large brown bug (Giant water bug)

by Karen Mowrey

Thought it was a bat, good size, flying clumsy at night, 70degrees,Sandy Hook CT. I was hoping it was a Cicada but does not look like the pictures I had seen My husband said to tell my friend, whose house it was at, that it was a cockroach, but he is not sure either and teasing me.


Moni saysYour bug is a giant water bug.

They do live in water but are attracted to lights at night. Do you live near a pond or lake?

They do like clean water so I am not sure there are as many around these days as several years ago. Perhaps they are still plentiful in TN.

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Large Brown Bug
by: kimsuki

I'm certainly no entomologist, but it looks like what in Tennessee the kids used to call a "June Bug". It was a great big (let me make that HUGE) brown beetle with large horns. The first time I saw one I totally freaked out! The kids used to tie string around them and swing them through the air like a toy plane and they would make a buzzing noise as they went through the air! How cruel, but I was totally fascinated as a city girl from the San Francisco area and new to rural Tennessee. People play with bugs here!

Big water bug
by: Anonymous

One of these bugs washed ashore from the ocean and was trying to get out of the water in Savannah ga, it was like 4 or 5 inches long it was scary but it was eaten by a seagull.

Never seen one here Giant Water Bug
by: Anonymous

just saw one of these down in Texas, bout a hundred yards from a large pond, in the garage.
Was frantic and dragging a tangled web behind it.
Must had just escaped a spider.

NIAGARA FALLS
by: Anonymous

i live in canada and just found one ot these on our driveway. near niagara falls

large brown water bug
by: Sunshine

I live in south florida. One nite I went out on the back porch with my shitzu, she likes to sniff everything, but I saw her walking towards it it looked like it has pinchers so I grabbed her and we went in side. I later went out side to poke it with a plastic bottle to see wat it would do. It didn't move which freaked me out more so I left it alone... creepy bug..

Swimming with the giant water bug
by: DEE

As others have mentioned, this is a giant water bug (Lethocerus sp.)
Last year my son and I were swimming in our community pool and one of these was swimming with us and swam towards my son and could not be scared away. We were able to splash it out of the pool. These are fierce predators that stalk, capture and feed on aquatic crustaceans, fish and amphibians. Their bite is considered one of the most painful that can be inflicted by any insect and can be quite destructive to tissue and rarely can do permanent damage. It was big enough to give us a scare but have not seen one since although our pool on the shore of Utah lake where I think it came from.


bug encounter
by: Sean

Hopped out of my car and saw this beast of a brown bug that scared me at first due to the proximity to my shoe thought maye hissing cockroach or the pincher beetle but walking with pinchers nope giant water bug. Ely, MN

found this bug in Massachusetts
by: Anonymous

I had one of these giant water bugs on my screen door tonight. It was attracted to the outside light. I have never seen this bug before. It's strange, however, because we don't live near water.

Giant water bug
by: Anonymous

We here in Wisconsin have these bugs too! We live on a farm near Lake Michigan. My cats like to play with them, but the latch on there faces and the cats shake them loose, but they keep picking on these poor bugs. I too thought they looked like a cockroach. Now that I know they fly, I am assuming that is what I see flying, not bats.

Things are nasty
by: Derek

I live in Gainesville fl I seen one of these nasty things there was actually like ten of em around me it freaked me out sobi went inside my work away from em . I am not messi. With those things helllllll no lol

weird things
by: Anonymous

I live in Wisconsin. And was camping with my wife when we discovered one of these bugs flying around my lantern it landed on our table and Hung out with us for a bit before flying off into the woods. It was huge!!!! Like 5 inches long it was the first time I have ever seen one of these amazing insects.

WTF?
by: Anonymous

Opened the front door after dark in Central MN and saw this guy looking at me. Upon closer examination it was not intimidated, and attacked a stick I put up to it by slicing at it with its pincer like front legs/pincers. I had never seen one before, and while I didn't think it was poisonous, I wasn't sure if it had any kind of bite to be worried about so I sprayed it with some spectracide. After it laughed that off I stepped on it. EOS.

Freaked Me Out
by: Freaked Out

I walked outside one evening to find my 10 week old puppies frantically trying to get to something just out of their reach on the other side of the fence. Upon first glance all I could see was something large and dark. I grabbed my headlamp and moved in for a closer look. OMG it was the biggest, scariest bug I had ever seen! I tried to get it to leave by poking at it with a stick but it only got pissed off and began making strange hissing-type noises so I backed off! Then it took off and flew at my head totally freaking me out. Later that night another one was on some rocks nearer the house by the porch light. I wacked him with a hammer. He oozed yellow stuff then got up and started to walked away before I waked him again! I've never seen bugs like this before but we've been experiencing a drought and bugs are everywhere now. Weird!!!

ugly BUG !!
by: Joe in N.E. Pa.

one of these flew into my garage last night , immediately freaked me out and i caught it in a bottle to get a better look . i was sure it was a gigantic cockroach ... im ery glad that there wasnt more of them ...!!!!

I think I just saw the same.....
by: Anonymous

I think I just saw the same thing outside my apartment. only its wings were spread out. The thing is huge.

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Brown spider black spots (Camel cricket)

by Liz
(Marlboro, NJ)

What kind of bug am I

What kind of bug am I

Brown with Black spots, spider like, it has six legs total, the hind legs are large, 2 antennae, small tail

Moni says this is a camel cricket

They are known to habit moist greenhouses, basements and laundry rooms. They feed on various food stuffs especially organic material dead or alive. They can cause damage in greenhouses by feeding on young plants. These are quite common and were introduced from China.
Here is a website from North Carolina State Univ Entomology Dept about these crickets for more info.

Read more here

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Camel cricket
by: Moni

This is a camel cricket. They usually live in moist places.

OH MY GOD
by: Anonymous

OH MY GOD.. I have these in my mobile home in the bathroom/laundry room and Ive only seen them MAYBE 4 times in 3 years but I have been searching for 3 years trying to figure out WHAT IN THE WORLD they are because they SCARE ME TO DEATH!!!!!!!!!!! OMG!!!! they jump like 50 feet!!!! AAAHH!!! I seriously almost cried when i just saw the PICTURE alone! lol

Camel cricket
by: Moni

Anonymous
They are known to habit moist greenhouses, basements and laundry rooms. They feed on various food stuffs especially organic material dead or alive. They can cause damage in greenhouses by feeding on young plants. These are quite common and were introduced from China.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/grasshopperlike-brown-insect-greenhouse-camel-cricket-female-comments.html#ixzz1KGnTnaFA

Scarey scarey bugs!!!
by: Scared Too!

I find these in my bathroom and now in my outside storage closet.. my condo backs up to a wooded area. They scare the SH&^ out of me! How can I make them go away??????

Scary Bug
by: Anonymous

went into my basement and saw this thing hop.After screaming tried to trample it and failed 3 times. it was partially dark where it hopped. Finally got it and put the remains in a plastic bag. Looks indentical to the picture.I Live in Pennsylvania.

Scary Jumpers
by: Anonymous

We call them JUMPERS in my house. They come around so often, we go around stomping every spot on the floor...I actually just killed one a few moments ago! How do we get them to go away?

Water bug .......No , cricket!
by: Anonymous

So finally I have found out what this creature is! We have them in abundance here in the tropics of Australia (we haven't been here long and had never experienced them before). I thought they were water bugs as they were always around moist watery areas but my 6yr old son argued they were crickets. It came to the stage of me saying i'm the adult, they are not a cricket! Oh the shame! I now have to eat my words and say, 'you are right it is a cricket - actually a camel cricket', that way I still keep my dignity!!!

Hate them
by: Anonymous

I was watching tv and saw something white fly across the screen, thought it was a moth... I was so wrong when I saw this abomination staring at me. It's good to know what they are called and now they plague my closet but I have been to afraid to clean it up due to my new found phobia of these wretched creatures.

Brown spider black spots (Camel cricket)
by: yonosoon

We have them here in Arkansas. yes they are a new breed of Crickets. just like the centipede with long skinny legs and the same color as the cricket.

get rid of them
by: Anonymous

Please tell there is away to get rid of these bugs. This the first time in 44 yrs I have had bugs,,, Brown spider black spots (Camel cricket) How do I get rid of them?

Camel cricket
by: Moni

Anonymous
They are mostly a nuisance pest in moist damp areas, tho these crickets can also come indoors during hot dry weather. They can damage fabrics packed in boxes in a damp bathroom or basement, if the crickets cannot find suitable food.
Effective control starts with eliminating hiding places, and reducing conditions that are attractive to these pests.
Here are the steps to take - seal gaps and openings around windows frames, doors, foundation and clothes dryer vents, crawlspace access doors; install weather-stripping; stack boxes off of the ground.
Keep ground cover, shrubs, firewood, and mulch a foot or more away from the foundation.
Put sticky boards, like those used for cockroaches and mice, in corners and behind appliances to catch crickets.


camel crikcet
by: Anonymous

Hi, I just visited your website, and I want to say thank you for making it because I found the information I needed. one day I found a camel cricket in my house next to our sets of stairs. I had know idea what it was. I have never seen an insect like this in my life. But now that I know what it is, I'm not scared.

Catch and release
by: Julia

I just admired my new basement roommate for about 30 minutes. I figured cricket because of shape and loooong antennae, but the size, looking sorta hairy and the markings were very strange to me. Anyway, it wasn't doing much and I thought after it's done with any other roommates I am unaware of, I didn't want it to "find" my clothes. Soooo, caught it in a paper cup and released it back into the wild. I got some great close up pics and video to remember him/her by. 😢

BTW: Eastern PA, USA

camel cricket
by: Moni

Julia
Thank you for doing a catch and release!
Wish more folks would do as you have...learn and let live! :)

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Brownish Little Stinkers (Boxelder Bugs )

by Grammadot
(Barto,PA)

Fall Migration

Fall Migration

As shown on October 19th there are insects called Stink Bugs. I am surprised that there was only one noticed in Iowa. In Eastern PA we have quite a few. In late September they invade our houses; some survive in linens, books and window sashes until Spring. Their musty odor is noticable occasionally, probably because they were stepped on or tormented by one of our cats; however, on Thanksgiving Day, although I routinely throw hundreds back outside without causing a "stink", one in my dish closet objected to being removed and my guests fell over each other trying to leave the room! This year they seemed to favor the back door which we luckily did not have to use.

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Stinky!
by: Anonymous

i was there! ...
they give me the willies every time i see one ...
and THAT one stunk to high heaven!

Boxelder Bugs
by: Moni

If you have bugs on the house like that and you call them 'stink' bugs, I assume they are boxelder bugs. Are they slender, soft bodied, black with red markings?
The other "bug" that accumulates on houses like that are the Asian lady beetles. They are round, hard shelled, and red with black spots. They do leave a smell on your hands when you touch them.
Both insects come into homes in the fall in IA, evidently PA, and most of the Midwest. They are a nuisance but do not do any indoor damage. The lady beetles feed on aphids, primarily in soybean fields in the summer. Boxelder bugs feed on, you guessed it, boxelder trees. These bugs do not stink when you touch them like the traditional stink bug.
Best way to get rid of them, if that is your intent, is to use a small shop vac and vacuum them up inside and outside(on a warm fall day). Dump the contents into a bag, seal it and throw away!
If you send in a close up of the insect, I can tell you which it is.
Thanks.

Invasion of the third degree!
by: Anonymous

i was there as one of the guests falling all over each other trying to get out of the kitchen...little buggers...its true they have invaded ...they love my curtains!

Oh no Moni!
by: Grammadot

Thanks for the input Moni. They aren't boxelder bugs. They are all brown, hard shelled shieldbug look alikes and I would not have the heart to smother them. However, I admit the vacuum is handy during tomato canning season!

Close up?
by: Moni

Grammadot,
We have so many boxelder bugs on our buildings in the fall I just figured it had to be. Do you know that it is a stink bug? or were you needing an id?
Do you have a closeup of this critter?
Thanks

DRX
by: DRX

They're no stranger to us here in Ludington Michigan.

they are not boxelders.
by: Anonymous

They are not Boxelder Bugs the are very different. trust me we have them both in Wyoming and they both give me the willies! the stink bug just puts its rear end up and lets off a foul odor. while the boxelder only flys at your face and sits there like hi we are friends now.

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large brown insect wtih black eyes on back ( Eyed Elater, Eastern Eyed Click Beetle)

by james
(kitchener ontario canada)

just wondering what it is?

just wondering what it is?

we were wondering if you could tell us what kind of bug this if you could let me know either way that would be great thanks

Comments for large brown insect wtih black eyes on back ( Eyed Elater, Eastern Eyed Click Beetle)

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Eyed Elater, Eastern Eyed Click Beetle
by: Moni

James
That is a large click beetle called the Eyed Elater or Eyed Click beetle. The large eye like spots make it very easy to identify. The adults do come to lights, esp in the spring and early summer.
These are found in woodlands. The adults may feed on some nectar. The larvae are predatory in decaying wood, eating grubs of wood-boring beetles like (Cerambycidae or longhorn beetles).
Neat large beetles to find!

thank you
by: james

glad to know what it is

yesterday
by: Anonymous

We seen a beetle like this yesterday. I had never seen one in 46 years they are pretty cool

HOW TO GET RID OF THIS BUG
by: CARY REDMAN

I want to get rid of this bug, what can i use?

EYED ELATER
by: Moni

CARY REDMAN
Can't imagine wanting to get rid of this beetle. Where is it? Where do you live? Why get rid of it?
If you found one just put it outside near a tree. It will not bother you.
Thanks for being patient and putting it outside where it belongs.

I know!
by: Anonymous

I saw one of those in my driveway and it started jumping! I looked it up and it said eyed elater! Kinda Scary... Thnx

i saw it too!
by: Anonymous

I just saw one and took pictures of it! Kinda creepy! I placed a hoe on top of it and it started jumpinkinda startling given that it scared me when it fell out of a tree!

Click Beetle
by: Nancy McManus

It's a click beetle. We had one as a pet, in an aquarium. Loved watermelon and lettuce. We didn't know what it was, either, until we spotted it at our local museum's bug show.


big eye beetle
by: swooz

found one in our garage under the hose, I throught I killed it, about 1hr. later when I put it in a jar to show my husband it moved, then after 5hrs. it still was moving. they must be hard to kill if suffercation won.t do it. never ever seen one of these, and i'am 59yrs. old, kinda of spooky looking for sure.

Eyed Elater
by: Moni

Swooz
I do hope you let it go...it may look funny but it is a good bug for the garden!

There are millions of insects and we will not see them all in a life time. So glad you got to see this neat beetle.

South East Louisiana
by: Sandra

We just found one of these beetles and had never seen one in my life. I photographed it and left it on the cabana where it was found Does anyone know if these little guys are native to this area. Why did others who found these kill them? couldn't figure that one out.

Eastern Eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Sandra
Yes, they are native to all of the eastern half of North America. So neat that you got to see one!

Glad you left it where it was. And yes it is too bad that others kill them before they find out they are not a pest nor dangerous...just a cool bug.

Only 1% of known insects are pests...it is too bad so many folks let insects bother them instead of seeing the uniqueness.
Thanks for sharing!

June 11, 2016
by: Chloe

Very excited to find this insect today. Didn't know what it was. Thank you for your website and information! Question. Is this black eyed betel common?
Thank You,
~Chloe

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brown Unknown Pod (mantid egg case)

by Levon
(Tujunga, California)

Unknown Pod

Unknown Pod

Hi,

I found this pod on my Walnut tree. This is in Southern California and I have many fruit and nut trees. I have placed praymantis pods in the garden a few years ago, but they did not look like this one, the color and texture are not consistent. Also I noticed a remnant of a web right above this pod with a bee in it. The wind blew the bee and the web, and you can see it hanging from the left side of the pod. The web may or may not have anything to do with the pod.

Thank you for your time.

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Mantid egg case
by: Moni

Levon
Well, you were thinking this might be a mantid egg case and it is. Perhaps you put Chinese mantid egg cases in your yard...they look more triangular in shape foamier looking, and larger than these. What you have here is probably the California mantid egg case which are laid in long strips about an inch or so long.
Here in the Midwest we have the Carolina and the European which lay the same type of egg mass as the California mantid. We too have the Chinese mantid that lays the triangular shaped egg mass.
These good guys will be helping you control insects this summer in your fruit and nut trees.


Great News!
by: Levon Parian

Thank you for letting me know, something told me not to get rid of it and I kept myself from taking any action. I'm glad I did. Thanks for taking the time to identify.

its an egg sac
by: cathy

ts a praying mantis egg sac

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brown with pincers (Antlion larva or Dootlebug)

by Richard
(Colorado Springs, CO)

What the!?

What the!?

Rear end has pincers like an earwig, but the head appears very, very small and at the front of the mitten-shaped body, unless the pincers are at the front and the bug is always moving backwards? Found it in my sunroom, where it blends in very well with the brown carpet.

It also has little tufts of black hair-like growths coming from the widest segment of the body.

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Found it!
by: Richard

Ah! I spoke with someone at a local university and they identified it as an antlion larva.

I guess it's constant backwards motion was its attempt to burrow into sand.

Antlion larva or Dootlebug
by: Moni

Richard
Glad you found out what it was...they are neat to watch in the sandy soils.
Thanks

we have these!
by: Anonymous

just came across this bug in Ashburn, Georgia. they dig a hole in the dirt/sand and locate themselves at the bottom of said hole. only pinscers showing. when an unknowing bug falls into their trap they SNAP with pincers and are very agressive about doing so!

Doodle bugs :)
by: Anonymous

We always called these doodle bugs when we were kids. If you take a small piece of grass and tickle the sand on the sides of the cone shaped hole, like a bug trying to climb out, it will throw sand up the sides to make "the bug" fall back down. They were always fun to play with. I hate to say it but I would occasionally throw an ant in just to watch it get pulled under. That was an odd place for you to find this though.

Antlion
by: Anonymous

Yup, an antlion.

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Jumping brown bug (Greenhouse camel cricket)

by Russell
(Wycoff, NJ)

Looks to have 6 legs. The rear legs are large. The body and legs are brown with dark stipes

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Greenhouse camel cricket
by: Moni

Russell
Looks like you have a Greenhouse camel cricket. They are known to habit moist greenhouses, basements and laundry rooms. Evidently they feed on various food stuffs (carnivorous) much like field crickets or cockroaches. They are about 13-19 mm (~ 3/4 inch). These are quite common and were introduced from China.

You did not mention where you found it?

surprise!
by: Anonymous

We live in southern Illinois. Have never had bugs (other than regular crickets) in our house. I have found these camel crickets in my bathtub in the morning and in my sink. I can't believe how far they can jump! They are scary as hell with their long antennae. Yikes!

There we are!
by: Sara

Thats what I have right here next to me! I've never seen one before so I thought about looking it up. I thought it was a mix between a grasshopper, Katydid, and cockroach! How silly is that? I found it in my room on the wall. It was two days after I brought in my lilies. I guess it hiched a ride!

hate those things!
by: Anonymous

First saw them 2 yrs. ago in basement. Don't know how they get in, give me the creeps. I'm in NJ. They climb walls???!!! Hubby moved stuff in garage today and there were MANY hiding in corner, all sizes. YUCK.

Grossed out n curious
by: Sparkle

I have these Camel crickets in my basement...Laundry room. They really creep me out even though i thought they where interesting being i never seen 1 before...Buut now I see them everytime I wash clothes! Are they dangerous in any kind of way and will they ever jump on me? I need more info. on these things...someone pls help...im about to go check my laundry ={

Camel crickets
by: Moni

Sparkle
These crickets will not harm you. They are crickets so they can jump and if you are close by...yes they might land on you. :-)
If you have a lot of them then you need to eliminate the moisture problem in your basement.

Here is a website from North Carolina State Univ Entomology Dept about these crickets for more info. You did not say where you were from however your extension office should also have some local information.

yuk!
by: Anonymous

I found a greenhouse camel cricket at the door way of my bathroom it was scary when I bent down to take a look because its extremely long antenas turned and faced directly at me I can't stand bugs or insects or anything so my first thought was to squash it I did so took a picture of it (so I could look it up) and then threw it outside

Greenhouse Camel Crickets
by: Anonymous

l found them in my greenhouse , quite a few of them and they seem to be quite harmless... Yes they like to jump and they can jump really far compared to the size of them, I would call it a cross between a grasshopper and a cricket. I would like to know what they eat, so l can protect my vegtable gardens if need be..

Greenhouse camel cricket
by: Moni

Anonymous
As stated before in the comment section they are opportunistic feeders, eating what ever organic material is available. However, in a greenhouse situation they will feed on the plants and can cause damage.
If they start to be a problem in your greenhouse, insecticidal soap spray or dust diatomaceous earth are said to be effective...ck the label for product use in your area and in a greenhouse.

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Brown and orange flying (Ten-lined June beetle)

by RyAnn and Cricket
(Aurora CO USA)

My cousin took this picture of this bug. She said it flew in from a window and kept getting stuck on it’s back. It has furry antennas and looks like nothing either has ever seen. We live in CO, I’m thinking some kind of moth, and sorry we don’t have a better picture. I hope you can tell what it is!

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Ten-lined June beetle
by: Moni

RyAnn and Cricket
The angle is not very good but from the antenna my guess is the ten-lined June beetle.
Let me know if this is it?
See my comments about this beetle here on Insect Id:
This is the ten-lined June beetle. Yes they do hiss especially when disturbed. They feed off the needles of coniferous trees.
Larvae hatch, burrow down in the soil and feed on roots of shrubs, trees, require 2-3 years to reach maturity. Pupation is in underground chambers. Adults do come to lights at night so perhaps you have light on the garage?
The antenna is quite large!

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/brown-and-white-striped-beatle.html#ixzz0NK2tqVPa

Cool!
by: RyAnn

I think so! Thank you so much!

Ten-lined June beetle
by: Moni

Glad that is it!

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brown and white striped beetle (Ten-lined June Beetle)

by joe watson
(victoria bc canada)

it is aprox. 1.5 inches long

it is aprox. 1.5 inches long

i live in victoria bc
this beatle was flopping around on its back on my driveway at about 1030pm
the antennea are wet in the picture but are much larger in real life and they seam to spread out like a feather with about 4 or 5 points
you cant see by the picture but it has quite large eyes
oh ya and it hisses

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Ten-lined June Beetle
by: Moni

Joe
this is the ten-lined June beetle. Yes they do hiss especially when disturbed. They feed off the needles of coniferous trees.
Larvae hatch, burrow down in the soil and feed on roots of shrubs, trees, require 2-3 years to reach maturity. Pupation is in underground chambers. Adults do come to lights at night so perhaps you have light on the garage?
The antenna is quite large!
Thanks for the photo!

...
by: Kaia

My sister found a beetle just like this and it was flopping around on its back......

thnx 4 the info tho! :)

-peace

cool bug
by: Michele

WOW! We are in San Diego CA and we see one or two of these each year in our yard each Spring. This year my kids caught one and discovered the hissing, and that it has a furry belly and can fly. Thanks for the info. We were asking everyone if they knew anything about this prehistoric looking bug!

N/W Wash
by: Kev & Trish

My wife was in the basement of our home and had one land on her arm. I thought she was going to loose it right there on the spot. We didnt notice any hissing noise so we let it go in the tree.

new to the region
by: Richard Best

this is a very interesting beatle and this year is the first time that I have seen it in Surrey BC our cats have brought 2 into the house to play with at first I was not shure if they would bite or sting my cats but the cats won Cats 2 Bugs 0 This site helped me to identify the bug Thanks

Caught one last night! 7-18-10
by: Kim

I'm in the Seattle area... and I caught one last night on my back deck! I have never seen the bug before so I'm glad you posted the picture! I almost had a heart attack because its so large. The hissing was incredible, it even scared my little dogs that enjoy playing and eating bugs for fun!

Same bug along Dalls Rd cliffs, Fairfield, Victoria, BC
by: Ian Frazer

Found 1 in my house - hissing and scaring our two cats. Really big with the wings out, etc. No idea how it got in.

I took a nice picture of it in a glass before letting go outside.

We found a few more along the cliff top the past few days. They -really- sound ticked off when you step near them!

Ten-lined June Beetle
by: Moni

Ian
Sounds like you have enjoyed your find...we entomologists like it when others share our enthusiasm for insects!
This sounds like a neat critter...hope to see one, one of these days.
Thanks for sharing!

June bug
by: Steph

We have had at least a hundred around the house this summer. I have lived in Gig Harbor area all my life and have never seen them before. I am glad to know what they are now. Thanks.

Glad I found this
by: CMG

I'm not a huge fan of bugs but when I saw this huge beetle fly into my apt and my cat corner it I had to catch it and watch it a while. No worries, I put it back outside. I don't like them but I don't like killing non-pest bugs. If it weren't for this, I'd have never known what I was looking at. Time to browse the site now!! Oh, sorry, I did not get a good picture of it and I live in the Central Valley of California.

striped beetle brown and white
by: Anonymous

Just found one in the showroom at firestone it scared me

Will it harm my trees?
by: TAS

I'm glad I found your site so I could identify this beetle. I turned over a pot that was located under a light last night and it spilled out on the deck and was hissing at me and my big lab backed away from it! I've had it in a jar not wanting to release it until I know it will not damage my trees to any great extent. This one does not appear to have wings. Any ideas on whether they are harmful to my evergreens?

TEN-LINED JUNE BEETLE
by: Moni

TAS
Tho this beetle does feed on conifer foliage it is not a pest so you can let it go. :-)

scared me to death
by: jeff

i found this beetle out side my house it scared me

Tan/brown beetle
by: Anonymous

We are in lacey, WA and I just found one that flew and landed on my arm!! Not sure of it pinched or bite, but that's how I discovered it!!! What the heck is it and where do they come from!!!????

ten lined june bug
by: kristen ladd

Vacationing in Lake Tahoe, they are abundant! Just wanted to know if they are poisonous to dogs/cats. My little dog loves playing with them but I of course do NOT want her to get sick!

Ten-lined June Beetle
by: Moni

Kristen
The June beetles are not known to contain a chemical that would be poisonous or irritating to the skin.
There are beetles that do contain chemicals that can cause blisters or are toxic, so I am glad you asked.
Do not know if a dog eats them if they will irritate or not...That would be a great question for your vet. :-)

big scary looking brown bug white stripes..
by: Anonymous

My son and I were peeking outside the window of my aunts house, playing hide and seek with my boyfriend when we noticed a huge beetle on the screen. We were so interested in it we caught it in a jar... Its actually right next to me now... I thought it might be a june bug of some sort since we see the normal small brown uncoordinated ones flopping around on the porch all the time. this one seems to be pretty mellow... haven't heard it hiss at all though I think that'd be pretty interesting. Glad to know I was right! Really glad to have stumbled upon this website... we'll let it go now.... away from the house of course... it's cool looking but i still am terrified of bugs lol.

big bug
by: Anonymous

We live in Gresham OR why would there be one here? I've lived here my whole 33 years of life and never seen anything like it.

TEN-LINED JUNE BEETLE
by: Moni

Big bug
They are found thru out all of the Western and north central states, so not surprised you found one :)
There are millions of insects in our yards and gardens. Many we do not see for any number of reasons...partly because we are not outside enough to see them, or we do not have the right habitat nearby for them to be around...but for sure there are many out there for us to look for and to find :)
So cool that you did see one!

They do come to lights so perhaps you were just lucky and one came into your porch lights and stayed around for you to see it.

It must be a Pac-NW thing.
by: Matt

I work in Ferndale, WA and I've seen quite a few of these flying / crawling around our large open-floor shop at night.

I'm just glad they don't seem as drawn to bright light as the moths. I don't think I could concentrate if one of these landed on the back of my neck while I was welding.

TEN-LINED JUNE BEETLE
by: Moni

Matt
Yes, they are common in the NW US. They are neat to see, but also agree it would be very annoying to have one on you while trying to weld!!

What in the world is that beetle
by: Tommy

I found this beetle on my front porch in Corvallis
Montana. I had no idea what it was until i looked it up. This website helped me identify it.

Found one in Earth Bound Organic Lettuce
by: Anonymous

I have never seen one of these in Vermont... And I had one crawling out of my earth bound organic lettuce! They are gross. Are they common in Vermont?

ten-lined june beetle
by: Moni

Anonymous
No they are not usually found in Vermont!! Only on the west and north-central states.

They are attracted to lights so perhaps at the Earth bound plant they had lights on at night during packing and it got in that way.

Large cool beetle to otherwise get to see. :/

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Small brown and white bug (Cockroach)

by Abby
(Adelaide, South Australia)

Roughly 1cm long, glossy body with distinctive markings of brown, black and cream sort of colour.
Has long antena and six legs.
Found in different areas around the house, sometimes in amongst dishes waiting to be washed, and other times in cupboards.
Underside of the body shows white colour.
Legs are covered in very small hair.

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Cockroach
by: Moni

Abby
From the photo, it is a little hard to see, it looks like an immature cockroach tho it could be a wingless female. Many cockroaches feed in and around kitchens on greasy sweet tidbits of food. They may have come in on boxes or packages from the grocery, tho they can also move thru sewer pipes if you are in the city.
I would suggest a thorough cleaning of every thing in the kitchen to get all food particles cleaned up and new food put in closed containers of plastic or glass.

It does resemble a camel cricket also...does it run or hop?
Do you have a photo looking down from the top?

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Large browinish 2 inch hairy flying bug (Robber Fly)

by Matt Waddoups
(Sierra Vista, Arizona USA)

This bug was in my apartment in Sierra Vista Arizona. Looks like a mix between a huge wasp and a mosquito or something.. Maybe a little house fly because of the eyes. I've lived in AZ all my life and never seen anything of the sort.

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Robber fly, Archilestris magnificus
by: Moni

Matt
Your insect is a robber fly with the scientific name Archilestris magnificus. There does not seem to be a specific common name. Robber flies adults and larva are predators feeding on other insects. They are considered beneficial insects for the garden.
Large Robber flies may bite if handled roughly.

Robber flies live in a variety of habitats tho usually open areas. Larvae usually are found in soil or decaying wood.

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brown Stink Bug on leaf (Stink Bug)

by Moni
(Iowa)

Stink bug

Stink bug

Brown bug on raspberry leaf. What is this?

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Brown stinkbug - seriously
by: Sadie

I think this is a brown stinkbug...great photo!

Pentatomidae
by: Anonymous

This is part of the Order of insects called 'Hemiptera'. Also known as the 'true bugs'. This insect is harmless enough, however, it has a very specialized mouthpart in the form of a large beak that it holds tight against its underside until it needs it to feed. Some members of this family can use this beak as a defense. This particular specimen is of the Family Pentatomidae, or is otherwise known as you have guessed 'stink bug'. It prefers soft fruits like Tomatoes and is most likely NOT causing the damage you see here on the leaves.

Brown stink bug
by: Moni

A note to clarify information about this pest that I posted to start the insect ID page.
Anonymous you are correct it is a Pentatomidae, order Hemiptera, and it is called a brown stink bug. They do feed on plants and can cause damage on fruits...like the berries of this red raspberry plant. And no, it did not do the eating of the foliage, the stink bugs have sucking mouth parts to suck plant juices, an insect like the grasshopper with chewing mouthparts made the leaf damage here.
The brown stink bug looks very much like the spined soldier bug, which is a very beneficial insect. The spined soldier bug has sharp pointed "shoulders" and feeds on other insects like soybean looper and other pest caterpillars.
If you handle any of the stink bugs they give off an odor...hense the name.

Illinois Guy was kinda concerned
by: Anonymous

My mom woke me up at 7am in horror of her discovery of this! It was crawling near her toothpaste. She thought it was a cockroach and I reassured that it most likely wasn't. (we don't live in a dump afterall) Thanks for the post!

stinkbugs
by: Anonymous

How can you get rid of them in other ways besides calling a professional?

Stink bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
If you truly have a stink bug in your house, just throw it outside. It does no damage in a house. It feeds on plant juices and does not prefer to eat houseplants.
No need to call professional pest control.

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brown Ant like insect with thorns (Leaffooted bug)

by Kori
(San Antonio, Texas)

A neighbor moved and left us their aloe plant. These red ant-like insects have been on the plant since. They don't seem to be eating it or doing much of anything. They mostly stay in a pack together. Only once have I seen them all in their own area on the plant. They have black legs, two black antennas, two black dots on their abdomen and thorn like spikes all over their body. I'm worried they're dangerous.

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Ant-like critters
by: Anonymous

I've had these in my veggie garden and they don't affect veggies or the plants. I think they're called assassine bugs in that they kill other bugs. They can grow to about an inch long and fly. Even tho they have a drill they don't harm plants

PS
by: Anonymous

yeah, they eat other bugs not plants, and are therefore good for the garden, but they can give you a serious bite if you get them feeling threatened. otherwise they won't bother you.

Leaffooted bug
by: Moni

Kori
I would agree they are probably the leaf-footed bug. The antenna is not quite right for assassin bug. Glad you found out they were not dangerous.

A closer photo would help with the ID.

photos
by: Kori

Moni,

I agree, a closer picture would have made it a lot easier to identify. I didn't realize the photo would be resized so it couldn't have shown bigger. But, next time I find a curious creature in my yard, I'll know =) Thank you for your time!

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Tiny wasp or ant? (Subterranean Ants)

by Lois
(Hartington NE)

Wasp? Ant?

Wasp? Ant?

I keep finding these in my basement.(they've all been dead) Thought carpenter ants, but these are tiny and everything I read says they get big. Put a dime in the photo for size comparison.

Thanks so much!

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red ants
by: Anonymous

They look like winged red ants that were in the process of swarming to a new nest.

Subterranean Ants
by: Moni

Lois
These are subterranean ants.

If you had the warm spell when you sent this in, like we had here in Iowa, then these ants maybe coming in as a result. These subterranean ants are quite harmless the rest of the year, and are a brief nuisance when they do enter houses, usually through basements. The winged forms naturally hang out in the cool autumn soil, and fly when the ground thoroughly warms during “Indian summer”. They sense the heat of the building through the soil, and move toward it.
You do not need to "control" them as they will go away with the warm weather, since the bulk of the colony lives away from the building in the soil.

Did you notice a lemony smell when they are around? If so, it is the citronella ants.

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winged borer insect with long antenna-like tail (Ichneumon wasp)

by Peggi
(Pittsburgh, Pa)

closeup of insect

closeup of insect

A maple tree in our yard has extensive damage to the trunk. There are holes around the circumferance of trunk from the base to about 5 feet from the ground. The holes are the size of a pencil width. The bark is peeling off in large sections.

The attached image shows the damge to the tree on the left and a closeup of the insects on the right. What doesn't show up in the photo is a very long antenna-like "tail" that the insects inserted into the holes.

Any guidance you can give us as to how to save the tree would be greatly appreciated.

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ichneumon wasp
by: Moni

Peggi
From your description and the photo ( a side view and clearer closer up would be better) I believe your insect is an ichneumon wasp. The long tail is the ovipositor that places the eggs inside the tree to reach the larva of a borer.
So the insect you see is probably the beneficial insect that is killing the borer in the tree. If the tree has borers it may not be salvageable. You should have a tree expert look at the tree to decide that.
Here is a photo of a giant ichneumon wasp on Doug's Insect Id site. Is this what yours looked like?
Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/long-orange-yellow-black-flying-4inch-insect.html#ixzz0UOu6KLPZ

Giant ichneumon wasp male
by: Moni

Peggi
With further searching, these are male giant ichneumon wasps. Males do not have the long narrow hair thin tail of the female. These are from the genus Megarhyssa.
The borer is probably the larva of the horntail wasp.

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Brown, approx 3 inches, flying (Giant water bug)

by Jessica
(Ottawa, Ontario, Canada)

Trying to sneak into the movies

Trying to sneak into the movies

I saw this guy in Ottawa. It's about 3 inches long, brownish-grey coloured, with large wings that cover the top of its body. It was by itself. At first i thought its front legs were pincers. Later i saw a couple more of them all on concrete outside of the movie theatre. This one was on the door trying to get in.

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Giant water bug
by: Moni

Jessica
It is a giant water bug that is trying to get into see the movies. Perhaps wants to star in an insect horror movie?!
These insects are attracted to lights, so that is probably why they were there. They live in clear freshwater streams and ponds and like to cling to cattails. The front legs do kind of look like pincers but it is the mouth parts that can bite. It does hurt for a short time. This fall I was bitten by the small water bug and it hurt!
The adults use those large front legs to catch their prey, feeding on aquatic insects as well as small fish, tadpoles and the like. They pierce their prey with their sharp beak and secrete enzymes that dissolve the body tissues, then suck up the resulting liquid. The young nymphs feed on aquatic insects.
They are neat strange looking critters. Would love to see one again...been a while.

Thanks!
by: Jessica

Thanks so much. I really wanted to know what kind of bug that was since I'd never seen one before. I really appreciate it

ATTACK BUG
by: SAUL MARTINEZ

this bug was swiming under water and it looked look like it was going to attack my friend tomas at a swimming pool in columbus tx ! infact it was going straight for him til i stopped it with a pool net ! it was determined if i ever seen a determined bug ! NOT LYING HAD TO BE HERE TO BELIEVE IT ! IT WAS SWIMMING FIVE FEET UNDER WATER!

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Saul
They are water bugs...so yes, they do swim under water...even to 5 feet! They were not going to eat Tomas...they eat small tiny insects and fish. They do bite tho and since it got lost in a swimming pool instead of a pond...it might be hungry. :-)

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brownish starfish insect (Hag Moth Larva)

by HWolfe
(Hertford, NC)

Belly shot

Belly shot

I found this on my car window whille visiting family in South Jersey. I first though it was a leaf but I took a closer look an have no idea what it is. I took pictures and asked practically everyone I know have they ever seen one. All I get is no. I was lucky because it was on my car window so I opened the door and got belly shots this part looks like an alien. I have a picture of the top but can only upload one.

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Hag moth Larva
by: Donalda

I believe your caterpillar is the Monkey Slug (Hag Moth Larva) - Phobetron pithecium, of the family Limacodidae. It is about the size of a large thumb nail. The curly "arms" are actually just lobes of hairy flesh atop the caterpillar. If you turn the caterpillar over you'll see the usual legs and head,as shown in your picture. It very often is mistaken for a leaf gall.
Those hairs on the "arms" are capable of stinging, so this caterpillar is very well defended.

Monkey slug larva it is!
by: Moni

HWolfe
Donalda has described your critter completely. These larva feed on many woody shrubs and trees throughout the whole eastern half of the US.
Some researchers do not feel this caterpillar can sting. If you are sensitive it is always wise to be careful.

creepy critter
by: Anonymous

it is the hag moth larve i just had one fall on my window today and decided to do research on this creepy critter. the scientific name is Phobetron pithecium

cool
by: Anonymous

That is so cool, I am actually doing a project on that bug but I cant find any info.

I saw one
by: Tina4dejr

I had one of these on my car also I took several top view pictures and got a video of it crawling.

Starfish bug thing
by: Mandy

I went into my basement to do laundry. When I walked over to my dryer I saw what looked like a flat starfish. I freaked and ran (deathly afrais of spiders). Later I went back down and it was on the side of the dryer and spread out about the size of my palm. Wish I new what it was, Oh yeahand I live in South jersey. never saw it before.

Hag moth larva
by: Moni

Mandy
The hag moth larva is only about 3/4 of an inch long so not sure what you saw that was the size of the palm of your hand...perhaps you could take a photo for Id.

a bugs life.
by: GUIN AND CALHOUN

we found the bug on a car window and we kept it for 3 days. and then on the 3rd day of that evening, and all his legs fell off and he flew away!

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brown long insect (Striped walkingstick pair)

by Benjamin Schwartz
(Fort worth, texas USA)

grill match to show size

grill match to show size

not sure what this is hangs around my porch with backs up to a wooded creek area. carries it's young on it's back

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Striped walkingstick pair
by: Moni

Benjamin
This is a pair of striped walkingsticks. The small one on the back is the male. These insects feed on trees and shrubs eating the foliage. They are known to eat oak, crepe myrtle, lyonia, rosemary, roses and even privet in captivity.
When disturbed they can spray a fine liquid mist that smells bad and can seriously affect the eye from a foot away. So do not get too close.

Possibly can bite
by: David N. Currey

Glad I finally found out what this insect is. Back in Louisiana in the mid-sixties in Boy Scouts, I was on a camping trip, and we were about ready to turn into our sleeping bags to sleep, and we found one of these things on this guy's sleeping bag. We tried to get rid of it without touching it, and it disappeared. We looked all over and couldn't find it. My buddy slipped into his sleeping bag, and then let out a yelp. Something had bit him. We opened up his bag and this insect had crawled in there to get away. Nothing else was in there that could have bit him. Ever since then, I give these things a wide berth.

can seriously affect the eye from a foot away
by: Anonymous

About a month ago my 6 year old grandson found one of these on a piece of paper in our back yard when he put the paper in the trash my 5 year old granddaughter was standing next to the trash can and this bug sprayed her in the eye ,I flushed it with water and she is fine ,I have seen several more in and around our front and back yard we are backed up to a bunch of woods so they are probably coming from there ,I do kill them every time I see them because my grand children are terrified of them ! Stay clear !!!!!

Brown walking stick
by: wayne/lisa

Found on back porch. Male on females back. I caught them. Lisa turned them loose three days later. My eyes have been burning off and on since I caught these insects. I finally located this site while trying to ld the insect. My eyes have never felt like this. Could it have been the insects? I say stay away from them.
Wayne

Brown walking stick
by: wayne/lisa

We found a pair, caught them. My eyes burning.

striped walkingstick pair
by: Moni

Wayne
As mentioned in my comment "When disturbed they can spray a fine liquid mist that smells bad and can seriously affect the eye from a foot away. So do not get too close."
So yes, these can spray a chemical that is an eye irritant.
Good that you let them go!

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Brown with Orange Stripes (Elm borer)

by Trudy
(Ontario Canada)

Brown bug orange stripes

Brown bug orange stripes

Less than an inch long, Started noticing them in the house shortly after christmas. 6 legs, long antenna,

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ugly bug
by: Anonymous

i think i'd move!

I'll stay
by: Anonymous

LOL, I think I'll stay. We heat with wood so they probably came in with the wood.

Elm borer
by: Moni

Trudy
Your critter is a longhorn beetle, family Cerambycidae. It looks like the elm borer, but without a clearer photo, I can not be positive.
This insect overwinters as a pupa in elm trees; adults emerge in May and June, and lay it's egg at night in bark of stressed elm trees; larvae bore beneath bark in galleries; usually one generation per year.
They are in a small part an insect that can transmitt Dutch elm disease. You might want to be careful if you have elms in your yard or neighboring areas. If you know where the wood came from, be aware of getting any more from that source. Use all of it this winter, so the beetles do not get out and infest the neighborhood!
This is the concern with the emerald ash borer in the Midwest US...people buying infested wood and taking it into uninfested areas.
So, Yes, you probably brought in some infested wood and the adults have had enough warmth to emerge.
Would love to have a couple for my collection.
Thanks for sharing your photo!

Elm Beetle
by: Anonymous

My husband thought thats what they were. My neighbourhood is full of Elms and unfortunately the bugs came from trees that were in my own yard. We had a wind storm and some of the Elms were all broken and blown down so we decided to use them for winters wood. I would definately send you a few bugs, exactly how do I go about doing that?
Thanks for the help

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4.5 inches Dry Brown Leaf-like Insect (Praying Mantid)

by Ganesh
(Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India)

The Insect

The Insect

I just don't know exactly how to describe it, but then, I've its picture.

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weird bug
by: Anonymous

could this be a type of praying mantis? Here in the USA they are usually green, but the body shape of yours says praying mantis, in my opinion.

Praying mantid
by: Moni

Ganesh
This insect is a praying mantid. The front legs are usually held upright in what looks like a praying position...hence the name. Mantid refers to the entire group of insects in the order Mantodea. Mantis is a genus in the order. Mantids are predators on insects and small animals like frogs. They are considered to be very beneficial for controling pests in the yard and garden.
In the US, we have green, brown and brown with green markings on our mantids. The mantids lay egg cases in the fall time of year which hold hundreds of eggs. These egg cases then hatch in the early summer and help control pests.
Hope that helps as they will be similar in India.


to add to Moni's comments
by: Donalda

There are several varieties of Mantis in India.
Praying mantis, or praying mantid, is the common name for an insect of the order Mantodea. Often mistakenly spelled preying mantis (a tempting mistake, as they are notoriously predatory) they are in fact named for the typical "prayer-like" stance.
The adult praying mantis varies in color depending on the habitat it lives in. It camouflages the leaves, flowers, twigs, and barks of trees where it is found. In your picture the mantis appears to be doing just that...camoflauging as a leaf. Its size varies depending on the species, from about 3 cm-18cm.Some species have powerful forewings for protection and flying.Other species are wingless, odd-looking, flower/leaf-shaped, and others are so thin to be recognizedthat they are hardly recognizable. They lay their eggs on stems of grass and and shrubs in a frothy mass which hardens into what looks and feels like a small bundle of beige styrofoam with minute ridges in the fall.The egg bundles hatch in the late spring.


Thanks
by: Anonymous

It looks like a variety of dead-leaf mantis. Thanks for the information everybody! I might post more pics of insects, so be sure you verify them as well.

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brown furry grub (Puss caterpillar or Southern flannel moth larva)

by willy
(New Orleans, LA)

Mr. Nice Guy??

Mr. Nice Guy??

I found this furry thing on my iron fence above some creeping fig and confederate jasmine. On top, he looks pretty handsome. On the bottom, he looks like a grub, with a white sectioned body, many legs, and a darkish mouth at one end.

We live in New Orleans, LA.

Are these poisonous? OK? for dogs?

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Puss caterpillar or Southern flannel moth larva
by: Moni

Willy
You have a Puss caterpillar or the larva of the Southern flannel moth.There are multiple generations of this moth in the south where you live. They are found in woodland areas and feed on a wide range of woody plants including apple, almond,birch,elm,hackbery ,oak,orange, pecan,persimmon, scycamore, and rose.

This caterpillar can sting with its venomous hairs. It is said that the sting starts a couple of minutes after contact from the spines on the side of the caterpillar. Pain and itchy burning occurs followed by the spot turning red and in a few more minutes small blisters appear. The blisters last several minutes with the itching lasting several hours and the reddness lasts a day or more. People sensitive to insect stings should seek medical attention.
To reduce pain and irritation use tape to pull out some of the broken spines in the sting area. Washing the area thoroughly with soap and water and as some suggest, poultices of potato or ginger root may help remove some of the irritating venom. Prompt application of an ice pack or baking soda may help to reduce pain and prevent swelling. Antihistaminic drugs, used for other insect stings, are reportedly ineffective.

So far I have not found any information on pets being stung or what to do if they are stung by this caterpillar. Best move the caterpillar(with a stick or container) to a place where the dog can not get to it.
Please be careful.

Puss caterpillar
by: Moni

Willy
Forgot to say thanks for the great photo. Having the tape measure, a full view and your description was GREAT!
Thanks for the thoroughness!

Furry Grub
by: Sandra

That is a puss caterpillar. DO NOT TOUCH IT! It is extremely poisonous. I was stung last year by one in my yard in Kenner, La. It was one of the most painful things I have ever felt. Apparently, the venom travels to the nearest lymph node in your body. The pain is very intense and covers the area between the lymph node and the site of the sting. The pain can persist for days but normally lasts about 24 hours. I would strongly recommend killing all the puss caterpillars that you see before you or someone else is accidentally stung by one.

Sandra

southern flannel moth
by: Anonymous

my dogs got stung by this brown furry grab caterpillar and I gave them benidrill and put mouth was on it to help the stinging

cocoon?
by: emily

what do they look like once they turn into a cocoon? or do they?

i kept one in a glass jar with leaves, twigs, and misted it every few hours and now its attached to a twig but i can't tell if its dead or in a cocoon...it hasn't moved and its got grey fuzzy stuff all around it.

Puss caterpillar
by: Moni

Emily

This insect does overwinter as a cocoon, so it could have pupated. If it is not cared for like the conditions it is use to for overwintering then it might not emerge. Cocoons can be hard to rear.
Just be careful not to get the stinging hairs on your skin!

KEEP AWAY FROM THE PUSS CATERPILLAR!!
by: Anonymous

I was sitting on a bench at work one day and i leaned my fore arm on the table. I felt this burning sting from within my arm and I couldn't explain what had just happened. i looked all over for an ant or something, but got worried when my fore arm started getting red, numb, and my arm pit was hurting like I was getting stabbed or something. It lasted from 4pm - midnight! Come to find out, these little critters are poisonous! They are the most venomous caterpillars in North America. So be careful NOT to touch them!.

We always called them asps.
by: Anonymous

We always called them asps or tree asps. My brother leaned on a tree when he was little and one got him. They do hurt and sting like the crazy. I always remember that and would check trees when my kids were playing around them.

We always called them asps.
by: Anonymous

We always called them asps or tree asps. My brother leaned on a tree when he was little and one got him. They do hurt and sting like the crazy. I always remember that and would check trees when my kids were playing around them.

Asp or puss caterpillar
by: Anonymous

The caterpillar likes to eat the leaves of mulberry trees, but not exclusively. It can be of any color from white to grey, brown or beige, and is often two toned. The venomous hairs are located in the ridge on its back. They deliver one of the most painful stings I have ever experienced and one that lasts for hours.

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brownish Jumping bug ( Eyed Elater)

by Debbie
(Battle Lake, MN, USA)

Bug that jumps.

Bug that jumps.

I opened the shower door and it fell to the floor. The shower is dry and rarely used (in the basement). I thought it was a piece of plastic or something the kids left behind, but as I went to pick it up, it jumped. Kind of like a mexican jumping bean. It has no wings.

Comments for brownish Jumping bug ( Eyed Elater)

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Eyed Elater
by: Moni

Debbie
You have an Eyed Elater or Eyed Click Beetle.
The click beetle family (Elateridae) are fun to turn on their back and watch them flip over. This clicking allows them to do this. Many times after being set on their backs they will "play possum". The Eyed click beetle is one of the largest click beetles, most are only about 1/2" long while this one is 1-1 3/4" long.
The 'eyes' are false and are to just scare away predators...the real eyes are much smaller. The beetles feed on plant sap and flower nectar, while the larva feed on other beetle larva found in decaying wood. They generally overwinter as adults, so perhaps you could just put it outside in a very protected place...under leaves or dried plant material.
Not sure how this critter got in your basement, but it won't hurt anything.

Found One.
by: Anonymous

I live in Minnesota as well and I found one just today, July 1st. I heard a small clicking noise and found this little bugger right next to my upstairs sink. I have no idea how it got there but it was kind of fun to watch really.

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two yellow spots and brown-black wings (Corsair Assassin Bug)

by Justin
(Centreville Alabama usa)

Bug landed inside on my neck, possible bit/stung my thumb heh.

Flying bug - 6 legs two yellow spots on a set of brown.black wings

Comments for two yellow spots and brown-black wings (Corsair Assassin Bug)

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Corsair
by: Moni

Justin
The insect in your photo is an assassin bug called corsair. It is in the Family Reduviidae and genus Rasahus. According to the Missouri Conservationist they can deliver a painful bite.
Like most assassin bugs they are beneficial insects as they feed on pest insects. The beak that bit you will suck the juices out of pest caterpillars and other insect pests.
One way to reduce contact and bites is to use yellow bulbs in porch lights and do not use bug zappers. To avoid the self-defense bite, gently brush away the corsair or any bug that lands on you, being careful not to smash it on your skin.

These stingers really hurt!!!
by: Anonymous

Just got stung/ bit by one of these tonight. Possibly 2-3 times. Worse sting I ever felt. Put baking soda paste on immediately to relieve the pain. Thanks for helping me identify it..

Help Me!
by: Anonymous

I have been being attacked by these bugs! They do not bother anyone else in my family, but seem to be drawn to me. I have been bit several times. I am not kidding. One will fly into the house, and go directly for me. We live in the hill country, open windows, doors. Is there any reason these bugs seem to like me so much? I have been bit on hand, 2 fingers, toe, and side of foot. All on different occasions occurring within the past two weeks.

baking soda works!
by: Dimitri

i was in SC for a wedding and me the groomsmen just got in the house we're staying(on a farm site). my friend Justin just got bit on the back of the neck and says he shared intense pain. it died soon after it bit him and we thank you for suggesting baking soda as pain relief, it works!!

?
by: Anonymous

Is this bug poisonous

Corsair Assassin Bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
No, it is not poisonous...just bites when mishandled.

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Long Brown ( Leaf-footed bug /Stink Bug)

by Kristen Lauter
(Morristown, NJ USA)

Hi there, my friend found a bug in colorado..and what was funny was that I found one too in my home same night, so i sent her a pic and she said it was the same exact one. So we wanted to know what it was because we never have seen such a beautiful bug =) and i'm in NJ.. so wild to see the same kind...

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Long Bug
by: Anonymous

It looks like a stink bug. Smells terrible if smashed.

I have the same bugs
by: Elaine

I get them in the fall. My neighbour told me it was a stink bug, I researched it on the net it doesn't look the same and I haven't notice any smell.

Leaf-footed bug
by: Moni

Kristen
You and your friend have a leaf-footed bug. They are related to stink bugs as they are both True bugs(order Hemiptera). If they are handled they could make your hands smell.
Since both of you found similar bugs, they might both be western conifer seed bugs. The leaf-footed bugs feed on foliage and seeds of various plants...if it is this one it would feed on conifers or evergreen plants. These western bugs have worked their way east so you could have the same as your friend, or it could be one of the other leaf-footed bugs. There are several species.
Here is a website for more information and pics if you are interested: http://bugguide.net/node/view/3393

Same bug in PA
by: Kathy

They come to my house every spring too. Watch out they seem to get in the house somehow. Someone told me once they are attracted by pine trees. They are ugly and they do stink when smashed.

Leaf-footed bug
by: Moni

Kathy
They are known for coming into houses for the winter.
Since they do feed on conifers, pine trees fit that description.
Perhaps throw them outside rather than smashing to avoid the smell...it does stink!
As an entomologist, they are neat looking not ugly, but of course beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Bug
by: Jack

How about that - they have a proper name. When I was a kid we liked to capture them and then turn them loose at school. The smell got every bodies attention real quick. We called them "stink" bugs. Get one, step on it and find out why we called them "stink" bugs.

Jack

what U got is An Ole Stink bug
by: Dennis Evans

Just as some one has already wrote, hey look, I'm from folks that were farming folks, mules and all. You have yourself in that picture there a cotten pickin stink bug. The brown ones stink worse than the gray ones.
Have a nice day!!!
Dennis

Surprise!
by: Darkwater

Yes, I have one of those too. It snuck up behind me last night and surprised me with the sound it made when it was airborne. What I find strange is that it flew, but it doesn't have wings. I trapped it under a glass, and it's still alive. I'm watching it right now.

Do not kill it, for it will stink very badly. That's why it's called a "stink" bug.

Leaffooted bug
by: Moni

Darkwater
These are leaffooted bugs(family coreidae) not stink bugs(family pentatomidae(the title for this got posted wrong). Though they do have scent glands present on the thorax between where the middle and hind leg attach. Like their relative the squash bug...they do smell if you smash them.
These are true bugs like the stink bugs, and they do have wings. The wings fold up on the back. You can see some of the veins of the wing on the lower bottom part of the wing. They can fly, tho we usually see them crawl.

Funk Bug
by: Anonymous

Smashed one and I immediately smelled the funk! I thought it had come from the folder that I smashed it with. Smells like old paper. It's just laying there with the guts smashed, on its back, with the legs and antennaes pointed out. Yuk!!! The smell is atrocious. I wonder how long the smell lasts? I also wonder how such a small bug can emit such a large odor...

Bug
by: Anonymous

Hi, me and my mum have just found the same bug in the house and we live in England. Must be one of those bugs that live everywhere in the world. We were stunned by it but then amazed because we hadn't seen a bug of this kind before. But of course we aren't going to kill it, about to take it back outside.

Long Brown(Leaf-Footed Bug/Stink Bug)
by: Anonymous

I live in Luzerne County PA & I just found a long brown Leaf-footed bug/stink bug enjoying life in my east facing sun room. I dropped it into a plastic lunch baggie for an easy web picture comparison view. I placed the baggie against the computer screen & discovered it is a mirror image of the picture posted on this web site. Size, shape, color, markings...everything.

Found one in IL
by: Justina

Saw this bug on my patio sliding glass door. Never seen anything like it before & ive lived in in the chicago northwest suberbs my whole life. I was googling its features when it flew into my hair & i swatted it away. Ive trapped it underneath a flower pot. I considered stepping on it outof spite. But glad i did the research & didnt because of the odor. My beagle has a very sensitive nose & wouldnt appreciate that. Glad i could identify it & spared its life. Gonna let it free now. The confiferous plants makes sense cuz i have a bush in front of my patio & it appears to have been trying to enter my apartment by where i discovered it. It is fall so all the information fit my experience. Ill take a pic & send him off.

They're in my house!!!!!
by: Marphy

I really appreciate this site. Great Information!!! I'm relieved to learn these darn bugs aren't harmful to me , my cat nor the house. But where did they come from???? I live on the South Shore of Nova Scotia, Canada, about as East as you can get...... and here they are.....!!
I burn wood for heat in the winter and I'm wondering if they can hide in the chunks of wood and come into the house in this manner. what do the eggs and nymphs look like??? thanks for the info.

Leaf-footed bug
by: Moni

Marphy
Leaf-footed bugs manage to get into our homes much like lady beetles and boxelder bugs...they find holes perhaps in vents, sliding glass doors/screens, they can be on the wood and some can even fly in as we open and close doors in the fall
When you are on the page to see the photos, you can then click on the word DATA and it will show you the states and Providences where folks have seen this insect. Looks like far eastern Canada is on the map!

Do you have evergreens nearby?

Thanks for checking this site!

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Light brown 2 inches long (Sun spider)

by Jim Schumacher
(San Diego, CA)

I foound this insect crawling inside a moving blanket that was stored in my garage in San Diego. The blanket hasn't left the
garage in 10 years. Because there are small children in the
house, I am concerned that it may be poisonous.

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Not Poisonous!
by: Korat

This is a sun spider or solpugid, a member of the order Solifugae. They are not poisonous, but their bite can really be painful! Interesting creatures, really.

Windscorpion, Sun spider, camel spider
by: Moni

Jim
As Korat said, this is a sun spider also called windscorpion, order Solifugae. The classification of this order is currently under revision.
These critters are nocturnal. They live in warm and arid places - mainly deserts and sandy places, but some species are found in forests and grasslands.
These are predators: eating invertebrates(insects and insect relatives) and small vertebrates. They will hunt for dead creatures as well as live prey.

The strong jaws of these critters can inflict a sharp bite in self-defense if handled. They do not have venom. The most common species are small and can hardly be felt except for a slight "pinch". Larger species have been known to draw blood, which should be immediately disinfected as you would treat any bite.

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brown with orange markings (Leaffooted seed bug)

found on my doorknob when i went home. never saw it before. seemed pretty big, 2-3cm?

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Leaffooted seed bug
by: Moni

Your photo is of a leaffooted seed bug genus Leptoglossus. This group of leaffooted bugs usually feed on the seed of pine trees. Seeds fed on look shriveled, deformed, and shrunken, or may have a dark spot or depression at the feeding site.
These are common to see in the fall as they are moving to hibernation locations. Adults overwinter under plant trash or mulch.

We call them Lloyds!
by: Anonymous

We had several of these in our house a day Aug-Sept 2009. We call them "Lloyds", as in "There's a Lloyd on the curtain, can you take him out?". They sit on the window screens, and have a knack for getting in the house, and I just get them on paper and throw them out "...and stay out!".

seed bug
by: Anonymous

They are as you said a leaf footed seed bug. They do not bite, and feed on the fallen pine cones of a pine tree. They do not bite, but do try to invade homes for the winter.

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TINY brown bug (aphid)

by Melissa
(Texarkana, TX)

TINY brown bug

TINY brown bug

Found crawling in room

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Aphid
by: Moni

Melissa
Your photo is of an aphid. Aphids suck juices out of our garden plants so they are a pest.
If it was in the house it accidentally got on your clothing or pet as it brushed next to an infected plant.
You will have to look in the yard to find the infected plant. The best way to control them is with a jet of water sprayed to knock them off or insecticidal soap.

Aphids
by: Moni

Lady beetles and their larva are the best to eat volumes of aphids, but it does take them a few days to get thru that many.

BED BUG???
by: Anonymous

I just wanted to say that I think it looks just like an adult bed bug!! I would look into this a little more if I were you! Hope I'm wrong for your sake. =(

aphid
by: Moni

Anonymous
If you look close you will see what we call 'stove pipes' on the back rear side of aphids. This one has them. Also if you compare the legs of aphids to bed bugs...they are quite different.
Bed bugs and aphids are in the same order but very different families, genus and species.

It is an aphid! =)
by: Kristine

Hi Moni,
Thanks for the correction. I am the anonymous one who made the comment about the aphid looking like a bed bug. I did some research (After I made the comment of course! LOL) and can see exactly what you are talking about. Again, Thanks for correcting me.
Kristine

aphid
by: Moni

Kristine
Glad you asked...it does kind of look like a bed bug...it is good for me to double ck as I sometimes answer before I do enough research too :-)

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brown and orange (Dermestid beetle larvae)

by Corey DeRosa
(Colorado Springs, CO)

the size of a pebble

the size of a pebble

6 legs looks like a caterpillar tan color very smart and hairy

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Dermestid beetle larvae
by: Moni

Corey
Without more information on size, where you found it, what it was doing, and a clearer photo showing the top, legs, and head better, I believe this is probably a dermestid larva. The dermestid larvae turn into small beetles that feed on fats and proteins.
This group of beetles can be found in homes as well as on animal carcasus outdoors. They feed on debris in homes such as dander, hair, wool, silk, leather or hide carpets, or other materials with proteins and fats like dog food, dead insects, oils and pantry foods, etc.
Hope that helps!

Bug
by: Sarah

I found about 50 of them in my cats catfood and i asked everyone if they knew what it was and they didn't know. So i looked it up on here and this is what i thought it looked like. I have my catfood in a tote with a lid and when i first opened it there wasn't anything in the catfood, i have the tote on my bakers rack and it still got to it.

Dermestids
by: Moni

Sarah
Since you had the cat food in a closed container, the cat food was already contaminated. Many times the warehouses where the dry foods - cat or human - are stored have problems with dry food insect and rodent pests. So your cat food bag either had eggs on the package that got transferred into your container or eggs were laid in the bag on the cat food.
To rescue the food you have you can put it in the freezer for a week, bring it out for 2 weeks then back in the freezer for a week. The freezing kills the bugs, then out of the freezer allows any eggs to hatch then back in the freezer to kill any remaining larva. --Or you can pitch that cat food out and hope the new stuff is not infested.
Other insects also can get in pet food - like Indian meal moths, saw toothed grain beetles, etc. The freezer techique works for all of them.

To prevent infestations there are Pantry Pest sticky traps for the moths and beetles but not very effective on dermestids. :-( Sorry.
Our local Pest Control company has them or find them online.

Better luck on the next bag of cat food...also might try smaller bags, so it is used before the beetle larva can develop.

I think I have these bugs
by: Anonymous

I have read all the comments, and I see that there is a lot of reference to cat food. I do not own a cat, but I have a turtle and some fish. This insect looks like the ones I have been seeing in my apartment. I am curious on if they are poisonous or not. I have three small children, and I have noticed them when there is food on the floor that I missed from vacuuming and I noticed that they were around wood. Can someone please help me with this, sorry I do not have a picture to show, but the insects I saw look like the one in the picture that was posted.

Dermestid beetle larvae
by: Moni

Anonymous
As noted in the very bottom comment "The dermestid larvae turn into small beetles. They feed on fats and proteins. This group of beetles can be found in homes. They feed on debris in homes such as dander, hair, wool, silk, leather or hide carpets, or other materials with proteins and fats like dog food, dead insects, oils and pantry foods."
This means that as the kids drop food and it gets into carpets, cracks in floor boards, under baseboards...it is there for the larvae to eat. With children around you will probably always have a few larvae around...perhaps using professional carpet and furniture cleaning would reduce the incidence of food they feed on.

They are not dangerous...they only eat the protein and fats in the food crumbs.


Found one
by: Emily

So I think I found one of these bugs in my just washed underwear. I was putting them away and saw a little moving brown thing. It had orange fur sticking out of it's but that was almost unnoticeable and a dark brown behind. Is this the same bug? If so, do I need to rewash all the laundry in the basket or just the underwear?

DERMESTID BEETLE LARVAE
by: Moni

Emily
Your laundry is clean...no need to rewash. The larvae crawled in the clean laundry after it was washed. They are probably on the floor in the laundry room or bedroom.
Best to do a thorough vacuuming of the floor around the baseboards, in cracks and crevices, and look for food sources. They feed on debris in homes such as dander, hair, wool, silk, leather or hide carpets, or other materials with proteins and fats like dog food, dead insects, oils and pantry foods, etc.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/brown-and-orange-dermestid-beetle-larvae-comments.html#ixzz1WSALrHSP

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brown-grey two ended (Plaster bagworm)

by Elaine Cox
(Lufkin, Texas)

This bug/insect is brownish gray and the largest one I have found is 1/4" long. Its moves but see no legs. The head can come out of either end of the body. These have been found in our house but also out side.

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Brownish larva
by: Moni

Elaine
Not sure what kind of larva it is yet. From the photo that is the head end that is brown. If something shows brown from the other end I would guess it is an appendage for moving, but without a pic it is hard to know. Will have to search my larval ID guides for this one.

What are you finding it on or in? ie food source? These are so small and since you are finding them inside and out, I wonder if it is a worm from a pet?
Do you have any other clues to help us with this one?
Thanks!

BROWN-GREY TWO ENDED
by: John

I've seen these in Florida for forty years and too have wondered what they are. They feel papery, accumulate in corners (ie: wall to floor or wall to wall) and move very slowly. They also appear to multiply rapidly and prefer to ascend a wall rather than spread over the floor. The posted photo is identical to what I have seen.

Brown larva
by: Moni

John
Thanks for the feed back!
I will keep looking. My guess is it is a critter that feeds on something in the house like dander, wool, leather, feathers or the like. It does not look like a Dermestid larva nor moth larva. Perhaps I need to put my southern thinking hat on.
Thanks

Plaster Bagworm
by: Amanda

I found this site while looking to find what this is. With your descriptions I came across the name. It is a plaster bagworm. If you google that you can get more information. I am not sure how long ago this post was written but I hope that helps!

Plaster bagworm (household casebearer)
by: Moni

Amanda
Thanks for your sleuthing work!!!
That is what it looks like and from the descriptions by the folks that have seen it, it certainly fits well. I learn something new every day!
Interesting how this moth larva lives in a case that is open at each end so it can feed or move from either end - explains why Elaine said the head can come out of either end. Most bagworms or case bearers just use one end.
And interesting that it eats spider webs primarily tho will eat wool fibers and such.
It does have legs, but unless it is moving you would not see them.
This site says they can show up in any type of building...it is just looking for some yummy cob webs!?!
Bugguide has photos of them from Texas as well as Florida, Arizona, and California and as the information says they are thru out the southern states.
Insects are so neat and interesting!!
Cool find!

ugly bug
by: Schae

I am from Jamaica and these insects fill my house. They annoy me so much because I like clean walls. This may sound bad but I always kill them. I am glad to find out what they are finally though I had an idea it's a larvae of some sort.

finally found you
by: lea

been searching for the right information of this bug,we have them on our ceiling and I'm a bit worried what are they. Thanks a lot!

Plaster bagworm
by: Moni

Lea
Glad you found your answer here!

brown-grey two ended (Plaster bagworm)
by: may

can this insects bit people...??

what is this?
by: brandi

I found this insect on my sheets and was wondering if it could hurt my child? how do I make sure I do not find anymore?

Plaster bagworm
by: Moni

Brandi
The larvae turn into moths. This is not harmful to children. The larvae eat mostly spider webs and sometimes wool fibers. Manual picking or vacuuming of cases and spider web removal should be enough to keep this species under control.
Vacuuming and thorough cleaning of areas where spiders live and wool fabrics are will keep you from seeing more.

thanks!
by: Kari

Thank y'all so very much! I just found one in my bed and thought " what in the heck is THAT thing?" Having battled bed bugs before, I'm always weary of creepy crawlies in my bed. I'm in south Alabama and this is the first one I've seen. Glad to know they are more helpful than harmful. Thanks again!

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Brown-black 6 legged winged bed bug look-alike (Carpet beetle)

by Katrin Madatian
(Glendale, CA, United States)

Brown-black, 6 legged, & winged

Brown-black, 6 legged, & winged

Hi,
I found this bug near my bed on the wall in day light. It is brown black, has six legs, antennas, wings (although it wasn't using it to fly) and in the picture it is being compared to the tip of a 0.5mm lead pencil.

Help!

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Carpet beetle
by: Moni

Katrin
Your photo is of a carpet beetle. Adults mainly occurr in spring, but may be found the whole year round in heated rooms.
They get the name because the larva are known to feed on wool carpets. The larva also feed on dead insects and anything with animal hair, fur or feathers. Therefore they may cause considerable damage to anything in your home that contains wool(carpets, clothes), fur(coats, rugs), feathers(pillows, comforters, jackets), and any artifact collections that have those products..
Adults are said to feed on pollen of flowers, not sure what they eat in our homes but they manage! :-)
If they cause a problem to your household things, to control them the best thing to do is vacuum items often, keep clothing and other items in cedar chests or closets.

found in my room
by: Kimber

I found it crawling in my room it scared my sister and me and she is 7

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brown with white spots (Ivory-marked beetle )

by Donna Spitzer
(Laurel,MD)

found Sunday crawling up my daughters pant leg sitting in our living room in Maryland.

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Ivory-marked beetle
by: Moni

Donna
That is a Ivory-marked beetle or also Four-marked Ash Borer.
It is found in southern/eastern Canada and eastern United States in deciduous forests.
Larvae bore into heartwood of deciduous trees, esp. ash, hickory. They may emerge from finished lumber years after milling. Which means the one on your daughters pants leg may have come in from outside when attracted to porch lights or it may have come out of a piece of your furniture! Interesting that they could live thru the crafting of a piece of furniture?!
Interesting find!

We just found one on my bright green shirt!
by: Donna

We live right outside of Memphis, TN. We are having lumber brought in for an outside project. That must have been where he came from! We had no idea what kind of bug this was. We're so glad we found your post. Thanks!

found one on my door
by: donna (la)

i live in southern louisiana i found one on my screen door at 2 in the morning at about 80 degrees. it has the same white markings. no one aroung is having any wood shiped in nor construction. do they bight?

Ivory-marked beetle
by: Moni

Donna(LA)
No they do not bite. But if you had porch lights on they may have come from nearby wooded area.

Marks on me from an Ivory Marked Beetle
by: Anonymous

Has anyone else had this happen to them. I had this type beetle on my leg and it left tiny holes from maybe his legs. It is not severe but creepy!!

Ivory Marked Beetle
by: Moni

Anonymous
This insect is not known to leave marks on the skin. You may have sensitive skin or allergic reaction...still both rare for this beetle. The claws are used to climb on wood bark so might be a little spiny but not enough to cause spots on regular skin.

bit me
by: Anonymous

Just went to squish one of these that I found in my house and IT DID bite/sting me. I don't see a stinger, but it CERTAINLY did leave a HOLE in my finger. A perfect little hole. I swear, it feels like he shot me with a tiny needle or arrow. No swelling. No venom injected. Just a super quick, PAINFUL jab of something. ??????? How do they bore into wood? Maybe he BIT me?

Strange
by: Anonymous

We live in Watseka, Il and I was outside and this nice little beetle that I have never seen before was crawling on my foot!! Was not sure what it was so I captured it and put it in a bag for my husband to see. He also had never seen on before so we came to google and found your site!! Thanks for having such and informative site!!

It Bites!!!!!! It Flies!!!!! And It's Creepy!!!!!!!
by: Anonymous

I live in Maryland and was recently bit by one of these bugs! They do bite.It latched on my calf and bit the tar out of my leg. My mother put it in a jar after it got caught in a water dish outside. It flies and has pinchers. I was bit about 3 weeks ago.The area hurt and burned for approx.3 days until I put neosporin on it.I still have the mark!

this buggg
by: Anonymous

Just found one of these, lighter brown though, crawling on my dog and it bit her as well, hard enough for her to yelp out of her sleep. I was able to catch it before she ate it and found this website. Long antenna and a hard body so figured it was a bettle. Only thing is there's no wood around here, not even furniture so what brought him here?

does it or does it not bite?
by: Carol

we have a 1 1/2 year old in the house. This beetle was in our kitchen but disappeared before we could kill it. Where would it try to hide, in the cupboards? Will it bite the baby?

Ivory marked beetle
by: Anonymous

We live is SW Michigan, an ivory marked beetle was found crawling on the ceiling late at night. We didn't know what it was at first, but looked it up and found out the species...cool, but it sounds like they are not common here, must be migrating north.

No Wood, Just a basement
by: Debi

I found one of these things on my basement floor this morning................We live in Parma, OH and have had several water bugs in our basement due to previous flood issues, and humidity. This was new to me, so like so many others, I looked it up online to see what it was. I captured it right away and flushed it down the toilet ~ no stings/bites of any sort, but now I'm wondering if it's yet another in a long list of pests I'll be seeing regularly.

omg
by: Anonymous

I lived in Ny Not Far From Canada & Vermont. I moved to ilinois & i had a shower buddy (unaware) he must have drowned so i flushed him

Bed bugs
by: Nathaniel

I enjoyed reading everyone's comments about this insect I felt compelled to write my own story. I live in San Antonio Texas and one of these beetles flew right on my bed sheets which freaked me out to say the least. I caught him in a jar I had laying in my room and now he's just sitting here with me. I'm debating if I should kill it and display it with a large beetle I found in Hunt Texas. Honestly I think I'm just gonna name him and put him somewhere in the back yard among my garden.
-he is 2cm long
-black eyes
-visible black pincers
-named Fredrick :P

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brown many legs (Centipede)

by Shane Salter
(Gaithersburgm Maryland)

FRED

FRED

Hi, thanks for taking a look of my little friend here. I've lived in this area for over ten years (Maryland) and have never seen anything like it. It had gotten into my house and was near some ant poison I had out, I think it was eating some of the dead ants.

I'm sorry, but I can't figure out how to put the picture in a lowercase jpeg. If you can't view it in the format it's currently in (upper case JPEG), please let me know and I'll see what I can do.

I appreciate any help you can offer.

Thanks again,

Shane

Comments for brown many legs (Centipede)

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Fred the Centipede
by: Moni

Shane
Fred is a centipede. :-) Centipedes have one pair of legs per body segment...as opposed to 2 pair of legs per body segment that a millipede has... or 4 pair of legs like the spiders class and 3 pair of legs like the insect class.
Centipedes are usually found in moist areas and in the house that is most commonly the basement. They are not a problem other than a nuicance.

Additional Info
by: Anonymous

This particular centipede is commonly knwon as a House Centipede. The scientific name is Scutigera Coleoptrata.

These guys are extremely delicate. Be carefull when handling, if you are fast enough! If you pick them up with your fingers, their legs can fall off, and they have very weak exoskeletons. All in all though, these creatures are some of the most intricate in the invertebrate world!

bite?
by: maryland also

is it poisonous cause i just found one in my house 10 mins ago and killed it,was hella fast

House centipede
by: Moni

some can bite when handled carelessly, resulting in a slight swelling or pain no worse than a mild bee sting"

House centipede
by: Anonymous

Definitely a house centipede (Scutigera coleoptrata). Ugly and fast moving. I used to have them in my apartment all the time (Boston area). Recently saw a big one at my parents' place in MD.

Land Shrimp!
by: Anonymous

We see them in Indiana and call them land shrimp!

Bad Bugs
by: Kathy

I have these creepy crawly centipedes in my house in the foothills near Sacramento Ca. HOW do I get rid of them ??

House centipede
by: Moni

Kathy
They are not bad bugs, they are actually good Chilopoda.
These relatives of insects are predatory on other arthropods, including cockroach nymphs, flies, moths, bedbugs, crickets, silverfish, earwigs, and small spiders. So, they eat many things you'd probably rather not have in your home.They are beneficial, not a problem other than a nuisance.


How do I get rid of them?
by: Anonymous

I would really like to get rid of them here at my house I have a little 6month baby. I don't fill comfortable with them around him. I have termenx that comes and sprays my house every 3months bit they are still hanging around.

centipedes
by: Moni

Anonymous
As I just commented to Kathy...comment right below yours, centipedes are not bad bugs...they are beneficial and will not harm people!

Centipedes require moist habitats. If they are plentiful, there may be an underlying moisture problem that should be corrected. So, perhaps you need to get a dehumidifier. If you have moisture you may have molds that would be worse for the baby than centipedes.

Blah!
by: Janina

I just found one in my bathroom, and I live in Donora, PA. at first I thought it was some kind of spider, and I ran screaming from the bathroom, waking up half of the house..

Atlanta
by: Carolina


I just saw this crazy bug for the first time in my condo. We used to get roaches (I'm assuming because we're on the first floor next to the pool?)but this is something I had never seen before. I understand theyre not dangerous, but goodness- I'd rather not have things crawling in my house!!! :)

Weird!!
by: Shane

We have a bunch here in califorina I thought it was really scary.But now I'm ok with them in my house because they eat spiders.😀

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brown long antenna (silverfish)

by Jordan
(Illinois)

creeping bug

creeping bug

Creepy crawly - found in my bathtub

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Silverfish
by: Moni

Jordan
You have a silverfish in your bathtub. They are often found indoors in dark, damp, cool places, especially basements environments and also places like in bathrooms and kitchens. They may be found in bookcases, around closet shelves, behind baseboards, and behind window and door frames. Silverfish are often brought in on cardboard cartons, books, and papers from infested sites, and are found in newly built homes with wet drywall...they love the moist starch!
They are active at night and do not like direct light.
They feed on starchy foods, cereals, moist wheat flour, glue on book bindings and wallpaper, as well as starch in clothing made of cotton or rayon fabric. When found outdoors they eat lichens. They can be considered an indoor pest when feeding on you clothing or book bindings and food.
Univ of Nebraska makes these control recommendations:
For control of silverfish and firebrats, three non-chemical control tactics should be considered:
1. Change the physical environment in the immediate ares of infestation. For example, controlling or eliminating moisture (e.g. leaky plumbing, around laundry areas, etc.) where a silverfish population is thriving can be quite effective in significantly reducing the level of infestation.
2. Reduce the potential sites of harborage. Seal obvious and easily accessible cracks and crevices. Do not leave silverfish and firebrats preferred places to hide and breed.
3. Remove potential food supplies, specifically paper, book bindings, starched linens, and organic debris. If these materials cannot be secured in tightly sealed containers or cabinets, make sure your pest control application cuts off access of these pests to potential food sources.

Firebrat
by: Anonymous

That isn't a silverfish, that's a firebrat. They look the same, except one is brown and the other is silver

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Found in southern californa mountains brown (Jerusalem Cricket)

Likes to be burrowed in the ground, large back end

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Yes... a cricket...
by: Steve L.

This is a Jerusalem Cricket, aka Potato Bug. Very scary bug to us when we were small... my sister is still very scared of them.

Jerusalem cricket
by: Moni

Steve is correct - this is a Jerusalem Cricket.
They feed on other insects, roots, and decaying vegetation. Sometimes found eating potatoes.
They are found in burrows and under rocks and logs. Sometimes they wander to the surface at night. To produce their sound they strike the ground with their abdomen to produce a drumming pattern.
Some say the bite hurts.

Here is another pic on Doug's Insect ID -
http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/big-yellowblack-striped-body-red-head-6-legs-los-angeles-ca.html#comments#ixzz0Kj9kGVOn&C

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brownish spiked crest (adult wheel bug)

by jgurk
(Farmer City, IL)

monika's nightmare

monika's nightmare

2 1/2-3" long. found in Central Illinois near woody/wet area. Did not see it fly or crawl. Back area golden and glittery. Kind of a horn closer to it's head. found on the side of our house.

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Wheel Bug
by: Bill Hilton Jr.

To be precise, it's A Wheel Bug, named because of the gear-like crest on its back.

Wheel bug adult
by: Moni

Jgurk
Thanks Bill!
Yes, this is the adult wheel bug. These are one of the true bugs also known as assassin bugs. Like the name suggests they are known as such since they hunt down their prey to attack and 'kill' them for food. They have a large strong beak to pierce the prey to suck the juices out. All stages prey upon other insects - caterpillars, aphids, bees, sawflies etc. Therefore they are considered beneficial. Great to have in the garden!
Wheel bugs overwinter as adults.
CAUTION: the adult wheelbug is reported to inflict a very painful bite.

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brown and orange (Oak Treehopper nymph)

by Susan
(Virginia, USA)

'Star Wars' Insect

'Star Wars' Insect

Found on my clump brich tree yesterday.

They don't seem to be doing any damage ...only resting.

Location: South West Virginia ~ Blue Ridge Mountains

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Tree Jewelry
by: Anonymous

What an unusual looking bug! - some sort of beetle??

These Are Cicadas
by: Rob aka Celt

These are a species of newly hatched cicadas. You know the funny buzzing sound you hear in the trees in the evenings. Many people refer to these as 'locusts'. However locusts is a more appropriate name for the ravenous grasshopper swarms of biblical proportions. Cicadas are in the insect Order: Homoptera. They are very similar to Hemiptera because they both have beak-like mouthparts used for 'sucking'. The Cicada's family is 'Cicadidae', and come in all kinds of sizes and colors. Their wings are membranous and eyes are most notably on either side of their head. These buggers spend 2-5 years underground in their larval state. There is a cicada species called the 17-year cicadas, and the 13-year cicadas where you only hear and see them every 17 and 13 years respectively. They are virtually harmless to your plants and pose no threat. This is a great picture however, and you caught them before their wings are fully developed.
Incidentally, if you find them as they are shedding their larval shell and try to help them out, their wings will not develop correctly and you can cause permanent harm to them.

aptly named
by: kath

Part of me wants to say HOW CUTE! Not in either of my bug books. How big are they? Is it just one little group or are there a number of clusters?

Truly Star War Fighters!
by: Moni

This is a great photo of a most interesting and truly a 'Star Wars' looking character!! This has to be one of my all time favorite pictures!
It took me a while, but I finally figured out what they were. They are the nymph or young stage of the Oak Treehopper. They don't do significant damage to the trees. They have a close relative the Thornbug that can cause damage to trees.

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gray-brown beetle (Leaf-footed bug)

by judy
(columbus ga 31808)

offending party

offending party

i've got these now greying, formerly very bright orange and black leggy alien looking beetles on the fruiting end fo my raspberry plants. they don't seem to be doing much damage, but i don't want to inadvertently eat their offspring, thus becoming a human host to varmants.

he looks like he may be called the 'long-eared-leaf-legged-funky-colored beetle', but what do i know.....

i live in columbus ga, half way down the west edge, zone 8.

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Leaf-footed bug
by: Moni

You have a leaf-footed bug in your raspberries. There are many species, some that feed on plants and some that feed on other insects. Many in this family of insects give off an unpleasant odor when touched.
As far as eating the little ones, the formerly orange colored ones, look much like this adult you have a picture of, except they do not have the wings that cover the whole back, and they are much smaller. You would be able to taste them if you take a bite as they would taste like they smell when touched...nasty!
Hope that helps.

Leaf-footed bug
by: Moni

At closer look I realized this is not a full fledged adult yet...the wings are not the full length of the body. If it was an adult we could better tell what species it is.

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brownish Assassin bug

by Deborah
(Chatham, VA, US)

This bug was in the back yard on some vines - I think variegated periwinkle. My son found it and we took this picture. (The bug is dead in the picture.) We live in a small, rural part of Piedmont Virginia - near the NC line. My son thought it looked like a picture he recalled of an assassin bug. I hope you can help us.
Thanks. I wish the picture could have been better, but the bug was dead and a little brittle by the time we took it.

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Assassin bug
by: Moni

Deborah
Yes, your bug does look like an assassin bug. Your son is a good entomologist!
As you said without a better photo and because it is a young bug called a nymph they are hard to ID for sure.
Most Assassin bugs are great predators for the garden, so hopefully there are more out there eating aphids, caterpillars, beetles and such.
Thanks for sending the photo.

Helpful?
by: Randee

I have some random flowering plants on my front step and they are being eaten up! The only insects I am seeing on them are these assassin bugs. Do they eat some plants or are they predatory? I live in VA and know nothing of gardening and would just like to know what I'm dealing with so i can hopefully treat the plants naturally.

Assassin bug
by: Moni

Randee
Assassin bugs are just predators on other insects. If you have a bug that looks like this on your plants and it is sucking juices from the plant (that is how these insects feed), then it is probably a bug in the squash bug family.
If you are having foliage eaten then is is another insect...
If the foliage is being eaten it could be an night feeding caterpillar or slug, so you may have to look for it with a flashlight at night.
First please send in a photo of the 'bug' you are seeing. Then if you see something at night get a picture of it also and send it in for ID.

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brown tiny ant-like jumping/flying insect (Parasitic wasp)

by Kathryn
(Idaho)

We have a bunch of perennial Cornflowers and these tiny ant-like insects are swarming all over it. They are just walking around on the leaves not doing any damage. They jump, and have back legs that look good for jumping, look like they have tiny wings, and don't have pincers like ants do. They also look to have some kind of orange spike? on their backs. Mostly black but upclose look to have some deep red/orange coloring.

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Parasitic wasp
by: Moni

Kathryn
These little insects look like some type of wasp. They maybe a parasitic wasp, but not sure yet which one. If so they lay eggs in/on another insect. The eggs hatch and larva feed on that host until ready to emerge.
I will continue to search more about these, but wanted to let you know what I think so far.
Very interesting find!

hey thanks
by: Kathryn

Hey thanks for your help, I tried to find it in our Insect Book and couldn't seem to find it for the life of me.

Parasitic wasp
by: Moni

Kathryn
They are not very common, so you probably won't find it in a general insect book. They are so small most insect books will not list them. I will see if I can find the website where I found it...thought I bookmarked it but can't find it when I want it :-)

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brown spider/grasshopper ( Immature Assassin bug)

by Jeff
(Ocala Florida)

creepy crawler

creepy crawler

was sitting on a chainlink fence very slow moving non aggresive i picked it up with a spachula very creepy looking has a big body, wings, legs like a spider, a head like a grasshoper with one little red pincher/fang and had antennas like a roach any clue what this might be? thanks in advance

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Immature Assassin bug
by: Moni

Jeff
You have an immature or young nymph of an Assassin bug. Tho the young look much like the adults, they do not have all the characteristics and full wing patterns to know for sure which one. The red fang you mention is the mouth...known as a piercing/sucking mouthpart that sucks the juices out of its prey.
Assassin bugs are great predators in the garden feeding on the pest insects. So, put it back out on the chain link fence and let it do its preying, killing some of the pest critters.

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brown lots of legs (centipede)

by Barbara
(Alpharetta, GA)

Creepy Crawly

Creepy Crawly

This looks like an anorexic caterpillar. Why am I suddenly finding them in my bathtub and crawling on the floor? And what is it?

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not catapillar
by: Anonymous

its a silver fish

lots of legs
by: Anonymous

It's a centipede. It eats other bugs and love bathrooms. Silver fish do not have as many legs.

Centipede
by: Moni

Barbara
You have a centipede running around your house. Centipedes are relatives of insects. They have one pair of legs per body segment.
This house centipede is mostly found indoors in damp areas such as bathrooms, cellars, and crawl spaces. It will go beyond these areas and is often seen scurrying across floors or walls.
Outdoors, they live under logs, rocks, and similar moist protected places.

Indoors they can be found all year provided they have warmth and prey. They feed on other arthropods, including cockroach nymphs, flies, moths, bedbugs, crickets, silverfish, earwigs, and small spiders. In short, they'll eat many things you'd probably much rather not have in your home.
To get rid of them, it is best to caulk as many entry points into your house as you can...cracks in doors and windows, etc. And then get rid of all the critters they eat.

Thank you!
by: Barbara

Thanks for the responses. They are very much appreciated. I never really saw any bugs in my house except some small spiders until last month after my cat died. She was pretty good at pest control, I guess.

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ridged brown (Wheel bug adult)

by cynthia
(Leawood KS)

he's almost dead,poor guy

he's almost dead,poor guy

looks like a combination of a stink bug and a praying mantis, except for the amazing ridge on his back.....like a dinosaur!

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Wheel bug adult
by: Moni

Cynthia
Your photo is of a large true bug known as the Wheel bug. These adults may be seen into December in the southern states.
This insect is easy to ID because of the rounded ridge of spines along its back. The best description was given to me by a 6th grader today calling its ridge a 'mohawk'!
The nymphs and adults are great predators to have in the garden to get rid of caterpillars, aphids, etc.
They overwinter in the egg stage then emerge in spring to grow into the adults. There is just one generation per year.

CAUTION: The sharp piercing mouthpart that is so great for sucking the life out of pests can also pierce us if it is miss-handled The adult wheel bug is said to inflict a very painful bite. It has been reported that use of ammonia water or Epsom salts is helpful relieving pain from the bite. Another alkaline product to try that is great for bee stings is baking soda mixed with a little water to make a paste.



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Brown furry fly (Golden Dung Fly)

by Diana
(Vancouver, WA USA)

Brown furry/fuzzy fly

Brown furry/fuzzy fly

Found 1 last night and killed it, there was blood or red juice inside. Then found 1 today and saved it until it died in a jar. Both found indoors walking on family room wall between window and outside door. It doesn't seem to like to fly around; very easy to capture. Sounds more like a bee than a fly when it does fly. Brown with light brown furry/fuzzy back end. What type of fly is this? What does it eat so what can I get rid of? Plants? Garbage? Bugs? Sugar/meat? Worried because it's so unusual for this area (NW Washington state) where we usually have black flies.

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Golden Dung Fly
by: Moni

Diana
Flies can be hard to ID unless you see the veins of the wings and sometimes other characteristics. With that said, my best guess right now is that it is a dung fly of the family Scathophagidae, probably the golden dung fly because of all the fuzziness.
The larva of these flies are found in or on dung of many animals. The adults are found in areas where dung might be. Adults prey mostly on other fly species, and occasionally on other insects, so not sure what it ate that left red when you smashed it.?
So, if you have pets or animals (farms, pastures, meadows, wooded areas) nearby that is where they live and as with most flies, they come in the house if they get a chance or the door is open for very long. As far as getting rid of them, patch any holes in screens, be careful having the door open on warm, humid days when flies are most active. It was probably a rare happening and you might not see any more.
Do you live in a farming area?

response to farming area
by: Diana

Yes, mostly cows, some horses, chickens and goats. Thanks for your response, and you were right, I've not seen any since the 2 that I found. Will take your advice and not leave the window with no screen open a few inches anymore.

Golden Dung Fly
by: Moni

Diana
Thanks for the feedback. Sounds like we are pretty close on what the situation was.

BTW - your photo with the different views and sizing was great! I admire your technical expertise.

Thank you!
by: Diana

Thank you so much for looking again. I really appreciate knowing what this fly probably is, because my imagination on how bad a bug can be is usually a lot worse than how bad the bug actually is.

I really like the bug identification and activity here, and will be sure to check back periodically to see what spiders and bugs are to be found that match those around my yard and house. If I can find another spider, an extremely odd spider, in my woodshed I'll share that here, too.

Thank you very much for your help!

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6 legged brown striped abdomen (Jerusalem Cricket)


(Alameda, CA)

I was in the garden removing dead grass and preparing for the soil when I discovered this unusual specimen in the dirt. I live in the bay area of California, and I do not recall ever having seen a bug like this.

It is bigger than a quarter, which is quite large compared to creatures I usually see around here. It has two little spiky things on it's behind, in case you can't see in the photo.

I really have no idea what it is! Anyone?
Thanks!

Comments for 6 legged brown striped abdomen (Jerusalem Cricket)

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Cool Bug!
by: Nelly Bear

I'm no bug expert, but that looks like a potato bug/jerusalem cricket to me.

potato bug
by: Anonymous

It is a potato bug, thank you!
I actually found out shortly after posting this that that is what it was. :)
Apparently they are also pretty common in my area, I had just never seen one before.

MYSTERIOUS BUG
by: Anonymous

THIS BUG IS A POTATO bUG AND IS COMMON IN CALIFORNIA

mole cricket
by: rosie

looks a bit like a mole cricket???

Jerusalem Cricket
by: Moni

This is a Jerusalem Cricket or Potato bug.
Glad you figured out what it was. Here is a little more info if you want.
They feed on other insects, roots, and decaying vegetation. Sometimes found eating potatoes(hence the other name).
They are found in burrows and under rocks and logs. Sometimes they wander to the surface at night. To produce their sound they strike the ground with their abdomen to produce a drumming pattern.
Some say the bite hurts.


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Brown Bee (Valley carpenter bee)

by liz
(sac)

brown bee

brown bee

Here's a brown bee

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Brown Bee
by: Somewhere in the Midwest

Is it a new species? It's really cute! Probably sting the snot out of whoever or whatever, though.

wow
by: i love flowers!

wow-nwvwe seen one-what region are you located in?

Valley carpenter bee
by: Moni

You have a male valley carpenter bee.
Valley Carpenter Bee (Xylocopa varipuncta)
The males are yellowish brown while the females are black. Interesting critter.


I see you have already had this ID'ed at another website.

Seen in California
by: Anonymous

Live in California and think I have seen this type/species of bee. It resembles the big black bumble bee only its brown and furry. Is this the same bee as the brown bee?

Valley Carpenter bee
by: Moni

Seen in California
As I noted in my comments on this brown bee, this is a male, the black colored ones are the females, so perhaps you are seeing the female of this species?

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