white and black moth with orange body (Colona moth)

about 1 1/2 to 2 inches in length, white and black striped moth with orange body.

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Colona moth
by: Moni

Your photo is of a tiger moth called Colona moth.
They are found on the east coast of the US from VA south, then west to TX, so I assume you live in that area.
This insect if found in moist woodlands. Caterpillars feed on a variety of plants especially deciduous shrubs and trees including but not limited to apple, ash, and hackberry.

Mel3
by: Anonymous

Thanks, it's the only one that I've seen like it. I live in Arkansas near Fort Smith.

tiger moth sited
by: Anonymous

We live in Morris, Illinois and we found on there. We are surrounded by woods.

Found in the Northeast
by: Michael Frees

I recently came upon one such moth at my Leyden, MA farm, which includes woods, meadows, and a great many apple trees.

Midwest Moth
by: Reades McCoy

Well I live in Wisconsin and I walked outside my home today August 21st 2014 and found two just hanging onto the side of the house.

tigger moth
by: maryke clement

we live in chatham kent ontario canada we see these all the time here

Colona moth
by: Moni

Ontario and Wisconsin folks
The species Haploa colona, the colona moth is only found in southeastern US. However there are six other Haploa species of moths that look similar that are found in North America.
The different species vary in patterns of the dark markings on white.
We would need to see a photo of each to know which species you saw.

Interesting how much some moths can look alike, but are totally different species. The fun stuff about identifying insects! :)

colona moth
by: Anonymous

how do I send you a picture, because I live in Wisconsin and the moth I just took a picture of looks exactly like the one pictured

To Have Your Insect Identified
by: Doug

To have your insect picture identified, go to http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/insect-identification.html or click the link under these comments.

colona moth
by: pattie

my friend just found one while painting her apt her in London ontario canada very pretty they are
augsut 26 2015

Saw one in Dallas
by: Steven

It was on a pumpkin plant, on 9/12/15. Do not recall seeing one before, fairly exotic look.

On my window
by: Obie

There were two mating on the window of my screen door and another on the door frame. St. Charles MO. I wonder if they are the culprits in my apple and nectarine trees.

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black white moth (Nessus Sphinx)

We caught this at our Oriole feeder, it appears to be a black moth, two white rings around it's lower body

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Nessus Sphinx
by: Moni

Your moth is a Nessus sphinx moth.
They do kind of look like hummingbirds as they fly around during the day and at dusk looking for nectar from flowers.

This moth is found in the eastern US and Canada.

According to bugguide.net the larvae feed on Ampelopsis, grape, and cayenne pepper.

These are fun to see.

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Large moth with brown camo design (Great Tiger Moth)

by Deathbliss
(Camas, WA)

For a sense of scale

For a sense of scale

For a sense of scale Up close

The picture below will show this beauty much better than any description. I found him/her sitting on the windowsill in the spare bedroom here at my grandmother's house in Camas, WA. I watch moths all the time, but have NEVER seen this kind before! I'd love to know what he or she is!

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Great Tiger Moth
by: Moni

Deathbliss
Your moth is a Great Tiger Moth. This moth is found thru-out North America in open meadows, gardens, wooded or shrubby areas.

The caterpillars feed on a wide variety of plants and trees including but not limited to birches, poplars, brambles, Alliums, sedums, geum, plums, blueberries, nettles, yarrow, willows, etc

There is one generation per year.

Bugguide notes this moth "Arctia caja was a favourite with early European collectors, who selectively bred it to create unusual colours and forms.

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patterned moth butterfly (Vine sphinx moth)

by Lisa K. Marquez
(Fort Worth, TX)

Found this on my trash can.. just beautiful; Please can someone tell me what this is.

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Sphinx Moth
by: Denise

Eumorpha vitis USGS/Amy Smith, the Vine Sphinx
The upperside of the moth is dark pinkish brown. Each forewing has a lighter brown band along the costa, and sharp pinkish white bands and streaks. The hindwing has a pink patch on the inner margin. Note large brown parallelogram between lowest striga up to transverse lines.

Vine sphinx moth
by: Moni

Lisa
Agree with Denise - your moth is a Vine sphinx moth. Not sure what the green spots are?

This moth is found from FL west to AZ and south into Mexico onward.
The moth feeds on nectar of flowers, while the caterpillars feed on leaves of plants in the same genus as grapes, or magnolia, Virginia creeper, and the genus Ludwigia which are aquatic plants.

Sphinx Month
by: Millie

I'm in Louisiana and I saw this moth outside my office and thought it was dried grass but when I looked a little closer it looked more like an insect. Then I poked it and it opened its wing to reveal the beautiful pink coloring with a hint of green. Of course I thought it was a butterfly until my daughter informed me it was a moth because of the fat body and wing shape. We have no flowers around here so I wonder where it came from but it is the most beautiful and interesting MOTH I have ever seen.

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yellow with blue and orange butterfly (Canadian Tiger swallowtail)

by brinda hunt
(sarnia ont ca)

i was out taking pix an come across this butterfly

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Canadian Tiger swallowtail
by: Moni

Brinda
Your photo is of the Canadian tiger swallowtail. They are fast fliers so it is not easy to get such a great photo!
The Canadian tiger and Eastern tiger look very similar however the hind wing of the Canadian tiger has a black line from front to tail that the Eastern tiger does not have.
The adults feed on nectar, while the larva feed on a wide variety of plants including willow, poplar, cherry and ash trees.

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moth on mint flower (Gray hairstreak butterfly)

by nancy
(annapolis md)

Moth or butterfly? This was on a mint plant's flower, and stayed still for so long while I ran to get the camera and took pictures. I'm sure he's something ridiculously common, but I can't find a picture anywhere!

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Gray hairstreak butterfly
by: Moni

Nancy
It is amazing that it sat still for you for so long...
This is the gray hairstreak butterfly. They are common for the hairstreaks and are found thru out North America south to Mexico.

They are most often seen in open fields and weedy areas.

The caterpillars feed on flowers and fruits of many plants including peas, mallows, beans, clovers, and cotton.

The adult butterflies get nectar from many flowers like your mint as well as milkweed, dogbane, goldenrod, trefoil, and clover.

thank you
by: nancy

Wow, thank you so much. It was pretty amazing - the little guy was so intent on the flower I took pictures for about 10 minutes, before it was so hot I had to stop (it was about 95 degrees that morning!)

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Butterfly or moth? (Common Wood-nymph butterfly)

by Robert
(Charleston, AR)

Found on my back porch one morning. Tried to find online, but couldn't. Would appreciate some help. Thanks.

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Butterfly
by: Marna (CT)

This is a Common Wood-Nymph which are part of the satyr family. Common all over the US but very common in the arid west. Their larval foodplant is grasses.

Common Wood-nymph butterfly
by: Moni

Robert
Yes, as Marna says this is a butterfly called the common wood-nymph. They are found in open fields, prairies, woodland edges, and savannas.
The butterflies feed on nectar, tree sap and rotten fruit.
And as Marna said, the larvae feed on grasses such as oatgrass, KY bluegrass, bluestems, and purple top.
They are found through out North America...tho bugguide reports that they are not found in the SW, TX, southern FL or Northern ME.

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moth with claws (Slug Caterpillar moth)

by nicole
(mt pocono, pa, usa)

moth that has 2 claws

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Saddle back
by: Lin

I'm not 100% sure, but it looks like a Saddleback caterpillar moth. I have only had a saddleback caterpillar sting me and I recognize the coloring underneath. The moths have claws.

Slug Caterpillar moth
by: Moni

Nicole
Great photo!
Lin has the correct family of moths, however the genus for this moth is Euclea, not Acharia that the saddleback's are in. Great job, Lin!

It is very hard to know which species this moth is because the green areas vary a lot...even the experts of this family are using DNA to try to figure it out!


The caterpillars feed on woody and herbaceous plants like oaks,maples, apple, willows, beeches, etc. They do have spines that could cause a rash so be careful if you see them.



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Orange insect w/ black and white markings (Ailanthus Webworm Moth)

by Colleen Smith
(Almont, MI USA)

I live in southeast Mishigan and saw this beetle (?) crawling on my milkweed and butterflyweed flowers. He was about an inch long. I spend a lot of time in my butterfly garden snapping pics and have never seen this little guy before!

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What is it?
by: Colleen Smith

I was hoping someone could identify this insect...forgot to add that in the original post :-) Thanks!

FOUND ONE
by: MJW

I found a dead one in my polebarn last night.in Highland Mi..was wondering what it was too

Ailanthus Webworm Moth
by: Moni

Colleen and MJW
Your insect is a moth...Ailanthus Webworm Moth.
They are found over most of eastern North America.
The adults feed on nectar of various flowers. The caterpillars are found in webs in Ailanthus (tree of heaven) and paradise trees. The caterpillars may also feed on other deciduous trees and shrubs.
The Ailanthus tree is not native and invasive, while the insect is native...so it has learned to like this invasive tree....a good thing!

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/white-and-orange-ailanthus-webworm-moth-comments.html#ixzz0u5k0y8Vb

Ailanthus Webworm Moth)
by: Anonymous

he was flying on my comp. screen while i was watching TV so i caught him an its def. one of these moths an i live in Ohio is he like far from home or something iv never seen one before very pretty bug though :) thought id share :)

Ailanthus webworm moth
by: Moni

Ohio Anonymous
Ailanthus trees are in Oh and this moth is there also...so not strange to see.
Moths are attracted to lights so your computer screen and a hole in a window or door screen allowed it in for a visit.
Glad you got to see this pretty moth.

Akron, Ohio
by: Fred Propst

I live on Akron, Ohio and I just fond one of these little guys on the tailgate or my pick up truck. I've never seen anything like him before! I never would have guessed it was a moth.

Ailanthus Webworm Moth
by: Moni

Fred
Yes, a rather pretty moth!
Thanks for checking to see what insect you found!

Found in NY
by: Danielle

So I saw one of these little guys near my porch light today (New York) and it stayed in the same place and position for hours... Got a beautiful shot and posted to FB and IG. I spent hours obsessing over finding out the species-as I have never seen one before... Thanks to you, I now know... It's a moth! A beauty for sure!

found one in Ohio
by: Anonymous

I found mine in Ohio and took a picture of it and posted it on Facebook to see if anyone knew what it was. (No luck) I thought it was a colorful lightning bug because it had a couple of them hanging out with it. Would never had thought about it being a moth

Work Moth
by: Abby

I live in the Sandhills of North Carolina and found one of these in the store that I work in, my manager caught it and we kept it sitting on my register to see if anyone knew what it was, but no one did! Good to know what it is now, I've never seen one before.

In PA also!
by: Ivoros

I saw one on my porch and took a pic of it. Love the daisy flower markings!

orange white four leg mystery bug?
by: WolvesRule

I found one of these today In northern ohio on the side of my house I don't know what it is? but I am also curious

Found one on my veranda
by: Anonymous

There's this orange white and black one inch long insect on my veranda. Never seen one before and had to look it up. I would not have thought it was a moth. Very cool looking.
I should add that it's in Ontario, Canada

Sheridan, Arkansas
by: GYPSYSOL7

Just found this little beauty on my front porch window shutter. So nice to be able to have an identification.

Eastern Kansas
by: Anonymous

Thanks for your help identifying this! I've lived in Kansas for almost 20 years and have never seen one of these until tonight.

Orange Insect with white spots
by: Anonymous

My husband and I just saw one of these for the first time in Morris, IL.

Found a little one
by: Carrie

I just found 1 in the furnace filter....never seen 1 of these before.
I live in Southwestern Ontario.

Found one - different color
by: Lori

Hi -My daughter found one of these in her sink but instead of the orange color it is almost a pale green, very light colors. Is it the same thing? Thanks

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Brown Polyphemus Moth?

by Mike
(Champaign, Illinois)

This one has cooperated and has his wings open for me. Wingspan is approximately 4 inches. Yellow eye spots on wings. Brown and Pink lines across wings. Brownish thick body, furry legs and big antenae.

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Polyphemus Moth
by: Moni

Mike
Great photo! and excellent documentation on size. Thanks for sharing this beautiful Polyphemus moth.

Thanks, Moni!
by: Mike

I appreciate you sharing your expertise and helping a novice like me.

Curious
by: Anonymous

I found one on the floor of the bathroom at my job I am really curious cause I came back this morning and it is still here I know he is not dead...I thought about taking him home but I dont really know everything I need to know to take care of him like what he eat or drinks...HELP!!!

Polyphemus moth
by: Moni

Curious
The Polyphemus moth does not eat. It would be good if you took it outside where you work if there are some trees around. Set it up high enough a cat or bat can not get it. If not you could take it home and put it in the back yard...then it would at least have a chance at finding a mate.

Thanks for your great concern!!

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Large Yellow Brown Fuzzy Moth (Imperial moth, male)

by Kati O
(Lee's Summit, Mo)

This was found on our front porch in Lee's Summit Missouri. She/he is rather large and body is fuzzy. We placed a pair of safety glasses for measuring purposes.

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Imperial moth, male
by: Moni

Kati
Your photo is of an Imperial moth. The more yellow color tells me it is a male, the females have more brown markings. This is one of the giant silk moths in the family Saturniidae. Being so large they do fly rather awkwardly.
The adults come to lights at night. They do not feed.
Larva come in a green or brown coloration. According to Bugguide, larvae feed on leaves of Bald Cypress, basswood, birch, cedar, elm, hickory, Honeylocust, maple, oak, pine, Sassafras, Sweetgum, sycamore, and walnut.
The larva pupate in burrows in the soil. The pupa stage is what overwinters, so the adult comes out in summer.
In Newark you probably only have one generation per year.
They are beautiful moths.



Beautiful
by: Lynn

What a beautiful moth! How wonderful to have a site where bugs can be identifiied.

Sexing the Imperial Moth
by: Holly Ellison

Moni, Would you please share how to tell the male Imperial Moth apart from the female? I now have 3 of these beauties at my backdoor and would love to know how to differentiate.
Thanks so much for your time! Great site!

Imperial moth
by: Moni

Holly
The male moth has more coloration...more darker colors on the wings than the female. Also the male will have very bushy antenna if you can see them.
The female is larger if you see the two next to each other.


Thank you so much for posting the identifying information
by: JC

We just found one of these in South West Ohio. Beautiful - I have never seen such a large moth. Based on the information on this site, I believe it is a male Imperial Moth.

Imperial moth
by: Moni

JC
So glad you got to see the imperial moth! Tho this is a big moth, there are larger ones such as the Cecropia, Polyphemus, and Promethia moths.

Freaked out in Florida
by: Jill R.

I was sitting in my back patio last night on the west coast of Florida when one of these flew over and landed on my windowsill. It was there till the next afternoon-didn't move once. I thought it was dead so went to touch it and it flew towards me and I ran screaming lol really cool n fuzzy looking!

imperial moth Texas Sept
by: Anonymous

One found in Central Texas on Sept 20th 2014

Male and female together on rose bush - Spring Hill, FL
by: Anonymous

Extraordinary!

Imperial moths
by: Moni

Spring Hill, FL
So fabulous you got to see a pair of them! It is extraordinary!!

Not many folks have seen that! Enjoy!

Hope you took a few pics!

Imperial Moth Bonne Terre, MO
by: Anonymous

Just saw my first Imperial Moth tonight around 11pm; he flew into the Garage when I opened the door and turned on the lights. Flew all over the place, not too graceful because of his size finally got him out of the garage... my little dachshund Annie was with me she was getting dizzy trying to follow him with her eyes, she could not figure out what he was, but knew it was O.K. because I was laughing. Beautiful creature.

Spotted one
by: Anonymous

Found 1 snoozing on my house this morning (8-2-16), southern IL, USA

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brown moth blue eyes (Black witch moth)

by Mary Ann Johnson
(San Antonio, TX)

Dark brown, with blue bands and blue "eyes" on the upper wings, do not see "eyes" on the lower wings (resting position). Has wing span of about 5 inches. Was in our garage.

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Black Witch Moth
by: Lin

That looks like a black witch moth and they live in Mexico, I believe.

Black Witch Moth Myths
by: Lin

The nocturnal Black Witch - the largest moth in the continental United States, with a wing span of six to seven inches.
According to folklore, if the Black Witch flies into your field of view, it conveys a curse from an enemy. If it flies over your head, it will cause your hair to fall out. If it flies into your home when you are sick, you will not get well. You will die.

On a happier note, if the Black Witch appears before you after someone has died, it represents the soul of the person returning to bid you farewell. Should one alight on you, you will become rich.

Should one land above the door of your home, you will win the lottery.

Black witch moth
by: Moni

Mary Ann
As Lin says, this is the black witch moth. It lives in South and Central America, but migrates north from Mexico during the rainy season from June-August. It is common in TX tho has been recorded in all 50 states. It can fly great distances in just a few nights...hiding in shade during the day...so your garage was a great place for it to rest.
The caterpillars feed on foliage of trees of the bean family. In the southwest food trees would be Acacia, Cassia, Ebony and Mesquite, while in the eastern states it would be Kentucky coffee tree and locusts.
The moth is the largest of the Owlet family and has been mistaken for bats.

There is quite a history behind this moth and the myths that Lin mentions.

Black Witch Moth Sighting
by: Tim

Sighted a Black Witch in the shade of our patio cover. Southern California area. Oceanside, CA. 12/13/2015. Very beautiful.
It landed above our back door entry so I'm on my way to buy some lotto tickets. Thanks for the info and pictures.

Black witch moth
by: Moni

Tim
Cool find! And so late in the year!

Well if you win the lotto, let us know :))

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Orange Moth (Spiny oakworm moth)

by Karin Rochester
(Cary, NC)

last picture taken - shows white circle on wing

last picture taken - shows white circle on wing

last picture taken - shows white circle on wing First picture - wings still stuck together

Orange Moth found in grass, appears to have just emerged. Wings were wet and together. Watched as they started to dry and open a bit. Just walked and walked on grass the whole time we watched. Dappled wings have white spots on top - can see in the first picture. Thanks for your help - my 2nd grader found her and would love to know what it is! Found near Raleigh, NC. 9-11-10

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Spiny oakworm moth
by: Moni

Karin
This is a spiny oakworm moth. It is one of the silkworm moths - family Saturniidae.

These are found from northeast US and southern Ontario south to Florida then west to MN and south to TX.

The caterpillars feed on oak, tho have been reported to feed on hazel and basswood.

Thank You!
by: Karin Rochester

Thanks, Moni, for your work with identifying this insect and posting it so that I can show my 2nd grader what she found. I was lost trying to identify it myself, so I really appreciate your help!!

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Orange flying fat bug (Hummingbird clearwing moth)

by Linda
(Haverhill, MA)

orange red flying creature

orange red flying creature

orange red flying creature orange red flying creature 2

I saw this flying creature hanging out with the bumblebees and dragonflies in my garden about 6PM tonight. It was about twice the size of a good size bumble bee and visited the same plants they did (purple NE Asters and lilies). Its wings never stopped buzzing so this picture is the best I could get. Is it related to moths or locusts?

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A moth
by: Anonymous

I too have seen something like this and from what I can discover it is a type of sphinx moth (maybe hummingbird moth or bumblebee moth) - it likes the same plants as bees and hummingbirds - buddleia and monarda especially.

Hummingbird clearwing moth
by: Moni

Linda
The insect in your photo is a clearwing moth, probably the Hummingbird clearwing moth. They fly at dusk and sometimes during the day and do look like a large bumble bee or small hummingbird.
Adults feed on nectar from tubular flowers. Caterpillars of this moth feed on hawthorn, honeysuckle, snowberry, or viburnum plants.
These are seen thru out North America.

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Light brown moth with orange fuzzy body (Edwards' glassy-wing moth)

by Stephanie
(Fresno, California)

This moth was found in Gilroy Calif, by a friend, Lorelei Monohan. It has a light brown body with darker brown design on wings and a vibrant orange fuzzy body.

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Edwards' glassy-wing moth
by: Moni

Stephanie
Your moth is the Edwards' glassy-wing moth. This is only found on the west coast into AZ.
This is one of the tiger moths. The moth gets its name as the wings shimmer in the lights. They are active in the fall.
Caterpillars of this moth feed on oak tree foliage.

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Unusual Beautiful Brown Moth (Walnut sphinx moth)

by Holly Ellison
(Conroe, Texas, U.S.A.)

Unknown Species

Unknown Species

Unusual Brown Moth. Odd shaped wings, tail curves upward, head appears very furry. Approx. 3" wing span. 40 miles North of Houston, TX, USA on Sept. 9, 2010

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Walnut sphinx moth
by: Moni

Holly
This is a walnut sphinx moth.
Your moth is found all over the Eastern half of the US and Canada.
They are found in fields and wooded areas. The caterpillars feed on not only walnuts but hornbeam, butternut, hickory, cherry, beech and alder. The adults do not feed.
It is said that the caterpillars make a whistle like hiss when handled and jerk their body around when bothered.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/brown-moth-walnut-sphinx-moth-comments.html#ixzz100qQUzw3

Moth in East Texas
by: Ginny

I've lived in Tyler almost 8 years, and for the first time this spring I've been seeing these moths. They almost look like little bats, and I don't really like them. Interesting to have them identified. But how can I get rid of them safely? I don't really like them sticking on my screen door!

Stealth
by: Spence

I found a moth like this on my window screen the other day at my house in Purdon, TX. I thought it looked very stealth.

Walnut sphinx moth
by: Moni

Spence
Yes, they do have the shape of a stealth bomber :)

Sighting
by: Myra

It was very big and odd. I couldn't tell if it was a butterfly or moth. After lots of searching I found this picture which matches mine.
Thanks

Walnuts sphinx Moth
by: Anonymous

I'm in Norman, Oklahoma and this moth greeted me at my front door in my apt complex...I have a pic if your interested.

Indiana
by: Anonymous

I live in Indiana and a couple of these moths have shown up on my property. I was looking for what kind of moth they were. All my searching lead to this site. Thanks for helping me out.

Walnut sphinx
by: Moni

Indiana
Glad we could help.
There are lots of insect photos labeled at the site if you need to know more.

If you have a photo you do not know what it is please follow the directions and submit it. :)

Iowa
by: Anonymous

Found one here in newton iowa

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Brown 3" moth with yellowish-orange striped body (Carolina sphinx moth)

by Rebecca Sweet
(Los Altos, California, USA)

Dead moth hanging by his tongue?!

Dead moth hanging by his tongue?!

I found this dead moth in Los Altos, California. The poor thing was hanging from his tongue (not sure of the actual term?) which seems to have been caught on the dead 'Popcorn' rose bud. If you look at the photo you can see the stick-straight tongue, still attached to the rose bud. I think it may be a Sphynx moth?

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Carolina sphinx moth
by: Moni

Rebecca,
You are correct it is a sphinx moth...the Carolina sphinx which is the adult of the tobacco hornworm.
It is very interesting that it died while feeding on the rose!
Not sure how that could have happened, but verrrry interesting.
The tongue is a good description and does work tho officially it is called a proboscis that is tube like so it can suck up the flower nectar.
The caterpillars feed on leaves of potato, tomato, tobacco, peppers, and eggplants.This is the Nightshade family--Solanaceae.

Thanks for sharing such an interesting photo!!

Brown Sphinx Month
by: Anonymous

Thanks, Moni, for confirming what exactly this poor moth was! I appreciate the information!

Dead moth
by: Anonymous

When moths die like this, it isn't because they were feeding and suddenly died, they die because they run out of energy reserves, they can't fly well and they will try as hard as they can to find nectar or water even if there is none, and theyre unable to curl it back up, and when they die thier bodies fall and the very end tip of thier proboscis is usually curled and gets caught on things easily.

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cylindrical body, orange, black, yellow (Ailanthus Webworm Moth)

by Jan Normandale
(Toronto Canada)

orange, black, yellow : 4 legged insect

orange, black, yellow : 4 legged insect

photographed in Elizabeth IL USA

42°19'29"N, 90°16'00"W

Comments for cylindrical body, orange, black, yellow (Ailanthus Webworm Moth)

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Ailanthus Webworm Moth
by: Moni

Jan
Your insect is a moth...Ailanthus Webworm Moth.
They are found over most of eastern North America.
The adults feed on nectar of various flowers. The caterpillars are found in webs in Ailanthus (tree of heaven) and paradise trees. The caterpillars may also feed on other deciduous trees and shrubs.
The Ailanthus tree is not native and invasive, while the insect is native...so it has learned to like this invasive tree....a good thing!

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/orange-insect-w-black-and-white-markings-ailanthus-webworm-moth-comments.html#ixzz0uRbYeASF

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Brown Moth with a 3mm yellow dot on forewing (Polyphemus Moth)

by Mike
(Champaign, Illinois)

This moth hung under a window ledge for about two hours without opening his wings. I did manage to see a 3mm yellow dot on one of the wings. It had a thick body, furry legs, and broad antennae like a luna moth. 2.5 - 3"large

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Polyphemus Moth
by: Moni

Mike
From your description and what can be seen in the photo, your moth is a Polyphemus moth.
This is one of the silkmoths, family Saturnidae, are the largest of all moths and this is one of the most common.
They overwinter in large silky light brown leaflike cocoons.
The larva become large green caterpillars. They feed on a wide variety of leaves of trees and shrubs including willow, birch, hickory, maple, oak, and members of the rose family like apple.
The adult moths do not eat, but live from the stored food of the caterpillar.




Thanks, Moni!
by: Mike

Based on one of the other photos on this site I suspected it might be a Polyphemus moth. My pictures weren't very good and the moth wouldn't open his wings. Thank you for confirming the identity of this guy.

the HUGH moth that appear out of the blu!
by: Anonymous

there is one right under my door i sprayed it to death and now i put it in my lunch box to take it to school monday! im so excited about what there going to say. im going to try upload a picture if possible hold tite peace out safe G!

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pink moth (Spanish moth)

by Kelly
(Tabor City nc usa)

pink moth

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Spanish moth
by: Moni

Kelly
Your photo is of the Spanish moth - the larva is called the convict caterpillar.

They are found in the eastern half of US as well as Central and South America.

The caterpillars feed on spider lily, amaryllis and narcissus; and have also been reported on figs in the continental US.
Bugguide reports that the "larvae have been reared on "iceberg" lettuce".
Really neat looking moth and caterpillar!
Thanks for submitting it!

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brown Moth (Royal walnut/ Regal moth)

by Amanda D.
(Leonardtown, MD)

Light brown moth with yellowish spots on wings, red-orange head with yellowish stripes. Medium sized. I'd like to know what kind of moth this is!

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Royal walnut/ Regal moth
by: Moni

Amanda
This is the Royal walnut moth also called the Regal moth. The caterpillar of this moth is called the Hickory horned devil...it is very large mostly greenish worm with black "horns".
Like most of the silkworm moths the adult does not feed. The caterpillar feeds on ash, hickory, sycamore, walnut and other trees and shrubs.


fuzzy yellow and orange butterfly
by: krista

wow! This butterfly is beautiful. I searched all over and cant find any info on it.. but the same exact ones were at my house the other day.

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Blue and Red Moth (Red-Shouldered Ctenucha moth)

by Rob Holland
(Nevada City, California, USA)

Lucha Mask-Faced Moth?

Lucha Mask-Faced Moth?

Lucha Mask-Faced Moth?

I photographed this wonderful one at the Humboldt State University campus in Arcata CA during the last week of July 2010.
It was about an inch long from the "nose" to the end of the wings - maybe another 1/2 inch of antennae.
From above - The wings are dark blue-black with silver lined tips. There are 2 bright shining scarlet red lines from the neck to the beginning of the tail sections. The pointed head and mouth parts are also red.
The thorax and tails sections are iridescent blue to blue-green.
Face on, (sorry, my camera didn't focus well and I didn't want to spook it),
it has a distinct mask-like look to it with blue eyebrows/eye and mouth markings surrounded by scarlet red in a kind of hexagonal pattern.
A friend thought it looked like a "Lucha-Mask" like the Mexican wrestlers often wear.
It was very aware of me and shortly took off and gently flew off into the bushes.
I'd love to find out what it is and then anything about it's origins (though after I have a name I can do some more searches).
Thanks!

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Red-Shouldered Ctenucha moth
by: Moni

Rob
Your moth was called Red-Shouldered Ctenucha but is now listed as Ctenucha rubroscapus/multifaria species complex. It has recently gone thru a reclassification so therefore the long name.

Please look at the references listed for more info.
There is not much info about the life cycle listed.
Hope you can find more - sometimes the large universities with entomology departments in your area know more about a more local insect like this and can help you.

Thanks Moni!
by: Rob Holland

Hello,
Thanks so much for the ID on the moth. I'll look it up and submit anything of interest that I can find.
(For some reason I can't get to my page but maybe it will show up again.)
Thanks again to Moni!

To clarify (a fuzzy photo)
by: Rob Holland

Now that I've seen a good deal more clear photos of the moth it's clear that the face-on shot I took only looks mask-like because it's fuzzy. I'd love to see a nice clear one face-on because it has a snout of some sort with bulging blue eyes and red features as well.
I suppose many creatures would see the face as in my photo so the scary effect could work just as well in nature.

Just saw one
by: Anonymous

I am on the Samoa Peninsula, about 7 miles from Humboldt State University. I just saw one. I don't believe I've ever seen one in my garden in 38 years.
A really beautiful moth.

Oh my gosh!
by: Laurel

I just saw one in my back yard in West Linn, Oregon. I have never seen one before, and I'm outside a lot because I have a lawn business and love being outside even when I'm home. Are they supposed to be in this area? I tried to catch it to get a better look at it, but it flew away. So my Google search lead me to this site. Awesome!

Thanks for the thread on this moth!
by: Barb

I spotted two of these on the Oregon coast this past week and have been searching for an ID. Now I am off to learn more! Thanks so much.

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White moth, with red under front arms (Tiger Moth)

by ginny
(Sonoma County, CA)

White moth

White moth

found this moth at my front door. I live in Sonoma County, CA and would like to know what this moth is called.
As stated, it's white with red under the front arms. It's got black eyes. One wing is curled, so it can't fly.
Many thanks to all. Cool site.

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Tiger moth
by: Moni

Ginny
Your moth is a tiger moth, but without more views and seeing it I am not sure which one. There are several species of tiger moths that are white with black spots and colored front legs in the Genus Spilosoma. The reddish legs make me think it might be the pink-legged tiger moth except it does not have black spots on the wings. :-(

There are also white moths in the same subtribe but different Genus Hyphantria called the fall webworm moth -

White Moth
by: Anonymous

I found this beautiful moth in the Bunker Hill area of San Mateo, CA- June 4th, 2011.

White moth menace
by: SumguyintheOR

When I first saw these moths at my apartment, I thought they were so awesome that I couldn't kill them or let others do so. When spring came, southern OR thought it had a spider infestation, from what apparently was this type of moth's offspring (I searched through all the awesome moth pics to find this guy, specifically). The trees and bushes in the area were full of webs, and it (the caterpillars) devastated some crops in the area. Such an amazing site, so many really cool bugs. Thank you to everyone contributing here. AMAZING site :-)

Tiger moth
by: Moni

SumguyintheOR

Tiger moth caterpillars do not spin webs... in the spring you probably saw tent caterpillars if they are in the crotch of the trees or fall webworms if they are in branch tips.

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large moth with branch like markings (Vine Sphinx)

large moth with wings that look like they have sticks or branches on them

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Vine Sphinx
by: Moni

The Vine sphinx moth is mostly found in the southern states, tho occasionally they have been found a bit further north. It lives year-round in Central America. Therefore you must live in the south?
The moths feed on nectar seen on jimsonweed, orchids, and periwinkle. The caterpillars feed on leaves of grapes, Cissus spp, Magnolia, Ludwigia, and Parthenocissus.
The sphinx moths are in the Sphingidae family. The caterpillars of this family usually have a horn on the tail end. This caterpillar is green or brownish with white diagonal stripes along the sides and does not have the 'horn' for a tail.

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White/Black w/orange moth w/furry legs (White furcula moth)

by Matt Miller
(Waterford, Mi)

Zebra slug-Moth ?

Zebra slug-Moth ?

Zebra slug-Moth ?

Wings approx 1.5" span. Did not see it fly and my son was encouraging it. I searched your site and did lots of Googling and didn't find any that really looked like this one. Saw some similar wing patterns but all had skinny legs, this one has very thick legs.
Thank you for your time.

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Black/White Moth
by: Anonymous

You are right-I couldn't find this moth on the web. I have an idea why it might not be flying. Did it recently break through the cocoon on the left? It will take a little while to dry off and get its bearings before it flies. It also might wait until it is alone to fly off and it feels a little threatened by your and your son's presence. Look at it in a little while and see if it looks a little bit different after it is out of the cocoon.

White furcula moth
by: Moni

Matt
It is the white furcula moth. And as you see the cocoon or pupa case that it has just emerged from in the photo, I agree that it needs time to make sure the wings are filled out completely and get its bearings before it flies. Also, they usually fly at night so when you see them during the day they will just wait until dark to fly off.

This insect is found in the eastern half of North America. Adults fly from April to August. Caterpillars feed on wild cherry, willows and poplar trees.

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Fuzzy green body with black wings (Snowberry Clearwing moth)

by Pam
(Waco, Texas)

It has a fuzzy green body then black towards bottom, it appeared as though it had two set of wings, but i think it was one. It looks like there were holes in the wings. When it took off to fly, it had to warm up it's wings, it looked liked they were vibrating.

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Snowberry Clearwing moth
by: Moni

Pam
This photo is of a Snowberry clearwing moth. They typically have all black legs. This moth and its relatives are in the sphinx moth family with the common name of hummingbird moths, which fly during the daytime and at dusk hovering like hummingbirds.
The snowberry clearwing moth feeds on nectar of many flowers. The caterpillar of this moth feeds on snowberry, honeysuckle, dogbane, and bush honeysuckle plants.
They are found thru out North America.
Great that it was posing for you - normally it is hard to get a clear photo as they fly so fast!


Snowberry clearwing moth
by: Pam

Thank you for your help, there are plenty of flowers here for him.

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Big brown with large eye spots (Polyphemus moth)

by Bobby
(Catawissa, PA USA)

comb like antenna
two big yellow/white eye spots with blue semi circles and black circles surrounding them on tail.
square shaped tail.
Mostly brown
two horizontal lines on tail and two lines that follow the edge of the wings
smaller eye spots on forewings

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Polyphemus moth
by: Moni

Bobby
Your photo is of a Polyphemus moth. Thanks for the great photo!
This is one of the silkmoths, family Saturnidae, which are the largest of all moths. This is one of the most common.
They overwinter in large silky light brown leaflike cocoons.
The larva become large green caterpillars. They feed on a wide variety of leaves of trees and shrubs including willow, birch, hickory, maple, oak, and members of the rose family like apple.
The adult moths do not eat, but live from the stored food of the caterpillar.


The big brown moth
by: Kk

I think this is the moth I just saw on my window screen! Brown and other same hue colors. The eyes on the wings were holes, I checked by moving my head to see either plant or yard thru them. Quite large 4-5 inch wingspan
I live in tallahasse florida

Have found one in my graden
by: paulina

I live in IL and today I found this moth! I am amazed how big it is. I do not know why but it satys in one place for few hours, I took picture and video of it.

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large camouflaged moth (Pandorus sphinx moth)

by matt withem
(mulberry, ar)

this moth was found in central ohio. looks like the fighter jet moth but more greens and blacks. only one i've ever seen.

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Pandorus sphinx moth
by: Moni

Matt
Your gorgeous moth is a Pandorus sphinx moth. The moths in the Sphingidae family all have that fighter jet like shape.
These are found in North America basically east of the Rockies. The larvae are also quite spectacular. The caterpillars do eat grape leaves, porcelain vine (Ampelopsis sp) as well as Virginia creeper.

The adult moths have a long proboscis or feeding tube for gathering nectar from flowers. They look a little like small hummingbirds feeding at night.


Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/large-orange-catepillar-pandorus-sphinx-caterpillar-comments.html#ixzz1QnWb0sca

Awesome
by: Gary Abosch

So glad I could easily find this on the internet as I was joking with my buddy saying it was some kind of alien insect. I took a picture of it and everything and was considering alerting the local media to this "new" species. The one I keep spotting loves it down near my friend's basement unit door. If he's not clinging to one wall he's on the other side. Been doing it for days. Never moves when you approach it and even when you lift a leg with a house key just barely. Thought it might be some kind of cicada as it looks similar to me but the wings are not see through.

Spotted in the South
by: Anna

I live 30 minutes outside of Savannah GA. One of these landed on my porch today. Pretty far away from its Ohio home!

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little, slender brown moth (Indian meal moth)

by Bonita Johnston
(Regina, SK Canada)

small, about 7mm brown moth (Indian meal moth)

small, about 7mm brown moth (Indian meal moth)

Only in my garage, fly at night but don't go to the light and don't want to go outside. Hundreds of them in the garage! Can't seem to find any that look similar. Saw a picture somewhere of one that looked like it and it was identified as an Indian meal moth but when I googled that, the pictures were not at all correct for this moth. Thank you for any help!

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Indian meal moth
by: Moni

Bonita
Yes, it does look like the Indian meal moth.

Indian meal moths are known for infesting all cereal food products and whole grains, with the larvae feeding on these as well as a wide variety of foods such as dried fruits, powdered milk, cornmeal, flour, raisins, prunes, nuts, chocolate, candies, health food and seeds, bird seed, dog and cat food, fish food, graham crackers, dried red peppers, pastas, etc. Therefore, you must have some kind of pet food or other dry food in the garage they are living in. Find that source and destroy it then you will not have more moths.
Please be careful or they will get in the house and into your pantry of dry foods!
They are a constant problem in warehouses that store not only the raw grain, but the processed products. So, you are constantly bringing them home from the grocery. Many times there are eggs of this moth in the cracks of the cartons of cereals, pet food bags, pastas, and all those types of products.

If you find an infestation, you can put the package in the freezer (0 degrees F) for a few days to kill off all the insects. Or for heat treatment put it in a microwave oven for five minutes or in a shallow pan in the oven at 140°F for one hour or 120°F for two hours.
A thorough cleaning of the cupboards on a regular schedule, especially the cracks and crevices with a vacuum followed with soapy water will keep the population down.

The life cycle depends on temperature, taking two to six months in temperate zones and three to four weeks in warm climates. Here in the north where we have freezing temps, some of the critters are killed in storage.


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brown and black moth (One-eyed Sphinx moth)

by Shaye
(Bend,Oregon)

I found this moth on the balcony hanging out on a wall.I've never seen this kind of moth before,I've seen plenty of Sphinx moths and hummingbird moths,the lesser small moths no one else seems to give a damn about.He's pretty big and was just relaxing,I was unable to identify him.Some help identifying him or it would be greatly appreciated.

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One-eyed Sphinx moth
by: Moni

Shaye
Looks like the one-eyed sphinx moth. Did you see the underwings? They help with ID.
These are found in most areas of North America in river margins and low areas where poplar, willows, plum and pear grow. Those are what the larvae feed on. The adults do not feed and are usually seen flying at night. Yours was probably drawn to lights at night then remained there when it got light. The moths will just stay put during the day then fly off the next night.
There is one generation per year...overwintering as a pupa.

Thanks!
by: Shaye

Yes you are correct,I just googled the one eyed sphinx moth and that is what he looked like.Yes I did get to see his wings,and they were exactly like your suggestion.Thankyou!

One-eyed Sphinx moth
by: Moni

Shaye
Thanks for the conformation. That way others will know for sure what they might be seeing.
ID'ing from photos is not very precise so with your help we now know for sure.
Thanks!

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Brown and Orange Moths (Cecropia moths mating)

by Jonathan Tallman
(Oswego, IL)

Two mating Moths?

Two mating Moths?

My daughter actually found these out side in our Bushes. She was calling them Huge Butterflies but I think they are actually Moths that are mating?
If you could let me know what they are that would be great. I think they are Cecropia Moths from looking at a picture on this website but I am not 100% certain.

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Cecropia moth
by: Moni

Jonathan
Yes! They are cecropia moths mating. What a great thing to find! I am so jealous!!
They may actually stay in that spot for a day or two. Then she is off to lay eggs. How cool!

Here is the basics on the moth as you found on this website.
Larvae feed on leaves of various trees and shrubs including alder, apple, ash, beech, birch, box-elder, cherry, dogwood, elm, gooseberry, maple, plum, poplar, white oak, willow.
Adults do not feed.
These are found east of the Rocky Mountains, from Nova Scotia south to Florida.
What a great find!

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/brown-moth-orange-markings-cecropia-moth-comments.html#ixzz1RC4hOrQG

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Shiny Orange/Brown Flying Insect (Small-eyed Sphinx moth)

by Carrie
(Branson, MO)

This bug was sitting on the side of my house. It was very still and never moved while I was up close taking photos of it. It is an orangish brown flying bug. It has a back that curls upward, but I didn't see a stinger on it. It doesn't look like it has any attenae. It wasn't making any sort of chirping noise.

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Small-eyed Sphinx moth
by: Moni

Carrie
Your insect is a small-eyed sphinx moth. The antenna are visible in your photo of the side view...they are the light colored strips that go from the head back kind of under the wing.
This sphinx moth is found thru out North America. The larvae of this family have tails and are called the hornworms. This species feeds on birches, hawthorns, poplars, Prunus species (apples, pears, etc), and willows.
Moths fly at night and come to lights, so the reason it was just sitting there was because they do not fly during the day time.
If you had seen the underwing you would see an eye spot that gives it it's name.
Nice photos and views of this moth!!!

slightly different color
by: Cheryl

I seem to have one of these perched patiently on my window frame. It doesn't want to fly -- you are correct -- but I did get it to unfurl its wings. I saw some pale pink on the top inside. Yes, the eye-mark is there under the wing. It may be older because there is what appears to be a small tear in one wing. Its colors are more black/brown, with some lighter, but I don't see orange.

Is this the same moth?

Small-eyed sphinx
by: Moni

Cheryl
Your description sounds more like one of the other Paonias genus moths like the blinded sphinx moth rather than the small-eyed sphinx...but it also could be one of the moths in the genus Smerinthus.

You will have to send a photo for identification as there are several that look similar...especially without a photo :)

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Brown Moth, flying (PROMETHEA moth, male)

by Jake
(Thorntown, Indiana)

Large Brown Moth with lighter brown border on wings

Found on side of our log cabin.

I couldn't find it in any of our insect books.

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Promethea Silkmoth
by: Anonymous

Promethea Silkmoth

PROMETHEA moth, male
by: Moni

Jake
Yes, it is a Promethea moth and from the coloration it is a male. The male has that dark brown color while the female is more reddish brown with half moon spots on each wing.
These are found east of the Rockies near deciduous forests, so being near a cabin makes sense.
There is one generation per year there in northern Indiana. The larvae feed on leaves of apple, ash, basswood, birch, cherry, lilac, maple, sassafras, sipcebush, sweetgum, tulip-tree, and other trees.
The adults do not feed.
Looks like you are pinning and spreading it. If it is not already dry you could bring the bottom wings up just a little for the best looking specimen. :-)
Thanks for sending in the great photo.

Got my first entomology degree from Purdue! GO Boilers!!

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Mystery Moth (Eight-spotted forester moth)

by Sam
(Ashland, Nebraska)

The moth is black with yellow spots on the upper wing and white on the lower. Quite fuzzy and the legs are covered in thick, orange fuzz. Yellow fuzz on either side of thorax with a stripe down the abdomen, a gradient from yellow to white.

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Alypia sp. Forester moth
by: Chimera

Looks like an Alypia species, pehaps A. langtoni Six-spotted Forester Moth.

Eight-spotted forester moth
by: Moni

Sam
Your moth is the Eight-spotted forester moth. Chimera you did know the genus, thanks! If you look at the hind wing I think there are 2 spots on each so it is the 8 not the 6 spotted.
Here is a website from Canada that compares three similar species of that genus. -

These moths are found over most of North America. The larvae feed on grapes, Ampelopsis spp. and Virginia creeper. So, they will be seen near woodlands and woodland edges. The moths feed on nectar from herbaceous plants and unlike most moths they do fly during the day.

There would be one generation in NE, bur has 2 generations in the south. They overwinter as pupa in the soil.

Eight -spotted forester moth
by: Anonymous

I just found one on a viburnum. We live at the edge of a forest and have grape vines. We are in Southern Michigan.

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greenish moth (Pandorus sphinx moth)

by Brian
(Coloma, WI)

At local gas station, been is the same spot for 3 days...Large green wings and body.
Picture taken 7-23-2011

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Eumorpha pandorus
by: Chimera

Looks like a Eumorpha pandorus Pandorus sphinx or a cousin.

Pandorus sphinx moth
by: Moni

Brian
Chimera knows moths...Yes it is a Pandorus sphinx moth. The moths in the Sphingidae family all have that fighter jet like shape.
Many times they will be drawn to lights and then stay until the next night and fly away, but perhaps the lights at the gas station are too bright and being on constantly it does not have the ability to fly away...perhaps you could let it crawl on your hand and you could put it in the shrubs or trees away from the light. They are such beautiful insects..both adult and larvae.
These are found in North America basically east of the Rockies. The larvae are also quite spectacular. The caterpillars do eat grape leaves, porcelain vine (Ampelopsis sp) as well as Virginia creeper.

The adult moths have a long proboscis or feeding tube for gathering nectar from flowers. They look a little like small hummingbirds feeding at dusk.


Moth ID...
by: Brian

After looking at many pics, I came to the conclusion it was a Oleander Hawk Moth...I had considered a Pandorus sphinx moth, but the wings were just a bit diff, and the markings were diff...After looking at many, many pics, the Oleander Hawk Moth was a closer match than the Pandorus sphinx moth. Thanx for the input...

Pandorus sphinx moth
by: Moni

Brian
The Oleander hawk moth is found in areas of Africa and Asia. It is a migratory species, flying to parts of eastern and southern Europe during the summer. It has also been found in Hawaii. So unless you took the photo in one of those areas, not WI, then it is the Pandorus hawk moth.

The Oleander hawk moth is approx 4" long, while the Pandorus is not that large at all.
Oleanders are the main food source for the caterpillars and they do not grow north of USDA zone 8...they do not grow in WI.

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A Butterfly? A moth? (Banded sphinx moth)

by Terri
(Boca Raton FL)

The bug has been on my screen for most of the day. It is rather large - about 2 1/2" - am in South Florida. Would love to know what this is.
Thanks!

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moth
by: Anonymous

I don't know the exact identity, but this is definitely a moth

Wrong antennae for a moth
by: Jan

Looks like a grasshopper cousin to me.

Hawk Moth
by: Jane B

One of the hawk moths. You can look it up and find the exact one.

Banded sphinx moth
by: Moni

Terri
Your photo is a banded sphinx moth. The distinct bands on the wings of the moth make it easy to ID. The moths feed on flower nectar at dark.

If you had seen the caterpillar, they are so variable it makes them harder to identify. Some of the caterpillars are plain green, while others have bands of yellow, pink, black with combinations of all!
The caterpillars feed on various primrose plants as well as willow, Oenothera sp and Ludwigia sp in southern gardens. Caterpillars once grown pupate in the soil just under the surface.
They are from southeastern US over to TX and west...occasionally found north of that.
Thanks for sharing a neat moth!


It look like Mossy Oak/Real Tree camo
by: Anonymous

I just found one of these at work. Im in Las Colinas, Tx. Its next to Irving where the old Dallas Cowboy stadium used to be, just for reference of where it was spotted.

I have had one on my front door wall for days too....
by: Sandy Evans

It doesn't seem to move...When I see it, the position stays the same....do they hibernate????

What else can I possibly see it do? Someone mentioned in comments that it feeds at night? On what type of plants?

Interesting moth...Would love to know more about it..

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yellow butterfly rescued (Imperial moth, male)

by Jane Driscoll
(Sarasota FL)

Large Yellow & Brown Butterfly

Large Yellow & Brown Butterfly

that we rescued from the pool. We've never seen one like it before -

can you help us?

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Moth
by: Lynn

I have seen these beautiful moths in my area of Birmingham, Alabama.

Yellow and Brown Moth
by: Miriam

This looks like an Imperial Moth. From what I read, they are fairly common and don't bother anything.

Imperial moth, male
by: Moni

Jane
Yes, your moth is the Imperial.
The more yellow color tells me it is a male, the females have more brown markings.

This is one of the giant silk moths in the family Saturniidae. Being so large they do fly rather awkwardly. It probably came in to lights and ended up in the pool.
The adults come to lights at night. They do not feed.
Larva come in a green or brown coloration. According to Bugguide, larvae feed on leaves of Bald Cypress, basswood, birch, cedar, elm, hickory, Honeylocust, maple, oak, pine, Sassafras, Sweetgum, sycamore, and walnut.
The larva pupate in burrows in the soil. The pupa stage is what overwinters, so the adult comes out in summer.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/large-yellow-brown-fuzzy-moth-imperial-moth-male-comments.html#ixzz1UM73HqWI

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Black and grey moth (Promethea moth, male)

by M B Barnett
(Gulfport, MS )

Black/Grey Moth

Black/Grey Moth

Motionless on tree near Durham, NC

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Promethea moth, male
by: Moni

MB,
It is a Promethea moth and from the coloration it is a male. The male has that dark brown color while the female is more reddish brown with half moon spots on the top side of each wing.
This one looks like it might have just emerged by the coloration and thick body. Beautiful specimen! It takes a while for the moths to move once they have emerged...also they fly only at night. They are so large and fly so awkwardly that even at night they are not smooth fliers. They are attracted to lights which will bring them near a light source and then they will sit there until night time then they move on to find a mate.

These are found east of the Rockies near deciduous forests.

There is one generation per year there in northern Indiana. The larvae feed on leaves of apple, ash, basswood, birch, cherry, lilac, maple, sassafras, sipcebush, sweetgum, tulip-tree, and other trees.

The adults do not feed.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/brown-moth-flying-promethea-moth-male-comments.html#ixzz1UfKMjCo0

Thank you
by: M B Barnett

Moni, Thank you thank you thank you so much. It is delightful to read about the intriguing moth we observed on our recent travels. I appreciate your knowledge, and thank you for your time. MB

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Black wings Orange body Black Spots (Squash vine borer moth)

by John Young
(Wasaga Beach, Ontario, Canada)

Black wings Orange body with black spots

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Black and Orange Bug
by: Anonymous

Your picture seems to match one I found on the internet. It was called a Squash Vine Borer.

Squash vine borer moth
by: Moni

John
Sorry to say that, yes, this rather nice looking moth is the squash vine borer moth. Next time you see it, squash it! (Pun intended)
These are found in eastern North America.
Larvae feed by boring into the stems of squash, gourds, pumpkins, i.e. Cucurbitaceae.
Adults fly during the day...looking a little like wasps to feed on nectar. You need to monitor your squash for these moths from mid-June through early August.

Time to check your squashes, esp the zucchini for evidence of the borer/eggs. The borers will bore in at a leaf axil then head inside the stem to the root area to eventually pupate.

Great photo so every one here knows what the adult looks like!!


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Moth on Tomato Plant (Achemon Sphinx moth)

by Orlando
(Pennsauken, NJ)

While trimming my tomato plants, I noticed what appeared to be a dried leaf. When I grabbed it, it flew from my hand and went back onto the tomato plant.

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Achemon Sphinx moth
by: Moni

Orlando
This is the Achemon Sphinx moth.
They are found over most of the US and Mexico.

The caterpillars can be green or reddish brown.

The larvae do feed on grape leaves, Virginia creeper, and Ampelopsis (porcelain vine) plants.

The caterpillars lose their tails in the last stage before it turns into a pupa. They pupate in the soil.

The adults feed on nectar from flowers. The adults can be seen at dusk feeding...looking kind of like hummingbirds.

At the site below is a caterpillar of this moth.There is another caterpillar that was just sent in to be ID'ed of this moth from CO.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/brown-caterpillar-with-stripes-achemon-sphinx-moth-caterpillar-comments.html#ixzz1UkwegJRa

To Leaf Or Not To Leaf?
by: CorrieAnn

I was cleaning the windows and siding on the front of the house when I saw what looked like a curled, brown leaf. Only it didn't make sense that it was there, clinging to a vehibrick wall, or that there was a dead leaf on the middle of Summer. So I approached it to get a better look and sure enough it was a moth. I'd never seen one like this before so naturally I took a minimum of 36 photos. LOL Thanks for all that you do on this site. Now I know who my little visitor was!

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cicada sized black flying insect. (Titan sphinx moth)

by Uli Conrads
(Morton Grove, Illinois, Cook)

I took this photo of an insect, a little bigger than a cicada, dark in color, with a white band on lower body.
It was feeding off a butterfly bush and had the flying characteristics of a hummingbird.
Could it be a typ of sphinx moth?
Thank you very much, Moni, for all your help. Uli

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Titan sphinx moth
by: Moni

Uli
Your moth is the Titan sphinx. There are several moths in the same genus that have that single white band on the abdomen, but because of where you live I think that is the one it has to be.
The caterpillar of this insect feeds on plants in the madder family (Rubiaceae), including Randia, seven-year apple, and pond apple. The caterpillars pupate in loose soil.
This moth and its relatives are in the sphinx moth family with the common name of hummingbird moths, which fly during the daytime and at dusk hovering like hummingbirds.
The moth feeds on nectar of many flowers.
Tho these moths are common in the south they do migrate north and are seen as far north as Maine to North Dakota.


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3-4 inch black and white flying insect (Sphinx moth)

by Keith Paschal
(Keno, Oregon)

This guy only appears around dusk, making picture taking difficult. He seems to look more like a moth than a butterfly but he was hanging around the petunias on the deck, going from flower to flower. Most of the pictures I took were fairly blurry due to low light. If I turned a light on, he'd leave. I hope this is a good enough picture. He was almost the size of a small hummingbird, which is what I thought it was at first in the dark. He has a large black and white striped abdomen and evidently likes polen or nectar from petunias.

Comments for 3-4 inch black and white flying insect (Sphinx moth)

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Sphinx moth
by: Moni

Keith
This is one of the sphinx moths, family Sphingidae.
Without seeing the wing patterns it would be difficult to know which one.

This genus of moths fly at dusk or dawn and do look kind of like hummingbirds. They have a long proboscis mouth for sipping nectar from flowers.

Caterpillars of this family are called horntails as they have a tail on the rear end...some species loose this tail during the last stage before turning into a pupa. The caterpillars feed on various plants depending what species it is.

Thank you!
by: Keith

WOW, fabulous! I went and looked at the images. Thank you so much for identifying this behemoth of a moth!

Species of moth
by: Keith

It looks the most like: Sphinx perelegans

Elegant Sphinx moth
by: Moni

Keith
If that is what you think it is then that is the name we will put on it. Elegant Sphinx is the common name for that species. Since you live in Oregon it is very possible.
Thanks for your verification!!

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Salmon Colored Moth (Polyphemus Moth)

by Mike
(Hernando, Ms, DeSoto)

Large Moth (Polyphemus Moth)

Large Moth (Polyphemus Moth)

Saw this on a public building in Panola County Mississippi. Wing span was about 5-6 inches adn the body was about 1.5 inches - very fat and fuzzy. What is this?

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Polyphemus Moth
by: Moni

Mike
Your photo is of a Polyphemus Moth.
This is one of the silkmoths, family Saturnidae, are the largest of all moths and this is one of the most common.
They overwinter in large silky light brown leaflike cocoons.
The larva become large green caterpillars. They feed on a wide variety of leaves of trees and shrubs including willow, birch, hickory, maple, oak, and members of the rose family like apple.
The adult moths do not eat, but live from the stored food of the caterpillar.


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