Black Beetle (Broad-necked Root Borer)

Black beetle, 1

Black beetle, 1

Found on hosta in mainly shade in residential organic garden in SW CT, surroundings are White Oak, norway maple, hemlock, rhododendron, compost bin. Approx. 1" in length, horns also maybe 1" long. No hairs. a shorter, stockier bug rather thanthe long, slim profile of say an Eyed Click Beetle. It also had a brown spike sticking out of it's rear end (folded wings?)


Moni says From your clear description, tho the photo is not at a good angle nor very clear, I think your beetle might be a Broad-necked Root Borer.

If so this is a longhorned beetle, family Cerambycidae.

This beetle can be found in the northeastern US, as well as then west to Minnesota down to Oklahoma and to Florida.

The adults of this beetle feed on foliage of fruit trees and grapes. Larva feed on the roots of those plants.

The projection out the back is probably the ovipositor of a female beetle.

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Thanks very much
by: ksb

Thank you for the ID. Poking around on the internet for more info on the BNRB suggests that I may have seen the adult larvae in past years - a really gross large larvae almost the length of your pinkie. So big that you are hesitant to pop it. Ick! I shall have to look into some way to treat these as I have many old trees in the back garden.
Thanks again.

root borer
by: Alex

I had these and they destroyed my hosta's.

Broad-necked root borer
by: Moni

Alex
Not sure what insect you had that fed on your hostas. I could not find any reference that broad-necked root borers touched hosta. Send photo next time you see something on your hosta, so we can see what it is.

Large beetle
by: Anonymous

I recently found 2 hosta's completely destroyed, could not figure out what could have done the damage. Today we found a huge beetle on my daughter's play set. It looks exactly like your photo. I think it may have been the culprit.

root borer
by: Moni

Anonymous
Root borers bore into the roots of plants not eat foliage. So when you say destroyed the whole plant it does not sound like this insect.
Please send photo of the beetle you saw on the playset.

Chomped hostas
by: ksb

The BBRB did not eat the hostas but local deer will crop them to the ground if they get hungry enough. In my area they usually do this in the fall when the weather begins to get colder. It works for me as the hostas are usually near the end of their season by then.

poison
by: Anonymous

Are they poisones?

Broad-necked root borer
by: Moni

Anonymous
Root borers eat plants...they do not bother people so, No, it is not poisonous.

Killing big bugs
by: Katie

The easiest way I have found to kill large insects/caterpillars etc is to nab them in a zip lock bag, put them in the freezer. When they are frozen, deposit in trash.

black beatle
by: joe grant

the black beatle,was inside waremart,oakland, ca,and he she didnt want anyone to mess with him her, she stick up a tail like a scorpion, and a white stinger extended out of her, she use pinchers like a crab, and charged at the two people in the tire shop waiting room, i grabbed her took her out side to a tree, she moved a mound of grass like thirty times her size, i feel sorry for the new naughbers of hers, she is a little mean and dont care about humans ,chargeing at two of the thousands of the size of her.

That was a bettle!!?!?!
by: Anonymous

I live in San Diego, California and have never seen one before until today it gave me a huge fright.

black beetle
by: Magda

I woke up with a horrible metally smell in my room, sickening, so bad I had to open my windows and thought back on 3 weeks before when the same happened. After then checking my house if anything had fallen over or so, I could not find anything so aerated the house and in time in disappeared. The only thing is that during the process I felt something itching in my neck and when I wiped it away it was a black bug. Picked it up and threw it out of the window. Telling the story to a friend; he said could be a stinky bug but when I looked that up, although we have them, it was not alike.
Last night, with that horrible smell I suddenly felt something moving in my armpit and that turned out to be the same type of but bug and my hand smelt terrible. It gave me the creeps but at least I know what causes the smell and I am nearly sure it is the bug on your photograph!

Black boorer bug
by: Magda

As an identification I would definitely mention the smell as I really thought that gasses had one way or another escaped in my house. It woke me up and my room and part of the hall were smelling so disgusting that I had to open windows and doors!

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Small Black 6 legs hairs on tail (carpet beetle larva)

by Andrew
(East Meadow, New York)

I found the bug in my bed. Its maybe a centimeter in length black with what looks like hairs that come out of the tail. Ive never seen this bug before just wondering what it is.

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Carpet beetle larva
by: Moni

Andrew
Your picture looks like the larva of a carpet beetle, probably the black carpet beetle but the photo is not clear enough or at enough of an angle for positive ID. The adult is black and less than 1/4 inch long.
Carpet beetles are also called fur beetles as the
larvae and adults feed on the skin and flesh of dead animals, including museum specimens of vertebrates and invertebrates, and will also eat any organic material (fresh or dried foods, woolen and silk products, rugs, etc.)
Many homes have them, but if you have wool carpets or a lot of natural fibers or perhaps animal skins, pets (as well as human) with dander...all these things attract them.
A thorough cleaning/vacuuming in all cracks and crevices of the bedroom as well as the rest of the house will help get rid of the food source. Clean all the bedding. They will also sometimes eat oily food crumbs, especially dog/cat food and other oily foods in the pantry.
They do not carry any diseases and are considered a pest especially if you have hides or artifacts made of natural/animal products.
If this is the only one you have seen then you probably don't have a big infestation...just enough to give the bedroom a good vacuuming.

bed bugs?
by: Amber

YUCK!

Carpet beetle larva
by: Moni

Amber
Bed bugs are something totally different. Just google bed bugs and you will see they look much different.

My ideas.
by: Jen

This to me, looks suspiciously like a "Silverfish". I have seen them on a few different occasions, ALWAYS on carpets or soft fabrics. Though silverfish generally ARE a very metallic silver colour, there are also much darker variants.

Carpet beetle larva
by: Moni

Jen
Thanks for sending your note. It is a dermestid larva...beetle larva.
It is not a silverfish, because if you look at the tail it is bushy while the silverfish has 3 distinct tail pieces.

Carpet beetle larva
by: Moni

Shanda
A thorough cleaning/vacuuming in all cracks and crevices of the bathroom as well as the rest of the house will help get rid of the food source. Clean all the bedding. They will also sometimes eat oily food crumbs, especially dog/cat food and other oily foods in the pantry.
They do not carry any diseases. They are really just cleaning up dander, hair, crumbs...anything with oil and proteins, but they are considered a pest especially if you have hides or artifacts made of natural/animal products.
There is more info at the site you saw this photo. See below.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/small-black-6-legs-hairs-on-tail-carpet-beetle-larva-comments.html#ixzz0tlBTIbVA

Whew!
by: Anonymous

Just found one of these in my apt. Thanks for the informative site!

carpet beetle larva
by: chris

Moni is right it is a black carpet beetle, also the hairs on it helps it def it self from other insects put out some sort of sticky substances.

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blackish Bee vs Fly (Tachinid fly - Belvosia borealis)

by Melissa
(Moosup,ct USA)

Large flying insect about the size of a half dollar, yellow and black striped end with black hairs but no stinger, tongue looks like a fly, large eyes. Does not make a sound when it flies. Has been flying around us on our back deck for days.

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Tachinid fly - Belvosia borealis
by: Moni

Melissa
Your photo is of a fly called Belvosia borealis. It does not have a common name that I could find. In fact there is not a lot of information on this fly...especially for as large and colorful as it is!! These flies lay eggs on the host plants of their larval prey. The when the larva feeds on the plant it eats the eggs along with the plants. The fly larvae then grow and pupate inside the larval host, which is eventually killed. Could not find out what larva this fly feeds on, but perhaps you have some larva that it likes near your deck?!
It will not hurt you.

Thank you
by: Melissa

Moni,
Thank you very much. Your right, there is not a lot of information about this fly. But now that I know what it is, I can search for more info. I am very relieved that it can not hurt me....I have a phobia of bees and the colors confused me. We have had a very very rainy season here so I do not know if that has anything to do with it appearing and hanging around for so long. Once again thank you for your help.

Tachinid Fly
by: Ann

It feeds on Sawfly larvae (found on red-osier Dogwood shrubs) and will also parasitize Monarch caterpillars. I discovered this when searching for images of Sawfly larvae as my Dogwood shrubs are covered with white caterpillars.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/bee-vs-fly-tachinid-fly-belvosia-borealis-comment-form.html#ixzz0QqkeQjS9

Response
by: Melissa

Ann,
Thank you..I do not have any dogwood bushes around but Monarch caterpillars are present here...so maybe that is why it stuck around. Thank you for the info.

Melissa

Tachinid fly
by: Moni

Ann
Would you please send us the site where you found out about this fly parasitizing dogwood sawfly. I still could not find it.
Thanks

Blackish bee with yellow spots (Tachnid Fly)
by: Anonymous

Thank you for your comments. I found one on my neck and was freaked out. It is actually very pretty. Do not have dogwoods nearby here in San Francisco.Didn't actually think I would find out what type of insect it was.Cathy

Tachinid fly
by: Moni

Cathy
Glad you found this site and know what insect you found.

tachinid fly
by: Virginia

Just had one of these flies land on me. I'm in Massachusetts. At least now I have a name and starting point for research. Never seen one like it before. July 10, 2011

Tachinid Fly
by: Anonymous

Just photo'd one on my deck up in MAINE. Didn't know they came this far north.

TACHINID FLY
by: Moni

Anonymous
These are found thru out eastern US.

Maine
by: Anonymous

I just spotted one on my front deck as well here in Maine. Like others, no dogwoods in my yard but I do have monarch butterflies during the summer And milkweed plants that seem to be a good food source for Monarch butterfly caterpillars.

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black and yellow fly with fur (Euonymus leaf notcher)

by cliff lund
(Severna Park, MD)

furry fly

furry fly

This fly ? is about 3/4" long and1" wide long antenna, brown fur body, several have showed up in my basement.

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Bumble bee moth
by: Anonymous

Picture is fuzzy but looks like a harmless bumble bee moth. Cute fellows. They mimic a bumble bee to ward off predators.

Snowberry clearwing moth or Bumblebee moth
by: Moni

Cliff
I agree with Anonymous. The furry critter does look like a clearwing moth. Can't understand why you would have several in your basement?

They overwinter as pupa so perhaps you brought them in and they emerged? Did you bring some plants, soil or mulch type duff that could have had the pupa's in them?

clearwing
by: Anonymous

looks like a hummingbird moth

Euonymus leaf notcher
by: Moni

Cliff
After looking at some other photos, I realized your moth is the Euonymus leaf notcher with the scientific name - Pryeria sinica. Evidently this is a new pest as noted by the Dept of Agriculture in May 30, 2003 -" New Moth Found in Maryland on Ornamentals". They suspect that the way it was introduced to the U.S. was from nursery stock from the Far East.
It seems to be located in Maryland and Virginia as of right now.
The larva of this moth feeds on Euonymus plants and Celastrus species. It can defoliate the shrub.
The moth lays the eggs on the stems in the late fall, with the larva emerging mid March. For control find the egg masses in the fall, cut them off and burn. Then in the spring, if you find the small larva from mid to late March you should spray Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) a bacteria the kills the caterpillars. Follow label instructions.

It might be good for everyone in those states to destroy/burn all the Euonymus plants to try to prevent this pest from spreading!

Not sure when you sent in the photo, but if in the fall the moths may have entered your basement thru an open window, dryer vent, or crack near a Euonymous bush.


Sawfly
by: Anonymous

I actually think this might be a cimbicidae ( a type of sawfly- which is actually in the order hymenoptera- aka bees) I can't make out if it has two or four wings. But the antennae are pretty distinct, and the body doesn't look constricted. Depending on the species they can look very different.


Euonymus leaf notcher
by: Moni

Anonymous
Thank you for looking at this insect. However it is the Euonymus leaf notcher.

Not sure why you were asking about the number of wings as all adult insects with wings have 2 pairs of wings except for flies. Flies (Diptera) have one pair of wings and a pair of halteres for balance. So sawflies and moths have 4 wings.

The antennae are too long on this insect to be the same as your sawfly photo and the leaf notchers antenna are not segmented like that sawfly.

Sawflies do not have the hairy body that moths do and that is on this insect.


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blackish beetle tick (Weevil)

by christian riding
(spokane washington)

bug

bug

we live in spokane washington and just moved into a new apartment. we found a few of these small bugs in cracks along the carpet. they have six legs and are very hard. there butts are dark brown and the head is close to black. it would be greatly appreciated if we could get some help in identifying it thanks a ton.
-chris

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Weevil
by: Moni

christian
Your critter is a weevil, a type of beetle. It is not a tick, so you can relax!
From the photo I can not tell what kind of weevil it is, but I would guess one that accidentally came inside. Most weevils feed on plants and plant seeds.
Just put it outside and you should not see anymore unless some would try to come in for the winter again....doubtful.

bug
by: Anonymous

or maybe a bed bug

Weevil
by: Moni

Anonymous
It is NOT a bed bug...it is a weevil. The photo is not clear enough to tell more.

interesting bugs
by: Fearful Catcher

I just found that same bug in my house, in the same area as you. I knew what it was from the funny shape of its nose, and me- but beyond that I wasn't sure what it's behavior was. As it turns out there are several different typse of weevils. Mine dissapeared before I could put it outside so I decided to learn something about it so maybe I can at least sleep. They burrow into plants and usually lay larve there... having just planted some indore things, I'm rather worried about my plants now, but I'm sure I brought it in accidentally with some of the soil I uprooted for them. Perhaps yours got in, in a similar fashion... how about that... I just spotted it near the ceiling... these things look awsome don't they. Too bad I have an irrational fear of bugs. ^.^

weevil
by: Moni

Fearful Catcher
Bugs are awesome!
It probably came in accidentally. It will not bother you. And it probably will not bother your houseplants. Each weevil has a food preference, so it would probably not be for house plants...tho do you not say where you live or what plants you repotted.

Help
by: Anonymous

i have the same problem. but not just one they are all over the place mainly in my bathroom and livingroom. they have the funny long nose so im sure they are weevils like people have said. i just want to know how to make them go away.

Weevil
by: Moni

Anonymous- Help
Since sending us a photo might not be enough for us to tell you species. Please take several into your local county extension service and they can find out what it is and if there is something you need to do.

blackish beetle tick
by: Anonymous

can they hurt you

Weevil
by: Moni

Anonymous
Weevils can not hurt you.

black bugs
by: Anonymous

THANK YOU ALL! We've recently had a huge influx of these bugs, and have 2 young children and a dog, so were of course concerned because they look like large tics..

tick weevil coming in droves
by: Anonymous

I have them coming into my kitchen by the tens and sometimes find them in the bathroom. I can tell that they are coming in around the kitchen door but why, what the heck do they thin I have in here that they want?

weevil
by: Moni

coming in droves
not sure what insect you have nor where you live so not sure how to help :-)
Send a photo.
Many insects are attracted to lights...so if you have your porch light on at night as well as indoor lights on many insects will come in when you open the door. Turn off the inside light well before you want to open the door to keep the insects out.

SIZE!!!
by: Anonymous

how big were these bugs?

They WILL bite!
by: Anonymous

We get these in the house during June & July in So. Calif. If they get on the furniture on the bed - they will bite. I have a TERRIBLE ALLERGIC reaction to them. We live in the high desert with miles of hills covered in scrub brush, etc. I'm not afraid of any of the bugs, spiders or snakes we get but these bother me. We have a dog kennel and horses so I really can't spray anything. Please, if you know where they come from, I'd appreciate hearing.

weevil
by: Anonymous

I live in the UK. Your "Blackish Beetle" looks to me like a Vine Weevil. The photo isn't very clear, but Vine Weevils are a slightly mottled black on the main part of their bodies. They don't fly and they move quite slowly. I've never seen one in winter, but they avoid bright sun and tend to rest during day at the edges of pots, under the rims, under leaf debris, etc. I've never heard that they sting or bite people (and we know them too well!), but their grubs are TERRIBLY damaging to tender plants, chewing through the roots just below ground level - so a beautiful plant (e.g. polyanthus) in full bloom will keel over during the night and be found with NO roots. If your bugs are vine weevils (when you've seen a good photo, you'll KNOW whether yours are), I'd recommend ritual slaughter - go out at dusk and gather them coming out of their beds and climbing... If you can't bring yourself to kill the adults, DO deal with the grubs. Study photos (easily found on Internet). They are stunningly destructive, but remain at root level, never very deep below ground, and they are easy to see. (If you find a healthy plant suddenly lying on its side and rootless, I can almost guarantee that you'll find these little s***s about 1-2 inches directly beneath.) If you keep chicken, let them help! Most garden chemicals are known NOT to work on vine weevils (most or all of those that do work have been banned), but there is a very specific nematode that works very well indeed. I never imagined that I could love something too small to see, but the vine weevil Nematode is high on my list of heroes.

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black and yellow small (Leaffooted bug nymph)

by April
(Ocean springs, Ms)

I saw this bug when I got out of the shower. It was on the door frame. It was crawling up the door frame and I thought it was a baby wasp because it was yellow and black. Then I got some tissue to catch it and it turned red and black. Every part of this bug that was yellow turned red. So we put it some water for about 10 minutes and I thought it was dead. When I took it out of the water to take a pic it was "dead" so I thought. A couple of minutes later it started crawling again. Oh it was freaky!! Please let me know what type of insect this is. Thank you for your time.

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Looks like...
by: Korat

This little guy reminds me of a Leaf-legged Bug - Acanthocephala terminalis.

Leaffooted bug nymph, Acanthocephala sp.
by: Moni

April
I would agree with Korat, that it is a leaffooted bug nymph, but I can not put species on it without a better photo or seeing the adult.
The leaffooted bugs are true bugs in the family Coreidae. Both the nymphs and adults suck plant juices. Also when touched you will get a bad scent on your hands. Not sure why it turned colors for you.
Some of the coloration may be to mimic wasps.

i am trying to find out also
by: Anonymous

i have lived out doors in Indiana all me life and i am just now seeing these bugs around here this year.

strange bug
by: Anonymous

i also had one in my truck a few weeks ago n posted it on my facebook page and nobody has ever seen it before , strange , ps i live in central Florida

Finally!
by: Red

Thank you for identifying this! I live in Austin, Texas and had an infestation of these in the bathroom of the last home I rented. The sink in that bathroom had water running out of the faucet continuously for a year because the landlord refused to fix it and I ended up with many different bug infestations depending on the season. These seem to be highly attracted to water. When it would finally rain they would disappear from my bathroom but return once the drought was back. I searched endlessly online trying to figure out what they were and found nothing! They seem to be able to fly short distances with the aid of a jumping action. They are like a mix between a cricket and an anorexic roach! I've seen some as small as Mosquitos and as big as grasshoppers, but never saw them before in my life until 2011.

Leaf-footed bug nymph
by: Moni

Red
These bugs will come into houses in the fall...sometimes coming in on houseplants that were moved out for the summer then back in for the winter.
They are not known to want to be around water. They live and feed on plants. So, I am not sure this is the insect you saw. Too late now but next time take a photo and send it in :)

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Black large flying antenna (Longhorn beetl)

by Jim
(Ottawa, Ontario. Canada)

Algonquin Park Bug

Algonquin Park Bug

Fly's around Algonquin Park in Ontario. I've had this fellow land on me before in the park. Wondering what it is called. He fly's in short bursts and his wings are rigid.

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Longhorn beetle
by: Moni

Jim
Your critter is a longhorn beetle, family Cerambycidae. These large beetles are heavy and not good flyers.
Because of the angle of the photo it is hard to tell just which beetle you have. It looks large but that can be deceiving in a photo. How big is it? Does it have any spots on it?
My best guess is it is one of the Flat-Faced Longhorns. These longhorn beetles larva feed in dead or dying wood of conifer trees.
Let me know more about your critter if you want a better guess and send other angle photos if you have them.

spruce bug?!
by: Anonymous

ive known them as spruce bugs... google sprue bugs and see what you come up with

Found in Michigan
by: Anonymous

Found one of these "all but interesting" creatures near my pool. ugh!

same critter?
by: Sally in NYS

I think one of these came to visit this morning. Wondered what he is.

Many in new brunswick
by: Anonymous

Just found many of these guys I'm in Miramichi new Brunswick happy you posted I was wondering what it was also

Sawyer Beetle
by: wild_rose84

He is a sawyer. We have them all the time up here thru June, and we call them June Bugs, but not what they really are. Ours have white spots on their shell, so specifically, they're White Spotted Sawyers.

Sawyer beetle
by: Moni

wild_rose84
The sawyer beetles genus is Monochamus. These are a genus in the subfamily of the Flat-Faced Longhorns.
The photo is not very clear and we were never given the size. But it looks like the size, shape and coloration (compared to the cooler) is as you say...that it is probably a sawyer.

Thanks for the suggestion!

Sawyers feed on evergreens. The antennae of the male is twice as long as the body, so it could be a male.
The white-spotted sawyer is found in the northern parts of North America, while other sawyers are found thru out North America.

Asian Long Horned Beetles
by: Kris

I'm an avid camper at Algonquin Park and these are Asian Long Horned Beetles! As its name suggests, they are foreign to Western forests, and are terrible for our trees :(

Asian longhorn beetle
by: Moni

Kris
Thanks for the help!
We did not get any more info about this beetle and the photo was not clear enough, close enough...to tell which longhorn it was.
If you have been in that Park then you have seen that the Asian longhorn beetle is there.

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black mean ant looking insect (Rove Beetle)

by Joe
(Redwood City, CA USA)

This bug is angry and defensive, when threatened it raises it's large tail like a scorpion and opens it's pincher mouth as wide as it can. It looks like an ant but it's tail section looks to have several parts and is about 3x it's first two sections. What is it?

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Rove beetle
by: Moni

Joe
You have found a Rove beetle. Unlike most beetles the hard wings on the back only cover part of the abdomen(the tail section). Since you are in the Bay Area of California, you may have the Devil's Coach Horse rove beetle. These are 1 - 1.25 inches long...how long was the one you saw? This particular rove beetle is known for it's defensive posture...so besides the pinchers and tail raising they can also spray from stink glands.

Rove beetles are predators. If this is the Devil's Coach Horse rove then it eats snails, slugs and other pests. So, it might be a good critter to keep around in the garden.
Great find!

found in class
by: jacob

i live in germany and we found one crawling around in the class a few minutes ago it is wickedd.....when i got closer, its tail propped up and the pinchers got really big...crazy
lol my teacher thought it was a scorpion

rove beetle
by: Moni

Jacob
Glad you have identified your critter. Now you can let the class and teacher know it is not a scorpion but a rove beetle!

what the hell is this?
by: Anonymous

i found this bug in my home it looks like i huge ant headed black giant termite. its head looks like a bigger than carpenter ant head but same deep black. its tuff and moves its tale like pitchers when touched. my first thought was a super termite, but black. my son showed us that it has wings that it can take out and put back in. the wings are yellow gold color and a little like termite wings. we studies this bug sent photos to a local pest control, and the said it was blurry and looked like a weevil. no its no weevil anyone know?

Rove beetle
by: Moni

Anonymous
Please! read the comments below yours....it tells you what this insect is. If you would like more information you may send in your photo for verification.

found 2 together [scotland]
by: bob

got afright when moving wheelie bin one flattened other one had tail up as if ready to attack it got away

Rove beetle
by: Moni

Bob(Scotland)
According to one website Ocypus winkleri is the most common in the UK and therefore may be your beetle.
The Devil's coachorse beetle is a predator, hunting mostly at night, feeding on invertebrates including worms and woodlice, as well as carrion.
Please the comments at the post below.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/hard-backed-insect-devils-coachhorse-beetle.html#ixzz0QHcvEcSB

Found one in Seattle
by: Anonymous

I get the willies just looking at the picture. We found one of these in our office building. They don't live in colonies do they? I don't think I can handle seeing another one in person. The one we found was at least 1.25" long. I couldn't believe how agressive it was...yikes!

I am glad I found this post.
by: Alicia

I live in Tacoma, Wa and before this summer I had never seen this insect. This bug freaked me out a bit and my daughter caught one tonight and wanted to know what kind of bug it is.

They're everywhere!
by: Dawn

I live in Annapolis, MD and have never seen these bugs until a few weeks ago. Now, it seems Luke every time I turn around, there's another one. I've seen them in my basement on the carpet, in the kitchen on the floor, on the counters, even on top of my fridge, and in my shower. I've sprayed Ortho Home Defense everywhere, but it doesn't seem to affect them. I usually only see one at a time, but have seen as many as four together. Does anyone have any recommendations to get rid of these things?

Rove beetle
by: Moni

Dawn
If the insect in the photo is what you have they are beneficial insects and should not be killed....they are not hurting anything except killing some insects you do not want!
Not sure why you have so many in your house...they like dark places. They may have come in if you have a basement or attracted to lights at night. If you have mulch right next to the house foundation that might encourage them also.
Try putting them outside, then, seal your doors and windows and pull mulch back a foot away from the house.
Without knowing exactly what insect you have and the conditions of your house and yard, it is difficult to know what else to tell you.

Rove Beetle (Glasgow)
by: Tanya

Yeah I saw one of these yesterday when I was out with my daughter. Thougot it looked to exotic to be a native of the UK (cos its too cold) but after reading these posts I see that this is not the case. Really quite mean looking.

Rove Beetle
by: Anonymous (Peterhead/Aberdeenshire)

Found 2 squashed under the wheelie bin yesterday and just thought how weird they looked but my partner found one running around in the house and when he prodded it with his shoe it arched up and angrily showed its horns. Scary looking thing and couldn't believe how long it was, 2cm long!

ground beetle is what they r called
by: cj

they can move both ways sting and pinch u and i also learned they can swim when i put it in the toilet i thought it was dead but it was just playing dead scary right :0

Rove Beetle
by: Moni

cj
NO...it is a rove beetle...family Staphylinidae!
No matter what country you are from.

Normandy Now Has These 2011
by: Gary Nadeau

My wife's broom was attacked by this scorpion looking narrow body beetle about 3 cm. long when I photographed it lifting its tail like a scorpion. However this was in Normandy, France between Saint Lo and Bayeux. Our gardener has only just this year begun to see them, and he is 65. He thinks they came from Africa with a shipment of vegies.

Rove beetle
by: Moni

Gary of Normandy
This rove beetle is called the devil's coach-horse beetle (Ocypus olens) which is a very common and widespread European beetle. It has been there for a very long time. Sorry the gardener has not seen it before, but there are millions of insects and it would take serious searching to see even thousands of the various species. That is what is so cool about bugs! :-)

jersulem cricket
by: Anonymous

I found this bug under a dirt mound in my yard. It creeped me out, and we didn't know what it was so we put it in a bug snatcher. We were hunting for salamanders but instead, found an ugly looking potato bug!

Illinois rove
by: scardybeetle

I found one in my garage..I have read they have been found all around. But none in the Midwest.

Creepy Mean and Ugly, But beneficial?
by: Lance C

I hope these things do good. I have seen some in my unfinished basement but today I found one creeping across the floor. I was so surprised when it started acting tough. I would rather have a hornet flying in the room than this thing. I have lived here near Seattle all my life and never seen any of these bugs. Is global warming causing this. We also had a Praying Mantis land in front of us a few nights ago. I work at night and we were sitting outside at break time. I guess I will let the bug go, I was going to squash the hell out of it...

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big yellow/black striped body, red head, 6 legs -(Jerusalem Cricket)


(Los Angeles, CA, USA)

Found under tree trunk. Almost size of my finger.
Big round body with yellow/black stripes.
red head.....

Comments for big yellow/black striped body, red head, 6 legs -(Jerusalem Cricket)

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Jerusalem Cricket
by: Moni

Dear Los Angeles
Thank you for the good description and measurement. It is very helpful for many of the photos we are sent.
This is a Jerusalem Cricket.
They feed on other insects, roots, and decaying vegetation. Sometimes found eating potatoes.
They are found in burrows and under rocks and logs. Sometimes they wander to the surface at night. To produce their sound they strike the ground with their abdomen to produce a drumming pattern.
Some say the bite hurts.

Yep, it is the Jersalem cricket
by: Nursenut

But we also call it a potato bug or a niño de la tierra (child of the earth)

Ugly
by: Anonymous

I have seen some with white heads, they almost look like human heads, one of the most gross looking and huge insects ever.

TOO COOL
by: tisha eastgate

SINCE IVE BEEN IN OHIO I FORGOTTEN ABOUT THOSE BUGS, I USE TO CALL THEM ALIENS...JERSULEM BUG IT IS.. TO COOL

Creeps me out
by: jimbob

I found the same bug crawling on a sidewalk with my friends. It creeps me out!

creepy bug!!!
by: madi

found this bug on my back door window.didint know what it was tryed to feed it to a spider it wouldnt die, so i stuck it in a jar. are they native in Idaho?

alien bug
by: kiki Lippman

we found this crazy bug in our garage. it makes its presence know without threat. we also call it an alien. I left lettuce and grapes for it. it does seem like an alien though I'm not inclined to let it bite me.

dorm bug
by: Anonymous

just found this bug in my dorm room, creepy. have no idea how it even got in here.but i'm glad you have info on it, I was really curious, Thanks!!

Found one in Scripps Ranch!
by: Elaine, Nishita, Josh

We're in a small community in San Diego, and found a large Jerusalem cricket in my front yard! We were horrified, but thanks to this website, we've learned that it is nonlethal, an doesn't cry like a child! Despite common myths!!!!

Thanks, Doug Green!

oh yeah
by: Crown Town

My husband would say their bite hurts! He is still PETRIFIDE after being bit as a child. We have also woken up to a chihuahua squealing in pain and one hanging off it's nose. They are just BIG, which makes those Nino de la tierra's no friend of our family! :)

Found one in Big Bear City
by: MountainDog

I found one of these in my yard on the southern edge of Big Bear City, CA (at 6,800 feet!). My first inclination was that it was some type of cricket. Good to know that my instinct is occassionally right!

jerusalem cricket
by: brinda

i thank you for the incredible pic depicting its details help me ..I'm reg'd blind here but have a pc that is built for me ...thx so much god bless ..ms brinda

Jerusalem cricket
by: Michelle

Found one of these in my friends yard in Bakersfield, CA.

cat attacking it
by: Anonymous

just found one of these in our house it was gross and huge. it looked like the size of a small mouse. we squished it because we thought it was a spider at first glance in the dark and the cat was after it.

Found in Hollywood Hills
by: Jane

Found today in Bathroom...no idea how it got in its so big. Never seen anything like it so had to look it up. 2 ins long. EEK.

Bathroom buggy
by: Keevie

i went to pick up a towel on my bathroom floor and found it right under it :O ewwie, we put it in a jar and let it out side. Crickets are good luck when found inthe home. Dont squish em :)

BIG BUG IN MY GARDEN
by: Anonymous

I took a few videos of this huge cricket,beetle, bee looking, creepy bug. I "played" with it to see what it would do, it seemed harmless enough. But is is so BIG I was afriad it would jump at me with it's cricket like legs. Thankfully it did not try to bite, it mostly kept flipping on it's back and trying to use it's hind claws to grab onto things. I can try to post some of my video if you want

Torrance Garden Monster
by: Anonymous

In Torrance CA - found this crazy looking bee, cricket, beetle looking thing in my veggie garden. Was wondering if this is what has been striping my plants of their leaves. If I could post my video of this 2 to 3 inch monster I would. He has currently wedged himself between two cinder blocks and will not come out.

JERUSALEM CRICKET
by: Moni

Torrance Anonymous
A Jerusalem cricket will not strip all of your garden plants. So perhaps you have another critter.
Please try to take a photo and send it in for ID. Then you will know for sure what you have and perhaps what is bothering your garden plants.
You could try sending a photo of the damage on the plants and maybe we can figure out what kind of critter is eating your plants. It may be a 4 footed animal not an insect.

I found that type one
by: FrozenSkye

IT bit my dogs nose and it wouldnt let go... angry little big things >:)

Mystery solved:
by: Anonymous

Pretty neat bug, the J.Beetle. Found one under a railroad tie, didn't know what it was and did some searching on Google. thought it would make a great meal for my tarantula, Seymor, but it's nearly as bigas he is. I think it eats more of the crickets I supply Seymor with than Seymor eats. (I call him Seymor because since I built him a great habitat with his own burrow I hardly see him.

JC
by: Anonymous

When I lived in Turlock, CA is when I first discovered the cricket/spider/bee crossbreed looking cricket and researched it. Whatever you do, don't go near the jaws, they can pinch through your skin, and it is pretty painful.

Ate a hole in my sleeping pad
by: Anonymous

First time I encounted one of these was at about 5 AM when I woke up and noticed that the ground was really hard. I realized that my sleeping pad was flat, opened my eyes and in the dim morning light of my tent saw this huge striped thing about 5 inches from my face! I later discovered that it had eaten a hole in the bottom of the tent and then into my sleeping pad!

Carlsbad, CA
by: John

Just found my cat chasing one of these. I didn't know what it was, but found it here...... Creepy.

huge bug with big red head
by: Anonymous

We found this bug while walking late afternoon in a park in San Pedro, CA. It was just crawling on the cement next to lots of vegetation. It was the biggest bug I've ever seen. Seriously huge like the size of my husbands thumb. Kind of creepy but seemed harmless. It flipped over on his back a lot then slowly crawled into bushes. Nice to know about it, but hope it stays in the park.

Oregon
by: Anonymous

I just found one of these trying to climb up the side of my house in Madras Oregon. I use to live in New Mexico and they look different there. They have more of a Brown color to them.

in my tack shed
by: Ann

I was out in my horse tack shed late at night, when I heard something big scrape against a bucket. We do have mice, so I thought it was that, when I looked over....And there was the ugliest creepiest looking bug in the world. Because it is red and black and striped, I thought it would have poison coming out of its skin, but I caught it in a cup, and showed it to my boyfriend. He is scared of bugs so he jumped and it was funny to see his reaction. I thought is was a wrongly bred oversized cricket. When I messed with it, it backed away, so I was pretty sure it was harmless. It tried to flip onto its back to protect itself before I caught it. I let it go in some weeds in our back yard. I guess they do surface at night, because that is the only time I have seen one.

Oh My, JC is Huge
by: Poway, CA

Two weeks ago my boyfriend heard a noise outside of the living room window. I thought he was hallucinating, but after peering out the window and listening closely I heard something too. He goes outside with a flashlight and in the flower bed, just below the window was this awesome big headed bug. He was digging or something and emitting a noise. Fast forward: tonight I entered the garage and there was a JC standing just four feet from garage entry door. We faced each other like a classic scene from a spaghetti western...then I captured him in a cup.

and in Topanga, CA!
by: Anonymous

One of these crawled out of some sheets piled up in a room where the bathroom was being remodeled. I reacted in fear and killed it. Found another a few days later at night crawling around. I won't kill this one now that I know what it is! Haha.. Still freaking big and weird!

Creeped Out!!!!!
by: Susan

I've seen many insects in my day, but this one totally freaked me out. I moved a log and saw this large specimen and thought I was hallucinating. Couldn't tell if it was an insect, a scorpion or what! Thank goodness I found your website and a description. I let it crawl away watching it walk with those six legs. The LAST thing I would have done is put my finger near it as in a photo I saw. Good to know it bites, as well. I assume similar to a red ant's bite. Extremely painful. - found it in New Mexico. Still having trouble eating after the fright. Thanks again for posting the information.

scared me in southern Idaho!
by: Anonymous

walking into the house late at night, freaked me out! my mom came out and squished it. this morning I looked it up... now I feel bad that it received the death sentence just because I didn't like the looks of it. :( now I know, next time we will just put it away from the house by the compost pile. my mom does eat potatoes, so I imagine it would have been very happy there...

Calimesa Ca
by: Anonymous

I found one while taking my dog out to use the restroom. It freaked me out because it looked so big for an ant. My folks freaked out. I thought it was a wasp and ant baby. Creepy little thing.

I always wondered what these were
by: Anonymous

I saw one of these in Ensenada Mexico years ago on the bottom it looks like a face to this day I've never seen anything like it .

This evening I shared my blanket w/this insect
by: Demetra Ennis

As I was enjoying a very peaceful sleep at 4:25a.m. in Ventura,CA I felt something crawling on my feet so I kicked it off. I thought a spider was crawling on me so I immediately jumped out of bed and turned on the light and saw that I was sharing my blanket with a Jerusalem cricket. As bad as I wanted to kill it I didn't because I didn't want it's insides to stain my blanket so I ran outside all the way to the street with my blanket and released back into its habitat.

On the trail
by: Jim

I was mountain biking on single track trails on the Wasatch Front in Utah at night when I noticed one of these interesting little critters on the trail in front of me. I had to stop for photos. What a cool bug! I don't think I've seen one before today...it's not one you're likely to forget seeing.

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Long pincher black bug (Male dobsonfly)

by Timothy McMahon
(Rockville Maryland)

long wings, 6 legs, long pinchers, long antenna.
Thank you for what ever help you can give

Comments for Long pincher black bug (Male dobsonfly)

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Found this pincher, too!
by: Demetra

Hi,

I found one of these too!

What is it?? I took photos, as well.

I live on the border of NJ and PA.


DOBSONFLY!
by: Demetra

It's a male DOBSONFLY.

The female has a shorter, roundre pinchers.


Male dobsonfly
by: Moni

Timothy
Demetra is correct. Your photo is of the male dobsonfly. This is an aquatic insect.
I have seen the female (do not have the long pinchers) but not a male...how lucky you are!

The females do not have the long 'pinchers', but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.
These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be some water near by. The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.

Larvae are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two-three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter. Adults emerge spring to summer.

These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.





I saw one to!!!
by: Anonymous

OMG!!! I totally had one on my car this morning and on my way to work I was driving about 70 mph and that thing hung on there! Lol It sort of freaked me out bc It was soo weird looking!!!

We found one in Bracebridge, ON
by: Carolyn

It was on the wall at my son's school. It is certainly a scary looking creature!

Thanks for the info that helped identify it.

dobsonfly
by: Joan

we found one in the strainer at the pool and watched it dry out and fly away. Ours had a longer neck, and short active pincers - was larger overall almost 3 inches - and the abdomen wqs large and fat. Not a friendly looking insect.

Dobsonfly
by: Georgie

We just found one at our Frio River property in Leakey, TX. Have owned the property for 30 years but this is the first time we have ever seen one, in fact we saw two. Sure are spooky looking. Thanks for the ID and the info.

Male Bug
by: Beverly

I let my dog out last night and one of the male's was on our screen porch (outside thank goodness). It was the most freaky looking things I have ever seen. Thought about catching it, but was afraid it might bite.

They're in Texas too!
by: J.W. in Austin

OMG! I finally found out what it is! Freaked me out when I saw one in Austin, Tx. Looked like something from another world! Took a picture too. Glad to know someone else has seen them too.

creepy bug
by: Anonymous

its known to my family as a helgramite and awesome for fishing bait.

omg
by: Anonymous

me and my friends saw one , and kept poking it with a stick we evencually pissed it off and it chased one of my friends idk why it didnt chase me xD i was poking it , it was a male .

Smaller Bug that looks sort of like the Dobsonfly
by: Kathy

The bug that is bugging me in the house is only about 1/2 inch long, has wings and pincers, sort of black horizontal bands on its body. I have swatted at least 3 a day for the past two weeks. Where are they coming from? A plant? I've checked all my plants, can't seem to spot anything. I do have a picture....

dobsonfly
by: Moni

Kathy
Please submit your photo on the Insect ID page so we can help you. Without a photo and info we can not identify it. :-)

Picture
by: Kathy

Yes I did find the page to submit a picture...waiting now for its identification.

Unidentified Bug
by: Kathy

OK here's a link to my bug picture.

http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/brown-flying-striped.html

I am not sure that it is brown as that may have been the result of the wall's colour and use of a flash.

DOBSONFLY
by: Moni

Kathy
Please see the answer to your photo at that site.

I had no idea what it was until now
by: Anonymous

I was outside of my work and I saw it on the wall, It had to be the size of my hand and a set of pinchers that could sure do some damage. It moved a little bit and I didnt get too close to it, this was last week when I saw him, and he is in the same spot almost a week later. I am pretty sure he is no longer living because he has been in the same spot and has not moved.

Large creepy male strolling thru my yard
by: holy moly!

Wife and I took the dog out and had a set of eyeballs staring back at us in the grass. Got a bunch of pics as it strolled thru the yard unafraid of how close I was getting.

OMG the Dobsonfly is in MO
by: Anonymous

This enormous bug was flying around my back door. I let my cat out and she must have pounced on it. It isn't moving, but eyes are glowing. Glad I've identified it.., but what is it doing in MO? LOL

dobsonfly
by: Moni

MO
These are found thru out the eastern half of North America...which includes MO :)
Please be careful about letting the cat get this insect or most any other.

ALIEN BUG!
by: Anonymous

I had one on my car this morning- and it had me freaked out- It would not go away or fly off- It was just staring at me on my window- EWWWWW GROSS!!! NO THANK YOU!

helgamites or dobson flies
by: kevin

nobody wants to include they can get almost 8 inches long. there all over western massachusetts.

caught one in south carolina. female
by: Dustin

I live in sumter sc and if what you say is true then I caught a female in a platic cup. First time I ever seen one.

Freaky
by: Nick

I was standing outside at night after turning the porch light on and this sucker just swooped in and landed infront of the door. I stood there wondering how I was going to get by when it took off, flew at me then went over to land on the side of the house...hope its not out there tommorow night, thing scared me more then the scorpions and camel spiders in Saudi!

Saw one in Minnesota!
by: Kirsten C.

7/5/15- We just saw a female in eastern Minnesota, just a black from the Rum River in Anoka.

Childhood Fear
by: Anonymous

I'm from OK and I've been seeing these since I was a kid. Always scares me too death!!! I took a picture of the male. So scary!!!

NW GA siting
by: Bugoff Please

Been seeing quite the variety of strangeness on my back deck. I live right next to the woods. Saw at least a 6" Male, took a pic & a while to id it. Thanks for the info! Super long freaky-looking pincers!

Seen my 1st one tonight
by: Anonymous

I stopped at the gas station in "st joe,mo" a little bit ago and seen a male one, it was bigger than a bic lighter!! They are very creppy looking...

Indiana
by: Anonymous

Found one today. Must be female short pinchers. Took pics and turned loose.

Found one in Rhode Island
by: Richard

This is the second male I have seen found one today 7/17/16 on a screen to the second floor window and creeped me out it must have been 5 in long I see that ppl post they are good bait for fishing but I'd never touch something like that i rather use a 410 to schoo schoo it away lol But creepy looking bug thanks for the help on what it is

Found one here in Oklahoma
by: Lee jJeans

Where our back porch light is and pool near bye, this big male version was hanging out? Insane look I g bug!!!!!!

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black and orange 6 legged (Boxelder bugs)

what kind of bug is this and how do i get rid of it
i live in michigan

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Boxelder bugs
by: Moni

You have boxelder bugs. And I assume that since you are in Michigan that you have a problem with them inside the house?

These insects feed primarily on boxelder trees and some other maples. Then in the fall the adults seem to collect on the south side of our homes and find a way to get in. They do not do any damage to anything in the house. They are just a nusiance!
The best way to get rid of them is to vacuum them as you see them. As we get a few warm days they seem to be more active.
They will eventually die indoors.
Hope that helps.

Box Elder Beetle
by: Sheila (Westport, ON)

As I understand it the tree they are primarily attracted to is the Manitoba maple (also called the Box Elder). I made the big mistake once of spraying for them on my Manitoba maple in Caledonia (there was a huge patch on the trunk) and they only just dispersed including onto my nice warm front porch (!!). I believe they live in the soil and come up onto the tree when it gets sunny (for the warmth). Your best bet, I think, is to just ignore them. They don't seem to do the tree any damage and it's sure a lot better having them stay there than coming to the house.

Boxelder bugs
by: Moni

Boxelder bugs do not live in the soil.
Boxelder bugs overwinter as adults and in spring leave the hibernating locations under piles of boards, rocks, leaves, grass and other debris close to the house. Females begin laying eggs in crevices of tree bark, stones, leaves, grasses and on other objects near boxelder trees. Bright-red nymphs appear about the same time new tree leaves develop.
Boxelder bugs feed primarily on the seed-bearing boxelder trees by sucking sap from the leaves, tender twigs and developing seeds. They do little damage to boxelder trees. There can be one to two generations per year.

Control measures in yards and gardens are best handled by prevention. Since boxelder bugs feed and reproduce on seed producing (female) boxelder trees, remove these trees, especially around the house, and/or planting male trees would eliminate nuisance populations. Adults can fly 2 or more miles to hibernate. Eliminate possible hiding places such as any boards, rocks, leaves, grass and other debris close to the house. Rake leaves and grass away from the foundation, especially on the south and west sides of the house. Be sure to caulk and close off any openings where boxelder bugs could enter the house. Screen all windows, doors, crawl spaces, exhaust and roof vents and louvers.
In fall when clusters of the bugs are seen, either vacuum with a shop vac or carefully pour boiling water over them.

these annoying harmless bugs
by: lydia

these bugs are so annoying one time in the morning one was in my hair and i went nuts because it was buzzing , thats when i realized that they fly.

stung by a box elder
by: Anonymous

got stung by a box elder bug, is it poisonious

Help
by: Anonymous

How are these things getting into my town house would they attach themselves to long haired dog by any chance??????

boxelder bugs
by: Moni

Dear Help
The boxelder bugs do not attach to long haired dogs. For the most part they are coming in small cracks in the windows, doorways, vents, etc. Depending on when your house was built it may have a few more crack and crevices than you think. Even then all houses have to breath so there are vents and spaces that they manage to get in. In the MidWest we also have the Multicolored Asian lady beetles that come into our houses.
None of these critters cause any damage...they do not eat anything (well lady beetles might eat aphids on your house plants if you have them :-) )...They are just a nuisance so just sweep them up and throw them out...or smash them if you want.l

i know how u feel
by: Anonymous

i dont know how to get ride of them but one summer they came to my house and covered the entire fount of it. im not kidding eather. there where millions of them. i hated it and could do nothing to get ride of them. then they started getting in my house. ugh but after winter came they left and never came back. and i like in ny

Getting rid of Box Elders
by: Ron

I live next to woods and every Fall I get an infestation of box elders. They rest on the vinyl siding on the south side of my house and porch. I presume its to get the most heat from the sun. I fill my spray with a mixture of Dawnliquid dish soap and water, using a cup of Dawn to 2 gallons of water. Works every time.

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Large Black Bug Gentle Giant (Predaceous Diving beetle)

by Pam
(Ottawa, Ontario, Canada)

Gentle Giant

Gentle Giant

This Gentle Giant was found crawling in the grass. My husband let him crawl on his hand (as you can see from the photo). It's very big, about 2.5 to 3 inches long and approx. 1.5 to 2 inches wide. I live in Ottawa, Ontario. I'm not sure what kind of bug this is, I'm guessing it's some type of beetle. Just wondering if it's a bad bug or a beneficial bug to have around? I have a vegetable garden near by. Your help with its identification would be greatly appreciated. Many Thanks, Pam

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Predaceous Diving beetle
by: Moni

Pam
Looks like you have a predacious diving beetle, genus Dytiscus.
The adults will fly to lights at night so perhaps that is probably why you found it in the grass. The larvae are sometimes called water tigers. Both the larvae and adults are predaceous and feed on fish, mosquito larvae, other aquatic invertebrates, and sometimes tadpoles and salamanders.

Here is another one found in Ontario on the Insect ID.
http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/large-beetle-found-in-southern-ontario.html#ixzz0KcSIIqQE&D

Similar Beetle FOund
by: Betty

There are dozens on only one of our trees.They seem to be mating.
Never seen them before.
Would like more information on them.Will they damage the tree?

Predaceous Diving beetle
by: Moni

Betty
As reported below in the comments these beetles feed and live mostly in the water.
They may have only come to your trees because of lights nearby....they will be returning to the water.

Are you sure this is the same beetle you saw??

You could send in a photo of your beetles so we can be sure.

Not always...
by: Anonymous

My understanding is these are not always so gentle and can inflict a fairly painful bite! Good thing these guy seemed to go with the flow :o)

Not so gentle...
by: Tracy

I tried to move one of these from a parking lot, because I was afraid of it getting run over by a car. When I went to put my hand down to let the bug crawl on my hand, it bit me and Drew blood, it hurt for quite a while.

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Long Flying Insect Black And White (Giant Eastern Crane Fly)

by Christopher Profrock
(Mio, Michigan, United States)

Black And white, long wings and body, triangle shape on wings, can not see a head looks like it is attached to the upper body.

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Giant Eastern Crane Fly
by: Moni

Christopher
Your photo is of a crane fly, family Tipulidae. From the pattern on the wings it looks like you have a giant eastern crane fly. And from the tapered pointed tip of the abdomen it is a female.
The larvae are aquatic. The adults may be found on nearby vegetation and may be attracted to artificial light.
The larva are predaceous on small aquatic insects.

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red and black flower insect (Curculionidae beetle)

by heili
(albania)

it's red and black It has wings .usually stays on roses.it forms same holes especially in the bulbs. I live in albania.

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Curculionidae beetle
by: Moni

Heili
You have found a beetle that is also called a weevil which is in the family Curculionidae. It is the largest family of beetles in the world with more than 40,000 species.. I do not have access to the species in Albania, so I am not sure just which one you have. It is a beautiful color but with that said, it is probably a pest of your roses.
This family of weevils do feed on plants and flowers. If they are eating holes in the flower buds the flowers will not open or will be deformed. Most larvae and adults feed on all parts of plants, and many species are important pests because they chew holes in fruits, nuts, and other parts of cultivated plants.
One fun note about weevils is that when disturbed they often play dead - laying very still on their backs.

Weevils
by: Anonymous

This red insect absolutely loves day lillies. Without fail, every year my lillies come up and look great for a week or two. By the end of the season they have been eaten away...the entire plants are gone.

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Hard backed black insect (Devil's Coachhorse beetle)

by S Stuthridge
(Cornwall, England)

Hard backed, black with 2 antlers, head is beetle like and then it has a sectioned body and a tail like a scorpion with 4 armoured sections that arches over if you approach the insect. Length is approximately 25mm. It was found in Cornwall under some plastic sheeting in a muddy part of a garden.

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Rove beetle, Ocypus sp.
by: Moni

S Stuthridge
From the size you mention, your Rove beetle may be the Devil's Coachhorse beetle, Ocypus olens. But it can only be positively identified by looking under a microscope. According to one website Ocypus winkleri is the most common in the UK and therefore may be your beetle.
The Devil's coachorse beetle is a predator, hunting mostly at night, feeding on invertebrates including worms and woodlice, as well as carrion.

Rove beetles in general have short elytra (hard wing covers) that cover fully functioning wings so they are proficient fliers. The wing folding process after flight is interesting to watch, if you get the chance.
They live in cool damp places at ground level - usually in the garden or woodland habitats, hiding under fallen wood or stones by day and feeding on small insects and grubs.
Most of the rove beetles adopt a 'scorpion like' posture when alarmed. They stand their ground, raise the rear abdomen up and open their jaws in a threatening posture. If bothered enough, they will bite - which is usually enough for most of us to 'back off' although the bit will be only superficial.

seen these lots
by: Anonymous

THESE bugs are all around where i live and often i find them inside my house, theres feilds out the back of my house i guess they come from there like, i live in ireland

yuk
by: Anonymous

quite a scary little thing to come across for the first time if you dont know what it is, yuk

stinky
by: Anonymous

found a large dchb in my kitchen, never seen one so big, it's in a jar so my 11yr old son can have a good look at it, think it was a bit annoyed at capture, has its tail up and has a strong smell a bit like meth spirit, will release it outside once my son has finished looking at it.

glad it's not a scorpion!
by: jill

Found one in my shower room this morning,in Cyprus.
Thought it might have been a scorpion but glad it wasn't! Strangely enough I live in Devon,but have never seen one there. It was about 3 to 4 cm in length,with long spotty antenna.
Saw a huge tarantula here once and a blunt nosed viper
Scary.

Thanks for the identification.

Devil's Coachhorse beetle, Telford
by: Saltydog

Hi I live in Dawley Telford and came across one of these Devil's Coachhorse beetle and thought it was a Scorpion. As I touched it no the back it tail arched up and some white-ish stuff came out. was very shocked.

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Wasp-like, orange and black, long orange legs (Great Golden Digger Wasp)

by Sandy
(Eastern Ontario)

I found this type of insect in two instances 'digging' (a nest?) in the stonedust of my pathways.

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Great Golden Digger Wasp
by: Moni

Sandy
This is the great golden digger wasp.
As you suspected this wasp is digging a nest. The female digs a burrow almost vertically. Cells are dug radiating out from central tunnel. Larvae are fed crickets, camel crickets, and katydids. The wasp stings the prey which paralyzes it not killing it as the larva like live food. One paralyzed prey is placed in each cell, and one egg is laid on it.
There is one generation per year. They are found in fields or meadows with sandy areas nearby, so it liked your sandy path. These are beneficial and do not sting unless really hasseled.
The wasp will feed on nectar of flowers.


Great Golden Digger Wasp
by: Sandy

Thank you for taking the time to identify and provide some details about this this wasp. It's fascinating and I'm glad to know it's a beneficial.

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Giant winged insect with pinchers (Dobsonfly male)

by David
(Conshohocken, PA)

Giant winged insect with pinchers

Giant winged insect with pinchers

Please help identify this large brown insect with brown speckled wings and a large set of pinchers, total length from tip of pinchers to wing tip 6.5 inches. Picture was taken west of Philadelphia PA in the morning. Insect was attached to the side of a building wall not moving.

Thanks
Dave

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Dobsonfly male
by: Moni

David
Wow! What a find! I want to see one too! Have seen female here but not the male.
Your photo is of a dobsonfly male. The females do not have the long 'pinchers', but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.
These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be one near by. The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.
Larvae are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two-three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter. Adults emerge spring to summer.
These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.
I am jealous!

Caught by surprize!
by: Joe

I got one of these bugs with big pinchers caught in my hair. It looks alot like this Dobsonfly, only it's about 2 inches long and seems to have a longer, more slender body. Do these things grow in Colorado? I have a picture, But I don't know how to submit it.

Dobsonfly
by: Moni

Joe
Yes, dobsonflies do occur in Colorado.
To submit a photo click on the words Insect Identification on the bottom of the page where you entered your comment. It will tell you how to post the photo. Then we can see if it is the same insect or not?
Thanks

We found one here!
by: Priscilla

We were trying to find what this huge bug was when we found it on the ground at a gasstation here in indiana. Thank you now we know what it its!

Dobsonfly
by: Moni

Priscilla
Thanks for taking the time to look up the big insect you found. Yes they do occur in Indiana. While growing up in IN, I did not find one,but I did not live very close to water sources (where the young live) and we did not have a big light nearby that draws them to places like gas stations.
Great find!

BIg One!!
by: Jeff Fanjoy

I just found one today. Never seen such a bug! It was at my local gas station in Corinna Maine. Is this normal? Iv lived here my whole life.....29 years. caught me by surprise hahahaha1

Dobsonfly
by: Moni

Jeff
As mentioned, they are drawn to the bright lights of gas stations.

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Huge black Beetle (Broad-necked root borer, female)

by Geil Patterson
(Riverside, R.I. USA)

It's the Giant Beetle!!

It's the Giant Beetle!!

This (beetle) is dark in color with large wings and long antennae or feelers. It seems to have something sticking out from behind that is somewhat yellow/white with some black like the size of a needle inside. It may be a sexual organ? It also has small yellow striped (not on top) but, they are on the undercarriage! It was very intimidating and seemed to lengthen the stem or stinger when approached closer...hhmmm. It, was very large in size also, A little over an inch maybe. It was sittting on a rock in our azalea bush! We left it alone and I tollk a pic. Hope you can ID this one...it doesn't seem native to RI . thank you Gail

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Predaceous Diving beetle
by: Moni

Gail
Your photo is of a predaceous diving beetle. You probably live near water!
These beetles are found in and around water. The adults will fly to lights at night, but usually are found swimming in water. The 'stinger' you saw was probably the rear legs held together in the back making it look like a stinger -

The larva and adults of these beetles feed on small fish, mosquito larvae, other aquatic invertebrates, and sometimes tadpoles and salamanders.

Broad-necked root borer, female
by: Moni

Gail
Have changed my mind, after looking at this photo again it is a female, Broad-necked root borer and the projection out the rear end is the ovipositor.
It can not sting humans. It is used to put eggs in the soil under debris.
These longhorned beetles are found in eastern N America.
The adults eat foliage and can damage fruit trees and grape vines. The larva feed on tree and shrub roots for about 3 yrs before turning into a pupa and emerging in the spring.




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Black and Red Bugs (Red-shouldered Bug)

by Barbara
(Corning, CA)

These Black and Red bugs just appeared, have been here over 20 years and have never noticed anything that looked like these. They were swarming all over the myrtle (ground cover - not the Crepe Myrtle) also looks like they are mating. They were not damaging the plants. And we have lots of it around the yard but just seems to be on two clumps. At least 600 on top of leaves.

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Red and Black Bugs
by: Anonymous

I also have had the problem of those red and black bugs. What is there name and what purpose do they serve if any.

Box Elder Bug
by: MydMo

It looks like a variety of box elder bug. In Missouri they congregate on the side of houses in the fall and in the winter when the temperatures warm up.

Box Elder Bugs
by: Barbara

Mydmo - so what do these Box Elder Bugs do? It' been very warm here in the 90's-100's, but the day we saw these it was much cooler. Do they usually stay in the ground? or trees? They didn't seem to be eating the leaves. the Black one is about an inch long and the red & black little ones are about 3/8" long. Have looked all over the property (5 acres) and haven't seen them anywhere else. Very strange indeed!

Box Elder Bug
by: MydMo

If they are box elder bugs, they mainly are a nuisance when they get inside the house to spend the winter where it is warm. I am wondering if you are near any fire areas that might have driven them from their usual habitat. They are true bugs with sucking mouth parts and usually feed on plant material.

Black & Red Bugs (maybe Box Elder Bugs)?
by: Anonymous

hmmmm, no we aren't near any fire areas, those are up in the mountains about 90-100 miles away from us....we're in the No.Sacramento Valley. They're about 40ft from the houses each way (right in the middle of 2 houses on property) I sure don't want them in my house! We live in the country surrounded by olive orchards. Maybe will call the ag dept in county.

Red-shouldered Bug
by: Moni

Barbara
As you all have discussed, your bug looks much like the boxelder bug and I think it is in the same family Rhopalidae. But I think it is the Red shouldered bug.
They are known to feed on the seeds of several trees. They, much like the boxelder bugs, do show up in clusters.
This is a bug found in the southern United States.
These bugs are known to feed on a variety of plants but prefers balloonvine which grows in southern Florida. Additional hosts include other plants in the soapberry family, Ficus spp. and hollyhock family. In some areas the bugs are observed feeding so often on goldenrain tree seeds, that they are referred to as 'goldenrain tree bugs'. Your crape myrtle is in the loosestrife family. Nymphs and adults suck juices primarily from seeds but also suck juices from fruits of many trees. This can deform fruit.
This insect seems to be much like the boxelder bug as it is considered a nuisance rather than economically damaging. So there is no need to spray.
When we in the MidWest get lots of boxelder bugs on the outside of the house in the fall, we sometimes vacuum them with a shop vac, put them in a sealed bag and throw them away or in a bucket of soapy water. Doing that prevents so many from getting in the house.

If you only have a few I would not worry about them right now. They do not do any real damage.

Black & Red Bugs
by: Barbara

Thank you Moni....mmmm you may be on to something......All these bugs were under a GoldenRain Tree in the myrtle...Bingo!!! We have several Golden Rain Trees here on the property the both of the other ones just have grass underneath them.
Thank you all for your assistance

Red-shouldered Bug
by: Moni

Barbara
Great to know it was under a Golden Raintree! Interesting how this all works.
Thanks for letting us know!

Tickle Bugs
by: Amanda

I've lived in Central Florida all my life and I have always called these particular bugs Tickle Bugs. As you have already mentioned they are harmless so we would pick them up and it would tickle when they walked up your arm. Also we have a large amount of the bugs living in an old railroad tie in our backyard.

Spraying for the Black and Red Bugs
by: Anonymous

Your right Barbara about spraying, it doesn't kill them anyway. And I live in Texas.

Black and red bugs
by: Christal McClay

These bugs are annoying. They are everywhere outside of our house and they come into the house and are always in the window seals. I've tried to spray and nothing seems to work. I wish there was away to get rid of them.

I have hundreds of these bugs in my garden & grass.
by: Georgia has them too!

I have hundreds of these bugs in my garden & grass. There is a Goldenrain Tree next to both of these areas. Am I understanding that the reason these bugs are here, is because of that tree?
They seem to be quickly killing my pea plants in the garden. It seems they might be sucking the stem of the plants & turning them yellow instantly. Does 7 Dust solve this problem in the garden.
Currently, they are all mating & everywhere I look, there are more & more of them.
Should I consider not planting the remainder of the garden this year.? It seems like I am definately outnumbered.

Arkansas
by: Anonymous

im in arkansas and just saw them EVERYWHERE yesterday looked like they were mating and the babies were there too they were smaller and bright red

red shoulder bugs swarm
by: Anonymous

They are swarming all over my patio and on my
bricks on the house. I need to get rid of them.ca

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Black Bug 6 Legs Orange Stripe (Boxelder bugs)

by Michael
(Elkton MD)

Crawling all over the house during recent warm days in Elkton Maryland

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Boxelder bugs
by: Moni

Michael
You have Boxelder bugs on your house. Welcome to fall! They are a common problem in the Midwest also.
They come off of boxelder (and sometimes maple) trees and gather on the southern warm walls of buildings. They then migrate into the mulch and crevices around the house for the winter. They are well known for also coming into the house. They do not bite or cause any economic problems...just a nuisance. Besides crawling around in the house, their droppings result in red dots on walls and curtains.

Best control if they become a nuisance and come in the house, is to use a small shop vacuum and suck them up, put them in a plastic bag, tie it shut, and dispose of it. :-)

Boxelder bugs
by: Steve

Hey, I'm from Maryland too. Those are boxelder bugs and they breed fast. They literally will become an infestation if you don't take care of it.

If its one or two, no worries but if you see them in groups its just going to get worse. Especially this early on in the season.

uh huh
by: Anonymous

that is a boxelder.

they are all over illinois.

Michigan
by: Anonymous

Michigan has boxelders everywhere too. they are pests because they eat your (if you have a garden) plants but mostly wood (lke the bark on your trees) git rid of them. Their young are small bright red all over.ALL OVER! ONLY RED! Git rid of 'em!

we tried this and it worked
by: Anonymous

we had these all over our house and in the wood pile. We planted mint around the base of the house and they went away. We had them for 10 years and they have been gone now for 3.

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black bug big pincers (Giant stag beetle)

by Bean
(Belleville IL)

found on the back of a commercial building

found on the back of a commercial building

large black beetle with pinchers in the metro east

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I researched it and I believe it to be
by: The poster :)

A male Stag Beetle.???

Giant stag beetle
by: Moni

Bean
Your photo is of the Giant stag beetle. And yes it is the male. The female does not have the large pinchers.
According to Bugguide, "adults may feed on plant juices. Eggs are laid in crevices of moist, decaying wood. Larvae feed on decaying logs, stumps, where adults can be found in spring, early summer. (Presumably males battle there.) Larvae take one or more years to develop. Adults can be found at lights in early summer. Adults live two or more years, but one generation per year."
There is some concern about conservation of this beetle. A similar species in Europe is considered threatened. So hopefully it will find its way back to the woods.
Great find! I have seen the smaller stag beetle but not the giant male!

Giant Stag Beetle
by: Kate

We moved into a house built in the early 1900's in a heavily-treed area of a large city (LOTS of wildlife!) and we saw at least three of these, all males with the giant horns. We had no idea what they were at the time, but I thought they were so cool. I took them all back to the giant oak tree out back and freed them. (Our yard was home to the largest oak tree in the county.)

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black nocturnal insect (Two-striped walkingstick)

by Colleen
(Ocala National Forest, FL. USA)

found in Ocala national forest in FL. October 4th 2008. Started dropping out of the trees above when it was dark, well after dusk. Were coupled up as though they were mating. the larger bug was walking the other one was riding on its back. larger was approx 4" smaller was only about 1.5". They were very easy to kill/smush. when they died they lost their color and turned brown. They were not bothered by our presence at all. and when we tried to 'scoot' them away from our area with a paper plate they charged towards to plate.

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Two-striped walkingstick
by: Moni

Colleen
You have seen the two-striped walkingstick, a common walkingstick in the southeastern US - from FL to TX. And as you suspected, it is a mating pair. The larger being the female. It has been noted that the male and female may attach to each other even before the female is mature...the male will hang on while the female molts.
One thing to be aware of is they can shoot a chemical spray that is irritating to the eyes. This
'odiferous' secretion is for defense and can be shot a foot or so with great accuracy.
The Univ of FL Entomology dept notes that the distinctive black and white striped walkingsticks of this species is only seen in the Ocala National Forest (this species seen elsewhere is brown with black stripes). They note, as you saw, the insect loses its distinctive white stripes once dead.
These insects feed on the leaves of trees and shrubs. The females are known to drop to the ground in the fall to lay their eggs in the sand.

What a great find!
Thanks for all the helpful information you provided also - it really helped with the identification.

Dangerous to pets!!!!
by: Carroll

My cat came upon one of these bugs. It sprayed the defense chemical into his eye. My cat went nuts, his eye was swollen for several days. He droolled at the mouth and his eye drain clear liquid. I thought I was going to take him to the vet, but it cleared on the 3rd day, by day 4 he had his sight back. Please make it be know for animal such as cats and dogs to beware and not sniff around them.

Walkingsticks
by: Anonymous

Colleen, I don't understand why you found it necessary to "smush" them instead of leaving them alone?

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Black and Yellow Bee (Scoliid wasp)

by Simone Icough
(Spain)

Black and Yellow Bee

Black and Yellow Bee

Do you know anything of bees? I found like the same size like the black one but with 4 yellow spots on the back any idea what this is?

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Scoliid wasp
by: Moni

Simone
Your wasp looks like a wasp in the family Scoliidae. The species in the US like it is Campsomeris quadrimaculata. This may be the same species as what you have in Spain, however I do not know the wasps in Spain so can not be sure. Perhaps you have a university with an entomology department nearby that can tell you if it is the same as in the US,
Let us know.
Thanks

AHA!
by: Katy-Did

I live in Florida, and we have these all over. They don't actively sting unless provoked, and I do mean provoked. We've been shooing them off the porch and they've been pretty docile so far.
I believe they're beneficial as they help control grub and June bug populations.

scoliid wasp
by: Moni

Katy-did
Yes, this family of wasps are found here in North America. Here we call them flower wasps, scarab hunters, scarab hawks, etc.

There are more species found in southern states than northern. They are found around fields, meadows, and lawns (looking for grubs to lay eggs on). Yes, the larva are parasitoids of ground-dwelling scarab grubs. Making it a good bug :)

The female digs to the grub, stings it to paralyze the grub, then lays an egg on it.

Thanks for the information!

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Small black with red legs and two small spikes (aphids)

by B. Bradford
(Edmonton, Alberta, Canada)

Small Black/Red wingless insect. Major pest!

Small Black/Red wingless insect. Major pest!

This one is on an envelope because it was hard to see on anything else. These little things showed up (maybe by chance?) around the same time I had a new fence installed (pine of some sort).

They range greatly in size from 1mm to 4 or 5mm. They have six red legs and two tiny red spikes on their rear. They meander, crawling around slowly and randomly as if they have nothing at all to worry about, on everything from my fence to my patio chairs and table to the side of my house. They don't seem to do anything at all but wander.

My biggest issue with them is that they are delicate, and any attempt to swipe them off of something usually results in their death and a small red stain on your hand or towel. They don't hide or run, and sitting on them can force a change of pants lest you wish to have red dots all over your rear.

Their noticeable numbers in my back yard went from a few to hundreds overnight, and they were of all different sizes. There were several dozens of them on each of my patio chairs and a hundred or more on my fence. After dousing everything in my backyard with a high pressure stream of water their numbers have dropped considerably, though they have not gone away.

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Aphid
by: Moni

B. Bradford
You have aphids in your yard. They suck juices out of plants and it sounds like you have a nice infestation on several plants. Yes they are a pest.
Aphids can be black, red, yellow, or green.

You did the best thing to control them...spraying with a jet of water. You can also spray your plants with insecticidal soap, besides keeping up with more spraying of the water.
They will die with a frost...if that is any consolation. :-)

We have them too!
by: Victoria

We live in Victoria BC and I have been trying to find out what these are. We have lived in our home over 40 years and this is the first time I have ever seen them.They seemed to just appear and they are all over everything on the back deck. None in the house thank goodness. We trapped one..not hard to do... and watched it for a while. All of a sudden there was a tiny "baby" that dropped off the body of the larger one. A few minutes later, another one appeared.We live in a wooded area and wondered if they were somehow blowing from the trees because they appeared so suddenly and in such large numbers. I am glad to finally see what they are.Thanks

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orange black insect (Cicada killer wasp)

by Bruce Carey
(Weirton, WV)

orange_black_insect

orange_black_insect

-size of average human thumb
-orange black stripe body
-clear wings
-large orange eyes
-black antenna

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Cicada killer wasp
by: Moni

Bruce
It is kind of hard to tell by the photo, but with your description about the size, my guess is that it is a cicada killer wasp.
They are very large wasps, that dig holes in loose soil or sandy areas where they make nests for their young. The wasp catches and stings cicadas and then put them in the nest with an egg, so when the larva hatches it can feed on the cicada. The sting from the wasp paralyzes the cicada, so the young have "live" food.

So they are a beneficial wasp. They are not known to sting unless really disturbed...and it is the males that might sting before the females.

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Black/Blue flies with white spots and orange/red rears (Oleander moths)

by Chris Underwood
(Savannah, GA USA)

These flies were found mating outside my house in Savannah, GA in July 2009. They were oblivious to the fact I was taking a photo of them with my camera phone just inches away from where they were doing their business. haha.

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Polka Dot Moth
by: Anonymous

This is an oleander moth or "polka dot moth". It will destroy your oleanders as it lays eggs on the underside of the leaves and when they hatch into orange and black striped caterpillars that eat the leaves and can kill the plant. Talstar was the only insecticide I found that was effective to get rid of these tenacious pests. Spray bushes and ground underneath as spray may knock them off and they crawl right back up.

Oleander moths
by: Moni

Chris
As anonymous noted these are a mating pair of Oleander moths, also called Polka-dot Wasp Moth.
The caterpillars are orange with long black tufts of hair. They can reach 2" long. They do tend to stay in clusters. While the caterpillars eat oleanders and Devil's Potato (Echites umbellata), the adult moths feed on nectar of flowers especially asters.
Since you have a mating pair you might be interested in an unusual thing about this moth. Most moths find each other using sex phermone chemicals. In this species, female moths emit an ultrasonic acoustic signal which we can not hear, but attracts male moths from great distances. When male and female moths are within a few meters of each other, they begin a courtship of calls which continues until mating occurs two or three hours before dawn.
This insect is only found in the southeastern states, tho a few have been found in Texas.

As anonymous indicated this caterpillar can be a pest in Florida and coastal Alabama. Not sure if you have that big of a problem with them in GA.
In light to moderate caterpillar infestations, damage to leaves is seen as small holes chewed between leaf veins. In severe cases this caterpillar can strip the shrub of leaves and small stems in a short time period. However, this shrub is very sturdy, so shrubs rebounded after being mostly defoliated. Severity of damage to your shrubs and frequency of oleander caterpillar infestations will determine which methods of control to take.
If you only have few caterpillars, pick them off and put in soapy water. If there are many, you can prune the branch where they cluster and put it in a bag then tied shut and disposed of. If you have a lot of caterpillars you can treat with BT. It may have to be applied several times to kill each generation. You might also check the label of Spinosad another organic bacterial insecticide.

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black and red insect (Boxelder bug)

by mark
(York, PA)

Orange & Red insect in Mulch

Orange & Red insect in Mulch

Orange and red Insect found in smaller numbers than the previous Black & Red I uploaded prior to this one. Is it possibly the mature stage?

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Boxelder bug
by: Moni

This photo is of the boxelder bug adult and if the other black and red insect was nearby then it is the young or nymph. Sometimes a bug in the young stage makes it hard to tell different species apart. As expected they feed on boxelder trees, rarely causing any economic problem. They can somtimes be observed feeding on ash, maple, plum, cherry, apple, peach, grape and strawberries, where they can damage the fruit. They are known to be pests in the fall as they accumulate on the sides of homes. They also seem to manage to come inside in the fall also...which is a nuisance. The time spent in or on our homes they are not causing a problem.

Ugly bugs
by: Anonymous

These bugs are very annoying. In the fall they were all over the outside of my house, and now that it has been nice the past couple of days they are back on the house and in my house. Do you know how to get rid of them?

Boxelder bugs
by: Moni

Anonymous
The best way to get rid of them is with a small shop vacuum sweeper. If you use your good household sweeper it might end up smelling from a large number of these bugs. Being in the true bug (Hemiptera) order, these bugs many times smell when smashed.
A shop vac works well inside and out. Suck up the boxelder bugs and then dump them in a plastic bag and seal it. You can then throw it in the trash or let them die, dig a small hole in the ground and bury them...making compost. :-)

The same can be done with the Asian lady beetles that also collect on the southern outside of our homes and then manage to come in for the winter.

their "nickname"
by: Tamara in Oregon

Boxelder bugs always make me smile. When I was a very small kid I lived next to my beloved Grandma who had a great garden. (I am a chip off her block.) She had a Swedish accent and as I had never heard of "boxelder" I thought she was calling them "bug cellar bugs." :-) lol

boxelder bugs
by: Moni

Tamara
Thanks for sharing such a great story!
Great that your Grandma was such a good influence.
Happy gardening!

boxelder
by: Anonymous

In Vermont in the Champlain Valley they are all over the ground in my hosta bed at the base of a Silver Maple tree. There are hundreds of them in that one bed. It is creepy to see so many run around the ground when you are trying to weed!

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Tiny black bug (Aphids)

by Jennifer
(Coral Springs, FL, USA)

These are living on my potted hibiscus. They seem to be primarily on the buds, sometimes on the leaves. I also have little black ants which seem to be feeding on this mystery bug. They don't seem to be doing too much harm to the plant yet, a few holes on the leaves, but I don't want them to take over!

Comments for Tiny black bug (Aphids)

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Aphids
by: Moni

Jennifer
You have aphids on your hibiscus. Aphids suck juices out of the plant for food, so you will not see holes left by them. The ants are there to feed on the droppings of the aphids, which is called 'honey dew'.
To get rid of the aphids, since you are in Florida, take the plant outside and either knock the aphids off with a strong jet of water, or you can spray with insecticidal soap. You may need to repeat that in about 2 weeks, because if there are any eggs, they will hatch by that time. Then, the little aphids will start to feed on your plant, so repeating the spray or washing should clean off the plant.
Any time you might see aphids again on the plant, you can spray or wash them off. The aphids do seem to come from nowhere... however there are winged adults that can fly.
They seem to love hibiscus

Aphids
by: julieb

ladybugs love aphids and are available through most gardening centers.It is a great natural way to eliminate these pests

Thanks!
by: Jennifer

Thank you both for the input! I sprayed it with water, and it seemed to clean the plant up nicely. I'll also try ladybugs. (My son will enjoy catching them! lol!)

Thank you very much!

Aphids controlled by lady beetles
by: Moni

In the outdoor world, lady beetles work very well keeping aphids under control. The larva eat way more than the beetles.
Here in the Midwest we have Asian lady beetles that come in our homes for the winter. They eat a few of the aphids on my hibiscus, but not enough, so I end up spraying with insecticidal soap. I have even tried putting the beetles on the plant, but since they are not laying eggs this time of year...even in the house, the control is not what is needed.
However, that said, if you son would enjoy watching them, please try it and see.
If you put the plant outside for the summer, the natural predators like lady beetles and lacewings will help with the control.
Let us know how it works!

Aphids on my hibiscus...
by: Anonymous

I live in FL also. My hibiscus that get "all day" sun, have no problems w/aphids. It's the ones that don't get that amount of sun that are problematic. I have tried everything! I don't want to lose this one as I have grown it from a cutting and trained it into a tree. I'm considering moving it into the "all day" sun. Good luck w/yours! Sandie B

aphids and ants
by: Anonymous

the ants farm the aphids 4 there nectar they have a sybiotic relationship. the ants also eat the lady bug eggs if u get rid of the ants u get rid of the aphids

Aphids, Ants and lady beetles
by: Moni

Anonymous
Ants feed on the 'honeydew' produced by aphids. And to make sure they have honeydew to eat the ants will prey on the lady beetles to protect the aphids.
So, get rid of the aphids, which will get rid of the ants, so you don't need lady beetles.
A good spray with water every week or so helps to keep the aphid population at bay.

Which came first the chicken or the egg??

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black and white flying insect with red eyes (Rabbit bot fly)

by Shannon Svoboda's Kindergarteners
(Lincoln, Nebraska, USA)

black and white flying insect with red eyes

black and white flying insect with red eyes

This was a black and white insect my kindergarteners found on the playground equipment today. It was just sitting there- it doesn't seem able to fly very well- damaged wings, maybe? It has a furry looking white thorax, speckled-black abdomen, and large red eyes similar to that of a horsefly.

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Rabbit bot fly
by: Moni

Shannon Svoboda's Kindergarteners
Your fly is the rabbit bot fly. And as the name suggests it is a parasite of the rabbit, usually found on the neck, shoulder or rump of the rabbit.
Shannon - not sure how much you want to share of this with the kids...you know your class!
The eggs are deposited on the animal skin then the larva burrow in just under the skin.

One kind of bot fly attracted to rabbits in the wild will also lay eggs near rabbit habitat, on leaves or stems of normal vegetation. These eggs hatch when a rabbit brushes against them. When the eggs hatch, larva move in around the rabbit's neck or under the jaw where they burrow under the skin to eat flesh and grow.

There are similar flies that get on other mammals even humans in southern countries.

We use to see them on our cattle when growing up on a farm in central Indiana.

Rabbit Bot Fly
by: Anonymous

Found one of these on our patio. Discovered a rabbit lived out there about a month ago. This fly was very slow moving, and about 1 inch long. Thanks for your information!

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Black and Grey Bug w Two Large Black Dots (Eyed elater or Eyed click beetle)

by Ruth Hand
(Emmetsburg, IA, USA)

Nebraska Bug During Haying Season

Nebraska Bug During Haying Season

This insect had six legs and was long and narrow, at least 1 1/4" from head to tail. The shell was divided into two sections. The longer rear section was mostly black dotted with gray; it narrowed and rounded at the tail end. The shorter front section was grey with a black stripe down the center and more rectangular. One large black dot was located on each side of the black stripe; these appeared to be eyes at first glance. The head had two antenna and a probiscus of some kind kind extending from the mouth.

This bug was found on our Nebraska family farm in early July on a warm sunny day by my brother while he was hauling large round bales out of his alfalfa field. It was clinging to his pant leg when he first saw it. He had never seen one like it in his 63 years of farming so he stopped by the house to show me. I had never seen one either, but luckily, I had my camera along and snapped a quick closeup. He then took it to the side of the yard near the road ditch and let it go. A few days later, I returned to my home in NW Iowa, determined to find out what type of insect it was.

Thank you in advance for any time and help you can give me in identifying this bug. I am most grateful that there are people like you who offer such a great service.

Sincerely,

Ruth Hand

Comments for Black and Grey Bug w Two Large Black Dots (Eyed elater or Eyed click beetle)

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Eyed elater or Eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Ruth
Dear fellow Iowan, that is a large click beetle called the Eyed Elater or Eyed Click beetle. The large eye like spots make it very easy to identify. The adults may come to lights, esp in the spring and early summer. This one was probably looking for some nectar and happened to get to the pant leg during the activity of the haying process.
The click beetle family are known for playing dead. Once they are playing dead you can place them on their backs and they will "click" themselves over...reason for the name click beetle.
These are found in woodlands. The adults may feed on some nectar. The larvae are predatory in decaying wood, eating grubs of wood-boring beetles like (Cerambycidae or longhorn beetles).
So glad he let it go...they are beneficial in controlling those wood boring grubs.
Neat large beetles to find! Nice photo.


Southern Ontario too
by: Sue

Saw your question Ruth after observing a similar bug yesterday on our deck. Thanks for the photo, I was too slow to get the camera there in time. Nice to see the reply and know the name to the mystery beetle.

Thanks!
by: Ruth

Thanks, Moni, for your quick reply and great detective work. I called my brother with the news, and he was really glad he had let the bug go. A cousin who farms south of him had found one also, but he squished the poor thing. We'll have to tell him the truth and hope he will honor these beetles in the future for the valuable service they provide.

Click Beetle at Houston
by: Luis

I found one of these at Houston downtown last week.
I also had my camera handy so i took a pic, curious about it , kinda scary due size and loud click when "feel in danger", also it jumps 15 inch height when clicking.
thanks for your feed back.

2 spotted bug
by: Anonymous

Found one of these in Monticello, Indiana. This one was a little lighter in color.

Elmore City Oklahoma
by: Clayton Russell

hey I found one too I live in Elmore City oklahoma I found him in the road, at first I thought it was a fishing lure that had the hooks broke off. I reached down to pick it up and as soon as I touched him he jumped, ha ha It scared me, so I hurried up and ran inside to get a jar, I captured him and took him in to show my father. He has never seen a bug of this type, so I went to the computer and started searching. Well I found him on this web site. My name is Clayton Russell and im 18 years old... I learned something new.

I found one too!
by: Anonymous

Hi, My name is Mandy- from upstate NY-Castleton/Schodack area- I found one of these click beetles in the back yard after a HUGE tree was cut down-scared the crud out of me...

double black eyes
by: Patchogue, NY

I just found one today. I thought it was one of my fathers fishing lures because all of the arms and legs were underneath. I could not believe it was real until it started moving.

I found one in MIdland Michigan
by: Tasha Eichenhofer

We were in my neighbors back yards and the wind blew a leaf that was on the ground over and there it was just sitting on a stick we carried it on the stick for awhile and let him go. He was awesome looking.

click bettle
by: Ashley

Hi! im so glad we found this photo because we have one too here in Sicklerville, NJ. Sounds like they are native to the mid west areas. Im excited to see one they look amazing, although freaked me out because of the size. we werent sure if it was a breed of cockroach, so i researched it and found this photo. Next time we see one i hope its more of a friendly greeting.

Eyed elater click beetle
by: Moni

Ashley
This click beetle is found all over eastern North America...east of the Rockies so they should be just as common in NJ as the Midwest.

NICE PHOTO
by: Venus

I just found one today. I live in Winter Park, FL. It was outside my house on an area where there was some wood. I wonder what it was doing there?

Two of them making babies?
by: Marybeth

I went out today and found two joined together on mypicnic table. I have neaver seen these before. We live in Gainesville, Florida. I just had to take a picture.

EYED CLICK BEETLE
by: Moni

Marybeth
Sounds like you caught them in the act! Great, then we know there will be more of these beetles around.
Thanks for sharing....hope you got a great pic!

Click Beetle
by: Regina

So glad I found out what that was. I live here in NC and found a dead one at the bottom of my recycle bin. I took pics of it so I could try to identify it later. Going to save this site to my favorites. My son and I keep finding strange bugs sometimes. Woud love to find out what they are.

EYED CLICK BEETLE
by: Moni

Regina
Keep taking the photos and when you can't find it on the site, send it in with info so we can help encourage your son to enjoy these neat critters!
Thanks for your encouragement to show him all nature has to offer!!

bug
by: finder

me and my friend found this bug while playing in the sprinkler. i wasn't htere when he found it but we have it in a jar. does anyone know what it eats?

EYED CLICK BEETLE
by: Moni

Finder
The adults may feed on some nectar. The larvae are predatory in decaying wood, eating grubs of wood-boring beetles like (Cerambycidae or longhorn beetles).
It is best to let it go...they are beneficial in controlling wood boring grubs.
Please read the first comment at the bottom of this comment page to learn more.


Eyed Click Beetle
by: Kathy in coastal NC

Earlier this week I was spray painting a porch swing on my back deck. The beetle wouldn't leave me alone! He'd land on the rail and then click over playing dead. He did this repeatedly until he clicked right into my jar. I didn't recognize him, so I caught him in a clear plastic jar. The next day, I was painting another swing and guess who started flying around? His friend, of course! The paint fumes must have been very attrative for them. I was saving the one in the jar so I could identify him for my granddaughter. Now that I know what he is, I can let him go. I did keep a few drops of water and a large leaf as well as a dead bug in the jar with the Eyed click beetle. I wanted him to have a little bit of variety in his diet... so long as I wasn't part of it!

Eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Kathy
I will have to try spray painting to see if I can attract one at my place:-). Can't imagine spray paint having the right chemicals to attract the beetle, but you are lucky to see such a neat beetle!
Perhaps one was male and the other female, which might explain why 2 would be so close by.
Thanks for sharing your great story!

Just seen one in Walterboro, SC
by: Margaret

We where walking the dogs and there was one in the middle of the road. I got 3 good pictures of it with my phone if anyone wants to see them.

Neat!
by: UCMI

We just found one outside our house, and weren't sure what it was, so we Googled it... so glad to know it won't eat us during the night, because we saved it in my son's bug hut so he could see it in the morning! We'll definitely let it go then, though!

my brother freaked out
by: Anonymous

we are living in pennsyvania me and my brother were playing in our back yard when he saw this bug and freaked out. he ran inside and got a shovel he came back out and almost got it but then my mom stoped him and brought him inside and looked it up on the web. even after we found out it was good he was still scared.

Pretty
by: Carol

I found one here in Georgetown Texas! Wasn't sure if those were black eyes or not. Sounds like they aren't. I am guessing by the comments it won't hurt me or my dogs but it was friendly and stayed on the deck just watching us take pictures of it for a long time. Hour later it was gone....what is the actual name and if is harmful let me know:

EYED ELATER OR EYED CLICK BEETLE
by: Moni

Carol
EYED ELATER OR EYED CLICK BEETLE either one is the common name used for this beetle, depending on where you are from. It will not hurt you at all.
Neat looking beetle!

Jumped off my horse
by: Chase

June 12 in Northern Alabama, while crossing a log in what should be swamp, but dry because of this unseasonably hot weather, I saw this weird little critter and had to get down off my horse to get a better look. It clicked and acted dead allowing me to scoop it up in my hat. Thanks to all of you Inquisitive folks for the identification. I am turning it out in a big oak bottom that does not flood and hopefully it will be able to carry on...
Life is Good.

FREAKY THING IN MY BACKYARD in P.A.
by: Georgia and Lakaya

we were just walking into my backyard about to go in my pool when we saw this weird looking bug (EYED ELATER OR EYED CLICK BEETLE) on my suntan chair. we squirted it with water and it moved a lot . but then it played dead. we totally FREAKED OUTT!!! it open to what it seemed to be its mouth and just closed it. we wonder what its purpose is and where its from. it is still living back there at this moment.

EYED CLICK BEETLE
by: Moni

Georgia and Lakaya
If you read the bottom most comment in this comment section you will see the life cycle of this insect (which should answer your questions) as copied here..."The adults may come to lights, esp in the spring and early summer. This one was probably looking for some nectar and happened...(to get on your sun chair)...
The click beetle family are known for playing dead. Once they are playing dead you can place them on their backs and they will "click" themselves over...reason for the name click beetle.
These are found in woodlands. The adults may feed on some nectar. The larvae are predatory in decaying wood, eating grubs of wood-boring beetles like (Cerambycidae or longhorn beetles). "

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/black-and-grey-bug-w-two-large-black-dots-eyed-elater-or-eyed-click-beetle-comments.html#ixzz1Ps0eKoiR

2 inch black beetle with eyes on its back
by: Anonymous

This insect fell out of tree as I was sitting on a bench in my woodland garden in South Carolina. This black hard shelled beetle had a fast walk. Thought perhaps the birds would eat him, but he blends in with brown mulch. Glad to know what he is.

strange.scary black/white bug.
by: Ed

This rascal scared the daylights out of my wife (she called for her hero)...this bug/beetle also scared me. I took my sandal and he/she was hard to kill on the carpet. After 4 or 5 smacks, I took a wag with alcohol and made sure it was dead and sucked it in the vacuum cleaner. My wife said, "will he come back to life?" I surely would hate to wake up and have that rascal on me in the bed. Ed from Kings Mtn., NC

School Teacher
by: Anonymous

We see them often at our school. We always get new wood chips for the playground. So every year the children come up with, " What is that?" Now I can say, "Its a Click Beetle" Thank you

Lets talk strange looking in NJ
by: Valerie

We saw something on the edge of the birdbath. When I saw it I ran for my camera. I posted it on facebook to see if anyone knew what this bug was. I have been on the Internet for more then an hour and found this site. I think this ugly fellow arrived in the neighbors mulch. Stopped by for a drink from the birdbath. I also read they bite and will not let go easily. I have yet to find out what they eat and if they are destructive. Funny story. I typed in large eyed gray bug. The internet showed me a photo of little monster muppet. I wish the bug was that cute..

Eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Valerie
Assume that the beetle you found is the eyed click beetle. There are no records of this beetle biting...so not sure where you got such wrong info.
You said you had not found out what they eat and if they were destructive...if you scroll down a few comments below where you left a comment you will read this info which should answer your questions...it is not destructive but a cool insect!..."The adults may feed on some nectar. The larvae are predatory in decaying wood, eating grubs of wood-boring beetles like (Cerambycidae or longhorn beetles). "

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/black-and-grey-bug-w-two-large-black-dots-eyed-elater-or-eyed-click-beetle-comments.html#ixzz1Re2FGGd5

Found one in Georgia!
by: D.Thomas

My cat killed one that looked jjust like this. IN Northeastern Georgia. I remember those huge fake eyes in front , that white dots , on black and all those wings.

GIant Click Beetle
by: Carolyn

I also found one on the side of my porch where the bouganvilea and sunflowers are, in Robertsdale, Ala,a I thought it was actually two insects of the same species in their little love clinch but it turned out to be this elater click beetle with the two eyes on it. I went inside to try to find it on the internet, but when I came back outside it was gone. Glad to know it is not harmful but beneficial.

found one in south-west indiana, bit me.
by: Anonymous

I had never seen one in my 50+ years. it snaps it's head down with a click to jump. Picked it up, wife took a pic of top and bottom.
Then it bit me, made me say "OUCH" so I squished it. No doubt there are others around, i will leave them alone now that I know what it is.

Click Beetle
by: Prevo's & Sloan's

Found this click beetle today in Olney, Illinois! We were playing outside on a beautiful sunny day and this huge flying insect came by, so I grabbed the flyswatter thinking I had to kill it because it looked like a gigantic wasp! I couldn't kill it with the flyswatter because the shell is hard, so we brought it inside in a jar and it started clicking. It's a very interesting insect that all the kids loved to look at!

heres a question...New york state
by: chelsie

my aunt had a beetle similar to this with a rounded head land on her shoulder could it be the same bug?
its coloring/size is the same.

Eyed elater click beetle
by: Moni

chelsie
Yes, these click beetles do occur in NY as well as over most of North America east of the Rockies. They are such neat beetles! Glad you and your aunt got to see it!

Black and Grey Bug wTwo Large Black Dots
by: KJM

I came across this bug for the first time on my deck. We live in coastal Georgian Bay in Ontario Canada. So glad to have found out what the name of this bug was. Will be on the look out from now on!

Saw my first in NC today
by: Judy

This is such an interesting beetle and tough as nails. I heard it flying into the side of my son's pickup truck several times before looking to see what it was. I thought it was a cicada at first. So glad I found this site and learned it was a beneficial. What does it eat? How do I encourage more of them?
Judy
Salisbury, NC
35 miles NE of Charlotte
Central Piedmont

Eyed elater or Eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Judy
Welcome!
Once you find the photo of the insect you are trying to Identify on this site, if you click on the comment section and scroll down( usually near the bottom of the comments) to the section written by me (Moni) I usually have where the insect is found and what it eats. So as you find more interesting insects, you can look at the Insect ID site and ck out the comments on the critters you find. :-)

The eyed click beetle adults may feed on some nectar. The larvae are predatory in decaying wood, eating grubs of wood-boring beetles like (Cerambycidae or longhorn beetles).

Off To School
by: Ann

I live in NC and my son and I found one yesterday. The beetle was inside a damp, moss covered railroad cross-tie that was in the woods near our house.
After reading what you (Moni) said- "larvae are predatory in decaying wood" I'm now wondering if we interrupted a mom laying eggs. She (I assume "she") was collected and added to my son's school project based on the temperate deciduous forest. Now that I see nectar is a chosen food source I'll add a little sugar water to her container and hope it is a good enough substitute. We will release her back into the cross-tie we found her in as soon as she returns home from school. Thank you for all the info you supply!

Eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Ann
So neat that you and your son have such a neat critter for his school project! Even if the beetle was laying eggs, it is so good to know it is educating other students about its life!

Thanks for helping your son learn about insects and the interesting lives they live :-)

cool beettle
by: Lina Caswell

I am in Western New Jersey and My little three year old found this beetle yesterday. I am glad someone know what it is, because it made an interesting clicking sound! She loved the beetle!

Eyed Click beetle
by: Moni

Lina
So glad your daughter got to see this cool insect. Great time to let them know that 99% of all insects are not pests and they can be very interesting!

As mentioned earlier, if you place it on its back it will click itself over. :)

Found one
by: Poppiepink

Hi!! Found this on the screen of sliding glass door.. We live in charleston, wv.. Got a close up pic too.. Thanks for an interesting website!! Bookmark!!

Click Beetle in CT..
by: Anonymous

I also was spray painting when I found this one. Early Summer in CT. The beetle did play dead for awhile then popped its head and long legs out of its shell.,Basically transforming and then a slow start in flying away soon turned into a quick get away. Took plenty of pics as I too thought it was a cicada..

Eyed Click beetle
by: Moni

Poppiepink and Anonymous
Glad you found the site and got your insects identified.
Cool insect to photograph!

Help!
by: Anonymous

This bit my little brother, and I'm assuming it's not posionous but I just wanted to be sure, so is it poisonous?

Eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Anonymous Help!
No they are not poisonous...but are good bugs. If you do not handle them gently they can bite.

spray painting attraction
by: Naomi

I was spray painting an outdoor deck table and one flew near me. It tried to climb the metal leg. Then I saw another one near my doorway. I am glad I researched what it was before I tried to kill it. I left both of them alone.
Then I found the comments about spray painting, so I decided to add own spray painting attraction incident.

found near bird houses
by: Danny

I have lived in Norfolk, VA for over 35 yrs and this is the strangest looking Bug I have ever seen. I did not kill him/her but this one surprised me while I was spray painting the posts for the bird houses. If you hold him down and press on his back he will make a clicking noise. Thanks for helping with the ID. Wish I could add a picture.

eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Danny
So glad you got to experience the click of the click beetle. Even smaller click beetles will click :)

Also, good that you did not kill it. Only about 1% of the million insects are pests of any kind. Many are just out there as part of the ecology...a few are food for birds, frogs, toads, snakes, other insects etc, some are there to break down decaying wood, dead animals, plant matter, etc, some are just there to be pretty - like butterflies :).

There are so many cool insects...glad you got to see on of the large cool beetles! Keep looking!!

found one on porch
by: Tricia

hey, got a question tho. do they bite? found one on my porch today just sitting there. freaky. didn't know if it would sneak into house. do they bother cats? can someone please let me know. my cat got bit by something and swelled. no scratches like in a fight. don' t make sense. it was just sitting there and my cat was short distance from it. :O)

eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Tricia
No they do not bite, nor do they bite cats.

These are found in woodlands. The adults may feed on some nectar. The larvae are predatory in decaying wood, eating grubs of wood-boring beetles like (Cerambycidae or longhorn beetles).

These are just really neat beetles! So glad you got to see one...not many folks get to see them.

Found one
by: Anonymous

Traverse City, Michigan. Friday 30 May 2014.

I found one
by: vicky in new jersey

I live in south Jersey and just had one crawling on me.. needless to say I screamed. . Lol but I let it loose in the yard. ...

I found one
by: Anonymous

I was talking with my family and it just flew into my hair and I whacked it and it landed on my shirt where my friend flicked it off my shirt and it is either playing dead or is actually dead because it's not moving at all and we flipped it on it's back but there is no clicking.

Eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Whacking Anonymous

If it does not move then yes, you killed it. Sorry.
Know a large beetle like that would be scary, if it landed on someone unsuspecting.

They are a good bug so hopefully it was Ok and flew away later.

Yes, they bite!
by: Laura

These beetles 100% do bite. My 4 year old was just gently holding one when it but her finger. It left two small incision and drew a small amount of blood. Judging by Aubrey's reaction, it HURT. We're in MA and it was 100% an eastern eyed click beetle, so if there's no record of them biting, there is one now.

Eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Laura
Sorry Aubrey was bitten. This is not common.
Tho she was holding it gently, if a critter feels trapped they could bite. That is just survival for them.
Thanks for letting us know.

Click beetle
by: Merin

This week and last week my family and I have been staining our back fence when these suckers would pop out of nowhere. Never seen them in my life and neither has my mom. We had decaying wood under a shed for a while until we moved it last weekend and I'm guessing that disturbed them and now they are attracted to the fumes of the stain because of an earlier post. Great to know they aren't just a figment of our imagination! Haha. Thanks for the info! All the way from Clarksville, Tennessee.

Sunbathing at the Lakeshore
by: Anonymous

Our kids found an EYED ELATER sunning itself on the deck about 11am on the Lake Michigan Shoreline in West Olive, Michigan.
Took photos and eventually it left. If we would have known about it, we probably would have tried playing with it, getting it to click. Oh well, maybe next time.

Found one
by: Sonja

Found one on my grill cover on the deck. Learned about it on this site.... but a bit too late. (Sorry bug!) I assumed it was after my tomato or bell pepper plant. There seems to be a never ending line of critters and things eyeballing my miniature garden. I plan to eat my tomatoes. I'm not generous at all and don't share! :-)

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Black insect with red stripes ( Black and red lined blister beetle)

by Wil
(Flagstaff Arizona)

It was running in a hurry dragging what looks like a sack full of babys? What is this thing?

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Black and red lined blister beetle
by: Moni

Wil
This beetle is a Black and red lined blister beetle and the 'sack' is just part of the abdomen of this beetle. By the size of the abdomen this is a female. The males are smaller in overall size and the abdomen in not as large or swollen looking. They do not fly or run. The bright red color tells insect predators to stay away. If that does not work, should the predator get very close the blister beetle will "bleed" from its joins cantharidin, a toxic smelly substance. They are very strange looking! Gorgeous color!
There are 3 species in genus Megetra. These beetles range the southwest U.S. and Mexico, and are often found in the Chihuahuan desert.
Blister beetles produce cantharidin, a highly toxic chemical that irritates the skin (blisters form..hench the common name) and stomach of humans as well as farm animals. It could lead to death if ingested, especially in horses. Therefore it is a concern for hay producers should the beetles get caught in the hay and inadvertently eaten by livestock.
These beetles feed on various plants, but are not considered a pest, except for the blisters :-)
Interesting find!


freaky bug
by: Anonymous

I am from Louisiana and am living in El Paso Tx. and got several pics of one of these it was very aggressive and followed me until I stepped up to a place it couldn't follow... I am glad to finally have it identified. thank you

Saw one Summer 2012
by: Jim

Came upon one of these on the ground in Chino Valley, near the Peavine Trail. Very unique looking, thought is was pregnant, but apparently this is how God made them. From another post on this site, I probably encountered a female as she was rather large for a bug.

Black and red lined blister beetle
by: Moni

Jim
They are strange looking beetles...great that you got to see one!

I call the hunchback beetles
by: Anonymous

During the summer I see hundreds of these around my yard here in Chino Valley.

Red Stripe Blister Beetle
by: Pugggmama

Holy Cow! We live in Chino Valley and in the pat few weeks there have been MANY, MANY of these beetles walking all over our 2 1/2 acres. Big fat things..must be all females? YUCK

Black and red lined blister beetle
by: Moni

Pugggmama
That would be very interesting to see! They only live in your area of North America so enjoy!

The largest are females, but many you see could also be males.

Paulden Arizona
by: Tiffany

i am from Indiana and just moved here and tonight i was out side and found one of these creepy bugs and smashed it! screw that! u guys havd creepy bugs here in Arizona!!!

black and red lined blister beetle
by: Moni

Tiffany
Sorry you got in such a hurry to kill it. Please get to know the critters in Arizona before you start smashing them :)

You will find many different insects in AZ than were in IN!!...enjoy learning about them. You might look up any biting or stinging pests of AZ, so you know them and that way you will not be killing the good ones :)).

Chino Beetle
by: Trish

These must be prevalent in Chino. I was outside and counted at least a dozen in just a few minutes. My neighbors are from back East and their dog is not Arizona savvy. I'd better go let them know.

Papaw called them Frost bugs.
by: Anonymous

My papaw used to call these Frost bugs. He said that the old timers used them to help predict the first frost. He always said that when you start seeing them, that the first frost is about six weeks away. I've only tested that time line once and it was only a few days off. I'm checking this year again. I first started seeing them on July 15th this year so that would put our first frost around labor day. I'll keep you posted.

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Black winged bug with reversed scorpion tail (Pelecinid wasp female)

by Sheldon
(Mankato, MN)

Ok, so we found this bug on our wood deck today (Sept 6th). We have never seen it before and were researching and didn't find anything either. We live in Minnesota and were wondering what it is...

Thank you for your time with this and can't wait to find out the answer.

Sheldon and Meredith

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Pelecinid wasp female
by: Moni

Sheldon and Meredith
You were very fortunate to see a female Pelecinid wasp. The long "scorpion" like tail is the ovipositor. The ovipositor in female insects is used to lay eggs. In this case the female uses the length of its ovipositor to reach into rotting wood to larva of scarab beetle grubs, where it then lays an egg. The wasp larva feed inside the grubs. Gross but interesting!
The male wasps do not have the long "tail" and are rarely noticed.

WOW - nice tail
by: Shadymutton

We also found one of these ladies on our deck rail this summer - the dog ran up and scared it off just as I was trying to get a picture of it. Thanks for filling in the blanks about what that was - I was clueless.

Thanks for the answer
by: Meredith

I am the original poster of this, and my son is doing another bug project for school. How crazy was it to find this on-line with the answer of what it was. I have not seen it since, and I have not bookmarked this website to keep it for reference.

Thank you.

Meredith

Pelecinid wasp
by: Moni

Meredith
So glad you submitted the original photo! It was a cool insect to see.
Good to hear Sheldon is doing insect projects at school! Let us know if you need help with the insect project.

thank you
by: Thais

Thanks for posting and thanks for answering. Just this last week I found one climbing on our porch railing on Monhegan Island, Maine. I offered my hand and she climbed on (I seem to remember previous encounters with others) and was fortunate that my husband was close to take a picture or two. So now I know! The word "scorpion" is key to googling for an ID, I've found.

Pelecinid wasp female
by: Moni

Thais
Interesting that "scorpion" was the key word you needed to find the ID. Glad it worked!
Such a neat looking wasp! And not one you see every day!!
Neat that you got to see and hold one :-)

was shocked
by: renee'

I live in Ohio and I've never encountered an insect like this. I was setting the dinner table and my youngest child yelled mom there's a huge bug on our celling...so I got a plastic container and captured it and my oldest child took it in to her science teacher. He had no clue to what this insect was...so thank you for shinning light to this insect..

Pelecinid wasp (female)
by: Anonymous

I saw one of these in Ontario today, just off Georgian Bay. I took a picture but don't know how to share it!

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blackish small beetle with spots (Sap or Picnic beetle)

by James Anez
(LaPorte,In.United states)

small black beetle like with beige spots on back.

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Sap or Picnic beetle
by: Moni

James
You have a sap beetle that is also called a picnic beetle since they show up at picnics to taste the fruits and sweet things that are available!
Sap beetles(family Nitidulidae) are commonly found in berries and other decaying fruit in the gardens in the fall.
These beetles overwinter as adults in protected places in debris or compost type piles. In spring, picnic beetle adults come out of hibernation and lay eggs in April and continues in May and June. Larvae develop in rotten food materials that are in contact with the soil. Full-grown larvae leave their food when mature and change to the pupa stage. Adults then emerge in June and July. There is usually only one generation per year.
Best control is to keep food materials away from the house and cover food at picnics!

blackish small beetle with spots
by: Anonymous

This seems to be the beetle I am finding in my house in South Dakota. They are not in my food..but sort of wander on the counter once in awhile and I found 3 dead ones up high in cupboards that are hardly ever used. Any one have any other input on them? They move rather slowly and don't appear to be too interested in anything.I do have a deck where I feed the birds and perhaps they like the seed out there and wander in but I would think I would find them somewhere other than the kitchen if that were the case.J

Beetle
by: Moni

South Dakota
Send a photo of your beetle!

You probably do not have the picnic beetle...it is probably a dermestid beetle...like the larder beetle if it is not on fruit. But you need to send a photo if you want more info on the insect you have questions about so we can identify it properly. :-)

Eating my harvest
by: Anonymous

Green Bay, Wisconsin
These guys are eating my tomatoes. I've lost half a dozen green tomatoes already. They seem to eat into them and then eat just the meat of the tomato. All that is left is the shell of the skin. I could use some suggestions on how to stop/get rid of them.

sap beetle
by: Moni

Green Bay
These beetles only feed where there is an existing bad spot in the tomatoes...they do not make the damage. They just take advantage of it.
If you are bringing in tomatoes, make sure they do not have bad spots, or clean out the bad spots and use the fruit right away.

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Black and Red Beetle (Milkweed Bug)

by GardenJoy
(Kingston,Ontario)

This little beetle doesn't seem to be interested in anything other than my butterfly weed .. doesn't seem to do any damage .. can anyone tell me what it is or what it does ?
Looks similar to the one Doug has in the upper right hand corner of this page.
Thanks !
Joy

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Milkweed Bug
by: Donalda

Joy, your insect is a milkweed bug.It appears from your picture that the plant you call butterfly weed is a milkweed. Milkweed bugs have few predators because of itheir bad taste. This bug feeds on the seeds and you will see them around as soon as the milkweed pods dry and pop open .

Bug
by: Anonymous

That is a Box Elder Bug...My mulch pile got infested with them last year when I pliled it up next to my silver maple in the back. They don't hurt anything, but can multiply quickly and will do anything to come into your house in the winter...

Small milkweed bug
by: Moni

Boxelder bugs and small milkweed bugs do look a lot a like. However, Joy, you do have the small milkweed bug like Donalda suggested. The small milkweed bug has more red markings and if you could see the rear wing area clearer, you would see there are only 4 or 5 veins, while the boxelder bug has many veins on the rear wing. The website that Donalda gave also has a photo of boxelder bug to help compare the two.
As Donalda noted, the small milkweed bug feeds on seeds of milkweeds. The boxelder bug feeds on box elder trees and come into houses in the fall...a real nuisance to those of us in the midwest US.

Thanks !
by: GardenJoy

I don't know how to thank people for their information without "ranking" my own photo ? haha .. thanks in any case for posting the information .. I hadn't seen these little guys before .. was curious !
Joy : )

black and red bug
by: Anonymous

That't a milkweed bug and it's eating the seeds. I can't find anything really negative about them as they're seen as beneficial to help control the milkweed plant.

Small Milkweed Bug Lygaeus kalmii

interesting
by: bryan

hi, this beetle is normally found on rotting logs, called payneintheneck as when you have wood in the cave ( cellar ) they tend to fly everywhere when they mate!!!!!! ha ha but all said and done I would prefer a close up of the other insect!! good photo.

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small black bug (Broad-nosed weevil)

by Melissa
(Toledo OH)

small black bug

small black bug

The bug is black - 6 legs - 2 antennas - large body - medium shoulder area- small head

Saw in kitchen first and now seeing them in bathrooms and dinning room

What is it and how do i get rid of it?

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Little Black Bugs
by: Anonymous

We have had the same bug show up in our kitchen, an on the floor in the kitchen/dining room area. Do not know what they are, except they are crunchy. We did notice that where we previously put down/sprayed Taro Ant Spray to keep sweet ants out of the house, the little black bugs are laying dead in that area. We assume they are coming in through the patio door and the taro ant spray works so that's what we are doing right now. Hopefully they will go away with fall/winter. We are in Green Bay WI

We have them too!
by: Rachelle

We have the same small black bugs in our house. We live in Green Bay, WI as well. We cannot spray Taro because we have indoor cats and it is poison to them. Any other suggestions as to how to get rid of them? My husband is killing them in droves!

small black bug
by: Anonymous

I live in green bay, wi
and i started seeing the same black bugs also
but i do not know anything about them
but i will try taro ant spray.. ty

Broad-nosed weevil
by: Moni

Melissa and others
The photo is of one of the broad-nosed weevils, it is not clear enough or closeup enough to tell which one. Some species of weevils may migrate into homes in the summer and fall.
There are several weevils that can come into homes either attracted to lights or because of the plantings nearby, or looking for a hibernation spot(like the Asian lady beetles). It could be the Asiatic oak weevil, black vine weevil, strawberry root weevil or imported longhorned weevil.

For control it is best to caulk cracks and snug-fitting doors and windows tp prevent weevils from entering homes. Weevils, especially the strawberry root weevil, are strongly attracted to water and can be trapped in shallow pans of water placed around building foundations. Physical removal is best with a vacuum sweeper. Chemical control usually is not necessary.
These are not household pests just a nuisance.

lots of these in NJ
by: Anonymous

I live in New Jersey and have these in my bathroom and kitchen. I keep flushing them away only to have more appear. They seem to love the shower area and around the bathroom vanity and kitchen counter near the sink. They seem to appear out of nowhere. How do I get rid of these? my cats don't seem to want to play with them and I don't want to spray pesticides in the house due to my cats.

Little Black Bugs
by: Dan

I see these occasionally where I live in SLC UT. I notice everyone talking about killing them but no one seems to consider the obvious alternative to just let them be. I mean, take it out of your house when it is in your face, but these little bugs are 100% harmless. I even think their weird little face is kinda cute. No need to spray poison in your house to kill them for sure!!! I mean if they were poisonous themselves I would understand taking a chance, but you are more likely to end up harming yourself if you spray, and all to eliminate a completely harmless and pretty unobtrusive little insect. Just my opinion of course. :)

little black bug
by: Anna

I live in Norfolk, Va. and I have them as well, they seem to be near the window and like to hide under a throw rug. I have no idea how to get rid of them right now I just flush them, they are a nuisance and seem to multiply.

Broad Nosed Weevil
by: Anonymous

Im in Hampton, Va and I can not seem to rid of these things. AAAHHH. It seems like the more i put outside ten times that many come back.

My Crazy Story about these Black Bugs
by: Anonymous

First of all I'm sorry if my English is not that good :( I live in Grand Rapids, MI & I started seeing them about 20 to 30 a day!! I was squeezing them between a napkin and they made a crunchy noise :/ After a week, I start feeling bad to kill that many of them. So I started to keep them in a empty MacDonald coffee cup with some holes in it and the crack in the middle for the air but they couldn't get out. I was counting them and when they were around 400 (I know!!) I went outside and far away from my house in the woods, I released them. The last 3-4 weeks I caught more than 1,200 of them!!! I was just wondering if they are harmless or not and I'm happy to read here that they are NOT :) They mostly walk on the ceiling! I give them some lettuce and water to survive until I release them. I know you are all thinking that I'm crazy but I just couldn't hear their poor bodies to crack :( I have two cats and I think drawing lines with the chuck around the windows would be a good idea. I hope it works ...

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huge black earwig (Giant Stoneflies)

by Chris
(Minneapolis, MN)

It was 3 inches long it has 6 legs and its body looks like it is segmented. And it looks like it has feelers. I was near the Mississpi River in Minnesota and walking along the rocks above my head.

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Giant Stoneflies
by: Moni

Chris
Your photo is of a giant stonefly nymph.
These nymphs feed on plant material and algae. The adults do not feed, but can be attracted to lights at night.
Weeks before they hatch, stone fly nymphs will start to migrate to the banks of the river where they live. So that is why it was on a rock above your head.
These larva are favorite food of trout as well as other fish and some birds. They are a good indicator the stream/river is clean as they need plenty of oxygen to breathe.
Neat find!

Giant stonefly
by: Moni

Anonymous
The family of giant stoneflies are often called salmonflies - that is a common name, which can cause confusion, depending on where you live different species have different common names. That is why it is important to use scientific names, however, I do not always list the scientific name since it is not commonly used. The genus Pteronarcys is for the group of Giant Stoneflies. Giant stonefly is the accepted common name as all insects in the Order Plecoptera are known by entomologists as stoneflies. As I noted originally, stoneflies are an important food of trout and other fish. This does include salmon (hence the common name) and are a favorite bait of anglers. If you Google the name giant stonefly, you will only get info on the genus Pteronarcys.
(Note - I write the word stonefly using one word not two. If you separate the fly from the word then an entomologist knows it is a true fly in the Order Diptera - two wings only. When attached to the first word like stonefly, dragonfly, dobsonfly, or scorpionfly, we know it is in a different order and has 4 wings.)

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black beetle with yellow striations and red blotches (Sharpshooter leafhopper)

by Arnold
(San Diego, CA)

black, red and yellow beetle on staghorn

black, red and yellow beetle on staghorn

black beetle with yellow striations and red blotches, about 3/4 inch long. Found on a platycerium (staghorn fern). It did not seem to eat the fern or cause any damage. San Diego, California.

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Spittlebug or Froghopper
by: Moni

Arnold
That is a great photo. Can not see the detail of the tibiae for better ID. I believe it is a spittlebug of some kind but not sure which. The spittlebug family is Cercopidae and are sometimes called froghoppers.
Spittlebugs feed on plant sap. The nymphs when hatched begin to feed and surround themselves with residue from there droppings that is the froth or spit-like looking substance (hence the name spittlebug) This spit protects them until they are adults. The nymphs sometimes move from their froth to that of others.

Sharpshooter leafhopper
by: Moni

Arnold
After doing some further research, this is probably a leafhopper, Family Cicadellidae. More specifically it is one of the sharpshooters. It is probably a Glassy-winged sharpshooter, but some of the photo is not clear enough and would need other angles to be sure.

This leafhopper is found in eastern US and is especially found in the southern tier of states.

They feed on at least 73 species of herbaceous plants and have been found on sunflowers, hollyhock, okra, lambsquarters, cotton, corn,oak, ash, crapemyrtle, peaches, apricots, orange, magnolia as well as carrot wood.

They have piercing sucking mouthparts to suck the juices out of plant tissue. It has been known to transmit some diseases in southern California.

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small black beetles ant like (Broad-nosed weevils)

by JIM STOETZEL
(ATHABASCA, Alberta Canada)

They seem to like popcorm hehe

They seem to like popcorm hehe

we find these mostly on ceilings and at different houses we live in. Most of the time we spot them on the ceiling or heading there, only on the main floor of the hose and sometimes in the bathtub

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Broad-nosed weevils
by: Moni

Jim
These beetles are Broad-nosed weevils. There are several weevils in this subfamily. Some are called black vine weevils(too large for yours) or strawberry root weevil (probably your weevil) or lilac root weevil to name a few. Not sure which you have, I would need a much closer view of a couple of angles and perhaps even the specimen to really Id properly.
As the names suggest these feed outdoors, and have just found their way inside. After developing into adults, some weevils are known to come into buildings. It appears they do this to seek shelter from unfavorable weather conditions, especially when it is hot and dry. These weevils enter buildings by crawling through cracks or openings around foundations, doors, and windows. They do not harm people or pets, or damage anything, or infest food products. They are just a temporary nuisance.

Here is what Univ of MN suggests for control:
CONTROL
Exclusion is an important step in reducing the number of nuisance weevils that enter homes. Caulk cracks and ensure snug-fitting screens and doors to reduce the number of weevils that may enter a building. Weevils, especially strawberry root weevils, are attracted to moisture and can be trapped in shallow pans of water placed around foundations or walls of the house. Although these pans captures some weevils, they probably do not capture enough to significantly reduce the number of weevils that enter homes.

Chemical control outside is usually not necessary. In instances of high numbers of weevils, home dwellers can attempt to prevent these insects from entering by applying an insecticide, such as chlorpyrifos or diazinon, around the home's foundation. However, the insecticides available to the public often are not very effective against weevils.

When weevils are found indoors, physically remove the insects with a vacuum or broom and dust pan. Insecticides are not effective or necessary. Remember that these weevils are harmless and temporary and will go away on their own. Their numbers can vary from year to year; because weevils are abundant one year does not mean that they will be a problem again the following year.

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black and red insect (Boxelder bug nymph)

by mark
(York, PA)

Black & Red insect

Black & Red insect

black and red massing on Hosta leaves and in mulch, by the millions

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Boxelder bug nymph
by: Moni

This is the young or nymph of the boxelder bug. You must have a boxelder tree nearby?? They feed on boxelder leaves, seeds and stems, but usually do not cause any major damage.
They do not eat hostas.
See note on Boxelder bug.

found in a lot of dead grass
by: nicole

Found in dead grass by the millions I. Maine never see nothing like it the young ones are small and red and as they get bigger the black wing like things appear on the sides and from that point they get bigger and bigger . Are these in any way poisonous? How do u keep them away?? Spider like movements and creepy insect to say the least they are nest get and spreading out the further away they ate from the nest the bigger they seem to be ...

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Large Black Bug (Whipscorpion)

by Rhiannon
(Wickenburg, AZ)

large black bug with brown legs and very long feelers on either side of the body. flat bodied. crawls sideways and very fast.

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Whipscorpion
by: Moni

Rhiannon
Your photo is of a whipscorpion. Unlike scorpions, the tail cannot sting, but is used as a sensory organ.
These arachnids are carnivorous, nocturnal hunters feeding mostly on insects and millipedes, but sometimes on worms and slugs. They are beneficial because they eat roaches and crickets. They love dark damp places.

Whipscorpion
by: Den

Well I just found this in my kitchen,I live Trinidad, I never saw a spider like dat b4 so i bug sprayed it 2 death. If I knew it eats roaches, etc I would not have killed it but it just looked so mean and dangerous....

whipscorpion
by: Moni

Den
Glad you now know it is a "good bug" and not to be so quick to kill something just because it happens to show up in your house.

Sometimes the big looking critters are our best friends for getting rid of pests :)

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Small, black-gray beetle-like triceratops (Meadow Spittle bug)

by Sandy
(Eastern Ontario)

Solitary, but on quite a number of my hostas. I am wondering recently whether some of the hosta leaf damage is caused by other insects like this, not only the slugs. I thought I should start with a positive ID first. Thank you so much for your time!

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Meadow Spittle bug
by: Moni

Sandy
Your photos are of a spittle bug. The young are usually found in a mound of what looks like spit. Once they are grown then they don't need the spit for protection and are out hopping about. They do feed on plants with sucking mouthparts. So, they are probably not the cause of damage on hosta.
Large numbers of nymphs can cause stress to a plant and stunt of growth. Adults do not cause economic damage.

Thanks!
by: Sandy

Moni,
Thank you, once again, for identifying this insect! I appreciate your assurance that it does not chew holes in the hosta leaves.

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small black beetle (Southern Green stink bug)

by cathy swan
(palo alto, ca)

what is this?

what is this?

small black beetle with green spots. Looks like a lady bug only wrong color. In the picture the spots look white. There are about 20+ on one plant. I am not sure the picture got uploaded

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Southern Green stink bug
by: Moni

Cathy
Your photo is of nymphs (young) of the southern green stink bug. The nymphs of this true bug go thru quite a few colorful changes before becoming a solid green adult bug.
This group of stink bugs feed on plants of all kinds. They are considered a pest of tomatoes, beans, berries, peas and others in the garden and in the ag fields on soybeans and cotton to name a few.

The mouth parts are piercing/sucking so if they pierce a spot on fruit early in it's development it can deform the fruit to be unmarketable. Piercing new shoots deform them also.

Organic control consists of keeping the area free of weeds, esp noted in one UCDavis study mallow, mustards, thistles. and mullein. They suggest a trap crop of alyssum will attract the bugs then you can collect or spray the bugs there to prevent them from getting on the garden. Also, you can spray with insecticidal soap. You might check the label of Spinosad to see if it is labeled in Calif for stink bug control. It is a bacteria that affects some insects.

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black with yellow stripes waspish (Red-Headed Ash Borer beetl)

by Dennis Gann
(Hamilton Alabama USA)

1 inch long, black in color, 4 yellow strips that go complete around lower body, 2 feelers, no visible pinchers, possble extremly short stinger/comes to a point at back, visible wing/seperated rear upper body. Possible bitting insect as children in home have started to show red bumps/started at tiem of bug find. Started shwoing up as climate in area warmed up/non visible during winter months.

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insect ID
by: Anonymous

Try UC Davis, CA. They have an excellent Integrated Pest Management program.information. www.ipm.ucdavis.edu


wood boring beetle
by: Anonymous

I suspect it is a wood boring beetle, by any chance do you burn wood?? I have seen these near my wood piles outside if I am not mistaken.

Vespid wasp
by: Moni

Dennis
Though your photo is not clear at all, your description was very helpful. I would guess this is a wasp in the family Vespidae. It is probably a southern yellowjacket wasp, but again without a clearer photo it is impossible to ID for sure.
If this is a Vespid wasp, then it does not bite, but can sting. If it is in the house, it has come in by accident...it does not want to be there any more than you want it there!! :-)
You may have a nest in a hole in the soffit of your house around the roof area, with a hole that leads indoors. These wasps make a paper nest. If there is a nest in the soffit or attic, the warm weather will make them active and come in.
Carefully collect them...you can use a vacuum sweeper or put a glass over the insect, then slide a paper between the surface and the glass to trap them in the glass. Then you either smash them or let them outside.
It would be good to see if you can find out where they are coming from for repair before it happens again.
Tell the children not to pick them up.

Red-Headed Ash Borer beetle
by: Moni

Dennis
As I reviewed your photo again I have changed my mind and this critter is the red-headed ash borer. It is a beetle so still would not bite or sting the children. The photo was blurry, but the borer is a much better fit than the wasp.
It is the larva that do the boring into the trees.
The red-headed ash borer attack stressed and dying trees not healthy trees. Trees fed on by this borer include many hardwood trees, but the favorite hosts are ash, oak, hickory, persimmon and hackberry.
The adults can emerge from firewood stored in the home, so perhaps that is where yours came from. Red-headed ash borer adults are seen as a nuisance as they do not feed on wood in the home.
Sorry for the earlier diagnosis and confusion...again a clearer photo would help.

Ash Borer
by: Mike C

I brought a new supply of firewood into the house about two weeks ago and I have recently killed about 6 of these. They apparently have come out as the wood warmed up. I have a mixture of ash, elm, hackberry, and locust.

Red Headed Boarer
by: Anonymous

I believe it's a red headed borer. I just caught one today because it was climbing on my back while i was playing the game. it has noticeable pincher therefore i believe it could bite. I have it in a bottle, but uhh. Creepy

They Bite
by: Anonymous

I was drawing at the zoo and I feel two little stinging spots on my hand suddenly. When I looked, it was a red headed ash borer. Stung a little for a few min and went away. But now a week later they are itching like a mosquito bite and swelling up. Gonna put some caladryl on it.

in my bathroom
by: Anonymous

i just found one of these in my bathroom it was in my tub i killed it but I'm worried that there is going to be more should i spray insect spray like in my bathroom or should i just leave it i opened the tap so water would go through the drain so if there are anymore they wouldn't come up hopefully

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Fuzzy Black Fly with White Wing Tips (Bee Fly)

by Marjorie Madison
(Montrose, MO)

Can you tell me what kind of fly this is? I found it on the side of our garage while we were painting it. It is fuzzy and black with white wing tips. I'd really appreciate the help!

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Bee fly
by: Moni

Marjorie
Tho the photo is a little dark, I believe this fly is in the bee fly family and is probably in the genus Hemipenthes. They are fairly commonly seen and photographed as there coloration is distinct.
Bee Flies generally have hairy bodies and patterned wings. They tend to hover/fly like bees and many have long beaks seen feeding on nectar at flowers.

Bug
by: Anonymous

i do not know what the bug is called but i do know they sting and or bite.

Bee fly
by: Moni

Anonymous
This Bee fly does not bite or sting.
Please send a photo of your insect that stings or bites for proper ID.

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Black Gold beetle (Oriental Beetle)

by Cheryl
(Nyack, NY)

Something is eating at my hostas! Could it be this insect? It's mostly black with somewhat gold metallic-like markings. The hosta that this was found on did not have holes in the leaves but a few of my other hostas do have holes in them. I found another all black bug on them too. It's looked almost like a small lightening bug but was entirely black. Could THAT be the bad bug?

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Oriental Beetle
by: Moni

The picture is of the Oriental beetle. The adult feeds on flowers such as daisies or roses, but do not cause much damage. The larva (white grubs)are the pest, having become the biggest turf pest in the northeast. The adult emerges late June/early July and lays eggs in grass. The eggs hatch into worms or better known as white grubs that feed on lawns. Do you have a problem with your lawn having brown patches or animals digging it up?
So, this is not a pest of your hosta. Not sure about the black beetle you mentioned without more information...please send a photo so I can help identify it.
Thanks.

Brown patches
by: Cheryl

Thanks for the info! Have not seen the black beetle again but if I do, I'll get a photo here for you to see. Interesting about the lawn...yes, I DO have brown patches! I brought a sample of it to the nursery as they suggested because they mentioned white grubs too! They didn't see anything wrong with the sample and were unaware of the beetle I found later on the hostas so now I was not treating the lawn. I have lots of brown patches! I guess I'll start treating the lawn for white grub. Any suggestions?

White grub control
by: Moni

Cheryl,
For control first see what Doug has to say at his website: http://www.beginner-gardening.com/whitegrubs.html
Now is the time to work on control, as the adults are out flying around getting ready to lay the eggs for next years grub population. It is too late to control the grubs that did the damage...they are emerging as adults right now!
There are several organic controls for grubs...some work better than others. Nematode parasites are a good choice and work better than Milky spore. If you are really interested here is a great website of the US Golf Assoc. about Nematode use: http://www.usga.org/turf/green_section_record/2007/mar_apr/nematodes.html
Milky spore is slow acting and needs several years to build up the spores to the level needed to keep the grubs under control.
Another tool is trapping. There is a kit with baffle/can and a lure for Oriental beetles that attracts the male beetles and traps them so there is less chance for mating and therefore egg laying. These have been common for Japanese beetles -first called "Bag-a-bug". They now have them in the Northeast for Oriental beetles. They need to be placed on the ground and pretty close together as it is said the Oriental beetle is not a good flyer(?).

That said, the best preventative to having a pest free lawn, is read what Doug says about keeping a lawn healthy. One common thing I see in the MidWest is many people mow their grass way too short. Keep the mowing height at 3-3 1/2" and your grass will grow much better and healthier.
Let me know how it goes.

Thank You, Moni!
by: Cheryl

Thank you so much for your assistance, Moni! What a wonderful and highly informative site!

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Black & Green Striped Flying Insect (Four lined Plant Bug)

by Rich
(Washington,MI)

Its small and likes to fly. Has a reddish body with black & lime green stripes on the wings. It's infesting my Shasta daisies & Snowball bush

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Black and Green striped flying insect
by: Anonymous

It's a cucumber beetle. My garden is infested with them too!

Beetle
by: Rich

Thanks for the comment but I'm not sure that's it. I pulled a picture up on the internet. It's similar but the striping is different. Also, they're leaving my cucmbers alone and going after my daisies

Four lined plant bug
by: Moni

Rich
There were two pictures of this to ID the same day! Interesting how similar bug show up about the same time around the country.
This is a four lined plant bug. Most plant bugs feed on plants sucking the juices out of the leaves leaving spots, scratch-like markings, blotches or other marks. The spots you see on this leaf are probably from this bug. Some of the plant bugs inject a substance that kills the surrounding tissue.
Most of the damage by plant bugs does not look good but does not kill the plant. Organic control is mostly from beneficial insects like lady beetles, green lacewings, spiders, etc. You could also try Doug's favorite :-) - hose them off, but since the adults fly they will probably come back.


Thanks
by: Rich

Thanks for the information. Now to deal with them

i have them again
by: lori utica mi

I HAVE TO SAY THEY ARE NOT MAKING ME A HAPPY GARDENER. AS SUGGESTED BY A FRIEND I HAVE BEEN STRIPPING OFF AND CUTTING OFF INFECTED AREAS. I ALSO AM GIVING THEM A GOOD SPRAYING OF B.T.
GOOD LUCK.

Four lined plant bug
by: Moni

Lori
BT will not control plant bugs...it is for caterpillars only. There are special Bt formulas for mosquitos and other critters but not for plant bugs.

Best to hose them off. If that does not work you might check the insecticidal soap or Neem to see if plant bugs are on the labels for those products.

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A very large insect (Dobsonfly male)

by Kathy
(Mt. Crawford, VA)

This insect is from 4.5-5.5 inches in length

This insect is from 4.5-5.5 inches in length

Insect is dark brown; long, clear veined wings; large pinchers; longer antenna; 4 pincers on rear abdomen;

Thanks for the look see! I do appreciate it. kathy

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Insect
by: Audrey Howard

Not sure, but this looks very similar to an insect that I found up in the West Virginia mountains a couple of weeks ago. Cabin is near a good fishing stream. Insect is a member of the mayfly family....females are larger than the males...wing structure and veining is


Dobsonfly male
by: Moni

Kathy
You have a dobsonfly male on your window. I have seen the female (do not have the long pinchers) but not a male...how lucky you are!
The females do not have the long 'pinchers', but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.
These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be one near by. The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.

Larvae are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two-three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter.

Adults emerge spring to summer.
These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.



south east
by: Shane in sc

I found the same insect today dead. nowere near a stream thow..

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black and orange on a six-legged (Wheel bug nymph)

by Sara McCrary
(Arlington, Virginia)

six legged black and orange bug on Mandevilla

six legged black and orange bug on Mandevilla

Photo of six-legged insect on Mandevilla leaf in Fredericksburg, Virginia

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Wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

Sara
You have a wheel bug nymph on your Mandevilla vine. They are considered beneficial insects. All stages prey on other insects - caterpillars, aphids, bees, sawflies etc. The adult is a large gray bug with a semi-circular spiked area on the thorax area of it's back hence the name wheel bug.


Great!
by: Sara

Thank you so much!

thanks
by: Tom

thanks for posting this. I found this same bug today while painting my house and I was hoping to find out what it is. Now I know!

Wheel bug nymph
by: Susan


Thank you, thank you, thank you! for your page and photos.

I'd been looking a long while to identify my odd bugs and the eggs from my tree... and was getting worried... and about to try and kill them all... when I found them on your page.

It was so NICE to find they were the beneficial wheel-bug nymphs... and not some odd, invasive species.

Again, thank you SO much.


Wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

Susan
Glad you found this site so you have your bugs identified.
Should you find some other odd insect...and not find it amongst the hundreds of photos here, you can send it in for identification. :)
Thanks for finding and using this site!

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Flying creature (Giant ichneumon wasp female)

by Bobbie Peters
(Cloverdale, Indiana, USA)

What the heck is it?

What the heck is it?

Black body, yellow head and feelers, long black stinger, about 3 inches (body only) stinger was about 5 inches, black wings, black legs. It was on my windshield, I have never seen anything like it. I should have tried to catch it for the D.N.R. people at the lake nearby but didn't think of it at the time. You can tell size compared to the windshield wiper at the bottom of the picture. This was taken In Indiana.

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Giant ichneumon wasp female
by: Moni

Bobbie
We are getting several of these insects in the Id pile right now....wish I would see one!
This is the giant ichneumon wasp female. The long tail is the ovipositor - used to lay eggs inside of a tree. The eggs are laid near a host larva of the horntail wasp that bores into wood.
The males do not have the long narrow tail. See the Insect ID page for photos of the males.
Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/winged-borer-insect-with-long-antennalike-tail-ichneumon-wasp.html#ixzz0V76Kcgb1

Such a cool find! Thanks for sharing it!


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large winged insect black and yellow (Robber Fly)

by Ruth Howe
(Todi, Italy)

Large insect, about 8 cms long, with black and yellow legs found in Umbria, Italy.

Large insect, about 8 cms long, with black and yellow legs found in Umbria, Italy.

Insect found on plank 8 cms wide, see photo. Insect looks to have 6 legs, black body and black and yellow legs. Was found in July 2009 in Umbria, central Italy. The local people have never seen one before. This is a hilly area with a Mediterranean climate.

If anyone could tell me what this is I'd be very grateful

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Robber fly
by: Moni

Ruth
If you were here in the States, I would say you have a Bee-like Robber Fly - Laphria sacrator. My guess is it is a similar genus/species in the family Asilidae. Italy may or may not have the same robber flies as North America.
These large predatory flies, often perch in exposed location and make short flights after prey. They feed on other insects, so they are beneficial in the garden.
It is said the large robber flies can bite if agitated.

Hope that helps some.

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Black with white markings bee-like insect (Baldfaced hornet)

by Jocelyn Weatherbe
(Toronto)

Black & white insect

Black & white insect

The insect is shown on a brick wall in downtown Toronto on August 7, 2009. It looks somewhat like a bee or wasp. There were 2 identical ones but one flew away before I could get the pic. It stayed on the wall for several hours.

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Baldfaced hornet
by: Moni

Jocelyn
This wasp is the baldfaced hornet. They make the large basketball sized paper nests seen hanging from tree limbs in the fall after the leaves have fallen. These nests are only used one time. A fertilized queen overwinters and starts a paper enclosed nest in the Spring. As the colony grows, multiple tiers are added, consisting of hexagonal cells - all is made from wood fibers mixed with saliva. The opening at the bottom allows the hornet workers to fly in and out.
The workers feed the larva pre-chewed food. Hornets are beneficial predators that feed on other insects, particularly filth flies and blow flies. The adults are found on flowers where they drink nectar.
The nest population is from 100 to 400 hornets by the end of the summer. In the fall, males and new queens are produced. These leave the nest, mate and the fertilized queens hibernate. The remainder of the workers, the old queen and the males die of old age or freezing temperatures.
These are not aggressive wasps. Not sure why that one was just sitting. Perhaps were workers enjoying the sun or looking for more insects to catch. It might have been a pair that you saw and the one in the photo is the queen that will be out looking for a place to overwinter...tho August does seem a bit early for that.

What a wierd bee...!
by: Shawna Holzworth

I just saw one of these hornets on one of my windows in my house. i took some great pictures of it too. What an interesting insect! funny thing is is that I'm afraid of bugs so I had to have my dad kill it for me... Lol very hard to find on the internet if you don't know what the heck it is. I have never seen anything like it before in my life and I hope that I never will again

Baldfaced Hornet
by: Moni

Shawna
Just because you don't like bugs you do not have to kill them. They have a place in this world just like every living creature and they do their part. Please be more considerate and do not kill it next time.
If it is in the house catch it in a cup and put it outside....that is where it wants to be.
You do have a choice!

Bald Face Hornet in Upstate SC
by: Den

Thank for the writer for identifying this Hornet. We have watched the nest grow over the spring and have been amazed how docile these insects have been. The nest is wedged under the garage door sill and it has been a bit inconvenient, but it's been worthwhile watching the nest develop. We continually pass by the nest and they simply fly by without any aggression. I am relieved however to learn they only use the nest once as we can now plan on using the garage again next year.

Baldfaced Hornet
by: Moni

Den
Thank you for letting it build its nest and finish this life cycle!
Insects are fun to watch!
Thanks for sharing!

What!
by: BlueFire

The last couple of days these guys have been flying all over my truck in the morning. I park under a maple tree which has had a lot of sap this year so I suppose they're attracted to the sap landing on my truck. It's become quite the hassle in the morning trying to make sure they don't fly in when getting my toddler set in the car. =/

Baldfaced hornet
by: Moni

BlueFire
The sap on the truck is probably coming from scale insects on the maple tree....and yes the hornets may be attracted to the sweet sap called "honey dew". There are a lot of cottony maple scale on trees this year in our area. You did not say where you are from.
Perhaps you could park further away from the tree canopy for now...until we have a frost and the scale are gone. The hornets will not be as active on cool mornings or evenings.

They do bite
by: Jackie

Just got bit, by one, last night! I must have some how disturbed it. I wasn't impressed. Thanks for posting the info...I wasn't sure if it was a bee or a wasp. After it bit me, it parked itself on the screen door...at the time we didn't know what it was, and my husband didn't want it stinging anyone else, so he killed it.

BALDFACED HORNET
by: Moni

Jackie
Were you stung or bit?
Don't think they bite, it was probably a sting. They only chew on paper type products to make the nest and this time of year they are more apt to sting.

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Pure Black and Pure White Beetle l(Banded alder borer)

by Diana Crockett
(Carmel Valley CA)

This incredibly interesting Insect was spotted on a walk near the Bandon Oregon Coast this July. The Body of it was about 1 and a half inches long ..the antenna seem to be as long as the full body maybe even longer..Because of the Pureness of the Black and White and the pattern...this almost didn't seem like a real bug ... more like a piece of Art

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black and white insect
by: Anonymous

looks like an asian longhorn!!! if not, then a close relative! We are required to report the asian longhorn here in Canada, highly destructive...going go now and check for proper ident!

black and white beetle, possible asian longhorn
by: Anonymous

The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is large, ranging from 0.75-1.25 inches long, with very long black and white antennae. The body is glossy black with irregular white spots. These beetles feed on many species of hardwood trees. Adults can be seen from late spring to fall depending on the climate. This beetle was introduced from China and is currently limited to areas within the cities of Chicago and New York.

Banded alder borer
by: Moni

This is a banded alder borer. It is found from California and New Mexico north. Larvae feed in dead hardwood trees: maple, alder, oak, willow. These longhorned beetles are confused with the eastern Asian longhorn, but if you look at photos of the two, the banded alder has much more distinct black and white bands while the asian has spots that are not in a certain pattern. They are both in the Cerambycidae or longhorn beetle family
Great photo and what a neat beetle to see on your walk!

BLACK & WHITE BEETLE
by: BARB

I live in Ashford, WA ( Foothills of Mt Rainier) I have seen this beetle on occasion in the past. Just a few days ago in Sept. I spotted one a my business in Eatonville WA. It appears to like a spot on the fence where the wood has been damaged. Has been ther now for several days. Great looking bug.

Banded alder borer
by: Moni

Barb
As you noticed the adult on dead damaged wood , it was probably looking for a place to lay eggs since the larva feed in dead hardwood.
Great observation.
What a colorful beetle it must be to see!

I need to learn more
by: Joeshwa

I have found and captured two of these beautiful bugs and as far as I can tell either the female or the male not sure which has a brighter white than the other and together can consume phenominal amounts of wood and seem to like mertle wood more than others I would love to learn more about these amazing creatures

Banded Alder borer
by: Moni

Joeshwa,
The color difference may not be male/female but how old the beetle is. The longer it lives the more beat-up and dull it would look.
Secondly, the adults feed on nectar or pollen...it is the larva that eat the dead hardwoods.

Saw one in Rancho Cucamonga, Ca
by: Charles

I worked at an office building that was next door to a tree farm in Rancho Cucamonga, California. I was taking the trash to the dumpster outside and was surprised to see this quite-large insect just sitting on the ground. I was a bit cautious because I had never seen a bug like this before. I showed the picture that I took of it to many people and they were all creeped out by how big it was, LOL. Beautiful insect though.

Beautiful Bug or Not.
by: Anonymous

Although beautiful in color, I have lost around 300.00 dollars due to these beetles. They have been found around my trees only when we would water them. Lost all the trees and beetles were gone. Found two of them the other day around some new trees i have planted. Really concerned now.

Banded alder borer
by: Moni

Anonymous
This beetle did not kill your trees, as you read in the comments about this borer it feeds on dead hardwoods....However, if you have the eastern Asian longhorn beetle it may be the culprit. They do look similar but different.
Please send a photo of your beetle for positive Id.

sunnyside
by: Anonymous

we had 3 of them in our back yard in sunnyside washington. i have never seen one until today. :)

weid bug
by: matt and natalie

we found 2 in our back yard. nanaimo B.C
never have we seen these before.

Banded @ Qualicum Bay
by: gord & lisa

I was leaving our travel trailer, and just as I hit the bottom step, noticed this odd looking "BUG".
I took a photo and have since, through the wonders of modern tech, discovered what it is.

Banded Alder Borer
by: Dennis and Veronica

August, 2010
\
We spotted a few around our cottage in the Garden Bay Area of the Sunshine Coast. Colorful black and white markings.
This was the first that we noticed this insect in our area.

Black and white bug
by: Robert Beck

we justed seen this bug on the sidwalk at my home! i wanted to see what kind of bug it was!

Washington State
by: Anonymous

We had one hanging on the house this past weekend in Home Valley, Washington.

Interesting
by: Anonymous

I have lived in the Forks, Washington area since 1958 and this is the first time I have seen this bug, even though wen have lots of alder in this area.

Beautiful Bug!
by: Ginny W.

A customer discovered one of these beetles just outside the door of the Variety Store in Willamina, Oregon today (9/9/11). Quite a beauty!

dog ate it
by: just john

so, standing around one beautiful day in Zig Zag Oregon, summer of 1998, one of these flew up, landed on nearby tree. we checked it out up close - it was gorgeous! about 1 1/2" body, 1 1/2" antennae. when when it flew off (making a loud buzzing racket), my dog jumped up and snatched it out of the air and crunched away, eating the whole thing. weird.

hi
by: Anonymous

my name is jessica and i found this little guy at the beach of Fort Casey sitting on a log. i tried looking for more of them bt i couldnt find any. they are every nice bugs and i found that out by piking it up and have him crawl all over my hand and arm.

I ran from it
by: Anonymous

I was haning some clothes in the beautiful sunshine in Pullman WA (8/11/12) and i turned around to go inside and it was right on the outside of my slider and scared me, I looked it up to make sure it wasn't dangerous but it still creeps me out.

Banded Adler Borer
by: Keryl

Also found this along the Oregon coast at a light house. I was busy taking pic. of the ocean and my husband spotted it over the rail in the lush leaves. Never seen anything like it. Got great pic. and thought it was beautiful. Love new things that God has made, that I have never seen before When we got home we showed the pictures to the rest of the people who had gone with us. It really is unique and stunning.

Banded Alder Borer
by: Richard

I seen one of these bugs 9/19/13 on the back of a person walking in downtown Port Townsend, when I mentioned it to the person he was freaked out. He told me that he had spotted the bug on the beach by the ferry and had taken a photo of it. The insect must have liked him or was just hitching a ride to the other end of town.

Spotted At The Gas Station
by: Anonymous from Washington

While filling my gas tank today, I saw something fall right next to my gas pump out of the corner of my eye. I looked down to find this bug! I had never seen this particular bug before. Very interesting and cool looking bug!


So beautifully designed!
by: Phil Garman

I discovered this lovely beetle today (8-5-14)
in my back yard in Wood Village, OR.
I was fascinated and ran back in the house to grab a magnifying glass and drag my wife outside to be my
witness to this awesome little creature.
We observed him for a few minutes up close with the magnifier. I imagined him (or her) pulling out a little magnifier of his own and looking back at us.
Your site is so helpful! We learned what kind of insect this is, it's habits and that when it's markings are so distinct it is probably young.
Thank you!

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Grasshopper in disguise or the Largest Black Wasp (Sphecid Wasp)

by Kate
(Western North Carolina (mountains))

Its HUGE!

Its HUGE!

I found this guy hanging out near a blackberry bush. He is about 2-3 inches long with orange legs. Whats weird is that he would never fly away but just crawl from one leaf to another. When I came back 2 hours later he was still in the same location. He only seemed to use his wings to better position himself on a leaf. Is this a grasshopper in disguise or a very large wasp/hornet? Was able to get multiple pictures.

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Sphecid Wasp
by: Moni

Kate
It is a Sphecid wasp of some type. There are several large black wasps in this family, tho none are quite 2-3". Most of the Sphex spp. wasps are known as digger wasps. They dig a hole in the ground to lay their eggs. Depending on the species, the wasp stings its prey to paralyze it as food for the larva. The larva eat live food, so the toxin that paralyzes the prey keeps the food fresh and alive until the larva hatch and feed on it. Some of these big wasps capture, katydids, crickets or grasshoppers to feed the young.
Your wasp looks like the Katydid wasp but the size is not as big as you noted. H

Looks similar
by: Kate

Sorry it took so long to reply. :) couldn't find the website for awhile. It looks similar to the ones you posted but I don't think that's it. The one one I took a picture of had orange antenna and its bottom (thorax?) didn't have a very distinct pinching. The bug's bottom looked more connected as if it was just wearing a tight belt. I could be wrong, he could just be a fat bug. Thank you for responding. :)

Been Looking EVERYWHERE
by: Kelly

I've been looking everywhere for an answer to what type of bug this is. I took a pic with my phone because i didnt want to get very close as it looks like it has a stinger and it was HUGE! but the pic didnt turn out. I was on my lunch break in september, sitting in my car which is in a parking lot near a pond in the twin cities of Minnesota.

Mydas fly
by: Moni

Kate (and maybe for Kelly too)
Not sure when you responded but if you put in your email address after you have submitted the photo, you will get an email, when the photo has been ID'ed.

Anyway...found your insect name...it is a Mydas fly!


It does fit your description much better. Saw one myself this summer so when I reread your comments the light bulb went off. Sometimes when I ID my first response is not the correct one..but once I have slept on it the light bulb comes on :-)

These are huge flies that look like wasps in the way they move and act. The antennae are the biggest clue. Flies have short antenna(about the length of the fly's head) while wasps generally have long antenna (at least 3/8-1/2" long).
These flies are beneficial and are found in eastern North America. The adult flies do not live long. The immature stages prey on soil-dwelling insect larvae, especially on beetle larvae (including white grubworms and other larvae of beetles).


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Black and Orange Spiky Bug (Lady beetle larva)

by Skye
(Menomonie, WI)

small black bug

small black bug

I Found this crawling up my arm. It is a small black bug (about 5mm long) with orange stripes down its sides. The body seems to be covered in spikes or possibly fur?

Comments for Black and Orange Spiky Bug (Lady beetle larva)

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small bug
by: Donalda

Hello Skye,
It would appear from the picture that your bug is the larva of a lady bird beetle.....otherwise known as a ladybug.People don't associate the rough ponted outer appearance of this little guy as an immature lady bug....probably the Asian lady bug.It is a predator ,feeding on aphids,and other small insects that attack your plants.It is a very beneficial insect.

Lady beetle Larva
by: Moni

Skye,
As Donalda said, you have a lady beetle larva. It is a great predator, so put it back in the garden to eat aphids and other pests. Yours looks to be on the large size which would mean it is about to pupate. Then it turns into the adult beetle to overwinter.
A nice find!

lady beetle larvae
by: Cathy

I just found these on my roses and was going to kill them. lucky i didnt. thanks for the info

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Cathy
Your garden is thankful you checked on this beneficial insect before killing it also!
Glad we had the info for you. You can always send a picture in if you don't find an identification for an insect you have.
Thanks

they bite or something
by: Anonymous

I'd just like to add that I've been bitten by these creatures. I had never seen them until last year and have been intently watching for them this year to catch a picture to ask what it was. I have been bitten or pinched when they get stuck inbetween folds of clothing up next to the skin. they leave a nasty little trail of itchy bumps that looks like a poison rash. my skin is sensitive to bug bites anyway so the couple of times it's happened may have been my own body's overreaction to the little critter. my husband think i'm crazy but i've got the itchy proof.

lady bug beetle larva
by: Audra Payne

Hi, i`ve been wondering what these bugs where and now i know, i have been inundated with these in my front garden, i`ve never seen these before until this year, it`s nice to know that they are being helpful to my garden.

lady beetle
by: Anonymous

i have an infestation of these in my garden especially covering the bins. but i think they have come from the tree. just above my bins . but they look a little menacing do they bite.

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Anonymous
Fantastic! You are so blessed to have these great beneficial insects in your yard! Keep up the good work.
The larva feed on mostly aphids. To do so they do have to pierce the soft body of the aphid. So, it might be possible they could bite if you got them on a tender part of your skin and really threatened or mishandled them. However they are not poisonous and do not inject any toxins....it would just feel like a tiny pin prick, then go away.

Well
by: David

I also found this on my trash bin outside. There was a lady bug on the other bin and at first glance I thought this other little guy was a lady bug as well. I took pictures just in case no one else knew what it was but I'm glad I found it here

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

David
Glad you found out what you had. Now you know you have a good bug in your garden!

great web site
by: Anonymous

this web site was great! my kids found alot of them on a tree in my yard and now that i know they are not dangerous we have really been checking them out!

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Anonymous
So glad you are helping your children learn about insects... bugs are so cool!
If you find some this summer that you need Identified send them in.

Bug bite
by: Anonymous

I was in my kitchen and felt quite a pinch on my leg when I looked down and saw a black bug, I naturally swatted it,thinking it was a spider. I thought I had killed it and put it on a paper towel. It was a bug I have never seen before black in color with a yellow and orange spikey back. Immediately got online to see what it was. Luckily I found it on this web site and saw I have nothing to worry about, it is a good bug. And also, the bug was not dead, I must have just stunned it so, I set it free back to nature. Thanks

???
by: Anonymous

We keep on finding it by wood why is this?

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Anonymous
This larva eats soft bodied insects. It is on the wood either to pupate or looking for lunch. I am sure there are plants nearby that it has crawled from.

bites
by: Anonymous

I found loads of these on my car last week and thought they looked a bit menacing with the spikes. the next day I had three very large insect bites...2 on my legs and one on my back. They swelled up and were extremely itchy. They felt firm as if there was poison inside. They are still healing now. Could this be an alergic reaction to a ladybug bite?

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

John
So glad you found your answer here!
Lady beetle larva are great aphid eaters for your garden.

thanks
by: Anonymous

thanks for who ever found out what that was i found one today and wondered what the heck it was....me had hoped me found a new species lol guess it's not that easy ^^ well thanks so much anyway :)

Lady Beetle Larva
by: Anonymous

I have never seen these before in my garden, was about to go and get some bug spray, until I realised I had run out, so thought I would check first what they are, glad I didnt kill them now, they can eat my green fly etc - wonderful

Weird or what.
by: James Moss

I found one of these on my back door i did look a bit viscious so i kept my distance but in the end it was quite friendly when i stroked it.

Aphid Eaters
by: Dawna

I've lived in my town for several years but have never seen this bug before until a couple of months ago. The city is having a real issue with aphids in the trees, which get onto the mailboxes, cars and people - you can't walk out to get your mail without having flying aphids land on your person or in your hair. They sprayed a few months ago for them and since it doesn't seem it was effective, is it probable that their next step was to introduce these aphid-eaters as an alternative?

so they are?
by: Anonymous

are they really lady beetle babies or what I am so clueless when it comes to bugs.
I how ever did find one in my kitchen window and tramped it to day, in hopes that my husband would know.
Well no luck there he had no clue either so I let him go at my Rodie bush and got on here to see what he was.

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Dawna
If there are lots of aphids you will find lady beetles and their larva. Lady beetles and the larva (for Anonymous info....yes the larvae are what you could call the babies for this insect) both eat aphids...it is their favorite food.
Evidently, the insecticide that was sprayed did not kill all the lady beetles, so they could do the work of eating the aphids. Lady beetles are far better controls than spraying the city which would kill all the great beneficial insects.
There are many other insects that like to eat aphids if given a chance....like lacewing larva, wasps, ground beetles, robber flies, etc.
If the city would allow Nature to take its course then next year there will not be an aphid problem.

LADYBUG LARVAE BITE
by: Anonymous

ladybug larvae will bit and for some, like me who are a bit allergic to them, leave raised, hard areas that will eventually go away. Tracie

Lady beetle larvae
by: Anonymous

Tracie
Thanks for your comments...hopefully it will help others who get bit to know this beneficial insect tho not perfect is not dangerous.

leaf hangers
by: Samantha

i have never found a lady beetle larva that is not hanging upside down on a leaf. that is what they like to do.

Shocking!
by: Lauren

I just found one of these on my dressing gown on my bed! I was shocked by it's black and orange spikes and what looked like could possibly be a stinger tail. So, I caught it in a glass, called my little brother to see and will put it outside in the morning (it's 12:40 am!!!). My cats sometimes nap on my bed so maybe this is where it came from. Never the less, made me check my sheets for more before I got back into bed! Hard to beleive this menacing looking bug grows into a ladybird!!! Thanks so much for your informative site x

ow
by: Anonymous

One of those bit me today. I was wondering what it was. It hurt. I got a sort of raised red bump. Well, I acciddently sat on it. It got all squished on my leg ):

Lady Beetle Larva
by: Anonymous

So glad I found this website! I found one in front of the garage today, and I went screaming back into the house! Yes, I am sort of afraid of bugs, but mostly because I have no idea if they're posionous or not. The Lady Beetle Larva is about half the size of my index finger (or so I think is 5 mm). Glad there weren't any more of them, Lady Beetle Larva sort of freak me out with their bright orange stripe and spiky fur(or something close to fur).

Many in my house!!!!!!
by: Anonymous

Ok, so I took clippings of a beautiful bush into my home to enjoy its spring flowers. Didn't notice these lady beetle larva until it was to late. They are all over my house!!!! Climbing up cupboards, ceilings and even on my couch! How do I get rid of these? It is grossing me out!

Omg
by: Anonymous

Omg I found one of these on my wayhome I was riding my bike then it landed on my hand I got freaked out I thought it was an unknown species it looked meand and about to bite me which it did

cool
by: josh

i was riding in the car with my friend when i felt it crawling on my hand. I almost flung it off my hand, typical reaction, but no, I looked at it and though it looks kinda..cool. So i let it stay there until i got home.

o m g
by: lesley

well i found one on my plant pot out side and wondered wot it was i left it be then when next i looked there was another one the first one turned into a cocoon and now so is the second one going to keep on watching

On pot and tree not on roses
by: Annie.E

I have a pine tree in a pot.Thats covered with them.And I have roses but I dont see any on them..Why is that? I do have tiny black ants on the pot also.

Lady beetle larvae
by: Moni

Annie.E
The larvae are going to be where there is food. So perhaps the little black insects on your pot are aphids not ants?
A pine tree in a pot might be more stressed (rather than a pine tree planted in the ground)...so it might have more insects that the lady beetle larvae are interested in eating than roses free of insects.

They hurt!!
by: Anonymous

I found one yesterday and it bit me while I was bringing it into the woods. It was throbbing for like 10 minutes, and left two little white dots on my finger. After it lost its stinger, it died. :(

lady beetle
by: Anonymous

i too have not seen this bug before this year. My back yard is full of them they are so net looking. I was in the back yard just today and had the pleasure of watching this little bug devour another smaller bug on one of my tables outside my family and i all grabbed chairs and sat around and watched it was so interesting to get to witness the natural process of how this little thing lives. while i was watching it i seen another bug i have never seen before maybe someone knows what it is it is small and white it looks like a small cotton fiber with fiber-like antennae very strange looking.

Found one too! What can i do with it
by: Amanda!

Ok, so i skimmed through everyones comments.
So did i read it right that it will turn into a cocoon? I would like preserve it somewhere where i can watch it. Found it in my work office.
If i put it in an aerated jar with leaves etc, will it stay alive?

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Amanda
The larvae needs to eat enough to be mature enough to turn into a pupa (more common name than cocoon for beetles when they go from larva- pupa- then adult). Once a larvae has had enough to eat molt several times and finally be ready to turn into an adult it will naturally turn into the pupa then a few weeks later shed that skin to become the adult lady beetle.
All that said you need to feed it aphids or small caterpillars until it is mature enough to go to the pupa stage. You can keep it in a jar with a lid. The lid can be cloth or paper towel attached with a rubber band or tight string.
Good luck with your rearing project!

The War Between the Aphids and the Ladybugs...
by: Bunny

I've been battling with aphids all spring this year!! I kept finding ladybugs in our front yard, so I would take them to my garden on the side to the plants that had the most aphids. I didn't know that their larvae looked like these. I'm so happy though! At least I won't have to get some poisonous spray to douse our fruit/veg plants in. My okra and marvel pea seedlings have struggled to stay alive because of the aphids eating all of their new fresh leaves. Even spraying the aphids with water and removing all of the aphids by hand wasn't helping. Thank goodness the army of the ladybugs have appeared stronger.

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Bunny
I am a little confused. You say you have aphids but comment that they are eating all your pea and okra plants...aphids suck juices out of plants - they do not eat them? Could it be that you do have some aphids but also have something else eating your veggies?
If it is aphids and by saying they are eating your new shoots means they are causing the new foliage to shrivel and curl up...then it might be aphids.
It does take lady beetles and larvae a while to eat all the aphids. They may not eat all, but most should allow the plants to get a head start. You do need to have enough aphids to feed the hungry lady beetles. Be patient and give them a chance.

If you are not sure they are aphids or not you can send us a photo to make sure.

If the lady beetles do not help enough, you can knock what lady beetles and larvae that are on your plants off and spray with insecticidal soap. It will kill the aphids that you hit with the spray. Be careful - you do not want to spray the lady beetles or larvae.

Great website....thanks everyone!
by: Anonymous

These little gals are all over the place. One bit me today and it was quite painful. (Perhaps I resemble a giant aphid...humph!) I am pleased to find out they are beneficial to plants. This year marks my first attempt at gardening so I welcome the little nippers despite the bite. Cheers!

I see this bug also
by: Anonymous

I live in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and noticed one the other day inside the house. I took it outside and put it on the brick ledge. Today I looked again and saw two of them close by the same brick ledge. I cannot say if I can remember having seen one before. Probably only because I'm getting a little older so slowing down and noticing more.

may explain bug bites!
by: Anonymous

Well! just found one of these in our bedroom. It may explain the bites I found on my leg (a series of them, look like mosquito bites but not particularly itchy...I was worried about bed bugs but we haven't found any evidence of those unwanted critters...)

Little Pesks!
by: Sarah

I found one yesterday on it's back in the bus, so I picked it up ( I love watching bugs ) and it crawled around on my hands for a while and then crawled up my arm and bit me! The little demon!!
What's up w/ them? Why do they do that?

Lady beetle larvae
by: Moni

Sarah
They bite other insects for food...so perhaps it was looking for lunch and it happened to be you rather than an aphid.
Also, many insects do not like being handled...they think you might hurt them. Just put it in the garden to do its great job for you.

They are everywhere
by: Anonymous

They are all over the walls of my carport and around my doors. I have lots of trees therefore do not have a garden because of the shade. First I was covered in canker worms, now these things. How do I get rid of them????

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Anonymous with them Everywhere
You probably have scales or aphids in the trees that the larvae are/were feeding on. They may have moved to your carport to pupate...Or got knocked out of the trees with a storm.

They are beneficial insects so PLease leave them where they are...they will soon move on and not bother you. They are great to have in and around your trees or you might have an insect pest in your trees.

Thanks!
by: Anonymous

Thanks for the website! My daughter found this bug in our yard and was wondering what it was. After typing 6 legged black and orange bug with spiked back....we now have an answer!

Ladybeetle larva
by: TG

Never seen one of these up until 15 minutes ago! I found out what it was from this site, caught it in a glass and showed it to my two interested children before releasing it outdoors :)

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

TG
Thanks for showing the kids such a good bug! And thanks for releasing it!
So glad you looked it up and shared it with the kids...now they know one of the beneficial insects out in the garden.

lady bug larva
by: Anonymous

ha i found one on my hand whilst on the pc so i blew it off, covered it with a glass then looked it up and found this site! how great is that!

i got a cheeky picture now i think ill send him/her on his/her way and put it on the plants out back :D

Glad it isn't a louse!
by: Anonymous

I found one of these in my daughter's hair and briefly thought it was an overgrown louse-- sort of the same shape! Big relief, thanks!

ohh
by: Anonymous

I was just in my front garden and noticed something that looked like this but loads two on my arm which i flicked off. my partner was worried that these would be posion because we have two dogs. so i came online to check it out and thank goodness i looked here. they are on a tree outside my house, loads of them big ones and little ones. i shall leave them to grow now :)

How to overwinter them
by: Kris

So glad I found this thread! I've been battling mites on my hops and found these all through the bines in fall. Guess they've been helping me fignt the mites. Will try to leave that part of the garden undisturbed over winter so they make it to spring.

Black bug/yellow stripes
by: Anonymous

I found this page to be somewhat helpful. I, too, have NEVER seen this bug until this year. This seems to be the only picture I could find that resembled most closely to the bug I found at home. However, where I am finding this particular bug is mainly all along the edges of our wooden deck or on our front porch- also made of wood, but painted. Do these bugs really NOT do any damage to wood? I worry, since I found at least 6 of them in one particular area on our wooden deck.

lady beetle larvae
by: Moni

Anonymous - worry about wood
No they do not eat any wood...only insects.

If you found them on the wood deck it is probably because they are needing a sound safe place to pupate.

WHEW!!!
by: Anonymous

OREGON INSIDE OFFICE BUILDING, GLAD IT'S HARMLESS

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Large black beetle (Predaceous diving beetle)

by Neil Law
(Waterloo, On, Canada)

Hopefully the picture is clear enough. We found it walking across our deck on summer. Few inches long with a very hard green/brown shell

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Giant water beetle
by: Donalda

I believe this beetle is a giant water beetle.These beetles are ambush hunters,and are one of the largest,(if not the largest) insects in Canada.They like slowly moving water where they can grab hold of a plant and lay wait for prey such as tadpoles minnows,salamanders etc. which they grab with their strong front legs.They pierce their prey and inject a secretion that disolves the body tissues which enables them to suck out the fluids.Giant water bugs are active all year,and are often seen around street and patio lights in late summer.At this time of year they leave the shallow ponds and look for deeper water where they can remain active under the ice.This beetle will give a nasty bite if handled.

Diving beetle
by: Moni

Neil
Looks like you have a predacious diving beetle, genus Dytiscus.
The adults will fly to lights at night so that is probably why you found it on your deck. The larvae are sometimes called water tigers. Both the larvae and adults are predaceous and feed on other aquatic arthropods and small aquatic animals including fish.
Nice photo.

Thanks for the Information
by: Neil

It's great to know who he is (or was perhaps). I have a large pond in my backyard and back onto conservation area so we do get a lot of very unique creatures. I like to leave them be for the most part.

Thanks so much Moni and Donalda

Giant beetle
by: Grace Cork

I recently found something similar at my property north lof Lindsay. It was a large oval shaped beetle, but instead of legs, appeared to have very narrow flipper like appendages????
I live by a lake-does this help

Predaceous diving beetle
by: Moni

Grace Cork
What you found is probably a similar beetle...there are several in this family, Dytiscidae. The hind legs do look more like flipperlike appendages than legs, so they can swim in the water.
These nearly one inch beetles overwinter in large bodies of water as adults. They can come to lights at night.
They do eat other insects and small fish in your lake.

Maine
by: Christopher LaMotte

Happy Easter,
We just came home on this very warm day in the beginning of april and I found this large beetle in are drive way. We live near the coast, but not near a lake or pond. Very strange




Predaceous diving beetle
by: Jennifer

I also found one in Wichita Kansas. It flew into me in the middle of the day and Im glad I could find out what it is. Thanks

Giant Water Bug
by: Shane

It is a Giant Water Bug (or Belostomatidae), just search it on Wikipedia. I saw the same one at The Oshawa Airport, just east of Toronto. It's March 21st, and has been quite warm the past few days. (26C today).

Predaceous diving beetle
by: Moni

Shane
The photo is of a Predaceous diving beetle. It has a hard shell, hence is a beetle. The beetle in the photo is about 1 inch long with distinct antenna. The giant water bugs can be 2-3 inches long, have a softer body with a distinct triangle on the back behind the head and antenna are usually not seen.

The fore legs are small not pronounced like the Giant water bug. Giant water bugs are true bugs in the order Hemiptera, not beetles, Coleoptera, like the one in the photo.


Here is a photo of the giant water bug (Belostomatid)- http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/brown-insects.html

Thanks for cking, but this is a predaceous diving beetle.

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Black and Creme Striped Long Narrow Insect (Two-Striped walkingstick)

by Joan
(Greenville, SC)

Long Striped Insect

Long Striped Insect

This insect appeared in Edisto Island, SC when we were at a beach home and it was on one of the beach chairs that we carried to the beach. It hung around us trying to climb back on the chair(s) so we carried it on the chair back to the house and we last saw it on the porch screen where we took its picture.

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Two-Striped walkingstick
by: Moni

Joan
You have seen the two-striped walkingstick, a common walkingstick in the southeastern US - from FL to TX. The female is from 3-4"long while the male is about 1.5" long. I would guess yours is the female?
It has been noted that the male and female may attach to each other even before the female is mature...the male will hang on while the female molts.
One thing to be aware of is they can shoot a chemical spray that is irritating to the eyes. This
'odiferous' secretion is for defense and can be shot a foot or so with great accuracy.
The Univ of FL Entomology dept notes that the distinctive black and white striped walkingsticks of this species is only seen in the Ocala National Forest (this species seen elsewhere is brown with black stripes). They note the insect loses its distinctive white stripes once dead.
These insects feed on the leaves of trees and shrubs. The females are known to drop to the ground in the fall to lay their eggs in the sand.


help
by: Anonymous

while cleaning my lil brothers home in mass i found one of these does anyone know if they are poison creatures?

TWO-STRIPED WALKINGSTICK
by: Moni

Anonymous
As I noted in the descriptive comment below... "One thing to be aware of is they can shoot a chemical spray that is irritating to the eyes. This
'odiferous' secretion is for defense and can be shot a foot or so with great accuracy. "

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/black-and-creme-striped-long-narrow-insect-twostriped-walkingstick-comments.html#ixzz1SOjXiCpe

one on door
by: Charlie

Found one on the front door of my sisters apartment today when i took the kids the bus stop. I was not sure what it was so I told my niece would try to find out what it is. She will appreciate this answer more than the its an alien parasite that is going to enter our ears to take over brains answer i gave her. her reply "really" while covering her ears

walkingstick
by: Moni

Charlie
So glad you looked it up and found the answer...no need to make kids or anyone more scared of insects than they already are...we love to educate and help inquiring minds :-)

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black white stripe reddish legs (Ichneumon wasp - Ichneumon ambulatorius)

by Jacob
(Central Illinois)

This bug was just sitting there in late September in East central Illinois. I have no idea on what he is.

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Ichneumon wasp - Ichneumon ambulatorius
by: Moni

Jacob
Your photo is of an Ichneumon wasp. The antenna give it away. After much searching, I believe the species is Ichneumon ambulatorius.
The ichneumon wasps are one of the largest families of insects. They are noted for their antennae longer and with more segments than most other wasps. In many ichneumon wasp females the ovipositor is quite long, often longer than the body.
Most ichneumon wasps are beneficial with the larvae feeding in a variety of other insect larva as internal parasites. This species has been found feeding in the crop pest fall armyworm.

Same thing
by: Anonymous

I have the same thing in my back yard and am wondering if it's dangerous. I live in Indianapolis and have never seen anything like this.

Ichneumon wasp
by: Moni

Indy
It is a wasp but these are not known to sting people. The females...which have the stingers...only sting other insects. As noted in the previous comment, this ichneumon wasp "stings" or rather lays its eggs in armyworms...not people.

If you or someone in your family are highly allergic to wasps, then please use caution. Many insects including wasps might sting or bite if mishandled or provoked.

Thanks
by: Indy

Thanks , you have helped me a lot.

Known range
by: Jim

I live in Burgeo,Newfoundland,Canada and I have found one of those wasps in my garage. It is the first time I have ever seen a wasp of this type.Is it moving up the eastern seaboard as I assume they moving North rather than a southerly direction. Sure would like to know the origin of this species of wasp.

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Black beetle long antenna (Cerambycidae beetle)

by bryan
(france)

Moni , hope you can now identify, found in my garden hangar. about 7-8 cm long.

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Handsome Guy or Gal
by: Grammadot

That is one cool bug! It fits the characteristics of a Blister Beetle (just in case, don't touch) but, it is much bigger. Will be interested to see what Moni says. Great closeup.

Thanks
by: Anonymous

Hi, thanks G and G for your comment, it is appreciated!!!!

Cerambycidae beetle
by: Moni

Bryan, I wrote the wrong name when I said Sugar maple borer...I typed the wrong line I should have typed Plinthocoelium species. I do not think that is what it is(tho it is a close relative) now that I have the whole insect to view. Not being from Europe nor studying European entomology, I can get the beetle to subfamily but can not positively identify to species without seeing and/or keying it in person.

However, looking at the whole beetle, I can say it is a long-horned beetle family Cerambycidae, subfamily cerambycinae. Larvae of longhorned beetles feed on woody plants - most only attack injured plants. The larvae can be beneficial by helping decompose dead and dying trees. I think your beetle could be the Musk beetle, scientific name Aromia moschata, which is native to Europe and adults feed usually on willow leaves. Do you have willow trees or dead or dying wood in the garden area where you took the photo? Let me know what you think.


Sorry to be late responding, but the holidays with three college students home is hectic. Thank you for sending the second photo.

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Black and White Tortoise shell (Cottonwood borer)

by Debi
(Bixby, Oklahoma)

Black & White Tortoise Shell Insect

Black & White Tortoise Shell Insect

Black with white tortoise shell marking on main body. Incredibly long antenna. 6 legs. Black thorn like objects behind antenna on head.

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Cottonwood borer
by: Moni

Debi
You have a cottonwood borer in your jar. This beetle and its larva feed on poplars and willow trees. The adults supposedly feed on shoots of host trees, especially leaf-stems (petioles), and bark.
Life Cycle of this beetle involve eggs being laid in August/ September. Larvae bore at the base of poplars or willows and then overwinter there. Two or three years required to reach maturity. Larvae may girdle trees. Pupation occurs beneath bark.
They are quite striking large beetles. Do you have a lot of cottonwood trees or willows nearby?

Bixby
by: Anonymous

Debi, my 6 year-old son found one of these in Washington Irving Park in Bixby yesterday.
He was so intrigued that he captured it in a water bottle and now has it in a terrarium in his room. We're not sure of how to take care of it, so I'm not sure how long it'll be before we have him turn it loose, but it's especially peculiar (and creepy, if you ask me).

Cottonwood borer
by: Moni

Anonymous
Here is a site that shows photos and tells you the life cycle of the cottonwood borer if you want to keep it. http://bugguide.net/node/view/7956

As mentioned under comments where you put your comment...the adult feeds on the foliage, the larvae on the wood of poplar family of trees like ...cottonwoods, poplars, aspens.

So glad you are encouraging your son to study nature! no matter how creepy it looks :)

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Large orange and black ant (Velvet Ant)

by Margie
(Harrison, AR )

Halloween Ant

Halloween Ant

About 1 - 1 1/2 inches long. Does not fly. Runs around like an ant. Black & bright orange.
And very hard to kill.

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.
by: Eric

I've seen these in Georgia. I always wondered what they were.

Velvet Ant
by: Moni

Margie
Your photo is of a female velvet ant also called cow killer. Males have black wings while females are wingless. This is actually a wasp. It got it's name because it was said that the sting from the female hurt so bad it would kill a cow. They are shades of yellow and brown or red and black.
They are found in meadows, old fields, and edges of forests especially those with sandy soil.

Adult velvet ants feed on nectar and water. The larva are parasites of bumble bees. The female velvet ant searches for bumble bee nests, digs down and deposits one egg near the brood chamber. Velvet ant larva enter the bumble bee brood chamber, kills those larvae by feeding on them. Larvae pupate in the bumble bee chamber.

Females have a very painful sting if handled.
Velvet ants are not aggressive and will try to escape when encountered.

Velvet ant
by: Anonymous

I just found one in our back yard in the city of Houston, Tx. I guess they live down here too. This creature has a most unusuall behavior, it sleeps most of the time and it's only seems to be awaken by the warm air outside. Right now it lives in a small acquarium in my kitchen. I am trying to study its behavior. So far I've noticed that it sleeps a lot. Does any one knows anything about this creature and how long does it lives in captivity?

Velvet Ants
by: Moni

Anonymous
Most insects live a short period of time. The adult lays its eggs then usually die. Therefore, my guess is this insect - if you have one like the photo - it is a female has either laid its eggs and it is ready to die or it needs to find the bumble bee nest to lay eggs in, so it can complete its life cycle. It will probably not live long. The adult males are known to feed on nectar...did not read what the females eat if they do at all.

Either way, since this insect can inflict a painful bite I would not think it a very good "pet". Please be careful.

In North Georgia
by: Anonymous

We just found one around large rocks that make up our raised bed garden. She is really cool looking but her pinchers look TERRIBLE! We fed her some sugar water and she went crazy for it! I think we might keep her for a while to watch her.

Velvet Ant
by: Anonymous

These ants really are hard to kill! It takes a lot of squishing to kill them. There are some here in South Carolina.

Thanks
by: Anonymous

I've seen two of these since moving to North Carolina. They are horrifying! I wondered what they were- so glad to know. Thanks for the info.

Sara

velvet ant
by: Anonymous

i cut the back end of one of these ants off an picked up the front halve an it was the most horrifying pain i think i ever had just from the hair on its leg it felt like getting hit by 220 elect volt my thumb an wrist hurt so bad for 30 mins. my advise stay away even if there dead

Southern Illinois
by: didthat1x

Concur with the "hard to kill". It was crawling across the deck carpet by the pool. We were warned about the painful "stings". Does the pain come from formic acid on their pincers?

Very, Very Large orange ant
by: Anonymous

I just killed, after jumping on it four times because it kept moving, an ant with segments as large as small jelly beans. I was totally freaked out because it had a black head and a huge, two segment, body which was bright orange. I have never seen anything like it in my 61 years on earth!

My 3 year old got bitten!
by: B Smith

I live in South Mississippi and up until last week I hadn't seen one of these ants since I was a little girl. Last week we were outside playing with the children and I heard a blood wrenching scream from my 3 year old. He had been bitten by one of these and his entire finger was red and swollen from the tip where he was bitten to the nuckle joining his hand. It broke my heart!

they also sing!
by: Anonymous

I found one of these scurrying along on my driveway - it's beautiful irridescent orange in the sun - very captivating. I caught it in a clear plastic cup and was looking at it when I heard a high pitched sonar sound, quite loud. I looked around to see what and where the sound was coming from. Suddenly realized it was coming from the beautiful creature in the glass. I took some photos of it and let it go and it scurried off not making any more noise. Really quite an eerie sound, but so interesting. The insect looked to be quite frantic - no way was I going to touch it, but I let it go, as it should be - free.

velvet ant
by: Anonymous

Just saw two of these in my garden. Never seen these in my life. It freaked me out a bit since I just moved to Georgia from Florida and thought this was a invasion from outer space!

Jackcson,MS
by: Anonymous

I 've seen this insect at the preschool where I work. How do you kill them? Some of the children have severe medical problems and I'd hate for any of them to get stung.

velvet ant
by: Moni

Jackson, MS
These insects are seen during summer and early fall. Velvet ants are not aggressive and will try to escape from you. Velvet ants do not cause damage and no chemical controls are need. Velvet ants should be left alone, but if control is desired, make sure you have on a heavy-soled shoe before stepping on the insect!

Great time for a few class lessons to educate the preschoolers about insects! There are some you can pick up and some you can't. This is one that you do not pick up. And they should ask an adult before picking up any insect since some can sting, leave a rash on the skin or bite.

You can ck the playground before sending the kids out to play also.

NOT an ant
by: Dave Andrews

This is not an ant. It is a cow killer wasp. They are wingless and predate on other wasps. They're called cow killers because they have a very nasty, painful sting (but it doesn't really kill).

Known of these for 50 plus years
by: Kay

I remember these ants (wasp) when I was a child. We called them cow killers back then too. I never had the nerve to catch one, although just about everything was fair game.

We were told to stay away from them. It is still good advice today.

Velvet Ant
by: Rhonda

To the woman that said that this beautiful creatire also sings: I'm so glad you decided to set it free when ot started to "sing", because it was not a beautiful song you were listening to --it was calling for HELP!!! I cannot imagine how tragic your hesitation would have been!

angry ants
by: Anonymous

When I was about 10yrs old, so 30yrs ago my cousin and I caught about 20 of these nasty little "screamers" if smashed they make a squeaky noise. Anyway I dropped the jar in my grandmother's bedroom and most of them got away. Later that night my grandmother woke us all up by her screaming in pain. She got bit at least 4 times. We never said a word to anyone, until now. Lol.

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black, striped (Dermestid beetle larva)

by James Gallington
(Conroe Texas in the city)

Wool worm?

Wool worm?

appox.1/16 to 3/32 in. long and apperars black in color till I enlarged pic about 50 times. They have been found in a fuzzy material in the closet and seem to stay in dark places. They also are in the bathroom and come out and leave their dead on the white tile floor. They were seemingly nesting in the plastic bag that the fuzzy material was in. There is also some white wiggling larva present.

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Dermestid beetle larva
by: Moni

James
Great photo of the little critter. You do have a dermestid larva feeding on the fuzzy stuff. Your larva is probably from a small carpet beetle based on the size.

The "dead" you see are probably shed skins of the larva as they grow. You also mentioned some white wiggly larva? If they look a lot different than the photo then you may also have a moth pest that feeds on clothes or pantry food. (If it is really different please send a photo of that critter.)

Dermestids are beetles with the larva and adults feeding on many materials like leather, dander, wools...basically any natural material. If you find the source...like your plastic bag with fuzzy stuff...throw it away and you will have gotten rid of most of them, however they have probably moved to other things.

If you find anything of value with them in it you can put the article in the freezer for a few days and that will kill them. Vacuum and clean the infested area thoroughly.

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Very small orange and black bug with 6 legs (Lady beetle larva)

by Tara Fisher
(San Antonio, TX, USA)

Orange/Black bug

Orange/Black bug

Okay the nasty little bug is black then orange and then has a black head. The orange on him contained a black dot. It looked like his body was made of horns (don't know how else to describe it). It had 6 legs which seemed to be a burnt orange color. They're pretty small, but I'm horrible with measurements and couldn't give you anything accurate. Less than an inch, for sure.
They are infesting my yard and I even found one IN MY BED. I didn't like them in my yard but now I'm terrified after having found one on my pillow. Please help, I don't know what it is and I'm scared!

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bring on the aphids
by: rustyshovel

This looks like a ladybug larvae. Other than being a nuisance because of sheer numbers these are generally considered beneficial because they love aphids. I envy you.

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Tara
You should be excited to know your critter is a wonderful lady beetle larva. It is great that you have so many in your yard!
These larva are great at eating aphids. Aphids are insects that suck the life out of your garden plants. These larva can eat some other pests, but they love aphids.
Leave them in the garden to help you out ...the one in your bed was accidentally there from having gotten on you as you were in the garden.
In a few weeks you will see the lady beetles that they turn into.

Good to know
by: Anonymous

I have those in my garden too. Glad to know they are friends and not going to destroy my vegies.

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Black Insects (aphids)

Tiny black bugs the size of pin head infesting my herbs. Please help with identification and treatment. Thanks.

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Aphids
by: Moni

The insects infesting your herbs are aphids. They suck the juices out of plants and can deform flowers, fruits and leaves.
First method to control aphids is to wash them off with a strong stream of water. Lady beetle adults and larvae, lacewing larvae, and flower (syrphid) flies all love to eat aphids. Check the plants regularly. If the aphids continue to be a problem then an application of insecticidal soap might help.

treat
by: Anonymous

aphids can be killed just with water and dish soap. It dehrates them.

black aphids
by: Moni

Yes, these are black aphids. Aphids can be green, brown, yellow, reddish, or black depending on what species it is and what plant they are feeding on. There are several known black aphids like the black valerian aphid and the black bean aphid. Not sure which one you have as you did not say which herbs they are feeding on.
Aphids generally feed in groups and are sometimes 'tended' by ants.

Aphids are found thru out North America. They do suck juices from plants and in high numbers can deform growing tips and leaves of herbaceous plants.

Generally lady beetles, lacewings, and hover flies will keep a population in check. Remember you need a lot of aphids to feed a growing lady beetle larvae (teenagers are known to eat a lot! :-))

Your photo does show some winged forms (not all have wings), which indicates they need more food and will be moving on to other plants.
If that is the case then to control them, you can try to hose them off with a strong stream of water...most are eaten before they can get back on the plant. If that does not work then as Anonymous suggested, spray with a product labeled as insecticidal soap such as Safer's Insecticidal soap - following label directions. Depending on the plant some dish soaps can damage foliage and since you have aphids on your herbs...foliage is an issue. :)


Black Aphids
by: Anonymous

I have the same problem with my rosemary and basil. I noticed that they are selective only in aromatic herbs. I use dishwashing soap mixed with water to kill them but they still keep on coming back.

Black aphids
by: Moni

Anonymous
If you have active growing basil and rosemary are these in your house or greenhouse, or do you live in the very far south?

If you have used "soap", perhaps it is not at the correct concentration, you might try using official insecticidal soap labeled for aphids...follow all label directions. Knocking them off with a strong stream of water should reduce the population also.

There are other products labeled for aphid control such as horticultural oils or neem...but as you do not say where you are and where the plants are...they may or may not be labeled for your need. Please check the labels to see that anything you use is labeled for your state, crop, and location of the plant.

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Little Black Wasp (Black robber fly)

by Grammadot
(Barto, PA)

Small swarms of these black (wasps?) appeared for a short time at the end of Summer. Thankfully, they ignored me, just played on my fence. Does anyone know what else they do?

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Flies?
by: Moni

With a quick look your black insect is a fly I think. The shape and antenna looks like that of a robber fly which is beneficial...feeding on other insect pests. I would be good to get more information.
How long is it?
Do you have another picture of it?
Thanks

WHAT , HOW?
by: Anonymous

i have found 6 inthe past 2 weeks in my bed room. Not sure how there getting in, theres no crackes, splits or holes in the screen or window frame. I would really like to know as well what these are. I don't get to close cause i'm very afraid of bees. (or bee like things)

Black robber fly
by: Moni

Anonymous
What? How?
Not sure this is what you have in your room. It would be great if you could take a photo and send it in to the Insect ID page.
Robber flies can not sting if that is what you have.The live in a variety of habitats, but most diverse in dry, open habitats - usually woodlands next to open grassy type locations. Larvae usually occur in soil or decaying wood. Do you have decaying wood nearby...really close by?
These adult flies are predatory on a variety of other insects, so they do not bother people.

Perhaps you have some other insect?

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Half Black/White Rice Krispie (True bug nymph)

by JJ
(Thornhill ON)

Do you know this bug?

Do you know this bug?

4 legs like spider , body is cone shaped, back is whitish and like rice krispie, front is blackish

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Legs
by: MyMo

Hard to tell from picture, but all insects have six legs, and spiders have eight legs unless someone has been pulling the legs off.FYI

Strange bug
by: Anonymous

Yeah, never heard of a bug with only 4 legs - unless this is a never before discovered species - may want to consult some insect experts.
May want to avoid relating bugs to food, though, lol!

rice krispie bug
by: robb4265

It looks like what we call a pumpkin bug. Not good for the garden.

squash bug
by: gardenlover

last summer as my beautiful squash leaves grew so did my squash bugs! They laid their eggs under the leaves and when they matured hundreds of these bugs appeared! Sprays would not work! I did not use chemcal sprays. The best I could do was grab,wrap the leaf around and squeeze!

True bug nymph
by: Moni

Well, I agree it looks like the young or nymph of the squash bug, but the legs are too long for it to be that family of true bugs.
One member of this true bug order is the water strider...as it slides over water you only see 4 legs. So that is a possibility as I see it crawling out of what looks like water, except the body is too wide.
The family of true bugs with those long legs is probably best represented by the Assassin bugs. This is the young nymphal stage which makes it harder to identify. This family does tend to have rather flat abdomens which this insect looks to have also.
How long and wide of a body was this insect?
What time of year did you see it?
Did it crawl out of the water or just land on the bucket?
Were there any others around? What plants were around the area?
Thanks

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blackish 6 legs antennae big jumps (cricket)

by Nick
(white plains, NY)

It's fairly large, torsoe as large as a large bee with 6 legs and long antennae, it jumps fairly long distances seems to be a little over 6 inches. The insect is on a crumpled white bag i refuse to pick it up with a paper towel or anything thin because they seem so thick and full of fluid.

Doug notes this isn't a good picture but I"m hoping Moni can see it clearly enough to give a close id (if not individual species)

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perhaps a cricket?
by: Donalda.......

The picture is difficult to make out. Did you mean in your write up that it could jump 6 inches or it's size was 6 inches? From the shape of the body it appears to be a cricket.It would be a guess to say that the appendage protruding on the left is an ovapositor.Perhaps Moni can be of a greater assistance.

Cricket
by: Moni

Nick
Like Donalda said the picture is hard to make out. It is a true cricket, probably in the field cricket subfamily Gryillinae...again probably a field cricket or house cricket(different genuses).
And as Donalda said it does look like a female as it seems to have an ovipositor.
Where was it found? What size is it? Does it have long wings?
If you have a clearer photo that would help ID it closer if you need that.
Thanks Donalda for the thorough response!

I hate these things
by: Thomas M

I killed 2 on my back porch last week, and one 2 night. I had never seen them until a couple years ago in my storage shed, now my shed is over run with them. As soon as the door opens you can see them hop around like a puppy happy to see their master. I have come to the conclusion that when it storms they look for dry ground and they migrate to my screened in porch. I know the picture doesn't show much but they are big and unpredictable because they can jump far distances. When I see them they either taste Jordans or Nikes. One day I will call the orkin man to spray my shed, because its a matter of time before they learn how to make their way into my house.

Camel Cricket
by: Anonymous

That looks like a camel or cave cricket. A really scary freaky camel or cave cricket.

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Miniature Ladybug-type Insect (Common carpet beetle )

by Tammy Johnson Mayer
(Rural Tamworth, Ontario, Canada)

I found this on the inside of a window sill on the first mild day in April. Although it looks just like a ladybug, it is less than 1mm long. Fortunately, it was set free to enjoy the spring. Thanks kindly for your help.

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Common carpet beetle
by: Moni

Tammy
Your tiny beetle is the Buffalo carpet beetle or also called common carpet beetle.
It is found thru-out the US and Canada...as well as worldwide, tho most often seen in the north.
The larvae are known to infest goods made from animal products, such as carpets, wool, textiles, and also preserved museum specimens.
It can take the larvae 65-70 days to go thru the various stages to turn into an adult depending on room temperature. Adults make their way outside to feed and mate. The adults feed on nectar and pollen from light colored flowers.
It is best to prevent infestations by thorough cleaning like dusting and vacuuming. If the larvae or their damage (small holes in clothing) are found you can wash or dry clean fabrics. If the larvae are on objects that are not washable, the objects can be put in the freezer for several days to kill them. Once fabrics are clean store in tightly closed containers.
Hopefully, this was a single critter, but a thorough cleaning would be good.

Thank you!
by: Tammy

Moni, thank you so much for your detailed & informative comments! Yikes. We will certainly check out the room for more of these attractive, but concerning little beetles. The room gets cleaned regularly, but there is clothing and a few other things stored. Sounds like a call for better storage solutions!

Thanks again, Moni,

Tammy

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Black, long antenna (Whitespotted Sawyer beetle)

Very friendly 3 inch bug who seemed to enjoy human contact. Spotted in the Eastern Townships of Quebec, near Sutton.

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Whitespotted Sawyer beetle
by: Moni

Tho the photo is not very clear nor does it show the coloring well, I believe this is a male Whitespotted Sawyer.
This beetle is in the longhorn beetle family Cerambycidae. Most of these beetles have long antenna.
The female has more white mottling on the back and antenna. Adults feed on the needles and tender twig bark of various living conifers.
Larva of this beetle excavates galleries in coniferous trees,that are weakened or damaged by a fire, storms, ice, etc. They prefer to feed on white pine, but will attack jack pine, red pine, balsam fir, white spruce, black spruce, and red spruce.
This insect takes 2 years to complete its life cycle.

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tiny black insect with pincer claws (Pseudoscorpion spider)

by Sue Wylde
(Everett, WA)

very tiny black insect with claws

very tiny black insect with claws

this insect was extremely tiny, totally black, moved very quickly. It was found a bathroom where I suspect it found its way thru the skylight, there were no plants to identify its usual surroundings.

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Pseudoscorpion spider
by: Moni

Sue
These are actually small critters in the Arachnid class with the spiders. They are also called false scorpions. The front pincers are modified pedipalps found in regular spiders.
They are found in leaf litter, under bark and stones, in caves, and in people's homes. (I have found them in my house also).
Most have poison glands in their pincers which they use to stun small insects. So guess they are beneficial in the house. They are not large enough to bite people.

They do bite
by: Anonymous

I had one bite me five minutes ago and I have a bit of swelling and it's so itchy. They are gross and freak me out

Pseudoscorpion spider
by: Moni

Anonymous
These spiders are 3 mm or less in size. They are not known to bite or pinch. Are you sure this is the critter that got you?

Since they do carry a substance in the pincer, I suppose if you are sensitive to it, it could itch if it was strong enough to break the skin.

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Black and yellow striped Tree-climbers (Locust Borers)

by Ronnie

mystery bug

mystery bug

.75 inch up to more than one inch in length. Red legs. Pairs of these insects were attached to each other, piggyback. Several pairs of them are climbing all over the trees in front of my office building in Salt Lake City, UT. It is September. They look like wingless wasps.

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Locust Borer
by: Anonymous

I found out these are Locust Borers. They are detroying a pair of Black Locust trees on my office property.

Locust borers
by: Moni

Ronnie
You are correct that is what they are.
Since the larva feed on weakened or damaged trees your trees must have been under stress or damaged from something to attract the borers?

boars
by: Anonymous

We are in SE Idaho and have these infesting our purple locust. Our tree split last year in a large wind storm, yet grew back. We have been treating for insects, but they came back again anyway. Probably going to lose it. 😢

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Big Black Winged insect with long pinchers (Male Dobsonfly)

by David B. Rodriguez
(Washington DC)

Big Winged insect with long pinchers, brown in color,and spots in wings

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Male Dobsonfly
by: Moni

Your photo is of a dobsonfly male.
The females do not have the long 'pinchers', but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.

These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be one near by. The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.

Larvae (called hellgramites) are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two-three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter. Adults emerge spring to summer.
These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.




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black flying long antennae (Banded hickory borer)

Place: North Carolina, Carteret County, Newport/Morehead City

Bug is approx. 1/2 inch long six legs and anttenna longer than it's body. We found it flying around our house, unknown were came from might have been from out side, pic is on a white endtable

thanks.

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Guessing
by: Anonymous MO

I believe it is some form of longhorn beetle.

Banded hickory borer
by: Moni

My best guess from the photo, which does not show any color or detail, would be a banded hickory borer. The spikes out the tail end are common on this beetle as well as points on the middle thorax section. It is a longhorn beetle, family Cerambycidae.
The larva of the banded hickory borer feed on dead and seasoned branches and limbs of hardwood species, including oak and hickory.
Adults start flying from March thru September.

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blackish brown bug with painted eyes ( Eyed elater or Eyed click beetle)

by Katie
(Maryland)

This bug was flying around outside and happened to land on my sons back. When I went to take him off he got hard like a stick and played dead. I took him inside and put him in a bowel for awhile to see what he would do. about 20 mins later he "came back to life" and started crawling around and eating the leave. I soon let him go ago. I really would like to know what he is?

Comments for blackish brown bug with painted eyes ( Eyed elater or Eyed click beetle)

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Eyed elater or Eyed click beetle
by: Moni

Katie
That is a large click beetle called the Eyed Elater or Eyed Click beetle. The large eye like spots make it very easy to identify. The adults do come to lights, esp in the spring and early summer.
The click beetle family are known for playing dead. Once they are playing dead you can place them on their backs and they will "click" themselves over...reason for the name click beetle.
These are found in woodlands. The adults may feed on some nectar. The larvae are predatory in decaying wood, eating grubs of wood-boring beetles like (Cerambycidae or longhorn beetles).
Neat large beetles to find!

Here is where someone else found one.Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/just-wondering.html#ixzz0Jgfl6kM1&C

Weird Bug!!
by: Anonymous

Thanks, for the enformation on this funny looking bug. Was wondering what it was. I saw one at my daughters back yard in Menola,Fl.
Della

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black and orange Striped Bug (Three-lined potato beetle)

by JWLW
(Atkinson, NH USA)

This little guy is eating Liza's Datura.

Comments for black and orange Striped Bug (Three-lined potato beetle)

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Three-lined potato beetle
by: Moni

John
Liza has the three-lined potato beetle eating her Datura. They are solanaceaous plants like potatoes and tomatoes. They seem to like Datura sp and other nightshade family plants better, so perhaps they won't eat your potatoes. They rarely go to tomatoes.
The larva are 'hidden' by the adult putting its droppings on the larval backs.
The adults overwinter. Both the adults and larva feed on the plant.
For control you can either pick them off and put in soapy water or check the label for Rotenone or Spinosad. Spinosad lists beetles not sure what crops and specific beetles are on the label.
Thanks

THANKS
by: JWLW

THANKS MONI: We seem to have stopped them from having breakfast. Will know better in a few days, looks like plants are recovering

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Spikey Black Crawler with Red Rings (Giant leopard moth caterpillar)

by Alan Reiner
(Arlington, VA)

Found this thing on our front porch in Arlington VA. It's about 2 inches long when not playing dead, and it appears to actually be spikey, not just furry. The red rings between its segments are scary looking!

Sorry for the cat hair in the pic... that's not part of the bug.

Comments for Spikey Black Crawler with Red Rings (Giant leopard moth caterpillar)

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Giant leopard moth caterpillar
by: Moni

Alan
You have a caterpillar of the Giant leopard moth. It is a large white moth with black spots.
Yes the caterpillar will curl up when disturbed. The spines help keep predators away.
This insect overwinters as a late stage larva then will pupate then emerge as the moth.
The larva eat a range of plants including dandelion. They are not considered a pest, so enjoy having it around. Perhaps you will see the moth in a month or so!

wooly bear
by: Debby

I've always known them as "wooly bear" -predictors of winters. cute, aren't they?

Giant leopard moth caterpillar
by: Moni

The wooly bear caterpillar is smaller and a different genus species from this one.

moth dining
by: Northern Jim

something seemed to come out of the soil this Spring, earlier than most cold blooded neighbors, and ate the leaves, not the stems of the plant or the leaf stems.
I just found the first of these I've seen here, and wonder if they might have been the first to the table in the cabbage seedling patch.
Any idea when they become active in the Spring?

giant leopard moth caterpillar
by: Summer

I found one of these in my yard in Arlington,TX a few days ago. I kept bc its an interesting little thing and I wondered what it was. I first thought it was some hair and almost picked it up until I took a closer look. I would like to know what it eats and what type of habitat it lives in....Anyone knows?

Giant leopard moth caterpillar
by: Moni

Summer
This insect overwinters as a late stage larva then will pupate in spring to early summer. It then emerges as a moth.
The larvae feed on a great variety of broad-leaved plants, including banana, cabbage, cherry, dandelion, maple, orange, sunflower, violet, willow. It may be that your caterpillar is old enough that it will not eat...just need a little potting soil in the bottom of a jar or other container (where you can keep loose soil barely moist) for it to pupate.
Put a stick in the jar for the moth to climb up on when it emerges. It needs to pump the fluid from its body into the wings. A stick helps it to have room to spread its wings out properly.
Once it pupates, you will see the moth in a month or so!

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Black and orange (True bug maybe assasin bug)

by Kaye
(Portland, Oregon, USA)

The bug looks a lot like a boxelder bug, but it is thinner, has a small head, and it's legs are longer. Also, its underside and legs are green and it has wasp-like wings.
It is difficult to capture with a camera because it is very fast and energetic.

Comments for Black and orange (True bug maybe assasin bug)

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True bug maybe assasin bug
by: Moni

Kaye
This is a true bug and related to boxelder bugs, so you have the right idea!

Since I can not copy and paste this photo into my picture manager to blow up to a larger view, I can not identify it for sure. I will guess it is an Assasin bug

Correct
by: Kaye

Yes, I believe that that is it. Thanks!

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black spiderlike, spikey with yellow stripes (Lady beetle larva)

by Lawrence
(Southern California)

I found this black and spiderlike spikey insect on my carpet in my bathroom. It has yellow patters on the back part and is relatively small, but I don't know where it came from.

I thought it was a lady bug larva but it's different than that.

Southern California.

Comments for black spiderlike, spikey with yellow stripes (Lady beetle larva)

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Lady beetle larva?
by: Moni

Lawrence
From the photo a lady beetle larva is my best guess also...or a close relative. Do you have any side view photos or closer views to help learn more about what it looks like?
What size is this?
Were the color spots from droppings or where it got smashed?
Any more info would be helpful.Thanks

bug question
by: Anonymous

I believe that lady bug larvae is possible. Hard to tell from the photo. But from what I see the legs are longer and larger than a lady bug larvae.

Reply
by: Lawrence

I thought so too about the lady bug larva, but the legs are extremely long, and its body is not long like one, but ALMOST round.

It's about .3-.4 cm long.

lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Lawrence
The more I look at it and other images of lady beetle larva, I am sure that is what it is. I think it is the Multicolored Asian lady beetle larva..do you have them in your area of CA?
The length of legs can be deceiving depending on which stage of larva it is...they molt several times as they get bigger. And the yellow is probably the protective jucies given off like the adults do...which could be why it looks more rounded...they curl up a bit when caught and could have lost some fluids so looks smaller and rounder.

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Large 6 legged insect black (Whipscorpion)

by jessica
(california)

no idea what it is. I didn't find it but a friend did. Location was in california

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Whipscorpion
by: Moni

Jessica
You did not say how big this critter was, but it is a whipscorpion. It looks like the Giant whipscorpion without knowing more about it...that is the best guess.
This critter is an insect relative in the Class Arachnid - order Uropygi. This is the same Class as spiders and true scorpions. Critters in this class have 8 legs and if you look close the first set of legs have become long slender and similar to antenna rather than legs. There are also the claw/pinchers in the very front.

Whip scorpions do not have poison glands, but they can spray a chemical that smells like vinegar...giving them the nic name vinegaroons.
Whip scorpions hunt at night and feed mostly on insects like crickets and roaches as well as millipedes. This makes them valuable
predators. They live in dark moist places underground or burrow under logs, rotting wood, rocks, and other debris.

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Spiky Orange Black bug (Lady Beetle Larva)

by Kary
(Monrovia, CA)

Found in southern california

Comments for Spiky Orange Black bug (Lady Beetle Larva)

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Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Looks like you have a lady beetle larva. This is a good bug, so let it eat all those aphids that might be around. :-)

spicky orange black bug
by: Anonymous

this bug has been found on my smokable plant , will it hurt my plant?

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Anonymous
What ever your smokable plant is...you must have been smoking it instead of reading in the comments on that page - it says that is a lady beetle larva that eats aphids...which are insects. They do not eat plants.

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Brown & Black spiked bug (Keeled treehopper nymphs)

by Carole
(Vista, California)

Black & Brown spiked bug

Black & Brown spiked bug

8/28/2008 at 4pm in Southern California. They were not there yesterday.
I have never seen this bug before and I have been gardening for years. It is only one one branch of my tomato plant and I have about 15 tomato plants. I noticed that these bugs were on the shady side of the branch. When I moved the branch into the sun they moved to the shade. Also, when I put my hand near them they moved back but didn't leave.
What in the heck is it?

sorry I couldn't get a better picture. I have a few more so e me if you want me to send them to you.

Thank you!
Carole

Comments for Brown & Black spiked bug (Keeled treehopper nymphs)

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Keeled treehopper nymphs
by: Moni

They are a spiny looking bug!
These are the nymphs or young of the Keeled treehopper. They seem to be only in southern California and south. The nymphs and adults suck the juices out of tomato plants, so you need to control them to prevent damage or killing of your tomatoes.
Best control is insecticidal soap on the nymphs, but if you have adults you will need to spray with Neem.
One other item commonly mentioned with this insect is that there are usually ants around them. The ants feed on the "honeydew" or liquid droppings of the treehopper.
Hope that helps...if you need more info let me know.

I found the same bugs on the branch of one of my bushes (in Southern Cal)!!!
by: Anonymous

Thank you for your post! I've been searching the internet for some explanation. I'm also glad to hear that it's not a spider or other helpful bug.

Anyway, thanks again. Mystery solved.

they showed up out of no where
by: Andrew

i noticed the ants first. i have 3 plants of different variety and the the ants were only interested in the Big Beef. I've been trying to get rid of the ants for some time now as it appears that they made their home at the base of the plant. anyways, i just noticed on 9/08/09 these weird spiked bugs and there were ants crawling all around them. i sprayed them with soapy water and then i noticed green leaf like bugs there too. i came to find out that those were the adults. i cant find any info on how to kill these things but i did find out that they lay their eggs inside the soft flesh of the tomato plant steam. i am gonna find out a way to kill them and ill get back to you.

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very small black bug (Dermestid Beetle)

by Kerri
(Pittsburgh, PA)

very small black bug

very small black bug

This bug is about the size of an eraser and is completely black. We only find it in one bedroom of our house. We sweep and spray and they keep coming back but only to that one room. We usually find it on a stuffed animal or the bed. PLEASE help!! We need to know what it is so that we can get rid of it and obviously general bug spray doesn't do the trick.

Comments for very small black bug (Dermestid Beetle)

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Dermestid Beetle
by: Moni

From your description and where you find this beetle, I would guess this is a Dermestid beetle...probably a Black Larder beetle if 7-9 mm or Black carpet beetle, if smaller. But without actually seeing it(checking antenne and such) I can not be positive.
Dermestid beetles are common in homes. They feed on wool carpets and wool or silk clothing, as well as any animal product. The animal product list includes:dried meats, dead insects, stuffed (real) animals(unless the stuffing in the teddy bear is not polyester), fur, feathers, leather, dog food, rugs with plant fiber backing, hair and dried skin. They can also feed on seeds, cork, grain or other cereal products.
So, to control this pest it is best to find the source of food. If you can find and eliminate the source, then do a thorough cleaning being sure to vacuum(cracks and crevices), clean all bedding, check the closet for food source and clean and wash all surfaces (including window crevices) with soap and water. Clothing that might be suspect can be dry cleaned which will kill the pests.
Sanitation is the best control. Without finding the source of food, chemicals are not going to solve the problem.
Good luck with finding the source! Let me know if you do or have more questions.

what is it
by: Anonymous

i found a black bug in my bathroom i think its a baby it was not the size of a eraser but it looked the same!!! WHAT IS IT !!!

What is it by Anonymous
by: Moni

Anonymous concerning your black bug. After reading the comments left previous to yours, you do not know what yours is...would you please send a photo and more information.
If it is a beetle, then what you have is the adult. 'Baby' beetles are larva or worm like looking insects.
Please send a photo with where you found it, what size it is, how many are there and any other characteristics you can to help with ID.
Thanks.

black bug in bedroom
by: Anonymous

when you kill it does it crumble up

black beetle
by: Moni

Anonymous
Yes when a beetle dries and is smashed it does crumble. Dried insects are very brittle.

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Black and Orange (True Bug)

by Grammadot
(Barto.PA)

Garden Guard

Garden Guard

He was a faithful guard all summer (2007) on the sunflowers that the birds planted in the flowerbed. I guess my dad was right; the male of all species is the most good looking.


Doug says he's with your dad. :-)

Comments for Black and Orange (True Bug)

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True Bug
by: Moni

Looks like one of the true bugs (Hemiptera order)that like to eat pest insects like aphids and such.
It is an immature so I am not sure which one it is specifically.
It is good to have guards in the garden!

Harry lives in Fla too.
by: kkinpvb

I have tried to identify this same bug without any results. If this is what I have in my garden, it flys. I live in North Fla. Have tried to take photo's to send in but they aren't clear enough to positively i.d. The immature bugs don't have the black markings yet. Same one do you think?

Wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

kkinpvb
After a little practice I have learned that this insect is a wheel bug nymph. They are great to have int the garden. All stages prey upon other insects - caterpillars, aphids, bees, sawflies etc. - and are thus considered beneficial.

Harry
by: kkinpvb

I don't think this is my bug. Looks very similiar but the orange body has about 4 distinct markings. At least the mature bug has, the smaller immature only has two black markings. Thank you so much for the site! Thank you too for taking the time to respond. :)

Wheel bug nymph
by: Moni

kkinpvb
Sorry it was not the one. Keep trying with the photo and send in your best. Sometimes I get lucky and can figure it out if it is just a little off focus. :-)
You might look on bug guide at other bugs that look similar by clicking on 'browse' if you enter the site I listed. It will list others in that genus or even family.
Good Luck!

Harry
by: kkinpvb

Appreciate your remarks. Will keep looking for my Harry!! Thanks again!

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