.
Thanks for sharing such a great creature!!

Beautiful but spooky at first.
by: Anonymous

Had one of these land on my kitchen window the other night. It was the sixe on my cell phone! Thanks for the info as to what is was.

TEXAS
by: Raider

Has anyone else seen one in Texas two showed up at my home in south Texas yes they are bueatiful

Luna moth
by: Moni

Raider
This is a little early for luna moths to show up. Yes they do live in Texas...not sure what county you live in, in south Texas.

Luna moth
by: Moni

Duane in Alabama
Not sure why you googled 'looks like luna' ?? However to answer your questions, if you look at the bottom of the comment page it says return to Green leaf like bug (Luna moth). If you click on that it will show the photo that the originator posted to find out what the green insect was.
Some folks who have seen this moth before commented that they thought it was a luna moth but since they are not positive they say they think that is what the insect is. As an entomologist I do my best to verify each insect posted on this website.
Do you have an insect you would like Identified?

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Yellow/Green Beetle (Rose Chafer beetles)

by Salena
(Island Pond, VT, USA)

Green/Yellow beetle

Green/Yellow beetle

This beetle-type bug is a faded greenish/yellowish color and has orange legs. It was found on our apple trees. It was boring into the apples and pretty much destroying the leaves. (In the picture there are two bugs)

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Rose Chafer beetles
by: Moni

Salena
Tho the photo is not real clear, I believe those are a mating pair of rose chafer beetles. The adult is considered a pest as it does feed heavily on plant foliage. It will eat a wide variety of plant foliage, flowers, and fruits including grapes, apples, peaches, roses, and other garden flowers and fruits.They are known to skeletonize roses. They are poisonous to chickens and birds when eaten.

Rose chafer grubs feed on the roots of grasses, weeds, and nursery stock.

Control can be done by covering small crops with row cover. Picking off adults and putting them in soapy water. Cultivation destroys eggs and pupae in the soil. It is especially if continued thru July. If large numbers of chafers are around, you can drench the soil with insect parasitic nematodes to kill the larvae. These are the nematodes that are effective on Scarab grubs. Rose chafers are good fliers, more can fly into your garden, so you will have to stay on top of them for a while.

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green praying mantid

by Grammadot
(Barto, PA)

Gardener's Friend

Gardener's Friend

Praying Mantis on Butterfly Bush
We kept putting them over the fence so the cats wouldn't catch them. Luckily we probably have a dozen cases .......the potential for hundreds of helpers in 2008!

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Mantid
by: Moni

Your earlier photo was great camoflage for the praying mantid. He did look like E.T. Perhaps that is where they came up with the design of the character!?
I am glad he came out so you could see all of him. You should have lots of predators for 2008. I have a friend who takes the mantids off of her butterfly bushes because they eat the butterflies. The cat problem was a new twist for me.

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Small green rose bug (Small green leafhopper)

by Corrie
(Stoke poges, bucks, UK)

bug with biro tip

bug with biro tip

This little guy's from England...
• Bright yellowy green
• About 5-6 mm long and 2mm wide
• Tail seems to stretch in and out
• Tiny black dots for eyes on the side of it's head
• Smooth, soft looking body
• minute antenna about 1mm long and very fine
• no wings
• was found crawling slowly around the inside of a rose
THANK YOU FOR ANY HELP! :)

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Small green leafhopper
by: Moni

Corrie
Your green bug is either a leafhopper or a planthopper, order Homoptera. The photo is fabulous. And your description is great. This insect is in the nymph stage so it is hard to ID exactly, as many of the leafhoppers are small and greenish at that stage. The rose leafhopper has spots on the wings at an early stage, so I do not think that is what it is.
Leafhoppers and planthoppers suck juices from the plant they are feeding on and can cause distortion of the plant part or browning and yellowing. If you only have a few, don't worry the birds or other beneficial critters will take care of them.
If you have a lot then you might need to use a blast of water from the hose or insecticidal soap to get rid of them.
If you see adults - those with wings that go to the end of the body, not half way like your green guy, then please send a photo, so I can help better ID.
Let me know if I can help futher.

Rose bug reply
by: Corrie

Hi, Thank you so much for your help! and it's also reasuring they're not too harmful to my roses! After posting my photo I remembered my uncle's a biologist so I mailed him the same photo. He reckoned it is the nymph of a froghopper, the kind of beetle that leaves 'cuckoo spit' (At least that's what we call it in the UK!) Let me know if you think that rings true. Thanks again for your help :)

Small green hopper
by: Moni

Well, yes your uncle is right in that froghopper is another term that can be used for plant or leafhopper. Tho, it is not a beetle (those are order Coleoptera while hoppers are Homopteras)...beetles have hard shells and no nymph stage.
Not heard the terminology of "cuckoo spit". Aphids which are in the Homoptera order do leave "droppings" that are sticky and can be a mess on objects that sit under the plant with an aphid population.
Hope that helps.

Cuckoo Spit!
by: Anonymous

Over here in the UK, that little creature leaves white foam on plants, about the size of a thumbnail, which looks like someone threw some leftover dishwater out. We call it Cuckoo Spit but I've got no idea why they leave it :)

Spit
by: Moni

Here in the US we do have another hopper that we call the Spittlebug. The adult lays its eggs in a foam spit blob on the stems of alfalfa, clover and other plants. The egg hatches and the nymph lives inside the spittle feeding on the plant juices.
Corrie did not say the small green bug was in a "case" of spit so this is not the nymph of the Spittlebug...but is related.

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Small green insect (Leafhopper Assassin Bug nymph)

by Nichole
(Lantana, TX USA)

Little critter in TX

Little critter in TX

Hello there! I found this small green insect on my shirt after being outside in North Texas. The abdomen curled up slightly and had tiny spikes on the end. Any idea what this might be?

Thanks so much!
Nichole

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Leafhopper Assassin Bug nymph
by: Moni

Nichole
You found a Leafhopper Assassin Bug on your shirt.
These are found mostly in the southern and southwestern states.
These insects feed on other insects so they are a beneficial insect to have in the garden.
Your critter is in the nymphal stage. It will molt a few times before becoming and adult bug.

Assassin Bug Attack
by: Anonymous

I think this is the bug that stung me today..hurt like crazy. His body was hard and spikey.When I first felt it, i thought I had grabbed a sand burr, until I saw it. It wasn't easy to get him off of me either.

Leafhopper
by: Walter

I found this leafhopper on my arm when he stung me...felt like a bee sting....and raised a red welt. I live in north central Arkansas. Had never seen one before and had to look it up here. Thank you for this web site.

Assassin bugs
by: Moni

Walter and others
Since assassin bugs feed on other insects they have a sharp piercing mouth part that is kind of like a syringe needle. It can pierce then suck up the soft insides of an insect pest.
If you thought you were bitten, then perhaps it felt threatened so it bit you with its strong sharp mouth part. It would hurt briefly then go away.

This thing stings
by: Anonymous

I was in San Antonio, TX today doing some surveying work. I got one of these things on the back of my neck. I felt something crawling around and when I reached to grab whatever it was it bit me. It left a small raised bump on my neck but that has since gone away. The bite was not that painful but it sure got my attention!

Stings
by: Anonymous

One bit or stung my son today in Michigan. It got under his shirt while out playing. It was hard to get off of him.

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Green half-inch fuzzy-legged bug (Crowned Slug)

by Lewis Turner
(Marietta, GA, USA)

Green half-inch 14-legged bug  (Crowned Slug)

Green half-inch 14-legged bug (Crowned Slug)

This bug was on my driver-side car window -- exterior -- and stayed there until I removed it to a cup w/lid I had in my car. It did move, although very slowly during the two hours it was on my window. It is now nestled inside a sandwich bag.

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Mystery Solved!
by: Lewis Turner

One of my cousins in Arizona solved the mystery of this 'bug." It's the caterpillar of the Crowned Slug Moth.

Crowned Slug
by: Moni

Lewis
Great job from your cousin...this is the caterpillar of the crowned slug which is a moth.

Larvae are found feeding on oak, but also eat foliage of many other trees including cherry, maple, basswood, elm and beech. The early stages form a zigzag pattern on the undersides of the leaves. They feed on the undersides so not to be seen by predators.

Caution - This larva is a stinging caterpillar... so it is good you did not handle it.

This caterpillar is in the same family (Limacodidae) as the saddleback and hag moth caterpillars that also have stinging hairs. The caterpillars and moths of this family are really very interesting in shape and color!

It would be best to put it out on one of the food trees listed. It overwinters as a larva in a loose cocoon ...so it is time for that to happen. It then pupates and emerges as the moth in summer.

This insect is found over the eastern half of North America in woodland areas.

Thank you
by: Lewis Turner

Since this caterpillar can sting, what kind of pain/infection would one expect to encounter if stung? And, what activity does the Crowned Slug do that makes it beneficial? I've definitely seen the crowned slug many times.

Yea it definately stings!!
by: Austin

found one of these attached to my arm. Dont know how it got to be there must have fallen off a overhanging tree. Anyways i was greeted by a very sharp sting like feeling i brushed it off picked it up with a leaf and went inside. The skin that was in contact is now nice and swollen i got cream on it else it would be very itchy! not my fav bug ive found here for sure!

Crowned slug
by: Moni

Lewis
You asked about the what the sting was like in the caterpillar...Austins remark may help with that.

Also, for most people, the sting produced by most species, while sometimes painful, is generally minor, mild, and short-lived but, in some cases, evidence of contact may remain visible on the skin for a few days. However, the severity of sting or other reaction depends degree of contact and susceptibility of the individual. Allergy sufferers and individuals with sensitive skin should regard stinging caterpillars with caution.

While it was not mentioned here that crowned slugs are beneficial, they are not pests. Many insects are in the middle. They have their place in Nature and tho we do not always know what that is...they are here for a reason. There are so many insects that when research is done...it is usually on the biggest pests or those beneficials that control the big pests :-)

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Long Antenna'd, fat bodied small Praying Mantis?( Immature katydid)

by Stephanie C
(San Diego, CA)

I guess everyone likes their coffee!

I guess everyone likes their coffee!

We found this guy inside a Starbucks in San Diego. I think it's a type of Praying Mantis but, as you can see in the photo, he doesn't have the big front arms, he has a fat and stubby body (instead of a long slender one) and he has super long antennas. He almost looked more like a cross between a cricket and a praying mantis. Any ideas?

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Immature katydid
by: Moni

Stephanie
Your photo is of a young or immature katydid. It probably hitched a ride on someones clothing. They feed on foliage so it should be put back outside.
It is hard to ID a young katydid but it does look a little like a Scudder bush katydid as it looks like the antenna have white bands.
They eat leaves of deciduous trees and shrubs.
Eggs are laid on twigs and leaves, in an overlapping pattern like shingles on a roof. Eggs overwinter then hatch in spring. One generation per year.

IMMATURE KATYDID
by: Anonymous

WE FOUND TWO OF THESE IN LONDON.

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green brown japanese beetle and bumble bee

by brinda hunt
(sarnia ont ca)

mating time and hey i want my lunch can we have alittle privacy ..sheeesh ...

mating time and hey i want my lunch can we have alittle privacy ..sheeesh ...

i take pix all the time here's a Japanese beetle mating and a bumble bee ..thought it would be nice to see one on the site ..god bless

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japanese beetle and bumble bee
by: Moni

Brinda
Thanks for adding more good clear photos to the Insect Id collection!

beauty ehh
by: frank

Great shot. I try to shoot like this but you got it.

GREEN BROWN JAPANESE BEETLE AND BUMBLE BEE
by: brinda hunt

thanks for the comments on my pix of this ... truly grateful ..:) till next time keep shutter bug ..hee hee ing .. god bless and thx frank for that comment huggs from ont canada.

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2" long and hard green shell with black spots (Hercules Beetle)

by Larry
(Nicholasville, Ky Jesamine)

It has 6 legs

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Hercules Beetle
by: Moni

Larry
You have a Hercules beetle female (also called Rhinoceros Beetle, Unicorn Beetle). This beetle is in the scarab family along with June beetles and is considered the largest beetle in North America.
The adult male has a long 'horn' over the head, while the female does not. They come out in late summer.
The adult beetle feeds on rotten fruit, while the larva feed in rotten dead hardwood logs. The larva are large grubs once they are ready to pupate in the rotten logs.
These beetles are found in Eastern United States from southern New York, PA, west to IN then down to Texas.
Found one in southern Indiana during college that was a pet until it died...now it is in my collection!

Wierd Beetle
by: sue

found this hercules beetle in northwest arkansas at my work found the male with the single pincher wonder are they a poisonous bug or can they bite

Hercules beetle
by: Moni

Sue
No - this beetle can not bite nor are they poisonous. If you look closely you will see there is no hinge for the horns to be able to move, so it can not close them together to pinch or bite. Their spiky legs might scratch, but that would be it.

green bug
by: Devin J

I recently found this bug outside on my porch .. I have not gotten ride of it yet ... Wat should I do?

...
by: Devin J

And it was found in Virginia ... is that a weird place to find this bug

HERCULES BEETLE
by: Moni

Devin J
Let it go in the woods. They are found in your area.

Found in Maryland
by: tim

We found one of these beetles on our patio deck. We live in Maryland near Baltimore. It was dead, only recently I think as the ants had not yet attacked! It measured a full 2" long! I am guessing it came from a tree that came down a couple years back, and from which there remained some large debris.

hercules beetle
by: Moni

Tim
Yes, it probably came from the decaying trees. The larvae help break down those trees that have fallen over.
Cool beetle to see!
Perhaps the naturalist at your local park might like it for show and tell?

Hercules Beetle
by: Anonymous

Found two of these beetles at my neighbors house. In all my years and yes I have been blessed with a long life this is the first of these I have ever seen. Beautiful in color and shape. But I know nothing about them. Find them to be interesting creatures.

Hercules Beetle
by: Brenda

We have them in our house. What can we do to get rid of them? I am very much afraid of almost any bug in the universe and these are making me want to move. We live in WV. We average finding 1 or 2 a day. Please help!!

Hercules Beetle Bug Cut
by: Jay

I Found A Hercules Beetle Bug N Elkmont Alabama & in My Laundry Room Was Gonna Move it over Alittle Bit and the Thing Cut Me Like A Knife Shoo Ouch it Hurt Some
PEA2⃣CE YA❕😋💯

Hercules beetle
by: Moni

Jay
These beetles are not known to bite..they eat rotting fruit.
They do not have any body part that could cut you. The pincers are pointed but not that sharp unless you really mishandled it.
Not sure what happened?

Strange it was in your laundry room.

Hercules beetle
by: Moni

Brenda
It is not common to see this beetle, let alone seeing 1-2 per day. My guess is this is not the same beetle. The hercules beetle is huge...nearly 2" long. Please send a photo of your beetle and more information about it's size and where you are finding them.
These beetles do not bite or harm people. Just put them in a jar and take out near some dead wood or in a woodland.
These are not pests, but really cool insects.

It would not be common to find in a house unless you have lots of old decaying heartwood in your home? Do you live in a wooded area? Do you have large logs perhaps making up furniture in your home?
These beetles are so big and heavy they do not fly well..they would have had to emerge nearby.

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Green 6 legs pod like body (Common True Katydid)

by Margo Manfredi
(Analomink PA USA)

We found this insect hanging out on top of our truck in our driveway. We live in Analomink PA in a wooded community. I have never seen this before and cannot find it on any web site. It has 6 legs long anteni. I can only describe the body as pod like. Kind of like a pea pod. It was about 3 inches long.

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Katy-Did?
by: SRapp

I think it is a Katy-did.

Common True Katydid
by: Moni

Margo
Yes your photo is of the Common True Katydid.
And yes they do live in and near wooded areas. They are found in deciduous forests--often heard, but seldom seen, since it mostly lives in forest canopy.
They feed on various leaves of deciduous trees. This is the insect that sings the "katy-did, katy-didn't" song we hear in late summer in the evening and at night.

Those Were The Days!
by: Grammadot

When I was much younger I climbed a tree one night to find out what made all that racket, which I have taped to enjoy on a cold and dreary. winter evening.

Katydid
by: Moni

Grammadot
What a great idea!
That would be a welcome sound in middle of winter!
Thanks

Katydid
by: Margo

Thank you very much!

Katydid
by: Anonymous

I saw one of these outside my house last night...didn't know what it was...now I do! Thanks!

beautiful green critter
by: Anonymous

my grandaughter and I found one here in Citrus Heights,california. didnt now what it was, could only describe it as looking kind of like a praying mantis but not ,beautiful when it spreads its wings

Cool bug
by: Anonymous

Just found a katydid exactly as described on my car in Hayesville,N.C. It's a very cool looking creature with its funny little legs!!!

True Katydid
by: April from Georgia

I found they also love rose leaves. I gently relocated two of them to wild roses. Two days later they were back! Apparently they prefer expensive roses. They seemed to have no fear when I picked them up by their backs.

I found same bug just now!
by: Steve in Buffalo NY

I just took the pic and at first I thought it was a preying mantis but when I got closer I wasn't sure why it is. Never seen one before. We have some woods close to our house near the backyard but there's a open hey field before the woods so I'm sure it's super rare to find these in my neck of the woods.

Common True Katydid
by: Moni

Steve
They are found in NY and in your area of NY. You are correct that they are usually found in wooded areas but can glide to lower branches (since they do not fly) and crawl around on bushes and such. The wind could also carry them if the right conditions exists. Unusual certainly, but not rare in my opinion.
So glad you got to add it to your "have seen that one" insect list :-)!

Angle Winged Katydid
by: Anonymous

Yours is most likely a female.

Common True Katydid
by: Moni

Anonymous
You can not tell the sex of a katydid from a front view...from the angle of this photo there is no evidence of an ovipositor (female egg laying tool).

It is the common true katydid not the angle-wing because of the dark spot on the thorax, the rounded body, and the narrow space between the antenna.


Katy-did
by: Megan

I found one on my front porch by the swing. I was a little freaked out because I have never seen one before. I am from the city and we moved out by some woods and I have a bad fear of bugs and spiders. Now that I know what it is, I feel a little better. We live in Williamsport, PA so when I read they are mostly found around NY I was a little surprised. Happy to know what it is anyway. Thank you.

Common True Katydid
by: Moni

Megan
The common true katydids are found in PA as well as over most of North America east of the Rockies. So they are not uncommon. They are found in wooded areas which PA has.

Now that you are not in a city, hopefully you will see many neat insects and spiders and learn to enjoy their beauty and interesting habits as well as diverse habitats! If you need any of the critters you see that are insects identified then this is the place to get help.
We look forward to your future photos of the insect world!

Just Caught One
by: Anonymous

We just saw this bug on the side of our garage. Noone near us knew what it was or ever seen one! Have it in a jar with holes right now and will probably be releasing it soon now that I know what it is. We don't have much around us in the way of wooded areas and we live in Cottage Hills, Il.

Common true katydid
by: Moni

Just caught One
So glad you found the katydid and look it up. It would be good to let it go.

If you find other insects, you look them up on this website, or take a photo if it is not here and we will be glad to help you Identify it.

Katydid
by: Anonymous

Found one on my porch yesterday Williamsville NY

kattydid sighted
by: Anonymous

I saw one like this today n it was so cold it didnt move at all. Somerset Pa

True katydid
by: Anne Van Brussel

Found one in woods of Tallahassee.
Has been on my arm for hours. Purple on top of head with bright yellow eyes.

Unsure...
by: Sarah W

I just found this very large grasshopper/spider looking insect on my patio window. We love in San Antonio Tx as of a yr ago and have seen some big bugs we are not used to. Thanks for the comments, I'm pretty certain this is what you all have see. Feel a bit better now

Glad to know what it is
by: Carol

Found one of these hanging out on the outside of my screened porch this morning. We live in a rural area outside of Raleigh, NC. The noise in the trees was really loud this morning; I guess this one decided she wanted some peace and quiet for a little while. LOL!

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green winged,six-legged,one inch (Green banana cockroach)

by Mike
(Nova Scotia,Canada)

found in a bunch of bananas bought from major grocery store.Resembles a large affid,six legged,green winged,about one inch long,triangular head.Viewed through a glass jar.

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Leafhopper
by: Moni

Mike
You have a leafhopper of some type. Being an inch long is not normal for the US or Canada. Since you found it in bananas, I would suggest you keep it in a glass jar so it can not get out to contaminate North America. Not that we grow many bananas in the northern regions, it is best not to let a forgein pest get established...as it may also like some of our local plants.
Leafhoppers feed on plant juices and can cause economic damage.

You might send it to one of your local agricultural offices (in the States we would send them to the extension service for an entomologist to check )...they could perhaps identify it and put it in a collection for educational purposes. I love to show children large insects and the larger ones come from the tropics.
Thanks for asking and keeping it contained!

Panchlora nivea
by: loret

Hi Mike. Looks like a Green Banana Cockroach (Panchlora nivea) to me and the fact that you found it with banannas would seem quite possible. A search over at bugguide.net should show you clear photos.

Green banana cockroach
by: Moni

Loret
Thanks! It does look like Mike's insect is the green banana cockroach rather than the leafhopper I thought.

The photo was not very clear and now that you suggested the cockroach I can see the long antenna that a leafhopper would not have.

This cockroach is not commonly found indoors, so is not a pest and is sometimes sold as a "pet".
This cockroach is found in compost, leaves, debris so they must feed on decomposing plant matter.

They are here in North America in the deep south. They are thought to come into the states on bananas from Cuba. So perhaps your grocery got a load of bananas from there?

Loret...thanks for the correction! I have learned a new insect!

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wide eyed and curious (Dragonfly head)

by bryan
(france)

This is a Macro of something that is very beautiful in flight, guessed yet?

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Easy
by: Moni

Dragonfly is the answer. That is a neat closeup.

marvelous pic of this dragon fly
by: brinda

just marvelous pic ...keep up the good work .. :)

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Green with intermittent strips (Olive green cutworm)

by Mac
(South Boise)

About 1.3 inches long and smooth, found on a concrete porch in south Boise end of october

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Olive green cutworm
by: Moni

Mac
Your caterpillar is called an olive green cutworm. It turns into a moth.
This caterpillar was probably heading to an overwintering site. They overwinter as mature caterpillars.

This insect is found in the northern states from WI and Manitoba to BC and then south to CA and AZ..not found in the eastern states.

The larvae feed on grasses especially the invasive reed canary grass.
Here are some photos of the moth and other stages

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Long green insect with folded wings (Squash bug)

by CT
(Singapore, Singapore)

the GREEN insect

the GREEN insect

Long green insect with 2 pairs of folded wings, one pair over another, folded neatly into 2 overlapping triangles. 6 long legs. Head is like a triangle, 2 tiny eyes very close to the apex. Antennae are brown, each with a short but visible section of white near the middle. I accidentally touched it, and now my fingers still stink of the weird leafy smell. It suddenly flew to my hand in the late night. Nearly squashed it. Now it's safely kept in a microwave safe container.

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Squash bug
by: Moni

CT
This is probably an squash bug (family Coreidae) but could be an assassin or plant bug. Since it is from Singapore, it is hard to know as we do not have the same species usually in the US. Here is the closest I have found here in the States. http://bugguide.net/node/view/228541/bgimage
The photo is not clear enough to see the sections or spot on the antenna.
You do not say just how large it is. Many of the true bugs leave an odor on your hands, such as stink bugs (Pentatomidae), squash bugs (Coreidae).

I found one too..
by: Anonymous

It was on a plant in my kitchen. I live in the South Eastern US..

Squash bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
Please take a picture of the next one you see and send it in.
We have similar ones here in the US as seen in the Bugguide site I listed. Perhaps that is the one you have?

I just saw three on my roof
by: shannon

kinda cute looking...was wondering what they are so I'm doing a search for them....
was gonna feed my spider with one of them but it got away

buggy bug
by: Anonymous

my sister got me to catch one off of her radiator.

strangely though we're not where any of you are. we live in north london, england.


HOW
by: Anonymous

how big was it??? this is a sersou question.

is this called a squash bug ???
by: Anonymous

what kind of bug is this cause i caught one for a science project and i dont know the name of it ????

Squash bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
If you send in a photo we can try to tell you what your bug is. The photo attached to these comments is from Singapore.
If you are from southern US then you may have a similar insect...see if this looks like yours - http://bugguide.net/node/view/228530. There is no common name for this genus but a better common name for this group of insects is leaffooted bug.

Send us a photo if you want your bug ID'ed for your science project, and let us know where you live, the size of the insect and any other info you know about it.

From Mongolia
by: Anonymous

I found many of these in my apartment. I live in Mongolia and I never seen this kind a insect. Where they came from? My mother planting many flowers etc.

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Small head, large read antenna (Grass-like mantid )

by Tracy
(Natchitoches, Louisiana)

Some type of praying mantis (hope you can tell me).

Picture taken summer of 2009, in 39 years this is the only time I have seen this particular type of mantis.

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Grass-like mantid
by: Moni

Tracy
Great ID! Your photo is of a grass-like mantid (Thesprotia graminis). I have never seen one either!
Like many folks the first glance it looks like a walkingstick not a mantid.
This mantid is just found in southern US and Mexico. Like other mantids it eats insects.

It overwinters as an egg which hatches in early spring and then matures by late summer into the adult. The immature stages look much like the adults just smaller. Adult males have wings and fly while the females are wingless. It is hard to tell for sure from the angle but yours may be a female.
What a neat critter! Thanks for sharing it with those of us from up north.

Aggressive
by: Tracy

At first I recognized the distinctive shape of her head (not sure that's really a unique characteristic), but the real give away was that when provoked, instead of trying to flee, she took the aggressive stance we all associate with the mantis rather than having all limbs on the ground like in this pic.

perhaps
by: Anonymous

I think its a Brunner's Mantis (Brunneria borealis)

Grass Mantid
by: Moni

Anonymous
Well, it could be the Brunner's mantid rather than the Grass-like mantid... the color fits better. The photo is not clear enough nor at a good angle to see the main difference between the two...which look very similar. The common name for both can be grass mantid so we will leave it as that since we do not know for sure which it is.
They both live in similar areas of the country and feed on the same main foods...tho bugguide notes Brunner's feed on grasshoppers mostly while the grass-like mantid feeds on various insects.

Thanks for pointing that out!

grass mantids in Maine?
by: Jen in Maine

can we have found one of these in Southern Maine (Cape Elizabeth)? It looks so much like this and has a yellow stripe down its back. We're working on a picture...


Mantid
by: Moni

Jen
From what I can find the grass-like mantids and the Brunner's mantid do not come as far north as Maine

However with our unseasonable weather this year I suppose it might have gotten there esp with a tropical wind.
A photo would be great!

Look forward to your photo or more information.

had one in MA too
by: Brittany

I was just playing with one of these! It crawled onto my dinner plate so I picked it up.. then I couldn't get it off me haha.. I do have a few pictures of it as well but I'm curious because I live in Massachusetts and from what it looks like, these don't live here?

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Large Green Flying Insect (Katydid)

by Fred Baker
(Charlestown, RI USA)

Found Insect lying on doormat. Someone had stepped
on it while entering the house. It has 2 sets of wings, longest wings were very delicate. I don't know how it got there. I had walked on the mat about 20 minutes earlier and it was not lying there.Looks something like a locust or grasshopper, but I've looked at hundreds of photos and nothing comes close. I laid it on a table to take this photo. Each square is 3"wide.

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Katydid
by: Moni

Fred
Your insect is a katydid, tho because it is so smashed it is hard to say which one.

The green leaf-like parts are the wings. This helps them to not be seen while feeding on foliage of trees and shrubs.

They are related to grasshoppers and crickets and tho they have long legs they prefer to walk than hop. They are usually heard not seen. There is a book(don't remember the name of it or the author) to identify cricket sounds that also has a few of the katydid calls. They make their sound by rubbing the wings together.



THANK YOU!
by: Fred Baker

THANK YOU Moni for this identification of a Katydid. Because it had been stepped on, for me it was difficult to identify. Also I did not think they grew that large. Great Site! Thanks again.

Fred Baker

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Light green velvety burrowing grub ( Lycaenid pod bore)

by Patrice Michel
(Placerville CA, El Dorado County)

I found this guy last year and now this year. It is 1/2 inch long and likes my green beans. It bores a hole into the bean and eats it from the tip up. I think it incubates in the bean then emerges to eat, I have noticed a small hole and on the other side a larger whole. I used to think the translucent globes where eggs now I think it is the green bean. Both years he seemed to come out in mid August. Thank you very much for letting me post this.

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Lycaenid pod borer
by: Moni

Patrice
Your larva is a Lycaenid pod borer. Thanks to your photo and description we have a positive ID.

There are a lot of Lycaenidae family larva but knowing where you are and what it was eating was a great help.


thanks for sharing this interesting insect.

Oh Heaven
by: Patrice Michel

Oh thank heaven you just saved me my mental state. I have been trying to find out what this guy is for 2 years. I thank you from the bottom of my heart. I now know that the little Trichogramma I keep seeing is my buddy in control. I am very glad to because I have been making sure my garden in completley organic. And tricho. is helping . Thank you Moni

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Green and red with yellow head flying (Red banded leafhopper)

by Rick D
(Montreal, Quebec, Canada)

Very small, thin, colorful beetle sitting on a cucumber leaf (but not eating!) in the sun, afternoon-ish, during mid-august near Montreal, Quebec. When bothered, would quickly flick into the air, do a quick circle and land on the same leaf or very nearby. Only saw this one.

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Leafhopper
by: MydMo

It is a variety of leafhopper. Many of them are quite colorful.

That's what I needed!
by: Rick D

Thanks MydMo!
Red-Banded Leafhopper. It does seem like there are a few very similar types. I'll have to spend some time to figure out exactly what the differences are between species if I want to know more.
Google searches generally work well, but not so much for "yellow headed red green insect identification canada". "Leafhopper" on the other hand works quite well...!

Red banded leafhopper, Graphocephala sp.
by: Moni

Rick
Looks like you two have figured this out.

I was going to say red banded leafhopper also but as you mention there are several that look similar. I think that may be what yours is.

One that looks similar on Bugguide is G. fennahi but it is only found on Rhododendrons. Since you found your leafhopper on on cuke it is not that one(unless you have lots of Rhodo's nearby?) It could also be G. teliformis.

Good luck with your search! Let us know what it is?

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green and brown popping bug (Treehopper)

by Amberlee
(Azle, Texas)

found this little guy in the leaves thought it was a peice of a candy wrapper. when i picked in up it popped i realized it was alive and not a wrapper.it kept popping in my hand. and it does fly.

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Treehopper
by: Moni

Amberlee
You have a treehopper(Smilia camelus). These hoppers feed on oaks and sometimes maples. They do not seem to be of economic importance.
As I think about them flying, I don't think I have ever seen the adults fly...they do just kind of hop. The nymphs or young crawl...they will tend to go to the opposite side of a stem if they know you are looking at them. But in the leaf litter they would just hop a little.
So, enjoy it's popping.

popping bug
by: Amberlee

Awesome Thank You So Much.

Amberlee

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green, irridecent wings (Cicada)

by Debi and Sam
(Quaker Hill, CT, USA)

green, irridedecent wings. Large body. Possibly a probiscus. We found it moulting out of a insect like shell. Wings a paper thin. We live in southeaster Connecticut.

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Green, irridencent wings
by: Anonymous

small cicada.....they are beautiful.....no mouth....only live to breed in this stage of their life.

Cicada
by: Moni

Debi and Sam
This is a cicada. Many cicadas have that beautiful iridescent color until the wings harden and the final coloration occurs. Until that happens, it is hard to tell which cicada you have.
Adult cicadas do not feed on leaves, and may suck juices from tender twigs. Nymphs feed on the sap from tree roots.
It is the male cicada's that sing the well known buzzing sound in late summer. The females do not sing.
Different species of cicada's vary in the time it takes to fully develop from egg to adult. There are the annual and the periodic cicadas.
Some can be pests of tree nurseries since the female slits the twigs of trees to lay eggs in. These slits are usually lined up along a twig and can distort and weaken the limbs, causing the plants to be unsaleable.

Thanks for the comments
by: Anonymous

Unfortunately this one only lived the day. He/she never left the spot we found it and the next morning it had died. It was still a beautiful sight to watch it "form". It turned into a dark brown and the wings lost the green tinge.

fount a cicada
by: Anonymous

my name is matt wells i live in mississippi and i just found one and i couldnt tell what it was but i looked it up and it is a cicada...lime green wings and black.

Cicada
by: Jean Watson

Found one of these beautiful insects in Our Yard yesterday.. We live in Michigan. It was cool to see. It was still attached to the Shell. We left it alone and found the empty shell on the ground the next day..

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Green Inchworm (Soybean looper)

by Elizabeth
(Frederick, Md - USA)

Inchy on his minature roses

Inchy on his minature roses

This is Inchy...he is green with black spots along his body in a line. There are also 2 white lines that go along his body in the same area as the spots. He has a black head, mincer-type mouthpiece, some sparse hairs along his body, three rear pro legs and three front appendages. I found him hanging from the bottom of my ottoman in the middle of my living room. He was quite distraught and was standing on his rear pro legs and looking all around. We had just brought our fall mums in from the front porch as it was getting too cold out (end of November). This is where we are thinking he came from. I removed him from the furniture and placed him in an empty 10 gallon glass tank (used to be for hermit crabs) along with a few leaves from the mums. He was very pleased with this and began nibbling little holes about the width of his body in the leaves. Inchy has been living in my bathroom for three weeks and now has a miniature rose bush plant of his very own. He seems content there and mostly sticks to the top areas of the stems and leaves and also likes to sit on the rose buds. I haven't seen him display any more alarmed behavior like standing straight up in the air and he mostly eats, inches, and just rests.

Unlike most people, I would like to help Inchy live out his life cycle. There is soil in the bottom of the rose plant for him to weather the winter and spin himself a chrysalis, but I would like to be certain that I have his environment right. I keep going back and forth between being certain he is a cabbage looper to being certain he is a cankerworm.

What type of caterpillar is he and what is his ideal habitat?

Thanks so much!
Elizabeth and Inchy - Maryland

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Soybean looper
by: Moni

Elizabeth
Your description is really super and helps a lot with your caterpillar ID. Fall Cankerworms are the only true inchworms (family Geometridae) that have 3 prolegs. but the coloration of the head and real legs does not fit. Therefore, the next group that loop like inchworms are the loopers. They are another kind of moth.

Therefore I believe, Inchy is a soybean looper. S

Soybean loopers feed on a variety of plants (herbs), including soybeans, goldenrod, lettuce, sweet potato, and peanut. Commonly they are a pest on soybeans. Other hosts include cotton, tomato, brassicas (cabbage, kale, broccoli), pea, tobacco, and cocklebur.

They are found in eastern and central North America.

Larvae are green with whitish lines along the length of the body and three pair of fleshy prolegs. The body of the larvae is tapered from the rear (largest) forward to the head. Often the true legs and head are black.

They overwinter as pupae within loosely spun cocoons which are usually attached to plant debris. So, if you want to try to keep Inchy, feed it any of the listed plants, with foliage available to make a cocoon on. Once you have the cocoon you can put it in a smaller screen or cloth covered container. Then, you should put it out in a garage or protected area for the winter so it has as much "normal" winter conditions as possible(refrigerator may work but keep a little moisture in the container). Then in spring it will emerge "on time" - if in the fridge put outside as soon as weather moderates so moth can emerge in spring.

Not sure it is worth it for this insect pest, but go for it! Rearing is fun and challenging.

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dark green with yellow markings (Red-legged Buprestis beetle)

by earl jordan
(gurley, alabama, usa)

Green bug with six yellow stripes

Green bug with six yellow stripes

it was sitting on my car tire when I saw it . It was around an inch long with orange legs and dark green body with six angled yellow stripes on it back. Three on each side from head to the tail.

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Red-legged Buprestis beetle
by: Moni

Earl
You found a red-legged buprestis beetle on your tire.
It is one of the metallic wood boring beetles.
This beetle is found in eastern US.
The larva feeds on maple, beech, oak, elm and birch trees, boring into dead or dying parts of the tree.

Stoplight Beetle
by: Mike

I'm so glad I searched through this site. I recently spotted one of these insects sitting next to a raised garden at my workplace. It had a metallic green head and black midsection with yellow stripes that changed starkly to red stripes on the last 25% of its rear (the red stripes being the only difference between my spotting and the one in the provided picture). In my thirty years, I had never seen this type of insect before, and I dubbed it the Stoplight Beetle, due to its resemblence to the green, yellow, and red lights. Thanks for solving this mystery for me!

thank you
by: Pat

I found one of these laying outside of my front door dead. Altho you said it is in the east, I live in NE Missouri, and we have a lot of those kinds of trees. We just went thru a horrific storm which brought a LOT of trees down, so it may have been a victim.

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3 inch green worm with black and orange spikes (Hickory Horned Devil)


(north carolina)

aggressive big bug

aggressive big bug

his is about 3 or 4 inch long came out the ground with huge horn like spikes on his head which are black and red with lot of eyes and black spikes all over his body

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Hickory Horned Devil
by: Moni

Your photo is of the Hickory horned devil. This is the caterpillar of the Regal or also called the Royal Walnut moth (pictures of those are in other Insect ID'ed).
These insects are found thru out the whole Eastern half of the US.
Larvae seen while they are wandering on the ground are searching for a suitable place to burrow into the soil for pupation. The size of your caterpillar indicates that is what it was doing. If he came out of the ground perhaps that spot was not to his liking. Hope it found its spot!
Larvae feed on leaves of ash, butternut, cotton, gum, hickory, lilac, pecan, persimmon, sumac, sycamore, walnut. Adults moths do not feed.
Great find!!

Found one, too
by: Anonymous

Today, we found a worm that looks just like the one in the picture. We live in Reading, PA near walnut trees. We had never seen anything like this before. We took pictures and tried to think of someone who could identify it. Thank you internet and this website. I guess we'll let it go as the comments do not seem to be upsetting. It certainly is fearsome looking.

found one too
by: Jessie Cocks

We found one today in Kennett Square, PA! It is an AMAZING looking creature!

Found one today
by: Anonymous

Wow, we just found one of these and I've never seen one before. It was right under our walnut tree which makes sense. We're in south central PA. So glad we were able to identify it on here!

Big worm
by: Beth

We found one too in georgia it is scarey looking It was near the pecan tree. All our pecans had fallen off before maturing was wondering if there are more and they are the reason we lost the pecans.

Found in Roswell GA
by: Anonymous

My husband was bite by one while putting up a bat house in a tree. Extremely painful followed by a horrible red rash.

liberty, ms
by: Anonymous

FOund one floating down the river have never seen one before.

Hickory Horned Devil
by: Moni

Beth
This caterpillar might eat the foliage of the pecan but is not the reason your pecans fell prematurely.
Usually tree fruits drop early due to poor pollination, or disease at time of pollination, or too many fruits for the tree to handle.
Hope that helps a little.
These are large but neat caterpillars...they do not harm humans in any way.

Found one today....
by: Anonymous

I live in Madison, IN. and I found one of these scarey lookin worms about 20 ft from our walnut tree and they are very intimidating lookin

My son found one today
by: Anonymous

My son found one today with his friend, thank goodness I told them not to touch it! I had no clue what is was, but I did know it looked scary, and wasn't sure if it was poison-ness or not. Glad I was able to find it on this page! Thanks for all your help!

Hickory Horned Devil
by: Anonymous

my husband found one of these worms in our
back yard under one of the pecan trees.we never seen anything like this before,needed to no if this worm was harmful.nearly 50 and never seen anything like this one in my life.lol

Under a tree
by: Anonymous

I found one of these creatures just lying on the ground under a tree.. Don't live near any walnut tree or anything so not sure where it came from? (Canton, Oh)

HICKORY HORNED DEVIL
by: Moni

Under a tree
What kind of tree did you find him under?? they do eat other tree foliage.
Also when it is time to pupate they start to wander around to find a good place to go underground and form a cocoon.

snapping worm
by: Anonymous

My Dog brought one of these in my yard and I had no clue to what it was. I can tell you it snapped at me. Live in Florida!

Hickory horned devil caterpillar
by: Moni

Live in FL
Hopefully your dog did not hurt it...that may be why it was snapping...to chase away any more intruders.
Please put it where the dog can not get it.

It may have been on the ground heading to a place in the soil to pupate. If it was 4" or so then that is probably what it was doing.

Yikes!
by: Sharon

My granddaughter and I found one on a walk in Alabama. We live in the woods and it was under a Hickory tree. Showed it to everyone and let it go! Cool.

Hickory horned devil caterpillar
by: Moni

Sharon
Thanks for showing everyone such a cool caterpillar! Not something you see everyday so it is nice to share when you do.

Found in Bourbon, Missouri
by: Anonymous

I just found one of these guys this morning. It is as long as my hand ans bigger around than my finger. It omits an awful scent.

3 big worms
by: Barbara Miller

September 2, 2015 found 3 of these 6-8 inch worms (Hickory Horned Devil) eating the leaves of a Persimmon tree. We live in the extreme north east corner of Tennessee in Jonnson County.

found 1 today by my persimmion tree
by: julie w jefferson co missouri

found 1 today by my persimmion tree. I let it go after reading this site.

Found in Texas?
by: Anonymous

Just found one of these not-so-cute devils on my front door step. Strange ... live in south central Texas (Austin/hill country area) We do not have have walnut trees, or any other type of trees that it likes.. have NO ideal where this bad boy came from, or where he was headed.

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brownish-green dragon fly (Antlion adult)

by Rachel
(Colorado)

same bug two veiws

same bug two veiws

brownish green body with four lacey wings the upper and lower fold over each other and the left and right fold to make a long triangle over the body. the eyes are set far apart with medium length antenna next to them. he's about an inch and a half in lengh. i found him on my screen door with a bent wing (see upper picture) so i dont know what plants he likes. any help would be greatly apreciated!!!!!

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Antlion adult
by: Moni

Rachel
Your photos are of an antlion adult. They are known to come to lights at night.
These insects are best know by the larva that are called doodlebugs. Larvae are great predators that lie in wait for their insect prey under sand or loose soil. They dig a shallow pit in loose sand to trap their prey.
Neat insect to find!

thanks
by: Rachel

thank you very much, i didnt know ant lions changed at all let alone something that big...

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6 legs two large antenna and Green (female katydid)

by John Nolan
(Ocala, Fl, Marion)

Big Green Bug Ocala

Big Green Bug Ocala

About three inch long or a lttle bigger Green with large antenna and 6 legs looks like it has wings but moves slow - not afraid of anything - what is it?

Comments for 6 legs two large antenna and Green (female katydid)

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bug name
by: brian keel

i beleive its whats called a katydid .i dont know the scientific name .thats what i allways knew it as

Katydid
by: John

Your right it is a True Katydid. I found a similar picture on the web 0 looks like thtas what the ugly cuss is we found. Thanks
Web says -
Scientific name:
(Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

Katydid
by: Moni

John
Yes, it is a katydid. It is actually a female katydid because you can see the curved ovipositor out the tail end. That is what the females use to lay eggs into loose bark or stems of trees or shrubs.

Thank you all again - great web site
by: John

You have all been very helpful - thank you.

Interesting thing is that another one was in the BBQ (unknown to us) when it got fired up and it was curtains for that one instantly. This one showed up the next day. It would not leave the BBQ lid even when I banged on the metal. I moved it with a piece of newspaper and it headed right back to the grill. I finally moved it several hundred feet away and haven’t seen it again. I would imagine that they are very aware of the pheromone or whatever of the mate.

we have on too
by: Jeff&Mel

We live in Escondido, CA and we had one on our gardenia plant. It lives there, will it kill the plant? I think it's eating it!

Common true katydid, female
by: Moni

Jeff&Mel
The katydids do feed on foliage of plants but they are not considered garden pests. They will not defoliate your gardenia, even if they eat a few bites it will not hurt the plant.

Adults have been found on flowers. There was an angle-wing katydid feeding on the dropped old flower from my hibiscus last night, but you could not see a hole where it was feeding. They are not the voracious feeders that grasshoppers are.
Thanks for checking.

I had one
by: Anonymous

Mine was hanging onto my wing mirror this morning.

.
by: Anonymous

I had 1 in my bedroom, scared the living daylights out of me!

Big Green Bug
by: Anonymous

I found one on my deck it was huge it has rounded wings that liik like leaves but i dont know what it is!

KATYDID
by: Moni

Big Green Bug
Send a photo!

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Large Green Flying insect (Annual Cicada)

by Darrin
(Southeastern U.S.)

Top

Top

Top Bottom

I found this big guy dead on my front porch. He (or she) is about 1-1/2 to 2 inches long with green and dark green colors. Also some black symmetrical spots. Very big wings.

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That is a cicada
by: Denise

Pretty ugly. They make all that noise on hot summer days. Live in the ground for 17 years, come out to mate, lay eggs and then die.

big green bug
by: Anonymous

cicada

perodic circada
by: Lynn

The coloring is not right but maybe it is a mutant of some type.

Annual cicada
by: Moni

Darrin
Your insect is a cicada, but it is the annual cicada.
The annual cicada is generally green with tan or black markings and emerge every year or two. There are several genuses of this insect. The insect needs to be looked at with a microscope to figure out which one it is.

The periodic cicadas (Magicicada species) have red eyes, brown wing veins, dark bodies and emerge every 13 or 17 years in mass emergences. When they all emerge the noise they make is very loud and bothersome.

Adults lay eggs in twig stems which are only a problem for nurseries with small trees growing, otherwise they are not considered a pest.
The larvae live underground feeding on plant roots. They pupate there and when ready to turn into adults they crawl up the tree trunk and emerge.

The pupa shell cases are seen on the tree trunks more commonly than the adults are seen.
The sound of the cicadas always indicates that we are in mid to late summer.


Thank you all!
by: Darrin

Thanks everyone for your comments.

Duane
by: Duane N Moore

These are AWESOME for fishing and food for any reptile pets!!!! I used to live in Milford Kansas and every year we would go and catch a mess of them !! As a kid , they were amazing!!!!!

Thank you!
by: Anonymous

We found one on a crabapple tree and couldn't figure out what it as. Thanks for the comments! They really helped!

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Small Green Beetle (Juniper stink bug)

by Corey Jones
(Randleman, NC, USA)

Some type of hard shelled beetle? Not sure.

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Juniper stink bug
by: Moni

Corey
Looks like your bug is a juniper stink bug.
The adults do overwinter in your area and that is an adult.
They feed on cedars and are attracted to lights.
Do you have cedar trees nearby?
Tho they do feed on cedar trees they are not considered a pest. They are quite a pretty green with interesting markings.

Thank You!
by: Corey Jones

How in the world did you know what my little green friend was? I looked up Juniper Stink Bug with Google, and there is no doubt that you nailed it! I do have cedar trees nearby. I see a lot of stink bugs in our yard, but they're all a very dull grey. This was the first green stink bug that I'd ever seen. Again, thank you for your service. I'll never have to wonder what a bug is again!

Stink Bug
by: Linb

I just knew this was a type of stink bug. I could smell it. Plus, it looks like a typical stink bug in my area, except I haven't seen any green ones.

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Green Bug, 1-2 inches (Scudder's bush katydid nymph)

by tiffany
(cedar park, texas, US)

Please help!

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Scudder's bush katydid nymph
by: Moni

Tiffany
Your insect is a Scudder's bush katydid nymph. It is a young katydid...related to grasshoppers and crickets.
The eggs overwinter and start hatching in spring....so that is a relatively newly hatched katydid. They feed on leaves of deciduous trees and shrubs, but are NOT a pest.

I found one of these in my house one winter and reared it to an adult by feeding it hibiscus flowers and other such food. Neat critters to watch!
Thanks for the great photo!

Bug
by: Anonymous

Thank you so much!:)

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greenish-black fly (Mining Bees)

by Bruno
(Superior Wi. USA)

green bodied, white haired, non-overlapping winged, and it looks like it has 5 eyes.

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Mining Bees
by: Moni

Bruno
Your insect is one of the mining bees in the Genus Adrena. There are many species and it would take an expert with the bee in front of them to figure out which one.
Mining bees nest in burrows in the ground. Adults drink nectar while the larvae feed on nectar and pollen. Many species are active in March and April when they collect pollen and nectar from early spring blooming flowers.
This genus is known to be cold tolerant and superior pollinators in cold weather. So these are great early fruit tree pollinators.
They are found thru out North America.

Bees have 2 large compound eyes that are the main vision for the bees. The 3 small eyes (ocelli) have light sensitivity.

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Metallic Green beetle with orange legs (Say's blister beetle)

by Greg
(Ottawa, Ontario, Canada)

These beetles showed up in the dozens as they swarmed all over the flowers of the choke cherry tree in my back yard. I live in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. They arrived suddenly in mid-may, and the tree is covered in them.

They are able to fly, though somewhat clumsily and they make a fair bit of noise with their wings when they do. They are often found joined back to back by the tips of their abdomens (possibly mating?). They also occasionally seem to have a light/white furry patch on their abdomen as well.

I would love to know what they are, whether they pose any danger to the tree, other plants, or my 5 month old daughter (who I often take outside into the garden with me).

Thanks so much for your time and efforts!

Greg*

PS I looked through the existing submissions and the closest I could find was this one: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/green-beetle-adult-leaf-beetle-comments.html

However, it seemed a little inconclusive and I wasn't sure if it was the same.

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Say's blister beetle
by: Moni

Greg
This is a blister beetle that is sometimes called Say's blister beetle after the person that named it.
These beetles are found in northeastern North America.
Adult beetles eat foliage, flowers, pollen and fruit of most fruit trees especially in the Rosaceae family (apples, roses), but are not pests. The larvae live in bees nests.
Blister beetles, family Meloidae, are called that because they secret a substance called cantharidin that can cause blisters on the skin. So, a 5 month old can not get hurt by being in the garden ... however, if you smash a blister beetle accidently and then touch yourself or your childs skin you might get blisters. These blisters are not fun, do heal, but are annoying like any damage to the skin might be. So, just like you are careful around thorns, poison ivy, and other "dangers" in the garden just stay clear of these beetles and they will not bother you. You have to smash them to release the cantharidin.

Blister Beetle
by: Anonymous

I live in the East end of Ottawa and I have tons of them in the backyard. They seem to be mating and are annoying and noisy. They are very attracted to my son's sandbox which concerns me a little. Do they bite at all? Are they going to leave eventually? If not , how can I get rid of them?

Pests!!!
by: Maria

Hi Greg,

These monsters have destroyed my whole crop of cherries, plums and apples this year!!!! Is there any (preferably organic) control for these fiends?

Maria

Blister beetles seem to like our weather this year.
by: Greg

Hi there,

When I initially posted this in May 2011 I was a bit concerned but all the information I received here was really helpful and informative and really put my mind at ease (Thanks again, Moni!) they are incredibly docile insects and, even though they are large and there are tons of them, I never had any issues or fears. I just made sure not to squish them.

They went away on their own as suddenly as they had arrived. They didn't show up again over the next two years but have returned again this year. They really love the choke cherry tree but don't seem to do it any damage... I think they are after the pollen in the flowers. I'm not sure what it is about this year that's different, maybe something about the weather patterns this year works well for them... Or was bad for whatever predator might eat them. Anyway, I'm sorry to say that I don't have any advice on pest control options. I just let them be and they disappear on their own eventually.

Good luck with your efforts.

Greg*

Black Bugs Orange legs about 1.5" long
by: GCD

Found these beetles in my garden 16 Jun 15. They were destroying my lupine flower talks by eating the buds vice the open flowers. Most often, it appeared they were mating while eating. Accompanying these beetles were small fly like bugs, they appeared to be feeding from the excrement of these beetles. When these bugs are in flight, the wings appear to be purple/blue. Using latex gloves, I cut all my flowering stalks while destroying numerous bugs. A few days later I saw new buds on my lupines, never saw these beetles again.

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Green and brownish orange (Damsel bug nymph)

by Chris
(MI, USA)

Insect

Insect

Insect Bite

This little fella bit my son causing swelling and redness, I know nothing about insects. Hope you can help. We live in Michigan, Thumb area (Genesee County). It happened about 2 PM. It was unseasonably warm that day over 80 degrees. When I lifted his shirt this insect is what I found. Has 6 legs, appears to have no antennae, and does not appear to have wings. It's body is aproximately 1/4" in length overall not including the legs.

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Check the insect - is it from the Assassin Bug (Kissing Bug) family?
by: Rob

Those can cause issues (maybe serious?) but I'm no expert.
Sometimes they can be in a nymph or young stage which makes them harder to identify.
I'll be someone here will comment.
Maybe edit your post with "Insect Bite" in the title to get more attention.

Insect bite
by: Chris

My son seems to have recovered from the bite just fine, there is just a small red spot with a scab in the middle of it on him now. To be honest I have no idea how to identify an insect, that is why I posted it here hoping someone who knows something about insects might identify it for me. I would have no way fo knowing if it was from the assasin family or not. I am really just curious because I have never seen an insect like this before. Thanks for commenting.

true bug - Damsel bug nymph
by: Moni

Chris
Sorry your son was bit, that never feels good.

First of all, it is hard to ID insects to species from photos...there are millions of insects and many in the same Family can look very similar without seeing them in person or with a microscope.
Secondly, a smashed, twisted and not all there insect is even harder to identify :-) Third, this looks like a young or nymph not an adult insect which is even harder to ID, since it has not developed all the characteristics commonly known for ID.

With all that said I believe your insect is one of the beneficial true bugs for gardeners. As Rob suggested it might be an Assassin bug (Family Reduviidae)( it is not a wheel bug), but I think from the size, color, and shape it is a damsel bug from the Family Nabidae. Either way, both of these insects feed on pest insects. To feed on these pest insects they use piercing-sucking mouthparts that they poke into the insect and suck the juices from it. So, it is possible that if the insect somehow got under your son's shirt, as it was getting pushed on, it "bit" back in retaliation of getting smashed. They are NOT known to bite, but when mishandled might have strong enough mouthparts to bite tender skin.
Damsel bugs are found in fields and gardens. The adults overwinter in leaf litter. The warm weather had them out and about looking for lunch.

Glad to hear the bite cleared up quickly!...another indication that it was not an insect with toxic saliva.

Should you have other insects you need ID'ed please send in the photos. Hopefully it will not be one that has bitten or stung someone :-)
Thanks for using this site!


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All green, very small, on fruit trees. ( Obliquebanded leafroller? tentative)

by Curtis
(Nelson, BC, Canada)

Next to a paper clip

Next to a paper clip

Next to a paper clip Nesting on leaf Close up 1 Close up 2

These little caterpillars are on all our fruit trees (apple, pear, & cherry) but none of our other trees or shrubs. They are very small; about 5 mm long when relaxed but they stretch to about 8 mm when moving. They often hang from the trees on thin, sticky threads, similar to a spider web. They also use this thread to form nests (?) on the underside of leaves.

We live in the beautiful Slocan Valley of southeastern British Columbia, near the city of Nelson.

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maybe Obliquebanded leafroller?
by: Moni

Curtis
So far I have not figured out which green worm you have on your fruit trees. Most green worms on fruit trees are leafrollers, which roll the leaves to feed in rather than forming a web around themselves.
These would be the redbanded leafroller or the Obliquebanded leafroller which is known to have the 1st stage move by silk threads. But the Obliquebanded leafroller has a dark head...unlike yours.
I will keep looking, but not sure what it is.

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Bluey/Green shiney bug with red wings (blister beetle)

by Britten
(Moose Jaw Saskatchewan, Canada)

This bug looks like a cross between a hornet, a shiney fly and an ant

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blister beetle
by: Moni

Britten
Your insect is a blister beetle that does not have a special common name but its official scientific name is Lytta rathvoni.
These beetles are found more in the western parts of North America than the eastern. The adults feed on foliage, flowers, pollen, and fruit, while the larvae live in bee nests.

Pressing, rubbing, or squashing adult blister beetles may cause them to exude their 'blood', which contains cantharidin. This compound causes blistering of the skin, thus the name blister beetle.

Yay
by: Sazzle

I found one today outside my work (on the brick work) while I was on my fag break! I live in England (northwest). I have seen it a few times and I wanted to know what it was as it was bugging me (excuse the pun).
Cheers!

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Praying Mantis (Chinese Mantis)

by Deb Schleutker
(Fishers, IN USA)

This Paying Mantis, also called the "Walking Stick" was found in a bed of dried daises on August 31, 2008. It's color (more brown than green this time of year) cleverly disguises his presence, as he waits patiently for his next prey. Picture taken in Fishers, IN.

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Praying mantis
by: Jane Dalton


Pretty cool, Deb. Can't wait to see what you come up with next.

PRAYING MANTIS
by: Moni

Deb
Your praying mantis is a Chinese mantis.
The egg cases are the ones that can be ordered as beneficial insect helpers in the garden. They eat pest and beneficial insects. So, it is great when they are in the veggie garden but not so nice to have on your butterfly bush :-). If they end up on a flower that the bees and butterflies like just move them to the cabbage or squash plants.

The Chinese mantis are large(4-6 inches long) and when mature are tan with green borders on the wings. Their size and the fact that the wings (on the adults) cover the abdomen help ID them as Chinese mantis not the smaller Carolina mantis.
Interesting fact noted on bugguide.net is that "Compound eyes chocolate-brown at sunset, pale tan soon after sunrise and during the day. "

I have some
by: Linb

I love my praying mantis's. I have several every year. They are small right now, but they hide in my potted plants. I look for them everyday. They don't bother me and they eat lots of mean critters (bugs). I would like more, but maybe I don't have enough bugs to feed more?

Response to Moni
by: Deb

Thanks for the info about the Chinese Mantis. I have a vege garden close to the daisies where I spotted this large predator and will be looking for more help on keeping the insects out this year...

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Large green flying insect (Coneheaded katydid)

by Mark Yarnevich
(Troy, Michigan)

Insect is about 3 inches long, 5 inches including the antenae. It is green colored with a flat head and 6 legs. The back two legs are long, red colored and look like they are for jumping. I found it trying to fly away while mowing the lawn. Picked it up and placed it in a bush, which is where I took the picture of it.

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Coneheaded katydid
by: Moni

Mark
Your insect is a coneheaded katydid. It also looks like it is a female because the dark brown sharp projection on the abdomen is the ovipositor.
These katydids feed mostly on grasses but are not a pest. They are found in eastern North America in grassy areas, meadows, thickets, and marshy type areas.
Females oviposit in crowns of grass clumps where the eggs then overwinter. In MI you only have one generation per year while there are 2 in the south.

Saw a note that said they may bite when handled but I have never had a problem...but be careful when handling. :-)

Reply to Moni
by: Mark

Moni - Thank you for the information. Quite helpful. This one stumped a lot of people.

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Bright green cricket( Shield-backed katydid)

by Susan
(Genesee Colorado)

Bright green cricket like insect found in Colorado

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Shield-backed katydid
by: Moni

Susan
I think your insect is a one of the shield-backed katydids...it might even be the long-legged Anabrus katydid, but I am not sure.
The shield-backed katydids do resemble robust crickets. These are found in western North America.
Most in this group are predaceous...feeding on other insects. They may also eat dead insects and some plant material.

Bugguide notes that they may bite if handled.

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