Brown verbena leaf-eating suspect ( Eastern shieldback katydid, male)

by Mo
(Virginia)

I found this little critter on my Verbena plant. Several leaves looked like they had been eaten by something, and this was the only suspect at the scene of the crime.


I thought at first he was a cricket, but he didn't jump, hop, or even move for that matter, when I pulled on the leaf to take a picture.

He kind of looks like a cricket, but didn't jump, and he has long antennae, a somewhat segmented body, and the two little protruding things in his rear - like a cockroach. I've never seen little critters like this one before.

I live in Virginia, if it helps.

Thanks!


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Eastern shieldback katydid, male
by: Moni

Mo
Your insect is probably one of the eastern shieldback katydids, maybe the American shieldback. These do look like crickets and are in the same Infraorder of classification. Without more photos of side views and size, that is as close as I can guess.
The two protrusions at the rear mean it is a male, a single protrusion would be the ovipositor of a female.
These are found in eastern North America in mixed woodland areas with low vegetation.
They eat other insects that are dead or alive and may feed on leaves, flowers, fruits of various plants.
There is a note that they can bite, so do not handle, or do so very carefully!!

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brownish-rust insect (Oak catkin mirid)

by Chris
(Richardson, TX, USA)

These insects have been swarming all over our front yard the last couple of days, by the thousands. Had pest control over and they couldn't identify them. I think they are mostly attracted to the flowering live oak tree in our front yard, but I'm not positive about that. We are in the Dallas area, Richardson, TX. The date so far that we have seen them has been Mar. 26-29. I've looked through lots of pics but haven't seen any like it. They fly and then land and fold up wings. They're a big nuisance as they want to land on you whenever you walk outside. Let me know if you need any more info. Sorry, they are so small that only one picture turned out well that I took.

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Oak catkin mirid
by: Moni

Chris
Your insect is an oak catkin mirid. The Miridae family of true bugs are known as plant bugs...they are found on plants.
Bet you have one or more live oak trees in your yard?
These insects breed abundantly on a tree call live oak. They actually feed on the pollen and the catkins, which are the flowers of that oak. Once the tree has finished flowering you will not see very many. This mirid is only found in the Texas and nearby southern states.
The name tells us where this insect lives and what it eats!
Plant bugs have sucking mouth parts and suck juices from plant parts. Some are pests, but most do not cause any problem in our yards and gardens.
Tho there are many of these they are not known as a plant pest...tho may be a nuisance to you right now.
They will go away.
Thanks for the post!

Oak catkin mirid
by: Moni

Chris
Just reread your post and see you did say you have flowering live oak in your yard.
I tend to read the description quickly and sometimes miss details like that esp when I know what the insect is right away.

Perhaps the early warm spring has had them pop out at the same time this year where in the past they tend to hatch over a longer period of time.

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Flat, narrow, brown insect, (Firefly larvae)

by Holly Fake
(Portland, PA, USA)

March 7, 2012 - Portland, PA: The weather was sunny and around 60°F. I was attempting to move one of the decorative rocks in my garden, and spotted a small flat insect crawling on top of it that I have never seen before in my life. The insect was approximately 3/4" long and narrow, and had 6 legs toward the front of it's body. It's coloring was mottled browns, in varying shades from dark brown to tan. The body had 11 segments, and appeared similar to a flat lobster tail. The head and neck were very tiny, with short stubby antennae, and almost snail-like in appearance and movement. The insect moved very slowly and appeared to be feeding on materials from the surface of the rock.

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Firefly larvae
by: Moni

Holly
Your worm is the young or what we call the larvae of the firefly/lightning bugs.

These are found in moist/damp areas. The larvae feed on dead insects, worms,and snails. Most adults do not feed.

The larvae do emit light from the tail end as well as the adults. Many firefly species give off a chemical that keeps birds and spiders from eating them.

As you saw they are active during warm weather.

Thank You!
by: Holly

Moni, I would like to thank you for identifying the Firefly larvae in these photos I posted. I had no idea what it was that I photographed, only that I'd never seen one before, and I really appreciate your help. I'm surprised at how large the larvae is compared to the Firefly itself. Nature will never cease to amaze me. Thanks again!

Holly

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Brown, slender insect with long antennae (Female Jumping Bush Cricket)

by Traci
(Ohio)

I've caught several of these in the past week. Two in my bathroom and one was crawling on my bedroom ceiling. It appears to have wings, but I can't tell. Doesn't really make noise as a cricket would. Appears between a cricket, beetle, or possible some type of roach. Not sure. Each one was single, no others around.

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Jumping bush cricket, female
by: Moni

Traci
This is a bush cricket also called jumping bush crickets. The appendage at the rear end is the ovipositor (egg laying appendage) hence a female.
These crickets are found in eastern North America.

This cricket is also known as a singing cricket...they are known to sing rather loudly in the trees. They are found in shrubs and trees feeding on leaves, flowers and fruits of plants.
Eggs are laid in stems of live plants where they overwinter...hatching the following spring.

This cricket is not commonly found in the house so perhaps it was drawn to lights and came in thru a hole or vents. Interesting that you had so many come in. It is not a house pest...so just put it outside where it and you will be happier. :-)

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Tiny brownish beetle looking insect (Sawtoothed grain beetle)

by Kathy
(Charleston, SC)

Tiny brownish to black beetle looking insects; they are about 1/8th of an inch long; they have invaded my house. Any information will be greatly appreciated.

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brownish beetle
by: Denise

Looks like an earwig to me.

brownish beetle
by: Kathy

Thank you for the response. However, I don't think they are earwigs - no pinchers and smaller.

Beetle
by: Anonymous

This looks like a type of Flour beetle to me.

Sawtoothed grain beetle
by: Moni

Kathy
You are right it is not an earwig. Your beetle looks like the sawtoothed grain beetle tho without closer look, I can not be absolutely positive.

Sawtoothed grain beetles feed on a wide variety of foods include cereals, flour, pastas, dried fruits, dried meats, candies, and other similar packaged goods. They may have come in on the cardboard or plastic packages from the grocery. This pest is widely seen in the large warehouses that store grain as well as the manufacturing facilities where grain is processed into cereal and such.

These beetles have been attracted to lights at night so there is also the possibility that they have come thru screens if you have a light on near an open window.

Once you have an infestation of them you will have to be diligent in keeping any grains or dry products in sealed glass or heavy plastic containers. But first you have to clean everything!...Sorry :(

You need to pull everything out of the pantry, drawers, or cabinets...vacuum then clean all shelves, drawers, closets with strong warm soapy water. If you see any dry products with any bugs in them either throw them away...Or if you want to try to rescue them - put them in the freezer for 1 week to kill any live insects, bring them out for 2 weeks then back in the freezer 1 wk to kill any that have emerged from egg or pupa stages which may not be killed with the freezing temps.

When all is cleaned...including all areas around the stove, oven, refrigerator or where any food is kept (even pet food), then keep all dry foods, like those listed, in glass or hard plastic containers.

Good luck eliminating them!

tiny brownish beetle bugs
by: Kathy

Moni,

Thank you so much. I do believe you are correct. Luckily, I have not seen any in my pantry - and I checked everything - and then, checked again. Most of my flour and rice type products are in tupperware or like containers - but, I checked any way and will continue to check for a few weeks. The only place I have found them is under my sofa - and I hope I found them before they decided to spread out. I don't know why they were under the sofa, unless a dog treat or such ended up under there and the "little buzzards" were attracted to it.

Thanks to you and everyone else who commented; I really appreciate it.

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Brown winged bug with long antennae (Spring fishfly)

by Kathy
(Dutchess County, NY)

About the same size as a cicada, but long wings, narrow body, long antennae. Wings have black dots along the "ribs." What is this thing? Thanks for any help! (NY State)

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Spring fishfly
by: Moni

Kathy
The photo is not close enough to be sure but I am pretty sure your insect is a spring fishfly. The other possibility would be a dobsonfly...they look similar from that distance.

But because of the timing and your location in NY, it is probably the fishfly.

Fishflies live near calm bodies of water that have a lot of plant material around it. The adults fly in late spring. The larvae feed on various plant material, debris, and sometimes other insects.
Fishflies are found in eastern North America.

This is not a pest and since the larvae feed on other insects could be considered beneficial.
A neat insect to find!

Thank you!
by: Kathy

Thank you!

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Black and brown Fly or wasp? (Glassy-winged sharpshooter)


(Orange County, CA)

Citrus fly or wasp

Citrus fly or wasp

Lime tree in California had this bug which fell on my leg and bit before I hit it off. Is black with white on sides and yellow ring at the end top. The wings were bright blue and red six legs.

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Glassy-winged sharpshooter
by: Moni

Orange Co
Your insect is the glassy-winged sharpshooter ...which is a leafhopper not a fly or wasp.

This sharpshooter is native to southeastern US, but was introduced into southern CA where it has become a serious threat to wine grape growing since it can be a vector to Pierce's disease.

The adults are known to lay eggs on citrus (hence being on your lime tree). The adults and nymphs feed on a wide range of plants...over 100 plant species have been noted. However, crape myrtle, citrus, and holly are favorites. They suck juices out of the stems.

With the piercing-sucking type of mouth part, it is possible for them to bite.
Though, they are not known to bite...they were probably just checking to see if you were a citrus plant :) Sorry you were bitten.

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large brown antlike with large wings (eastern dobsonfly, female)

by Steve
(Manhattan, KS)

looks like a big ant. large mouthparts. large wings. greenish in color..both wings and body...wings have small white spots

Comments for large brown antlike with large wings (eastern dobsonfly, female)

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fly
by: mydlars

Dobson fly

eastern dobsonfly, female
by: Moni

Steve
As Mydlars said, your insect is a dobsonfly, more specifically an female eastern dobsonfly.
The females do not have the long 'pincers' that the males do, but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.
These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be one nearby. The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.
Larvae (sometimes called 'hellgrammites' ) are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two to three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter. Adults emerge spring to summer.
These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.

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Brown Stick or Insect? (Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper)

by Brandi
(Miami, Florida, USA)

Long brown body with a white stripe on the side. It looks to be winged. Possibly 4 legs? And two antennae out front. It was found on my friend's glass door in Miami, Florida. I thought possibly a stick bug, but his body seems to be stockier than the typical stick bug and his legs appear to be shorter.

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walking stick
by: Anonymous

Walking stick

Bro wn stick insect
by: Anonymous

This is not a walking stick, at least not like the kind in Ontario Canada; did you find out what it is?

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper
by: Moni

Brandi

Your insect is a cattail toothpick grasshopper.

With that kind of name, you can see why someone would think it was a walkingstick. :)

This grasshopper is found in the southern states and further south into Central America. They live in wet areas and are typically found on cattails as the name suggests.

This grasshopper does have 6 legs...the hind legs are set very close to the body in the back when they are at rest, so they do not show well.
They are usually brown, tho many will have some green coloration especially in the younger stages.

THANK YOU!
by: Brandi

Oh Moni you are so awesome! I never even came across that as a possibility in my search. I'll let my friend know! Interesting to know about the 6 legs too. :)

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Brown TINY fly size of letter on dime. (Brown lacewing)

by Terence Duke
(San Diego,CA USA)

bottom rear area

Found this and others in upstairs bathroom of 2 story townhouse in San Diego. First thought why are fruit flies in my upstairs bath until I caught and viewed one. Too tiny for crane, dobson. Looked like pepper flake. TINY. Curious about worm like creature in mouth or maybe part of the fly? Plus seemed to have some on lower abdomen area. Drain fly/fungus gnat? 3rd floor unit had toilet leak twice I believe was never remedied properly as there is wall evidence right near bathroom inline to upstairs bathroom continuing straight down to underground garage floor. A drippy golden brownish but clear that sits for a while then breaks open to creamy colored interior. stating this to see if possible connection attracting the flies? photographed with Nikon D-50 with macro lens

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Brown lacewing
by: Moni

Terence
Your insect is a lacewing adult. It is one of the brown lacewings, probably genus Hemerobius.

The antenna do not look like most flies...tho the drain fly is a good guess for size and antenna, but they have lots more hair on the wings and body than this insect.

What looks like worms coming out of the mouth are actually papli, which are part of the mouth structure.

Lacewings are drawn to lights. So perhaps you had a light on in the bathroom and a window cracked open or a screen where they may have gotten thru.

The larvae and adult lacewings feed on aphids and other soft bodied insects. They are good bugs for the garden!

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Brown Stick Bug (pair of northern two-striped walkingsticks mating)

by Beatha R Galloway
(Memphis, TN)

Bug on step

Bug on step

Bug on step Bug on door

This bug appears to get about 4 to 5 inches long and carries baby on it's back. The baby's tail seems to be fused with the adults inder belly. Theynare as wide as an adult thumb. First notice them in the bark of a dying plant in my yard. Then we removed the plank boardsmfrom doors and found them nested in the wood there as well. The antennae is about 1 to 2 inches in length. Skin appears to b raised in sections like that if scorpion, but not hard shelled. Leg count appears to be six spaced on either of elongated body.

Moni says Beatha, Your insects are a pair of northern two-striped walkingsticks mating.

The larger is the female while the smaller is the male.

Walkingsticks feed on leaves of trees and shrubs. Eggs are dropped to the ground where they overwinter

Some striped walkingsticks have been known to secrete a substance and vapor that can cause irritation so be careful and do not get too close to this insect.

It is not a pest so enjoy having found it.

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Tiny shield shaped with brown, grey/black & light tan mottled (Varied carpet beetle)

by Renee CS
(Harrisonburg, VA)

small bug in center of allysum flower

small bug in center of allysum flower

small bug in center of allysum flower

This bug has 4 legs that I can see, almost every flower on my Allysum has one in the center of the flower and they seem to move from flower to flower eating pollen. They are a rounded shield shape, but have a fatter rounder body than a stink bug. The coloring is mottled, not spotted not striped, just blotches of black, grey, brown and light tan with black and white stripes on their underside. I just want to make sure it is not a harmful insect that will eventually devour my favorite plants.

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Varied carpet beetle
by: Moni

Renee
Your insects are varied carpet beetles.
If found indoors they are a pest feeding on wool, fur, skins, dead insects, stored grains, flour, etc. However there are some that are outdoors that feed on pollen, just like you have found.

The adults are attracted to lights and can come into homes thru open windows, around eaves, soffits and attic vents. Hopefully, yours are just the outdoor type, but you might want to keep the porch lights off thru the spring season. (while you still see them on your allysum)

Carpet beetles are found in all of North America. The field (outdoor) strains apparently need the cold temps of winter to produce adults in the spring, while the indoor strains produce adults in the fall.

Since yours are outdoors and feeding on allysum pollen, then there is no need to do anything. They will not damage your flowers since they are only eating pollen.

Interesting that there are 2 strains! New info for me! Thanks for posting these!

They like my Yarrow as well
by: Anonymous

Thanks for responding Moni, it is greatly appreciated!!! I just noticed this morning that they are now all over my Yarrow in a front bed...I've never seen them before so I am glad to hear they are harmless. Thanks again!

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Brown segmented hairy grub-like insect (Carpet beetle larva)

by Jon Bennett
(Mesa, AZ, USA)

1/2" in length. looks to be 12 segment body. fine hair protruding from sides and more lengthy hair sticking out the rear end. light tan underbelly. Six legs in the front 1/3 of the body. Seems to be trying to burrow, even when on solid surfaces. Found it in a Kitchen bowl in Mesa Arizona

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Carpet beetle larva
by: Moni

Jon
Your picture looks like the larva of a carpet beetle, probably the black carpet beetle.
Carpet beetles are found through out North America.

The adult is black and less than 1/4 inch long.
Carpet beetles are also called dermestids and/or fur beetles as the larvae and adults feed on the skin and flesh of dead animals, including museum specimens of vertebrates and invertebrates, and will also eat any organic material (fresh or dried foods, woolen and silk products, rugs, feathers, etc.)
Many homes have them, but if you have wool carpets or a lot of natural fibers or perhaps animal skins, pets (as well as human) with dander...all these things attract them.

A thorough cleaning/vacuuming in all cracks and crevices of the kitchen as well as the rest of the house will help get rid of the food source. They will also sometimes eat oily food crumbs, especially dog/cat food and other oily foods in the pantry.

They do not carry any diseases. They are considered a house pest especially if you have hides, rugs, clothing, or artifacts made of natural/animal products.
If this is the only one you have seen then you probably don't have a big infestation...just enough to give the kitchen a good cleaning.

These insects do not bite or sting.

carpet beetle washed off pet into shower
by: sam

I started finding these small worms in the shower about 0.5 cm long. I finally got one under my son's microscope. It had body segment lines and small hairs lining up with the segment lines. One end had a crown like set of hairs. The hairs look smaller than the one in the picture.
I was so worried that we had hookworms or some other dangerous pet parasite. Thank you so much for this picture. So far I have found about 15 of these worms coming out of the cracks in our custom built walk in tile shower. We are fostering a rescue dog and we gave him a good shower to clean his matted fur. About two days later I noticed a few of these tiny dark worms. They seem to live in the gaps under the tiles. The

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brown with semi-transparent wings, (Dobsonfly, female)

by Mike M.
(Downers Grove, IL)

Looks like a female Dobsonsfly

Looks like a female Dobsonsfly

Found this insect resting on stucco wall outside a community pool in Lombard, IL June 4, 2015. It has brown, semi-transparent wings, (wing structure is variegated) small eyes, two antenna, small pinchers, has sets of raised bumps on back of head. It was not bothered by the many people passing by.

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Dobsonfly, female
by: Moni

Mike M
Yes :) it is a dobsonfly female. Great job with the ID!

The females do not have the long 'pincers' that the males do, but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.

These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be one nearby? The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.

Larvae (sometimes called 'hellgrammites') are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two to three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter. Adults emerge spring to summer.

These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.

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Brown and tan insect with fuzzy white bottom (Acanaloniid planthopper nymphs)

by Dave
(Clemmons, NC)

Brown 1/8th inch insect with fuzz hanging from rear. Inzect has tan stripe on midsection. Jump far when threatened. They are tomato, squash and cucumber plants in garden in Clemmons, NC

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Acanaloniid planthopper nymphs
by: Moni

Dave
Your jumping insects are one of the Acanaloniid planthoppers. In the nymphal stage, we can not identify them further.

This insect turns into a green rather broad winged planthopper. The brown nymphs produce wax plumes from glands at the rear of the abdomen. This wax is thought to protect it from drying out or to keep it from becoming coated with its own sticky waste.

These insects do feed on various plant foliage but are not a pest in the garden. You did not say what plant you found them on?

This insect does not bite or sting.

Thank you
by: David

Moni,

Thank you for the identification assistance. It is greatly appreciated. The insects are on all the plants in my garden, squash, corn, tomato, cucumber and beans. They particularly like cucumber and bean plants. They are causing damage to plant stems and fruit so I am not sure how they are not a pest. I will have to watch for the adult stage and see if I can't get a picture.

Thanks, David

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Brown segmented body with big "teeth" (Windscorpion)

by Kate Alder
(Hemet, CA, USA)

The carcass is brown and beige, about 1" in length with a segmented body and big "teeth." It has a long abdomen; no evidence of wings. I live in a rural part of the Inland Empire region of southern California. The climate is arid with summer temps in the 90s or higher and very little rain. Almost desert but not quite.

I found it when I was stripping my bed to wash the sheets. It was stuck to the top sheet near the foot of the bed when I pulled the bedspread off. The sheets have been on the bed about 10 days; no idea how long the bug's been there. I have never seen this bug before and hope never to see another one...it scared the heck out of me!

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Pseudoscorpion ?
by: chaindropz

Pseudoscorpion

Windscorpion
by: Moni

Kate
Your photo is of a windscorpion. It is an arachnid...related to spiders, but are not true scorpions. The classification of this order (Solifugae) is currently under revision. Tho yours looks like it is in the family Eremogatidae.

These critters are nocturnal. They live in warm and arid places - mainly deserts and sandy places, but some species are found in forests and grasslands. These are found in the western half of North America.

These are nocturnal predators: eating invertebrates (insects and insect relatives) and small vertebrates (small lizards). They will hunt for dead creatures as well as live prey.

The strong jaws of these critters can inflict a painful bite in self-defense if handled. They do not have venom. The most common species are small and the bite can hardly be felt except for a slight "pinch". Larger species have been known to draw blood, which should be immediately disinfected as you would treat any bite. They do not sting.

Thank you!
by: Kate

Moni,

Thank you so much for the identification and helping me understand how to share the world with this creature.

Kate

Wind scorpion it is
by: Chris Ward

Its part of the family of Solifugae, they are also commonly known as "Camel Spiders" probably from soldiers stationed in the middle eastern desert climates. I have caught wind scorpions in the high desert areas of Oregon. I remember even doing a detailed report on them back in the very old school...

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light brown colored beetle type bug (Grapevine beetle)

by Tim
(Grand Rapids, Michigan USA)

this beetle/june bug type bug flew into my friend's garage and landed on my hat while i was wearing it and stayed there well after i took it off. This occured in Grand Rapids, Michigan tanish in color with three or maybe four spots that run down each side. Easily as big around as a half dollar if not bigger.

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Grapevine beetle
by: Moni

Tim
Your insect is the grapevine beetle. They are attracted to lights so perhaps that is how it came into your garage.

This beetle feed on wild and domestic grape foliage and fruit, but are not considered a pest. The adult beetle lays eggs on stumps and rotting logs.

The larvae feed on dead wood of maple, walnut, oak, apples and related trees, hackberry, sycamore, and elm trees.

This beetle is found east of the Rocky Mountains.

This beetle does not bite.

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Large Brown Beetle with Long Flexible Antennae (Prionid long-horned beetle)

by Scott K
(Pittsburgh PA USA)

Here he is on his back.

Here he is on his back.

Here he is on his back. Still on his back.  Better lighting.

Beetle. Brown. Inch and a quarter maybe. Pronounced mandibles. Long segmented antennae. Straight flat body. Found on its back on bathroom floor - still squirming but not able to turn itself over. Southwest Pennsylvania. July 14.

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Prionid long-horned beetle
by: Moni

Scott
Since you did not show a photo of its top side, we are not positive, but think it is probably the brown prionid beetle.
Not sure how it got into your bathroom, but guessing it came in because of lights left on and a hole in the window or screen?

This beetle is found in eastern North America. It is usually found in moist forested areas.

The adults will come to rotted fruit baits so it is believed they eat rotting fruit and sap in woodlands. They are sometimes attracted to lights at night. The larvae feed in old railroad ties or utility poles, but in natural settings they live and feed in decaying trees and logs.

Since it does have large mandibles (pincers) then they can bite if mishandled.

prionid
by: Anonymous

I just found one in my back garage, in Clio Mi

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Very large brown/white and black flying insect (Horse fly)

by Ray Matulis
(Middletown, CT)

Wow, what are you!!?

Wow, what are you!!?

It's a six legged, 2 wings only, very large fly type of insect. It has large greenish, brownish eyes, brown fuzzy shoulders with a black back and a white belly. It has an elongated mouth or snout. It's around 2.25 inches long and over a half inch wide. I was parked in a parking lot in Cromwell, CT and it flew into an open window and crawled around my dash for a while. I decided I needed to stretch my legs until it finally found it's way out!

Comments for Very large brown/white and black flying insect (Horse fly)

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Horse fly
by: Moni

Ray
Your big fly is a horse fly. Can't quite tell if it is a male or female from the angle. The eyes of the male are next to each other, separated if a female.
The females are known to bite, so it is a good thing to take a walk while it left the car!

There are 100 species of this type of horse fly. The scientific name of the genus of this fly Tabanus was used by the Romans for a kind of biting fly. Evidently they were around then biting horses and other livestock. Think yours might be Tabanus calens, but without more close up photos of various angles it would be hard to know for sure.

Female horse flies have sharp mouthparts that cut the skin to allow it to lap up the blood. Most females do not feed on humans, they usually feed on large mammals, biting the legs or body. Males feed on nectar and pollen (much like mosquitoes).

Eggs are laid on leaves or plant stems near water or very wet soils. The larvae live in the moist water or soils. These larvae feed on small insects mostly worms.
These flies are found in eastern North America.

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Walking Brownish Black Bug (Big-footed bug)

by Shana
(Frankford, Ontario)

This little critter was found in Frankford, Ontario. It is about an inch long kind of looks like a cross between a praying mantis and a walking stick. It has 6 legs which start out black lighten up then go back black again and what looks to be 2 feelers! There are also bumps on its back and the back looks to be like a hard shell(but may not be wasn't touching it!!). The back and head would remind you of a tortoise it looks prehistoric!! It walks like a crab with its behind up in the air...There are Hostas, rose bushes, Spruce trees and a small creek on the property but he was found walking across our deck. What the heck is it? Is it dangerous or venomous??
Thank you,

Comments for Walking Brownish Black Bug (Big-footed bug)

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Big-footed bug
by: Moni

Shana
Your insect is the big-footed bug, one of the leaf-footed bugs in the family Coreidae.

Because of where you live we can narrow the species to Acanthocephala terminalis...no other common name. These are found in eastern US and southern Ontario, west into CO and TX. It is then only northern species of the Acanthocephala genus.

These insects are found in shrubs in woodland/wood edges, fields and meadows. They do feed on plants, but are not considered a pest.

When these bugs are handled they give off an unpleasant odor.

These leaf-footed bugs do not bite nor are they poisonous.

Thank you
by: Shana

Thank you so much Moni, So happy to know this is an innocent little critter!!

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Huge brown triangular body (Leaf-footed bug)

by Rhoda Mccomb
(St Augustine fl usa)

Huge looks like black or brown n white triangula body with long antanis


Comments for Huge brown triangular body (Leaf-footed bug)

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Leaf-footed bug
by: Moni

Rhoda
Your insect is one of the leaf-footed bugs. The hind leg has a wide section that resembles a leaf to give it that common name.
This insect like other insects in this particular classification order called Hemiptera or commonly 'true bugs', do have the triangular shape with wide shoulders and narrower abdomen.

It is hard to see in the photo, the color of the antenna and how thick the hind legs are to know for sure which species you have. A view from the back and side are always helpful for better identification. It is probably in the genus Acanthocephala.

The leaf-footed bugs are found usually on shrubs near woodlands, fields or meadows. They feed on plants, but are not pests. If they are mishandled they will give off a bad odor. Some do come to lights. The leaf-footed bugs are also found indoors in the northern states during winter (a warm place to be when it gets cold out!)

They do overwinter as adults.

This insect sucks juices from plants so does not have a poisonous bite.

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Praying Mantis Egg Case? (Chinese mantid egg case )

by Colleen Schoneveld
(Bethlehem, Pennsylvania)

Praying Mantis Pod?

Praying Mantis Pod?

Praying Mantis Pod? Praying mantis

Moni,
I did have several praying mantis this season.
I found about 8 of these and from what I can figure they might be the egg sack.

I garden in a community garden and everything had to be removed.
I saved 5 pods.
The are hard and feel light as if made with foam.

If this is a mantis pod...how can I protect it so the eggs will hatch?
I live in a small apartment with no outside, but could bring them to my daughter's.

Thank you so much!
Colleen Schoneveld

Comments for Praying Mantis Egg Case? (Chinese mantid egg case )

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Chinese mantid egg case
by: Moni

Colleen
Yes, that is a mantid egg case. That heart shaped egg case is made by the Chinese mantid.

These have to be kept outdoors. It would be best to give them to gardeners who can put them in their gardens. Place them in a bush or other somewhat protected area so they don't blow to the ground. Assuming you have a bit of a stem attached to all of them you could clothespin them to a bush. Do not place them close together. If baby mantids do not find enough food when they emerge they do start to eat each other. :(

The mantid egg case is foam-like. It is filled with 300-500 eggs. It needs to overwinter outside, otherwise the mantids will emerge in your house in the middle of winter. You will have hundreds of tiny little mantids running around with nothing to eat.

Thank you for saving the ones you did. Perhaps the others were just put in a compost pile where they may still have a chance to hatch next summer.

Mantid
by: Colleen

Thank you!
That is great to understand.
I have them outside the window, between the window and screen.
I did leave some steam so maybe I can find good homes.
The two pods I "trashed" before I figure it out went into our tree line....maybe they will be able to survive in the compost it becomes.

It is fantastic to have someone to ask these things.
I want to learn more...I WILL learn more.
Thanks for sharing.

Praying Mantis a year later
by: Colleen Schoneveld

It looked like maybe two of the mantis cases made it through the winter.
I am pleased to say I have seen a baby praying mantis in my garden this year.
Thank you for your advice!

Chinese mantid egg case
by: Moni

Colleen
So glad you have mantids that hatched this year.

They are good to have in the garden..just not on butterfly bushes where they might eat butterflies. If they get on butterfly bushes, or similar bushes, just move them to where you have pests in the garden! :)

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