brownish wheelbug

by Wayne Arnold
(Downingtown, PA)

My neighbor, who’s an exterminator, never saw anything like this guy. He looks like a cross between a stegosaurus and a stick bug. In searching the Internet I just found out that he is a wheel bug, the largest of the assassin bugs. They also said that they could grow to be 1 ½ inches long. If that’s true then this one was a world record; I’d say he was approx. 5 - 6” long, not counting the antennae. This image is actually rotated as he was crawling up the wall towards the windowsill. He then flew off.

Comments for brownish wheelbug

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Wheel bug
by: Moni

It is a wheel bug and if yours was that long it must be a record!
Usually only big bugs like that are in the tropics.
Thanks for sharing!

wheel bug
by: diane zone 6

I live in exton so please keep him in your backyard!!

Wheelbug
by: David

Eureka! I saw one of these crawling on my deck railing a few months ago and I have finally found out what it is. I live in central Illinois and had never seen anything like it before! Mine was about 1.5" long from snoot to tail.

Brown wheelbug
by: Spence

We just found one in our backyard. We live in Central Indiana. This one was about 2 inches long and looked scary to me!!! I hope we don't get more. Does anyone know if they bite or sting?

Wheelbug - Do They Bite?
by: Wayne Arnold

They bite ridiculous - DON'T TOUCH IT!

Wheel bug
by: Moni

Spence
CAUTION: The adult wheel bug is reported to inflict a very painful bite. It has been reported use of ammonia water or Epsom salts is helpful in relieving pain from the bite.


The nymphs and adults are great predators to have in the garden to get rid of caterpillars, aphids, etc.
They overwinter in the egg stage then emerge in spring to grow into the adults. There is just one generation per year.



Holy!
by: Shanna

I work with kids and no joke they asked me to come see the "spider" they found. Thought it looked cool so I CAUGHT IT and then put it in our bug viewer for the day. Brought it home to do research about it so I could tell my kids what type of bug it is. Safe to safe I'm surprised! And grateful the kids or I didn't get bitten. Ours is almost two inches long. YUCK!

Florida wheel bug sighting!
by: Kristen

Wow, what an amazing bug to run across! This one flew in, onto the outside of our screened porch and gave us quite a show. Looked at us with the awareness of a jumping spider, moving around to stare and looked like he might pounce. I'm now very glad that he didn't.

i just found one
by: nic

found a wheelbug in my backyard today, haha, i let it climb on my hand and i took tons of pics of it! i'm really glad it didn't bit the hell out of me!

I found one too
by: Anonymous

I also was relieved to find out the name of the bug I had dubbed "the macon bug". I found it outside my hotel room window on the 7th floor. It was the strangest thing I had ever seen. The bug I saw was also about 2 1/2 inches long. I have the pictures to prove it. So their info on this bug is not all correct.

Found in NC
by: Dave

My wife pointed it out. Glad it's a predator and hope it laid eggs in our garden. Amazing! Glad I read about the bite. I always try to pick up new and interesting bugs, but this one was a little too big to pick up without checking.

Wheel bug
by: Moni

Dave
Glad you did look it up and did not get bit :)
Interesting they are still out there in winter...tho you have not had hard freezes yet.

Saw it in NC
by: Anonymous

Just found one of these in our front yard in NC and was trying to identify it when I ran across your site. Thankfully, my kids and I didn't touch it. It was moving veerrry slow, maybe because we saw it on a day when it had suddenly turned extremely cold. Thank you for the info!

Assassin (wheel) vs. Kissing Bugs
by: Anonymous

That is an assassin bug, or a wheel bug...very beneficial. The kissing bug, or triatomine is a very dangerous insect, known to carry a deadly pathogen that can lead directly to Chagas Disease. The disorder has been migrating north and is known to have killed many people...the folloiwng was taken from the CDC Website,

"Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Infection is most commonly acquired through contact with the feces of an infected triatomine bug (or “kissing bug"), a blood-sucking insect that feeds on humans and animals.

Infection can also occur from:
mother-to-baby (congenital),
contaminated blood products (transfusions),
an organ transplanted from an infected donor,
laboratory accident, or
contaminated food or drink (rare)

Chagas disease is endemic throughout much of Mexico, Central America, and South America where an estimated 8 million people are infected. The triatomine bug thrives under poor housing conditions (for example, mud walls, thatched roofs), so in endemic countries, people living in rural areas are at greatest risk for acquiring infection. Public health efforts aimed at preventing transmission have decreased the number of newly infected people and completely halted vectorborne transmission in some areas. Infection acquired from blood products, organ transplantation, or congenital transmission continues to pose a threat.
By applying published seroprevalence figures to immigrant populations, CDC estimates that more than 300,000 persons with Trypanosoma cruzi infection live in the United States. Most people with Chagas disease in the United States acquired their infections in endemic countries. Although there are triatomine bugs in the U.S. , only rare vectorborne cases of Chagas disease have been documented.”

Nc
by: Anonymous

One of these landed on me while pumping gas yesterday in Harrisburg nc. Glad I got it off before it bit.

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black saw back insect (Wheelbug)

by Jesse Seib
(Dayton, OH)

black winged insect with very particular saw-like spine. bug has 2 antennae and a long tongue like a butterfly. very hard-plated body.

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Careful? Assassin Bug?
by: Rob Holland

Be sure to find out what it is if you see more because it looks like it could be in the Assissin (kissing-bug?) family which can be quite dangerous.

Wheel bug
by: Moni

Jesse
This is the adult wheel bug. These are one of the true bugs also known as assassin bugs. Like the name suggests they are known as such since they hunt down their prey to attack and 'kill' them for food.
They have a large strong beak to pierce the prey to suck the juices out. All stages prey upon other insects - caterpillars, aphids, bees, sawflies etc. Therefore they are considered beneficial. Great to have in the garden!
Wheel bugs overwinter as adults and have one generation per year.
This insect is found in North and Central America.
CAUTION: the adult wheel bug is reported to inflict a very painful bite.


STINK
by: Lynn Smith

I have had 2 encounters with a WHEELBUG - at work & crawling up my recliner. Both times I re-located them back outside by their wheel and noticed the horrible odor they give off. I don't know about the "nasty bite" part but I am sure of the stink.

I WAS BIT BY ONE
by: Anonymous

I was sleeping on Wed Jun 12, when i was suddenly startled awake by something crawling on my arm, i jumped a little and swatted at my arm a few times, it then bit me, not knowing what had bitten me i went downstairs to sleep on the couch, i then went back up stairs to get my pillow and alarm clock, i lifted up a pillow on my floor, and there it was crawling away fast, so i smashed the head to kill it, and put it in a bag, i then went on google and found this, as one of the other comments read (WARNING BITE IS EXTREMELY PAINFUL) It starts to sting then after awhile it burns and then finally ITCHES!

Yes, that's an assassin
by: Anonymous

Yes, that's an assassin. Throw a cricket in a jar with him and watch out for that proboscis, or whatever the correct name is for his weapon of a mouth.

They can Bite you!
by: Anonymous

I didn't know that a small one had crawled under the collar of my shirt. I swiped at it when I felt it on me. Not soon after that I felt a stinging pain in my back solder. Taking my shirt off revealed a small assassin bug. Not fun finding that out.

All skeeved out.
by: Arthur Kelly

I found this wheelbug crawling on my neck while driving through the DWG. in PA. I quickly & I mean quickly swatted it off my neck.I didn't know where it landed, until minutes later it was on the trucks floor. The insect appeared to be knocked out. I pulled into the rest area & by then he was on the move.I saw him crawling up the side of the console. I had an empty bag that I used to get him in. Secured & unable to escape I got him home & jumped on my comp.Placing the bug against a picture I was able to match the bug to a picture of a black saw back insect. (Wheelbug). May he rest in peace.

Wheel bug
by: Moni

Arthur
So glad there was a happy ending for you...good that you did not have an accident due to this critter!
It is a beneficial insect, so hopefully if you find anymore you can just let it go.
Thanks for the great story!

wheelbug
by: Anonymous

We just found a bug crawling up our screen door in Clay Twp, near Ephrata, PA. We killed it. I am so glad we looked it up or we might have felt the bite. Thanks.

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Big Red-black insect (female velvet ant or cow kille)

by Mark
(Gunter Texas)

black and red stripe 1-1.5 inches hairy

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female velvet ant or cow killer
by: Moni

Mark
Your photo is of a female velvet ant also called cow killer. Males have black wings while females are wingless. This is actually a wasp. It got it's name because it was said that the sting from the female hurt so bad it would kill a cow. They are shades of yellow and brown or red and black.
They are found in meadows, old fields, and edges of forests especially those with sandy soil.

Adult velvet ants feed on nectar and water. The larva are parasites of bumble bees. The female velvet ant searches for bumble bee nests, digs down and deposits one egg near the brood chamber. Velvet ant larva enter the bumble bee brood chamber, kills those larvae by feeding on them. Larvae pupate in the bumble bee chamber.

Females have a very painful sting if handled.
Velvet ants are not aggressive and will try to escape when encountered.

ahhhhhh!!!!
by: m+g

OMG this bug is so scary me and my bff got out of the pool and there it was !!! SO SCARY!!!!

Thanks for the identification!
by: Anonymous

I saw one of these at my grandmother's farm in Georgia once and all I knew about it was that it was a "big furry ant that looked like a red bee" and my cousin told me to keep away from it. Nobody believed me in later years when I tried to describe it!

My Brother could have died....
by: Lockharts

We found one in our front yard when my brother was clearing it out. thankfully, he noticed the bright colors and decided to get some bug killing spray.... We were really scared because he thought it was a spider and looked it up. We live in central VA and are warning our neighbors... if there is one, there might be more....

Velvet ant
by: Moni

Lockharts
No need to get out the bug spray...Velvet ants are not aggressive and will try to escape when encountered.

Missouri
by: Anonymous

I just killed one in the office that I work at in Central Missouri! At first I thought it was a weird colored beatle, then a friend of mine stepped on it and he said it was a spider. I am terrified of spiders so I looked it up to find out that it is a wasp from the East coast...WTH is it doing here??

Velvet ant
by: Moni

Missouri
Not sure where you were looking for info about velvet ants, but they are found worldwide. They are found in North America especially in dry sandy soils.

There are about 480 species of velvet ants found in North America and several of those are found in MO.
Here is just one from MO...not sure if it is the same specie that you saw - http://bugguide.net/node/view/672075 - the author of that photo notes a few of the other species they saw at that location.

??
by: Anonymous

i found one of these in my yard,is it safe if i keep it?

caution
by: Anonymous

These wasp can cause a serious anaphylactic reaction even death in small children and the elderly.

Glad I was able to identify ours
by: Anonymous

Thank you so much for identifying this insect. I saw it running back and forth along the edge of my garage door while my dogs were outside. Glad I didn't bother it, but with a toddler and 3 small pets I want to know about the dangerous insects. I'm opposed to killing insects that aren't fire ants or black widows, but if this is a bumble bee parasite (as well as a risk to my family) I may not let if off so easily next time.

Velvet Ant
by: Pat

Found one of these by my back door yesterday & didn not know what it was. Good or bad? So, I tried stepping on it, but it kept running away. Was very hard to kill. It looked scary.

Hurts like hell!
by: Anonymous

I saw my first one of these a few years back as I was standing on our pool deck near some hedges that are on the other side of the fence around the pool deck.... When pain shot up my foot, leg and I jumped. One of these velvet ants ( I had no idea what it was at the time) had crawled up onto my flip flop and bit/stung me on the big toe!!! I saw such vibrant color with the red and black that first thought was some kind of black widow! I took a picture but could not find any answers until this app came along and I saw another one yesterday. The bite was horrible pain but did go away within a few days. My guess is that it didn't get a good chomp on me before I flicked it off. Very pretty looking but I would not fool around with them!! OUCH!!!

Central Florida
by: Anonymous

Been here almost 4 years and just saw one of these on a walk yesterday. Never saw one before anywhere. It went into the ground before I could exterminate it. Need to warn the neighbors, they have small children.

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Black and grey stripes with red antennea and legs (adult wheel bug)


(New Iberia, LA)

Found this bug after my son screamed about being bit. It does not seem to fly. In the center of its back is a bronze oval that looks a little like a small leaf. If has a long red tube for its mouth with long antennea.

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Wheel Bug
by: Lin

When disturbed, the wheel bug can inflict a painful bite. The bite has been described variously as worse than stings from bees, wasps, or hornets. They are said to be good bugs, because they attack other pests, but I don't care for them since they bite without being provoked.

Wheel bug
by: Moni

New Iberia
As Lin said, it is an adult wheel bug. It is named after the spiky looking 'wheel' on its backside behind the head.
They do bite with its long piercing sucking 'red' mouth parts and it is said to be very painful.

CAUTION: The adult wheelbug is reported to inflict a very painful bite. It has been reported use of ammonia water or Epsom salts is helpful in relieving pain from the bite.

The nymphs and adults are great predators to have in the garden to get rid of caterpillars, aphids, etc

They overwinter in the egg stage then emerge in spring to grow into the adults. There is just one generation per year.



Wheel bug stinks too.
by: Lynn

I have picked these bugs up by their wheel to get a closer look at them & noticed the odor they gave off. Good to learn of their bite & desirabiliity in your garden. Thanks

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What is this brown and black bug? (Wheel bug, adult)

by Tom Wood
(Lancaster County, PA)

Brown and black insect with long antennae. It is about 1 inch in length.

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bug
by: mydlars

Looks like a squash bug.

Bug looks like
by: LR

Looks like a stink bug. They fly, feel weird on your skin, and move slowly when they walk. When they feel threatened as when you come too close, you will smell their strange odor. Just gather up in a tissue and discard how you see fit. We flush them. Haven't researched what their good purpose is, but offensive smell when in your home.

Wheel bug, adult
by: Moni

Tom
This is the adult wheel bug. These are one of the true bugs also known as assassin bugs.

Like the name suggests they are known as assassin bugs since they hunt down their prey to attack and 'kill' them for food.
They have a large strong beak to pierce the prey to suck the juices out. All stages prey upon other insects - caterpillars, aphids, bees, sawflies etc. Therefore they are considered beneficial. Great to have in the garden!

Wheel bugs overwinter as adults and have one generation per year.

This insect is found in North and Central America.

CAUTION: the adult wheel bug is reported to inflict a very painful bite.

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six legged dark grey insect with wings and saw toothed ridge on back (Wheel bug, adult)

by mike brennan
(PA.,USA)

pic 1

pic 1

pic 1 pic 2 pic 3 pic 4

This insect has six legs, wings with a gold oval on each wing and looks quite ominous with a saw tooth ridge on its back and a proboscis with two 3/4 inch feelers (antennae) and a single fang like extension from the proboscis. Wings ,body and all parts appear dark grey. The size is about 1.5 inches long.

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Grey Bug
by: Mydlars

Wheel bug, or assassin bug

Wheel bug, adult
by: Moni

Mike
This is the adult wheel bug. These are one of the true bugs also known as assassin bugs.

Like the name suggests they are known as assassin bugs since they hunt down their prey to attack and 'kill' them for food.
They have a large strong beak to pierce the prey to suck the juices out. All stages prey upon other insects - caterpillars, aphids, bees, sawflies etc. Therefore they are considered beneficial. Great to have in the garden!
Wheel bugs overwinter as adults and have one generation per year.

This insect is found in North and Central America.

CAUTION: the adult wheel bug is reported to inflict a very painful bite.

thank you
by: mike brennan

Moni

thank you very much..... its quite a service you do....I called my grandchildren and asked them to do research on the wheel bug last night. So they are coming over today and I am going to share you information with them.

Thank You

MIke

thanks
by: mydlars

Yes,thanks.

Wheel bug
by: Moni

Mike
Thanks for involving and teaching your grandchildren about insects!

Insects are a very important part of our environment!
Insects are the largest group of animals with over a million species. They are mostly beneficial by pollinating, decomposing, a food source for birds, frogs, toads, snakes, other insects, are a human food source, help with medical research, are great forensic tools, etc. And they are just cool!
Only 1% of all insects are pests.

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Black White and Spikey (White-marked tussock moth caterpillar)

by Tracy
(Natchitoches, Louisiana)

Found on the fence surrounding the swimming pool, just wondering what it turns into.

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White-marked tussock moth caterpillar
by: Moni

Tracy
Your caterpillar is a white-marked tussock moth, so it turns into a moth. Tussock moths are in the Lymantriidae family.
Some folks are allergic to the hairs so be careful around this caterpillar.
The female moths of this insect are wingless and therefore flightless. The males are brownish with distinct markings. Females lay eggs that overwinter. The caterpillars come out in the spring feeding on a wide range of trees including birch, black locust, cherry , elm, hackberry, hickory, oak, willow and many others.
This is a common caterpillar to see over eastern US to TX and Canada.
Great photo!

Found Male Tussock
by: NancyLee VT

I.ve been looking for the name of this caterpillar. I found a male tan and black very handsomely beautiful. Markings are more distinct. Those 4 hair tuffs of hair on back are like some one gave that lilltle guy a haircut. Nancylee Vermont

White-marked tussock moth caterpillar
by: Moni

NancyLee VT
Assume if you saw a male it was the moth?, as you can not tell the sex of caterpillars.
The antenna of the male tussock is really cool looking!

Need help
by: Anonymous

This caterpillar is destroying our Japanese maple(lacy variety) What can we do to get rid of it ? The maple is hanging over a small pond.

WHITE-MARKED TUSSOCK MOTH CATERPILLAR
by: Moni

Anonymous
If there is too much feeding, you can try to just knock off the caterpillars and see if they can find their way back to the tree.
A second thing to do, since they can sting, it would be best if you could also pick them off with tongs or gloved hands and drop them in warm soapy water.
The third thing to try is to apply Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis). Bt is known to kill caterpillars of moths and butterflies. This is a bacteria that the caterpillar ingests as it feeds on the foliage. Then the bacteria grows inside the caterpillar killing it. It does not kill right away...takes a few days, but once the bacteria is inside the caterpillar they do not eat as much as before. If label directions allow use of BT where you live and on Japanese maples, then apply per directions and be careful not to spray where butterfly caterpillars exists or you will kill them too.

alburg, vermont
by: mary

these things have infested my yard this year, I've seen a few other years but this year they are everywhere, its creepy...and they do sting, my youngest (who loves bugs) got stung all over her hands and she said it really hurt for a few days....they are definitely bad this year...

found tussock on isle of wight
by: hannah

found on my rose bush

Tussuc moth
by: Elizabeth

Me and my mom found one and we were so scared of that cute little thing,but now I can hold it.yay!

tussock moth
by: Moni

Elizabeth
So glad you found one and that you are not allergic to the hairs.
They are very pretty caterpillars. Are you going to try to raise it to a moth?

White-marked tussock moth caterpillar
by: Anonymous

I can not tell if i the sane caterpillar as you, it almost looks the same but has some red, white, ans yellow on it, ans on its hump thing it is first white and at the top it changes to light brown. And i am in Marin, CA.

White-marked tussock moth caterpillar
by: Moni

Anonymous from Marin, CA
Without a photo we can not know what your caterpillar is. Next time take a photo and post it.
It does sound like it could be the same or related.

allergic
by: Anonymous

allergic to the hairs?

WHITE-MARKED TUSSOCK MOTH CATERPILLAR)
by: Moni

Anonymous
Yes...some people get an a rash if they come in contact with the hairs on this caterpillar.

I am killing hundreds of these every day
by: Anonymous

My husband got stung by one that fell down his back. I have 7 huge California live oaks and that is where they came from. In fact, I live in Menlo Park, CA and we have TONS of these moths buzzing around the trees all over Stanford, Palo Alto and Menlo Park. So even though I am killing tons (I pull them off trees, roses, plants, fences, my house and anything smooth like a hose, plastic garbage can, metal trellis and fence) by plucking them off with my secateurs and then squishing them with my feet, I am fighting a losing battle. I also know what their cresols looks like and each one of those also houses 50 or so little white eggs for the next generation.... There can be 2 or 3 generations a season. The ones I miss end up in my house, buzzing around my porch lights (that is how they get in), and flying around my oaks. I have no sympathy for them. They come in all kinds of colors. Mine can be grey, have red, yellow, brown. They can have black or light colored antennae. It is amazing how some can look just like bark, and some resemble the frass that comes with acorn growth. It is amazing how diverse they are. A bunch of my neighbors hire guys with big wands to spray poisons into the trees around now. Then the caterpillars descend on gossamer threads. Even though I kill thousands, thousands more survive.

Summer Visitor
by: Customcast

Just found one of these walking on my driveway in south central Pennsylvania . I have viewed these before but not in recent years. I think it's the above variety but not sure. When I lightly touched it,with a small stick, it went into full protection mode spines on its tail and under belly very impressive. I did get a couple of pics.

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Grey with Black Marks Possible Wheel Bug? (Wheel bug nymph)

by Megan
(Washington Crossing PA USA)

Found in Yew hedge when trimming. Frosty gray with black marks on back.

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Wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

Megan
Yes, it sure looks like the wheel bug nymph. The markings and orange antenna look like it. It is too young yet to see the "wheel" spokes on the thorax.

The nymphs and adults are great predators to have in the garden to get rid of caterpillars, aphids, etc.

They overwinter in the egg stage then emerge in spring to grow into the adults. There is just one generation per year.

As it grows it will molt a few times and turn into a large gray bug with a spiky looking 'wheel' on its backside behind the head. As it gets to be an adult, you would not want to pick it up as it reportedly bites with its long piercing sucking mouth parts.

CAUTION: The adult wheel bug is reported to inflict a very painful bite. It has been reported use of ammonia water or Epsom salts is helpful in relieving pain from the bite.


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green caterpillar (Saddleback caterpillar)

by D.R.

At least 10-14 hairy legs. Strange green box pattern with a red dot in the middle. Looks like it has 2 heads with 4 antennae each!

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Saddleback caterpillar
by: Moni

DR
Your photo is of a saddleback caterpillar.
These can sting so do not pick it up.

Here is what the Virginia Extension Service says about contact with this caterpillar
It has poisonous spines on the four large projections (tubercles) and many smaller ones that stick out from the sides of its body. Contact with them causes a burning sensation and inflammation that can be as painful as a bee sting. The irritation can last for a day or two and may be accompanied by nausea during the first few hours. Usually the site of contact reddens and swells much like a bee sting.
A person "stung" by a poisonous caterpillar should immediately wash the affected area to remove any insect hairs and poison that remain. An ice pack will help reduce swelling, and creams and lotions containing steroids will lessen the discomfort.

The saddleback caterpillar is a general feeder. Food sources are many trees, shrubs, and grasses including apple, asters, blueberries, citrus, corn, dogwoods, elms, grapes, linden, maples, oaks, Prunus species, sunflowers and viburnums.

poisonous
by: Anonymous

dont touch the spikes

Annoying Little Things
by: Anonymous

These are all over my banana plant and hurt so bad. I don't like them eating my leaves, either.

candy
by: Anonymous

it looks like a piece of candy... :/ i definitely don't think you're supposed to eat it though...

saddleback
by: Moni

As we noted in the comments...this is one of the caterpillars with poisonous spines. Do not touch in any fashion!!

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