Black borer with red triangles on back (Purplescent longhorn)

by Jonathan
(Scituate, Rhode Island)

Found this insect July 7 in Western Rhode Island. It has a black body with two red triangles on the upper back. Very long antennae. The body is an inch long.

Comments for Black borer with red triangles on back (Purplescent longhorn)

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Purplescent longhorn
by: Moni

Jonathan
Your beetle is one of the purplescent longhorns, with no common name, but scientific name is Purpuricenus humeralis. Longhorn beetles are called that for there long antenna.

These longhorn beetles are found in eastern North America. The adults will feed some on foliage of various hardwood trees, while the larvae mine in the dead branches of various hardwoods. Since they feed on dead branches they are not a pest of trees.

What a cool beetle to find!


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Red head and Black and Tan stripped wings (Colorado potato beetle)

by Haley
(Maryville Tennessee )

I found a cm long (maybe smaller) bug inside my shoe, it had a head that looked like and sorta, and Black and Tan stripped wings. I found it after playing outside when I took my shoe off. Thank you in advance.
-Haley (age 12)

Comments for Red head and Black and Tan stripped wings (Colorado potato beetle)

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Colorado potato beetle
by: Moni

Haley
Your insect is a Colorado potato beetle. These beetles are known to be pests, because they eat potato plant leaves. They do also eat leaves of plants related to potatoes like nightshade, eggplant, ground cherry, horse-nettle, tobacco, and sometimes tomatoes.

This insect was first found in Colorado in the early 1800's. Once settlers brought potatoes to North America, it started eating them rather than the native buffalo-bur. And then started spreading to most potato growing areas of North America. Unfortunately it was also spread to Europe.

There are several natural enemies that help keep this beetle under control in the garden. These include the green lacewing, predatory stink bugs, and a tachinid fly. If your garden have lots of damage, you and your parents can try to control them by picking off the beetles, eggs, and larvae dropping them in warm soapy water.
If the garden has a bad infestation, then treatments using rotenone with or without pyrethrum (added for faster knockdown), or neem can be applied. (Be sure your folks follow the label instructions for your area).

These beetles are not known to bite.

Were you out in the the potato patch of the garden before you found it in your shoe?

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shiny Black and red beetle (Flat-faced Longhorn beetle)

by chaindropz
(Alabama)

This insect mimics a milk weed beetle.

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Flat-faced Longhorn beetle
by: Moni

Chaindropz
Yes, it does look like the red milkweed beetle and it is related. However, your beetle is a different longhorn beetle in the genus Saperda...it is one of the flat-faced borers. It is either the elm borer or Saperda imitans (no common name). It is probably the elm borer as it is far more common than the other.

These beetles are found in eastern North America in deciduous woodlands. The beetles are seen in the summers when they lay eggs on dead trees.

Larvae of the elm borer feed on dead or stressed elm trees, while S.imitans larvae feed on various dead hardwood trees such as hickory, stone fruits (plum, cherry, peaches, almond), and willow.

This insect overwinters as pupa in sapwood of the trees emerging as early as May into June.

These beetles do not bite nor are poisonous in any way.

Very colorful beetle! Nice photo!

Thank you
by: chaindropz

Thank you for the identification. It troubles me a bit when I can’t identify an insect. I enjoy taking pictures of anything different and discovering the identity. You are more than welcome look at my many pictures. My latest are fox kits playing with a rope taken by my security camera at night also day pictures with my point and shoot.

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BLACK AND WHITE WITH SOME BLUE AND LOONG FEELERS (Banded alder borer)


(Monrovia,California USA)

Found this guy while cleaning an auto shop in Monrovia...startled means then I was intrigued....

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Banded alder borer
by: Moni

Monrovia
Your cool large beetle is a banded alder borer. It is in the longhorn beetle family...named such due to the long antenna.

This beetle lays eggs on dead hardwood trees such as alder, ash, laurel, etc. Since the larvae feed on dead wood, it is not a pest. It just helps break down dead trees.

The adult beetle is found on flowers feeding. If the beetle is handled it is known to make a squeaky or hissing type of sound :)

This beetle is found along the west coast of North America.

Sometimes the adult beetles are attracted to drying paint...researchers wonder if the odor is similar pheromones given off by the insect or perhaps it is the smell similar to dying trees.

These beetles are not known to bite.

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Black Flying Bug (clubbed mydas fly)

by beth
(exeter Rhode isalnd)

Black bug with orange stripe on body and purplish wings

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clubbed mydas fly
by: Moni

Beth
Your insect is one of the mydas flies (Mydas clavatus) sometimes called the clubbed mydas fly.

These are found in the eastern half of North America in deciduous woodlands, meadows, gardens or other such planted open areas.

The adult flies feed on nectar on various flowers. The eggs are laid on soil or rotting wood. The larvae hatch and feed on beetle larvae, especially those of the June beetle.

This fly mimics certain spider wasps.

The mydas fly does not bite or sting.

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Black and tan long horn beatle with wings bit me(Eucalyptus Borer)

by Sarah
(Perris, ca)

Today this critter crawled up my arm and pimched me while I was working in the yard. I had shaken and moved a dead eucalyptus branch out of my way and said to myself, "great now I woke up all the spiders before I sit down and work on this fence." I live parallel an open barren field in drought stricken california.

It had fantastic antanae that it seemed to be using to help it crawl. I accidentally had smacked one of the antenna off. Under its back it had 2 clear wings And was hopping/ attmpting to fly from leaf to leaf, but I infer it was injured since I had smacked it off of my arm. It seems to have had pinschers on its face. It was very strong and agile and could flip itself over after falling on its back. It used it's antanaes to assist itself to do this! It's belly was dark and had a pretty pattern, but at that point my husband had come to inspect my hooting and hollering and said it may be a kissing bug.... I don't think it is, but want to rest easy.

Could you please tell me what you think?

Comments for Black and tan long horn beatle with wings bit me(Eucalyptus Borer)

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Longhorn beetle
by: Moni

Sarah
Sorry you were bitten! This is a longhorn beetle not a kissing bug. They do not usually bite.

I'm traveling without my computer, so will ID when I get home. But wanted you to know was not a kissing bug

Response to moni
by: Sarah

I found it! It is called a eucalyptus borer beatle. His mandibles must have pinched me! Today my goal is to burn that wood! Thank you mini for helping me! ❤

Eucalyptus Borer
by: Moni

Sarah
Great job with the ID!!

Yes, there are actually two species of eucalyptus borers in your area. Yours looks like P. recurva. These both were introduced in the last few decades from Australia where the eucalyptus trees originated.

The beetles are attracted to freshly cut eucalyptus wood, dying limbs, and trees suffering from stress, especially drought stress. Eucalyptus species that naturally grow in wetter areas of Australia have been planted in California and with the drought over the last few years the beetle populations have increased.

Female beetles lay their eggs under loose bark. The eggs hatch then the young larvae burrow through the bark layer and into the cambial layer which is just below the bark. The cambial layer contains the food conducting tissues and water conducting tissues. Larvae have high mortality in trees with high moisture levels because water floods feeding tunnels and drowns them.

There is research to find wasps that will parasitize and kill the larvae. Four wasps species from Australia that attack the larvae have been introduced into CA.

This insect is found in CA and AZ and only feeds on eucalyptus.

The beetles are not known to bite but perhaps it was pinched so it pinched back?

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Black Type of Fly or Bee? (Elm sawfly adult)

by Marilyn
(Toronto, Ontario, Canada)

I found this on a closed road, in the middle of the pavement, dying. No apparent reason. Didn't seem to have been stepped on or hit by anything. It was found on June 9/16 at 8:45pm. The weather was dry and seasonal (approx 15C) and dusk was just beginning. Thank you for any identification help you can provide.

Comments for Black Type of Fly or Bee? (Elm sawfly adult)

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Elm sawfly adult
by: Moni

Marilyn
Your insect is an elm sawfly adult. This is probably a male since it does not have yellow bands on the abdomen like most females do. They are the largest sawfly found over North America.

This sawfly, related to the bees and wasps, can girdle bark on twigs. The larvae feed on foliage of elms, maple, birch, willow and basswood. Tho the larvae do eat foliage they are not considered a forestry pest. The larvae have chemical defenses that it can eject from glands near the spiracles (breathing tubes on the side of the larva). The larvae are many times seen coiled up in a resting position on leaves.

This insect is found in wooded areas. It overwinters in cocoons in leaf litter, pupating in the spring.

The adult may have been dead because it's life cycle was finished? Or it could have been parasitized? Or some bird caught it and found it not tasty so dropped it?

Interesting find! Thanks for posting!

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black flying wasp ant? (Ichneumon wasp)

by Cori
(Findlay, Ohio)

Black winged insect, 1/2 inch long or so. I thought it was a carpenter ant at first because we saw some recently. We saw it twice during the day. It bit or stung my son the first time (he tried to catch it to release it outside). It got swatted the second time (sorry bug!). We've noticed others outside since then. It is spastic, kind of twitchy when it moves. It's black all over but it's legs taper to brown-orange. Wings: two sets. Its antennae weren't segmented like the ants I've seen, more curly.

Comments for black flying wasp ant? (Ichneumon wasp)

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Ichneumon wasp
by: Moni

Cori
Your insect is one of the ichneumon wasps.
Without a better photo of the wing veination, and of the side and back it would be hard to know for sure. Also, there are many ichneumon wasps and they are hard to identify!

This group of wasps are 'good' bugs. They have long antenna and slender bodies. They lay eggs in or on other insects or spiders...helping to control many pest species of insects.

They overwinter as adults usually in or around bark of trees. Ichneumon wasps are found through out North America.

They are not known to sting people

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