Big brown hard insect (Mole cricket)

by Laura
(Reading PA)


About three inches, brown, hard

Comments for Big brown hard insect (Mole cricket)

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Mole cricket
by: Moni

Laura
The cool insect you have found is a mole cricket.
It is probably the Northern mole cricket, tho the photo is not quite close or clear enough to tell.

Mole crickets can be found thru out most of the eastern North America, then south into South America.
They are usually found in moist areas near streams and ponds, but also in gardens and agricultural fields. The adults do come to lights at night.

This insect is a herbivore...they feed on plant roots. It takes two years to complete a generation in most of N America. The males do have a call they make to attract females to their burrows, then the female lays her eggs and then guards them thru the second or third stage of life.
Some mole crickets can be pests of turf due to their tunneling.

This insect does not bite or sting.

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long brown bug with hairy feet and a striped thorax (Hanging-thieves robber fly)

by Cori
(Somerset, NJ USA)


my sister found this on her back porch. It is between 1 and 2 inches long.

Comments for long brown bug with hairy feet and a striped thorax (Hanging-thieves robber fly)

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Hanging-thieves robber fly
by: Moni

Cori
Your insect is a robber fly called hanging-thieves because they hang by their forelegs while they eat.

This robber fly, like all robber flies feed on other insects...sometimes they catch insects larger than themselves. They do prefer to eat mostly wasps, but will also eat dragonflies, damselflies and other flies. The larva live in the soil and are probably predators there.

There is a concern that these flies can be a pest if they prey on honey bees.

These robber flies are found all over North America in woodland and open areas. They prefer to hunt in shaded woodlands.

They are not known to bite humans.

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Large Brown Bug with antenna (Leaf-footed bug )


(Boston, MA)

Big Brown Bug with antenna

Big Brown Bug with antenna

Big Brown Bug with antenna
Second Bug found on my ceiling

Out of the blue ... on a sunny afternoon in October ... I found this bug on my dining room table! It was still, did not move or scurry away. It was about 2 1/2 long, brown, 6 legs and with long antennas and upright on its legs. I quickly caught in a napkin and threw it ioutside.
I have no idea where it came from!
3 days later , There was another one of these creatures found on my ceiling in my sunporch in the afternoon!
I have no idea what it is! I have never had any bugs in my house ... well a few ants! I live in a city close to Boston, MA
Your assistance will be very much appreciated!!

Comments for Large Brown Bug with antenna (Leaf-footed bug )

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Leaf-footed bug
by: Moni

Boston
Your insect is one of the leaf-footed bugs. The hind leg has a wide section that resembles a leaf to give it that common name.
This insect like other insects in this particular classification order called Hemiptera or commonly 'true bugs', do have the triangular shape with wide shoulders and narrower abdomen.

It is hard to see in the photo, the color of the antenna and how thick the hind legs are to know for sure which species you have. A view from the back and side are always helpful for better identification. It is probably in the genus Leptoglossus...probably the leaf-footed pine seed bug - Leptoglossus corculus.

The leaf-footed bugs are found usually on shrubs near woodlands, fields or meadows. They feed on plants, but are not pests. If they are mishandled they will give off a bad odor. Some do come to lights. The leaf-footed bugs are also found indoors in the northern states during winter (a warm place to be when it gets cold out!) This explains why you are seeing them now. It is not uncommon to have them come inside in the fall, along with boxelder bugs and multicolored Asian ladybeetles.

They do overwinter as adults.

This insect sucks juices from plants so does not bite people.

Thank you
by:

Thank you Moni
... for your time and expertise!
-Much gratitude from Boston

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Dark brown with black head and black dots on body (Corn earworm )

by Dustin Bartlett
(Great Barrington, Masscashuetts)





Found a few of these on eating some cabbage. I've had them in a cup overnight and they seem to put out a cotton like webbing. I was thinking they might be fall armyworms but I don't see the identifying Y in the face.

Comments for Dark brown with black head and black dots on body (Corn earworm )

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Corn earworm
by: Moni

Dustin
Your worm is a moth caterpillar called the corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea), also known as the tomato fruitworm, bollworm, sorghum headworm, and the vetchworm. The fall armyworm does look similar but if you did not see the 'Y' on the face then it is the corn earworm.

This caterpillar feeds on a wide range of plants as the various names for it indicate... tomatoes, sweet corn, peppers, cabbage, including many field crops, hence this species has been well studied. One was feeding on the verbena flower head in my garden this fall.

The adult moth feeds on nectar. It comes to lights at night. The moth is a dull yellow/tan color with spots on the lower middle part of the forewing and a dark band on the lower edge of the hindwing.

These are found throughout North America.

This insect does not bite nor do the hairs cause a rash.

Thank you so much, Moni!!
by: Dustin Bartlett

Thank you for the identification Moni! You are very helpful!

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2 cm long brown bug with stripes on back (Wood cockroach nymph)

Top of bug

Top of bug

Top of bug
Underneath of bug
Underneath of bug 2

Brown Bug with brown stripes across back, 2 cm long with antennae and barbed legs, at least 4 but I think 6. Hard shell, no visible wings? Found inside dead under our dog's cot bed, which was aired outside yesterday. The cot has no blankets etc., and it is a hardwood floor. From the piece of debris and the look of the tail end, it looks like he was pooping? We bombed for fleas 2 days ago. I checked for symptoms of bedbugs, but there are no blood spot stains on our mattress, it's brand new. Neither of the other beds have anything on their mattresses of that type either. They both had active flea problems, which seem to be lessening after the bombing, not all at once as we had expected. This bug was found downstairs and all our beds are upstairs. Can you help? I'd hate to bomb the house again as my dogs have to be boarded but we will do it if necessary. Thank you!!!

Comments for 2 cm long brown bug with stripes on back (Wood cockroach nymph)

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Wood cockroach nymph
by: Moni

Your insect is a wood cockroach nymph. Not sure which one since the insect is falling apart. Also you do not say where you are located or the planting conditions around your house.

Wood roaches live in and around trees, rotten logs, mulch, and other moist wood. They eat decaying wood.

They sometimes get brought in on firewood or other things that might have been out near wooden objects. Assume you brought it in when you brought the dog bed back in. Sometimes they just manage to get indoors. Males are attracted to lights. These roaches can also be found in gutters, especially ones with debris.

When indoors, they wander aimlessly during the day, do not breed, and will die within a few days due to insufficient moisture. However, if you have had the house treated that could have killed it also.

Wood cockroaches do not bite or cause rashes to humans or pets.


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Brown Worm or centipede (Millipede)

by Perry Hight
(Santa Rosa Beach, FL)



Black back light brown underbelly with delicate legs that are small

Comments for Brown Worm or centipede (Millipede)

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Millipede
by: Moni

Perry
You were on the right track that this is not an insect. Your critter is a millipede. It has 2 pairs of legs per body segment (Class diplopoda - 'di' meaning 2, poda meaning legs) while the centipede has only one pair of legs per body segment. Both are arthropods - related to insects (Class Hexapoda).

The photo does not have enough detail to know which millipede it is - there are over 900 species in North America. It is probably in the Order Julida.

Millipedes live in moist habitats under rocks, rotting logs, leaf debris, etc.

Most eat decaying plant material, but a few species occasionally can be carnivorous. Some may also occasionally eat living plants.
They are not considered a pest, though they may be found in basements if conditions are moist.

Millipedes do not bite, but they give off a scent if you handle them.

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Big Eyed brown Bug (Hanging-thieves robber fly)

by Colleen
(Bethlehem, PA)

Big Eyed Bug

Big Eyed Bug

This guy was in our garden shed.

He was very large, about the size of a...well, this is weird, I can't think of a comparable.

maybe 2 to 2.5" tall

Comments for Big Eyed brown Bug (Hanging-thieves robber fly)

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Hanging-thieves robber fly
by: Moni

Colleen
Your insect is a robber fly called hanging-thieves because they hang by their forelegs while they eat.

This robber fly, like all robber flies feed on other insects...sometimes they catch insects larger than themselves. They do prefer to eat mostly wasps, but will also eat dragonflies, damselflies and other flies. The larva live in the soil and are probably predators there.

There is a concern that these flies can be a pest if they prey on honey bees.

These robber flies are found all over North America in woodland and open areas. They prefer to hunt in shaded woodlands.

They are not known to bite humans.

Big eyed brown bug
by: Colleen

Thank you, Moni!
The garden is such a fascinating place.
I love learning about all these strange critters.
Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge.
Colleen

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