Black with yellow diamond (Longhorn beetle )

by Darrel Norris
(Toronto, Ontario, Canada)

My sister found this insect in her bedroom at her cottage just south of Algonquin Park in Ontario, Canada. She thinks maybe it belongs to the Carabidaes. I'm afraid I don't have any other information except that but it's a pretty good picture, I think. Hope you can identify it for her!


Thank you for your time on this!



Darrel Norris

Comments for Black with yellow diamond (Longhorn beetle )

Click here to add your own comments

Longhorn beetle
by: Moni

Darrel
Your sisters beetle is a longhorn beetle - family Cerambycidae not Carabidae.

As you can see by the photo the antenna is as long as the body, that is characteristic of the longhorn beetles, few other beetles have that long of antenna..there are always a few exceptions. Longhorn beetles are known to "squeak" if you pick them up.

Larvae of this family are borers. Depending on the species, they may bore in dead or live woody plants. It may take larvae 2-3 yrs to turn into adults. Many adults (esp. the brightly colored ones) feed on flowers. Adults may feed on sap, leaves, blossoms, fruit, bark, and fungi.

There are around 350 species in NE North America. The photo does not show the head and neck area well enough to know which species that is. If it was at a cottage, in a park, then it probably came in accidentally. Sometimes tho, borers are known to hatch from wooden furniture!

Longhorn beetles would not bite nor sting.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

black 6 leg 2 pinchers insect (Ring-legged Earwig)

by Giovanni
(Tampa, Fl)

I found this black body insect that has 6 legs, a head like an ant with small pinchers in the front, it also has antennas and for the tail looks like bigger pinchers. This was about a half inch in length.

Comments for black 6 leg 2 pinchers insect (Ring-legged Earwig)

Click here to add your own comments

Predators OR Pests?
by: Anonymous

I always understood that earwigs eat your plants & flowers! What do they prey on!? Earwigs are the only bug that I find in the very beginning of spring til fall...THEY ARE EVERYWHERE!!!!

Ring-legged Earwig
by: Moni

Anoymous
The earwig in the photo is not a pest....The European earwig is considered a pest...tho they do eat other insects besides plants. So it does depend on the species and location.

odd
by: Anonymous

you say usually in the northern state but i live in las vegas and there is not much in the form of plant life so what would draw them here?

Ring-legged earwig
by: Moni

Anonymous
You may not see much plant life, but as I mentioned these insects feed on other insects like small slugs, caterpillars, termites, and many other pests. They also eat plant material that is not live plants...so they can feed in compost, decaying plant matter, twigs, dead trees, etc.

You would be surprised the number of insects that live in Las Vegas!

help
by: Anonymous

what is good to kill those. they always appear inside my house.

ring-legged earwig
by: Moni

Anoymous - Help,
The ring-legged earwig in the photo is not a pest....You may have the European earwig who is considered a pest...tho they do eat other insects besides plants. So, it does depend on the species and location.
If you have the European earwig this site will tell you what to do to control them

Earwigs
by: Anonymous

I have tons of these in my home, 3 in past 24 hrs and one on MY NECK...I have kids in the home should I be concerned?

Where do these bugs come from
by: Anonymous

Where do these bugs come from

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Black biting bug (bettle) with two red stripes (Two-lined spittlebug )

by Engstfeld
(Slidell, LA)

Two red striped biting bug

Two red striped biting bug

Never seen this one before and I'm in south Louisiana, Slidell, to be exact. They suddenly showed up in a fair amount about a month ago (early May) and are still around. They deliver a mild, but noticeable bite, almost like what a horsefly would deliver, but only half as painful. They are not boxelders.

Sorry about the photo quality (or bug quality). I had to smash it to capture it and it lost one of his wings in the process.

Comments for Black biting bug (bettle) with two red stripes (Two-lined spittlebug )

Click here to add your own comments

Two-lined spittlebug
by: Moni

Engstfeld
Your insect is the two-lined spittlebug adult. They overwinter as eggs, which hatch in the spring. The eggs and nymphs live in what looks like spit on a plant. The spit is plant juices the adult gets from the plant and then hides the eggs inside for protection.

The nymph of this insect feeds mostly on many plants that are grasses including corn, bermudagrass,, centipedegrass, while the adults can feed on hollies.

They can cause enough feeding damage to be a pest but will not kill a plant, just show leaf feeding damage.

Most adults have the two lines like you have but sometimes they are just all black.

They are not known to bite, but most any bug can if mishandled or agitated enough. They will not cause a medical problem. Sorry you got bitten!

YES, they DO bite!
by: Anonymous

I was in my yard (Centepede grass in N. Georgia) and I was bitten twice by these guys in less than 5 minutes!

Spiddlebug
by: Anonymous

I live in South Carolina and yes, they do bite... fairly hard I would like to say. Also, they jump, and they are fast. Not cool at all.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Black and white broad insect (American Carrion beetle)

by Chris
(Brogue, Pennsylvania, USA)

bug in box turtle shell

bug in box turtle shell

The insect was inside a crushed box turtle shell. Top half (head to middle) is off white with a splash of black, and bottom half (middle to end) is black.

Comments for Black and white broad insect (American Carrion beetle)

Click here to add your own comments

American Carrion beetle
by: Moni

Chris
Your insect is the American carrion beetle... as the name implies they feed on dead animals. Well, they actually feed on the fly larvae (maggots) that feed on dead animals as well as sometimes feed on the dead carcasses.

The larvae of this beetle feed on carrion, larvae of flies feeding on the carrion and on other carrion beetles. They show up after the flies do, which is a point that helps with forensic time tables. This insect tends to feed on larger animals..."rat-sized" or larger.

These are found in the eastern half of North America , mostly in moist and wooded areas.

The adult beetles are usually seen working at night, so it is interesting you found one...and on a box turle too?

Thanks for sharing it with us!!

American carrion beetle
by: Chris Witham

Thank you Moni for the identification. As a hiker, I see a number of insects that I'm not sure what they are. Thanks again.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Black Wasp (Four-toothed mason wasp)

by DALE ARMOUR
(DREXEL HILL, PA USA 19026)

BLACK 1

BLACK 1

This black, whitish-yellow spotted wasp was flying wildly around
me as I sat on the porch in the backyard on a very hot and humid
day. I swatted it down and got it into a jar. A few minutes
later another one did the same thing, but I was unable to knock it down before it retreated.

DATE: Jul 18,2013

SETTING: DREXEL HILL, PA 19026 (JUST WEST OF PHILA.) A WELL-
SHADED BACK YARD WITH LOTS OF TALL TREES AND BIRDS.
WASP ENCOUNTER WAS IN DIRECT SUNLIGHT ON BACK PORCH.

SIZE: APPROX 2 CM LONG

DESC: BLACK WITH A YELLOW-WHITE BAND ON BACK, BELOW WAIST.
TWO SPOTS OF SAME COLOR BEHIND EYES.

BEHAVIOR: AGGRESSIVE AND SOMEWHAT FRANTIC. WAS INVESTIGATING
EVERYTHING ON THE PORCH. IT SPENT SOME TIME PERCHED
ON THE PLAIN WOODEN RAILING, CRAWLING AROUND AND ON
THE UNDERSIDE OF THE TOP PLATE. I THINK I LATER SAW
ONE OR TWO OF THESE WASPS FLYING AROUND THE EDGE OF
THE ROOFTOP, ABOUT 25' ABOVE THE GROUND. I WAS SPRAYING
SOME WATER ON A LOWER PART OF THE ROOF TOO HELP COOL
THE ROOM BELOW. THIS SEEMED TO ATTRACT THEM, OR AT
LEAST EXCITE THEM.


Thanks for your consideration and help.

Comments for Black Wasp (Four-toothed mason wasp)

Click here to add your own comments

black wash
by: Bev C

After searching for a while (what great entertainment this is), I think your wasp is a Species Monobia quadridens - Four-toothed Mason Wasp. Google that and see what you think.

Four-toothed mason wasp
by: Moni

Dale
Bev is correct...it is the four-toothed mason wasp. There is a mimic wasp that is in the same family but do not see the spots of white/yellow on the temple that that wasp has, so has to be the four-toothed.

These wasps feed on nectar.

This wasp, like all mason wasps, is beneficial as it captures mostly moth caterpillars to put in the nest cells to feed its larvae. They usually nest in wood borings, hollow stems, and old mud-dauber nests tho sometimes they burrow in soil banks to lay eggs.

These wasps are found in North America east of the Rockies.

Thanks for the great photo with measurements and all the details about it!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

big black flying bug, transparent and black patterned wings (Tiger bee fly)

by Marcia
(Warren, PA)

These are hanging around my brick house. They are about an inch or a little larger. The body is black with some white on the lower body. The wings are black and transparent patterned. They have a triangular appearance when landed.
I hope these are good bugs because I think there will be more.

Comments for big black flying bug, transparent and black patterned wings (Tiger bee fly)

Click here to add your own comments

Tiger bee fly
by: Moni

Marcia
Looks like you found a pair of tiger bee flies.
They are considered good bugs because the larvae are parasitoids of carpenter bees.

Carpenter bees drill holes in the wood of our houses, porches, garages and any wooden structure, therefore if this fly keeps them from damaging our wood they are good. :)The adult carpenter bees do help with pollination.

Tiger bee flies are found in the eastern half of North America. The adult flies have been seen lapping up minerals from mud puddles. They do fly in an unusual pattern of darting then hovering, usually moving rather quickly

...the diamond shape while mating is quite distinct!
Thanks for sharing!


Tiger bee fly
by: Marcia

Moni, Thanks for the information. All the internet in the world is no help if I don't know where to look. I am happy to have stumbled onto this site.
I am very interested to hear that they prey on carpenter bees. I have several of those holes already and I hate to spray. Maybe my tiger bee flies will take care of the situation.
Thank you,
M

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Black & Orange Bee type insect. (Wood-boring crane fly)

by Cindy F.
(Fulton, NY. USA)

This photo was taking in May 2011 in Central NY. I have never seen one before, nor have I seen one since. My curiosity has got the best of me, and I have just stumbled upon this page.

~~ This bee-like insect was about 3-3 1/2 inches in length (including the front and rear legs). It appears to have a stinger of sorts. The body wasn't like that of a wasp and it was straight. I am not sure what the 2 things protruding from behind the second set of legs are and the antennae are (for lack of better description) knobby?
I have googled many times, and don't even find anything remotely similar to it. I would be so insanely grateful if you know what exactly this is, as it's been driving me bonkers for a while now. Thank you SO very much in advance!


Moni says this is a Wood-boring crane fly, female


Your insect does look like a wasp, however it is a fly.
This is a large crane fly technically called Ctenophora dorsalis...tho some folks call it the wood-boring crane fly as it does not have a common name.
The knobs you see right behind the wings are called halteres which all flies have instead of a second pair of wings. The knobs help with balance.

For a crane fly this one is large and stocky. The males antenna is even more distinct by being more comb-like and they do not look like the female.

The larvae of this fly develop in soft dead wood. The long rear-end that looks like a stinger is the ovipositor...the female uses this long appendage for inserting an egg into the soft wood where it will hatch and the larvae develop.

These flies are found in open woodlands usually with wet and dry areas.

Cool find! Have not seen one myself so was glad to learn about a new to me insect! Thanks!

Comments for Black & Orange Bee type insect. (Wood-boring crane fly)

Click here to add your own comments

Thank you, Moni!!
by: Cindy F.

Oh wow! So cool, and I thank you so very very much!! I do live in a wooded area with plenty of old rotting trees and stumps not too far away, so I'll have to keep an eye out to see if I see others. Thank you again! Now I'll see if I can find some other "creepy crawly". :D

Again, Thank you, Moni!!

bee type insect
by: Elaine

This is fascinating! Years ago, we found two similar insects in our maple tree. They were possibly 3 to 4 inches long with great long what we thought were stingers. The "stingers" were firmly implanted in the tree trunk. I took a stick & touched one of the bugs, ready to run like the devil, & it suddenly separated from the 'stinger' & flew away, leaving the singer in the tree! My husband captured the other one in a jar & went around scaring the kids with it, then finally let it go. We never did find out what it was. They were not as colorful as this black & orange one in your post, they were more black/gray as I recall. Must have been this fellows great grand-daddy!

Wood-boring crane fly
by: Moni

Elaine
Probably what you saw on the tree was a giant ichneumond wasp. The "stinger" is again the ovipositor of the female evidently laying eggs in the tree where she sensed a worm for her young to feed on.

Thanks for the question. If you should see one again send in a photo for ID.

There are some photos under Insect ID of the giant ichneumonds - click on this link then scroll down to the ichneumond wasp - http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/-bluishpurplish-insects-.html#Purple winged long tail (Giant ichneumon wasp female)

this insect
by: Anonymous

On another website was very similar pic of insect and was thought to be a wood wasp but had a unusual long technical name not sure how to spell it etc. But this does look like 2 ive had in my home i was scared id be stung and die. So this info is great

House
by: Anonymous

Is it possible to find them in your house?

Just found one in my house!
by: Anonymous

Thanks for the ID of this insect. Just found one in the kitchen in northern ireland and was scared it could sting the children... I have a massive fear of wasps so thanks again!

wow!
by: Anonymous

I found one of these in my house today, at first I thought it was some sort of mayfly, guess not! This was really useful thank you :)

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Spider with yellow stripes (Black and Yellow Argiope, female)

by Douglas
(East Brunswick, NJ, USA)

Spider Web attached to Day Lilly plant in NJ

Spider Web attached to Day Lilly plant in NJ

Spider Web attached to Day Lilly plant in NJ Spider Web attached to Day Lilly plant in NJ

My wife Found this spider hanging out in her Day Lilly Patch. Spider had 2 yellow stripes along back from just behind head ending at a rust color round shaped spot. The yellow markings were very bright - seemed to retro reflect flash too much which ruined pic. Photos shot w/o flash.

Spider about 1.5 - 2 inches long ( including legs) body maybe 3/4 inch...? Legs had alternating stripes beginning as brownish orange with lower segments black and white alternate stripes.
Web had strands radiating from center where spider was, to anchor on various leaves. These anchor strand were connected by cross link strands in a semi circle.... hard to see but I don't think there was a complete classic "Cob Web" circular form.

I have discovered that the rainfall has been more than adequate this year, which I assume has a direct influence in boosting the insect population i.e. spider food. I have to use care walking outside after dark to avoid getting a face full of WEB and spider tangle in my beard.

I do not think the spider in question is common to the Central Jersey East Brunswick area, but then I certainly haven't met them ALL yet. My wife and I do not use any insecticides or herbicides or lawn chemical,s fertilizers, etc. NONE. As a result we have a boat load of rabbits and other wild things running around our yard - moles, voles, mice, song birds, possums, chipmunks to name a few - finches love the dandelion seeds even if our neighbors don't.

Our appreciation to Moni for the time and effort to research this for us... it must be considerable labor ...I have spent more than a few hours trying to get info without success.

Sincerely yours
Doug and Carol Robertson



Moni saysYour spider is officially called a black and yellow argiope...but most folks call it the yellow garden spider.

The shape and color tell us it is also a female.

This spider is common thorough North America...so it is common for NJ. They are usually found in gardens and meadows in late summer to early fall...right about now.
This spider like most spiders eat insects. It will enjoy a grasshopper if you toss one in the web :-). They are very unlikely to bite humans unless really provoked.

The heavy zigzag pattern, called the stabilimentum, is a good ID characteristic for this genus of spiders. They hang their heads down on the web.They overwinter as eggs in a brown round silken egg case.

Sometimes this spider will lose legs, but it can regenerate them!

If you go to that link and click on one of the photos it will tell you a bit about that photo.

So glad you got to see this spider if you have not seen it before! With it being a female, hopefully you will see lots more next year!!

Comments for Spider with yellow stripes (Black and Yellow Argiope, female)

Click here to add your own comments

Thank you Moni
by: Douglas G. Robertson

We really do appreciate your willingness to share your considerable knowledge with those of us who have less of an understanding. Many tiny life forms are essential to our very existence; re: honey bees... I recall those used to be much more in evidence around lawns and gardens... not so much the case now. That may be a result of "over doctoring lawns"... I do not employ any chemical treatments or pest control agents excepting professionally applied termite proofing. I use mulching mower which actually feeds the nutrients back to the lawn...

Point being: actions have consequences... I don't like finding dying bumble bees on our front steps and walkways... If bees are eliminated our food sources may degrade also... so when a "Black and Yellow Argiope" spider eats a ton of insects in my mind that is way better than creating indiscriminate chemical kill zones.

Thanks Moni

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Black crawling bug with white legs (treehopper nymph)

Brownish black tiny bug with white translucent looking legs. Found a bunch on my dahlias. I live near louisville, KY.

Comments for Black crawling bug with white legs (treehopper nymph)

Click here to add your own comments

treehopper nymph
by: Moni

Louisville
Your insect is a treehopper young or nymph. It is probably the species Entylia carinata.

These are found in most areas of North America.

Treehoppers can hop. But many times just walk/crawl to the other side of the plant if you are trying to get their photo :). They do hide when they see movement or a shadow...to keep from being eaten!

They overwinter as adults which lay eggs in the spring that hatch to very young nymphs. These nymphs molt several times before becoming adults. There can be up to 4 generations in one year depending on how far north or south the location.

Treehoppers feed on a wide variety of plants in the aster family. They are not considered pests. Typically they are found with ants. The ants "tend" (protect) the treehoppers in exchange for the honeydew secreted by the hoppers.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

4 legs black bug with 2 yellow stripes on back (Southern striped walkingstick)

by Jared, FL
(Poinciana, FL Polk county)

3 to 4 Inches long with 4 legs main body is black with 2 yellow stripes going long ways down the back

Comments for 4 legs black bug with 2 yellow stripes on back (Southern striped walkingstick)

Click here to add your own comments

stick insect
by: Mydlars

Walking stick, does have six legs, is an insect.

Southern striped walkingstick
by: Moni

Jared
As Mydlars said it is a walkingstick. It is a southern striped walkingstick. These are found year round in Florida.
This is a female by the size...the males are much smaller.

The front legs are held out straight in front next to the antenna so it looks like they only have 4 legs but there are 6.

The female will lay eggs on the ground in a pit and cover them with sand.

These insects feed on trees and shrubs eating the foliage. They are known to eat crepe myrtle and roses as well as oak, rosemary, lyonia, scrub palmetto and even privet in captivity. They are not a pest and do not cause serious defoliation.

Caution - When disturbed they can spray a fine liquid mist that smells bad and can painfully affect the eye from a foot away. So do not get too close.

Thank you Moni
by: Jared, FL

Thank you for letting me no about them spraying the mist. Very helpful cause I have two little girls who like to explore the world around them. Now I no to keep them a safe distance away.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Black Fly White Stripes (Hover fly)

by Stanford Jensen
(Price, UT, USA)

This fly was on a hay bale in Gunnison, UT. It was just larger than a house fly. Has clear wings and brown fur.

Comments for Black Fly White Stripes (Hover fly)

Click here to add your own comments

Hover fly
by: Moni

Stanford
Your fly is one of the hover flies, also called Syrphid flies. Yours is in the genus Dasysyrphus sp.
These flies are identified by the hairs around the eyes, curved bands on the abdomen, as well as a groove on the top of the abdomen(back end).

Hover flies are good bugs :)
The adult flies are helpful pollinators, while the larvae prey on other insects especially aphids!

Hover flies can be mistaken for wasps or bees due to their coloration.
Great find!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

colorful flying insect yellow white black (Ailantus webworm moth)

by Jim Moore
(Columbus, Ohio USA)

Reminds me of a lightning bug. Very colorful, almost artistic. Probably less than one inch long. Found on my passenger window of my van.

Comments for colorful flying insect yellow white black (Ailantus webworm moth)

Click here to add your own comments

Ailantus webworm moth
by: Moni

Jim
Your insect is a moth...Ailanthus Webworm Moth.

They are found over most of eastern North America.

The adults feed on nectar of various flowers. There is one generation a year.

The caterpillars are found in webs in Ailanthus (tree of heaven) and paradise trees. The caterpillars may also feed on other deciduous trees and shrubs. The caterpillars live in communal webs.

The Ailanthus tree is not native and invasive, while the insect is native...so it has learned to like this invasive tree....a good thing!

Colorful moth
by: Rachel

How funny, I just logged on to find the identity of this insect and I too am from Columbus, Ohio. I have one one my front and back door and it kind of freaked me out because I've never seen them before.

beautiful bug
by: j davis

This beautiful yellow/white/black bug was resting on my deck railing.
It was so different.
I live about 50 miles north of Nashville Tenn.
I enjoy your site

Missouri
by: Anonymous

I live in the Kansas city area and I found one.

Stranger Danger?
by: Anonymous

I've been seeing these all over my porch in Indianapolis! I never had seen them before! Interesting moth! Are they dangerous?

Kc!
by: Anonymous

Kansas City found one today:)

spotted on long island NEW
by: Anonymous

i live in long island ,ny and have one on my front door every night when my porchlight is on

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Long black fly like insect (Robber fly)

by Geoff
(Dedham MA)

Long black fly

Comments for Long black fly like insect (Robber fly)

Click here to add your own comments

Robber fly
by: Moni

Geoff
Your fly is a robber fly, probably genus Cyrtopogon, but without seeing it in person or more angles of photos can not be positive...there are 70 species in that genus alone :)

Robber flies are predators on other insects, so it is a beneficial or good bug in the garden! Good to have them around. The large robber flies can catch and bring down large grasshoppers. There is record of a Beelzebub Bee-eater robber fly attacking and killing a hummingbird. The smaller species of robber flies could catch smaller grasshoppers. Robber flies will catch other insects including beetles, flies, ants, wasps, dragonflies, etc

Robber flies are found in all of North America. They live in various habitats usually dry open areas. The larvae live in soil or decaying wood. The larvae feed on eggs and larvae of beetles, moths, and other insects that live in soil or wood.

This is not a large robber fly but for the record: CAUTION! Large robber flies may bite if mishandled or agitated.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Black insect with six legs and two antenna. The wings have orange edges and tips. (Boxelder bug)

by Sharon Naylor
(Mooresville, Indiana)

Black insect with orange tipped wings

Black insect with orange tipped wings

This insect is swarming cars at our auto repair shop in Mooresville Indiana. It is a black insect with six legs and two antenna. The wings have orange tips and edges. We have never seen this activity since the shop was established in 1989. We are curious about the identity and if you have any theories as to its behavior.


Kind regards,
Sharon Naylor

Comments for Black insect with six legs and two antenna. The wings have orange edges and tips. (Boxelder bug)

Click here to add your own comments

Swarming bug
by: Mydlars

Box Elder Bug,common during the fall season in my area of Missouri.

Thanks!
by: Sharon N.

Thanks for identifying this bug. I was able to do a quick search and learn a lot about it. This is a great service!
Kind regards, Sharon

Boxelder bug
by: Moni

Sharon
As Mylars said your insect is a boxelder bug.

These insects feed primarily on boxelder trees and some other maples. Then in the fall the adults seem to collect on the south side of our homes and find a way to get in. They do not feed on anything in the house, but they leave dark red spots on blinds, furniture, walls and woodwork. They are just a nuisance!
The best way to get rid of them is to vacuum them as you see them. When we get a few warm days they seem to be more active.
They will eventually die indoors.

These accumulate along with Multicolored Asian lady beetles in the fall thru out the Midwest states. Surprised you have not seen them before now :)

These insects do not bite or sting.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

black beetle with orange and white strips under wings (Broad-necked root borer beetle)

by Jamie Hillyer
(Dover, Ohio, United States)

all the same bug, one with wings open

all the same bug, one with wings open

This insect is about an inch and a half in length. It is black with orange and white stripes showing when wings are open. There have been appx 10 spotted today on my front porch in Northeastern Ohio (tuscarawas county).

Comments for black beetle with orange and white strips under wings (Broad-necked root borer beetle)

Click here to add your own comments

Broad-necked root borer beetle
by: Moni

Jamie
Your beetle is probably the broad-necked root borer based on the size you give and description. The photos are not very clear for the head, thorax and antenna for positive ID.

The females are larger than the males which makes it hard for them to fly. Males are attracted to lights at night. Do you have a light that is attracting them?

They are found in deciduous forests, which your area of OH would have. They are found over eastern North America, west to Ontario, MN, OK then south to FL.
Adults eat tree foliage sometimes damaging fruit trees or grape vines. Eggs are laid in the soil, where larvae emerge and tunnel down to feed on roots of trees and shrubs. They pupate in the spring. It takes 3 yrs to complete one life cycle.
These are very large beetles!

They do not bite or sting.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Black Bug with red on back (Florida predatory stink bug nymphs)

Black bugs with red backs on bamboo

Black bugs with red backs on bamboo

I found these on bamboo leaves on the afternoon of 9/23/14. They were there just one day. The leaves are 1.5 inch or less wide.

I have never seen them before.

I live in Lancaster, VA.

Thank you so much!!!

My email address is: gmdickerson@hotmail.com

Gale Dickerson

Comments for Black Bug with red on back (Florida predatory stink bug nymphs)

Click here to add your own comments

Florida predatory stink bug nymphs
by: Moni

Gale
You had Florida predatory stink bugs or also called Halloween bugs.
They are "good" bugs as they feed on other insect pests like caterpillars, leaf beetles and planthoppers. Both nymphs and adults feed on insects.

They are just found throughout southeastern US.
They are known for their metallic blue/green thorax with red abdomens. The adults look similar.

The nymphs are known to congregate together...sometimes this is to attack large insect prey together. Otherwise they sometimes are found together at night.

Adults sometime overwinter near buildings like the boxelder bugs, mammorated stink bugs, and multi-colored Asian lady beetles. We want to keep the FL predatory stink bugs around for next years garden protection :)

These insects are not known to bite, but with their piercing-sucking mouth parts that suck the juices out of caterpillars could bite if really mishandled.

Thanks!
by: Gale

Moni -

Thanks so much for the fast identification, and for the detailed information.

Hopefully these guyes will be back here next year to help with the insects.

Thanks again!

Gale

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Black and Shiny Blue Ant Like bug (Oil blister beetle)

by Crystal
(Salem Ma)

I found this Ant Like bug on my front steps after I had ripped open a wall in my house that had water and carpenter ant Damage. It is about an Inch long and black in color with a shiny blue Iridescent quality. When touched or moved it plays dead by curling up into a ball and not moving. What is it?

Comments for Black and Shiny Blue Ant Like bug (Oil blister beetle)

Click here to add your own comments

Oil blister beetle
by: Moni

Crystal
That is one of the oil beetles that is one of the blister beetles.

Caution! Pressing, rubbing, or squashing blister beetles may cause them to exude hemolymph which contains the blistering compound cantharidin.

These beetles have short wings and large abdomens which make them look more like an ant than a beetle.

They are found on the ground or on low foliage...they are not part of the water/damage in the wall. Carpenter ants have a narrow waist and much smaller abdomen. This was incidental to your construction...unless you disturbed a bees nest?

The larvae of this beetle feed on eggs and other food stuff in bees' nests.


Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Black and big beetle (Blister or oil beetle, female)

by Otis Curtis
(Ossining, NY)

Oil Blister Beetle

Oil Blister Beetle

I have attached my photo and also added a comment in the section under "Oil Blister Beetle". I pay attention to different types of insects but this was a first for me; thanks for the website!

Comments for Black and big beetle (Blister or oil beetle, female)

Click here to add your own comments

Blister or oil beetle, female
by: Moni

Otis
Yes, your insect is one of the blister beetles in the genus Meloe. These are also called the oil beetles.
In your photo the antenna of the beetle does not have an 'elbow' section in the middle of the antenna which tells us it is a female. The females also are larger than the males.

They are found thru out North America.
The larvae of these beetles feed on eggs and other food in ground bee nests. Adults feed on leaves and flowers.

The adult beetles have an oily substance that comes out between leg joints...hence the name.

Caution: The blood or fluid in the bodies of these insects contains cantharidin, which will cause blisters if gotten on your skin. This is where the family common name of blister beetle comes from.

Eeeek!!!!
by: Shannon

Do these things bite or sting?? I have found a couple recently on my porch and entry to kitchen. Also,DOES ANYONE KNOW HOW TO GET RID OF STINKBUGS?? I'm LOSING MY MIND!

blister beetle
by: Moni

Shannon
Please read the last paragraph of the comment before yours...it talks about the fact that these beetles do not bite, but can leave a blister if you mishandle them.

If you are talking about getting rid of the brown marmorated stink bugs that come into homes in the winter in eastern US. Just vacuum them up :)

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

black bug with distinct red butterfly shape on back (Redcoat seed bug)

by Ella
(San Diego)

close up of bug on wilting succulent

close up of bug on wilting succulent

close up of bug on wilting succulent side view, fairly skinny bug

Black bug with distinct, bright red butterfly design on back (not belly), found on a succulent plant in San Diego. This bug is small, about 1/8 or 1/4 inch wide by 1/2 inch long. It has a very exacting red double triangle pattern, like a geometric butterfly shape on its back. I am trying to grow a yard of water wise, fire protective plants in my yard. This summer I had a mealie bug infestation that had me pulling my dying plants from the ground to wash them. The mealie bug issue is passing but one of my plants is not bouncing back like the others. On further inspection and cleaning, this small, odd bug that I have never seen before appeared. It appears to be hard shelled but I did not touch it to guarantee that.

If it helps to know my yard also gets quite a bit of ants, an occasional Jerusalem cricket, other crickets, lots of lizards in summer. Also squirrels, mice, rats, raccoons and bunnies. Oh yeah, we also have a lot of spiders, black widow and brown recluse. After the mealies, ants and squirrels nearly taking out my new succulents I'm on the lookout for new things.

I keep it as organic as possible with water and soapy water but need to be aware. Thank you SO much!!!

Comments for black bug with distinct red butterfly shape on back (Redcoat seed bug)

Click here to add your own comments

Redcoat seed bug
by: Moni

Ella
Your insect is a redcoat seed bug.

It's relatives would be the large milkweed bug, small milkweed bug, and the whitecrossed seed bug. This is one of the true bugs, order Hemiptera. The name always has the word bug in it. This group of insects have thick bases of the front pair of wings, the little triangle behind the shoulders, and piercing-sucking mouthparts. The bright red color acts like a red light to tell predators like birds and lizards that it is a bad idea to eat this insect. Seed bugs are related to stink bugs, both of which give off a "stinky" odor if bothered.

This insect is found in the southwestern tier of states from CA to TX.

The seed bugs feed on seeds of many plants however since yours is the redcoat seed bug it feeds on seeds of plants in the Composite family. This would include common plants but not limited to dandelion, sunflowers, yarrow, chicory, asters, cosmos, daisy, goldenrod, coreopsis, dahlia, and zinnia. In your area it would also include desert broom, desert marigold, chuckwalla's delight, brittlebush, and trixis.

These bugs do feed on the developing buds and seed heads of plants, but are not considered pests. They suck the juices out of the seeds making them dry out and not viable. Their numbers are never high enough to be a pest. This insect would not be feeding on your succulent foliage causing them not to thrive.

Mealybugs in high numbers could suck enough juices out of your plants to cause a problem.

Wow! Thanks, awesome information, just what I needed to know
by: Ella

Wow! Thanks, awesome information, just what I needed to know!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

tiny black/white/orange flying wasp-shaped insect (Ichneumon wasp)

by DC
(West Virginia, USA)

tiny unusual wasp-shaped insect

tiny unusual wasp-shaped insect

black/white striped body; one pair of skinny wings; bright orange legs; back legs are similar to a grasshopper in shape and position; has two very very long antennas sticking out of its head that are black, white in the middle, then black again on the end; the antennas are close together to look like only one long feeler but they are actually separate; has a body shaped like a wasp with the tail section separated and held up high, there's the main body and then a skinny little bit connecting the tail section, tail section is tear-drop shaped; has a black skinny thing sticking up out of the tail section but it looks more like what's on a cricket instead of a stinger; I can't see any mouth-parts just big round solid black eyes

body is about half an inch from head to tail; from tip of the really long antenna to the end of the really long back legs altogether is only an inch

this thing showed up after midnight in my house out of the blue, randomly sitting on my finger and I don't know how it got there. I thought it was a bee and knocked it off, looked everywhere for it, then it landed on my shoulder. I knocked it off again and this time it flew straight back toward me and I ducked and ran. I turned on all the lights hoping to lure it out but it didn't go toward them. found it sitting on the wall. killed it with wasp spray.

I'm in West Virginia and have never ever seen anything like this anywhere around my house before.

thanks very much if you can help because it scared me to death. sorry that I don't have a very good camera but it looks very unusual/easy to identify.

Comments for tiny black/white/orange flying wasp-shaped insect (Ichneumon wasp)

Click here to add your own comments

Ichneumon wasp
by: Moni

DC
Your wasp is an ichneumon wasp. There are over 5,000 species in North America and are very challenging to identify without using a key. There are classification to species by 2 methods...so there is not agreement even as to how to identify them by the experts :)

These wasps are common. Most species help control insect pests by laying eggs inside the pest where the larvae of the wasp feeds, killing the pest.

These wasps are not known to sting people.
The stinger is only for the female to lay eggs inside the insect pest. It would not be hard enough to go thru human skin.

Sorry you killed it. Best to collect them in a jar or with a tissue and put them outside where they want to be. It probably came in as you were going in or out the door, especially if there was a night light on the porch.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

black crawling insect with red bottom (Wheel bug nymph)

by Myra
(williamsburg, VA)

I found this crawling on my fig tree in the front yard of my home in Williamsburg, VA yesterday...5-21-15. There are several of them and this one is one of the larger ones. It's about 1/2 inch in length. They are mostly underneath the fig leaves and I can't tell if they are eating them or just crawling. They have a thin black body, black legs, black antenna and bright red bottom. I couldn't tell with the naked eye, but noticed something on top of the red bottom when I cropped the picture and made the insect larger. I've never seen anything like this around my home. Any help you can give me is much appreciated. Thank you

Comments for black crawling insect with red bottom (Wheel bug nymph)

Click here to add your own comments

Wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

Myra
Your photo is of the wheel bug nymph.
It is a beneficial insect. It is scouting for insects to eat in your garden. All stages prey upon other insects (caterpillars, aphids, bees, sawflies, etc.). They have a long tube like mouthpart that stabs prey.

As it grows it will molt a few times and turn into a large gray bug with a spiky looking 'wheel' on its backside behind the head. Nymphs hatch in spring, adults are found late spring into fall and early winter.

These insects are found over all of North America.

Bugguide reports - "CAUTION: The bug can inflict a very painful bite. Ammonia water and magnesium sulphate soaks can be helpful in relieving pain from the bite."

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

Slow moving black bug (Broad-nosed weevil )

by Laurie
(Mississauga)

Black bug with 2 antennas and 6 legs. It moves very slowly. Have seen a few in my house in last month.

Comments for Slow moving black bug (Broad-nosed weevil )

Click here to add your own comments

Broad-nosed weevil
by: Moni

Laurie
Would need more photos of various angles of the weevil to know better, but it is one of the broad-nosed weevils. Some species of weevils migrate into homes in the summer and fall.
There are several weevils that can come into homes either attracted to lights or because of the plantings nearby, or looking for a hibernation spot (much like the Asian lady beetles do). It is probably one of the Otiorhynchus sp of weevil.

For control it is best to caulk cracks and snug-fitting doors and windows to prevent weevils from entering homes. Physical removal is best with a vacuum sweeper. Chemical control usually is not necessary in the house. These are a household nuisance not a pest indoors.

This genus of weevils do feed on plants in the garden...the strawberry root weevil can be a pest of strawberries; lilac root weevil larvae feeds on lilac roots; and the black vine weevil adult feeds on rhododendrons around the house while the larvae feed on the roots.

These weevils are found over most of North America. With most of the species only having females...males are only found in Europe.

These weevils do not bite or sting.

Thank you
by: Laurie

Thank you Moni for identifying our house guest! We appreciate the time you took to help us with this.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

long, black, antlike insect (Rove Beetle)

by Chris
(northeastern Oklahoma)

long black ant like beetle?

long black ant like beetle?

This is a tiny insect, about the size of an ant, with an antlike head, except it is longer. It has an elongated back end like a beetle but without any wings, or pinchers. It likes to congregate around my flower pots on the back concrete porch. Any ideas? And are they harmful to my plants?

Comments for long, black, antlike insect (Rove Beetle)

Click here to add your own comments

Rove beetle
by: Moni

Chris
You have found a Rove beetle.
Unlike most beetles the hard wings on the back only cover part of the abdomen(the tail section).

Rove beetles are predators eating other invertebrates. Some larvae feed on decaying vegetation. It is a good critter to keep around in the garden.

These are found under pots, rocks, logs, etc. Some found on edges of bodies of water, others on carrion, decaying fungi, etc.
Great find!

Rove beetle
by: Anonymous

Thank you for the info on the Rove beetle! Good to know!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.

black/brown, fuzzy, long antenna, (Camel cricket)

by Courtney Jefferson
(Oswego, KS)

This insect eats locusts. It appears brown and black in color. It has excessively ling antenna. It is found in Oswego, KS.

Comments for black/brown, fuzzy, long antenna, (Camel cricket)

Click here to add your own comments

Camel cricket
by: Moni

Courtney
Your insect is a camel cricket. The photo is not clear enough to know which one nor to see that it is eating anything?

Camel crickets are found in cool moist dark places.

They can be a nuisance in basements. They are known to habit moist greenhouses, basements and laundry rooms. They feed on various food stuffs especially organic material dead or alive and stored fabric or food items. Many will catch and eat other smaller animals (like grasshoppers) when they can. They can cause damage in greenhouses by feeding on young plants. These are quite common and were introduced from China.

A clean dry home will not be an environment for this insect.

Camel crickets are harmless to humans.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Insect Identification.








Want A Stunning Garden? Click Here For Your Free Lessons