Brown very small (Brown marmorated stink bug nymph)

by DARLENE "PEANUT" SUMMERS
(RIVESVILLE, WEST VIRGINIA)

I found this but in my flower garden. I have never seen one before. It looks like a cousin to a "Football Bug", the ones you touch and they roll into a ball. This picture is enlarged to show detail. To help you judge the size of the bug, the green spikey pod was about an inch in diameter.

Comments for Brown very small (Brown marmorated stink bug nymph)

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Brown marmorated stink bug nymph
by: Moni

Darlene
Your insect may be the brown marmorated stink bug nymph. It is a young one so they are harder to tell, but the antenna have white bands that make me think that is what it is.
That particular stink bug has just recently been introduced into the U.S. from China and in China it is considered an agricultural pest. It sucks juices out of fruits of many plants...your photo shows it on the fruit of a Datura plant.

If this is the Brown marmorated stink bug, then they also can be a pest by coming into homes to overwinter.

Since W. Virginia just had a lot of snow I would assume that this photo was taken last summer? Or is it on a plant in the house?

Lynn Morris
by: Anonymous

I too have recently found these bugs in my home and indeed that is the stink bug I called my Pest control co.and have them on the case I feel very fortunate to have a big backup...I,ve heard these bugs are very hard to get rid of Good Luck.

Stink bug
by: Moni

Lynn
If you just have a few that have come in for the winter they are not going to cause any problems in the house...just drop them in a container of warm soapy water. Would not think you need to hire a pest control co and would not want you to have you house treated with chemicals for a couple of non-house pests!

football bug
by: loiu

its called a rolly polly* P-o-l-e-e thats what the kids call em

BROWN MARMORATED STINK BUG NYMPH
by: Moni

loiu
The stink bug is a real insect as noted in the comments.
A roly poly is a crustacea not an insect. Here are photos of them - http://bugguide.net/node/view/15961/bgpage

Seed Pod
by: Anonymous

Clearly not from a Datura plant. That is from a sweet gum tree.

Brown marmorated stink bug nymph
by: Moni

Anonymous
Clearly...you do not know your sweet gum from Datura seed pods. If you compare the two you will see Datura has the single sharp points on the pod while the swt gum has double points on its seed head. Please ck internet images of each.

Stink Bugs
by: Little Bobbie

They are indeed stink bugs and they ARE a pest, both inside and out. Since the invasion here I cannot get through a growing season without them and they destroy EVERYTHING except my flowers. So I tried planting a lot of annuals among the veggies to deter them. Did not work. We have a trap of sorts that is a black light over soapy water that is on at night. Traps them plus many others. In the house they are vacuumed up when I see them. I had one land on my shoulder and let go its stink and I had to change my top it was so nauseating. They have approved an insecticide for farmers to use on it but that means more poison in our food supply. Any natural predators out there to control these nasty things? I live in the country in Southern Virginia and they were not here till about 5 years ago. I know they do not like wet so spring is a good time without them. Tried DE on them but they just laugh at the powder. Thinking of getting a plant vacuum and just use that each day that I see them. I have not been able to can veggies since they arrived.

Br marmorated stink bug
by: Moni

Little Bobbie
To help control stink bugs keep weeds out of the garden and keep areas near the garden mowed. Control stink bugs by handpicking adults and nymphs (dropping into warm soapy water) and smashing egg masses. Floating row covers will keep bugs off plants but must be removed before flowering crops need to be pollinated. For the other stink bugs, planting trap crops such as sorghum, millet, sunflower and buckwheat have been known to help. These trap crops can be planted in buckets or pots in the garden. To help attract the bugs to them, add cardboard or plastic stakes colored yellow.(then collect the stink bugs from these crops and destroy them)
The black lights may attract a few stink bugs but you may be killing more beneficials with the lights. Try the Yellow Stick traps instead.

Beneficial insects that control the brown marmorated stink bug include parasitic wasps as well as predatory stink bugs, assassin bugs, and spiders. Keeping lots of flowers near the garden help to increase numbers of beneficial insects.

This invasive new pest is a problem that is spreading to other states also.

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brown beetle (Nut or Acorn weevil)

by pam trudeau
(brownsburg, quebec)

grey, hard shelled, very strange head, looks like an elelphant's nose

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Nut or Acorn weevil
by: Moni

Pam
Your photo is of one of the nut and acorn weevils.
The female uses her long snout for boring into nuts/acorns, and deposits the eggs there. The larva feeds inside the acorn/nut and emerges to pupate in the soil.
Adult weevils feed on young leaves and young nuts causing the nuts to drop before being fully developed.
These weevils are found around many types of nut trees including oak, chestnut, beech, walnuts, birches, alders, hazelnuts, hornbeams and hop-hornbeams.
My guess is yours is an acorn weevil found around nearby oak trees.

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brown crawling bug (Tawny cockroach, female)

by Rene
(Washington, MI)

brown bug

brown bug

This bug is around 1 centimeter or less. I am finding them inside and out this summer. I didn't see any of these last year. I'm in the upper metro Detroit area. This one's missing his back right leg.

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Tawny cockroach, female
by: Moni

Rene
Your photo is of one of the Ectobius spp. of cockroaches, probably the tawny cockroach.
This genus of cockroaches have been introduced to this continent from Europe and are found in the northeast part of the country. The tawny roach was first noticed in 1985.
There is little information about them, so evidently they are not economic pests.
These feed on compost or other insects.
They are small.

In our bird bath
by: Anonymous

I fear these little brown things have invaded our new bird bath. Very disappointed and hope they stay outside!

Found them up north
by: Anonymous

Saw these bugs up north for the first time last year (2015) and now they are everywhere. Took one home downstate...I am horrified that they are considered cockroaches.

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brownish dragonfly (Twelve-spotted Skimmer, female)

by Nancy Hamel
(Belchertown, MA)

Dragonfly was in my frog pond. I hope someone will help identify it for me. I appreciate your time.

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Twelve-spotted Skimmer, female
by: Moni

Nancy
This dragonfly is a skimmer - a Twelve-spotted Skimmer, but until a professional Odonatist (S. Hummel) was consulted, I could not figure out which one.
As he observed - from your photo with the black background you can not see the black spots on the wings, but since he knew what he was looking for we have a positive ID.

Was this photo taken at night with a flash?

These skimmers are found thru out North America into Mexico. As expected they are found around ponds and lakes...and frog ponds :-). They feed on small flying insects...hopefully eating mosquitoes from your yard!
The young are nymphs that live in water feeding on mosquito larva and other small insects.



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brown fly (fruit fly)

by John Nugent
(NY)

Is this a fruit fly? I found it on a blade of grass in a field in upstate NY. I can't seem to find a picture of it anywhere and would like to know the name of it.
Thank you MONI

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Unknown fly
by: Moni

John
Have looked thru many photos of the fruit flies and can not find one like your fly either. Do you have any other views of this fly? A more detailed photo might help.

It could be a Marsh fly - Family Sciomyzidae. Or Ulidiidae family called picture-winged flies. Many in these families hold their wings back like your fly. Did not see any like yours anyplace yet, so it is probably neither.

Not sure what it is...will keep looking.

Another picture submission
by: John Nugent

Where would I submit another photo of this fly? I will go ahead and post it on the first page. I hope it helps...

Fruit Fly - Eutreta noveboracensis
by: Moni

See comments for other 'Brown fly'.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/83371/bgimage

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brown and black bug (weevil)

by BugMan
(Cardiff by the Sea, CA)

I found this little bug in my patio. It is so small it can hardly be seen.

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Weevil
by: Moni

Bugman
Your insect is a weevil in the Curculionidae family. It is probably in the genus Anthonomus. Without information on actual size, what it eats, and probably getting it under a microscope it would be difficult to get the ID any closer.
This is the genus that includes the boll weevil, pepper weevil and strawberry clipper.
The adult weevils are known to play dead when you disturb them.
Both the larva and adults feed on plants and like those listed many are important pests since they chew holes in fruits, seeds, nuts, etc.


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Big brown bug (Giant Water Bug)

by Lauren
(Auburn, AL)

I found this bug on the front lawn in central alabama at about about midnight. It was about 3-4 inches long.

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Giant water bug
by: Moni

Lauren
Your big bug is commonly called a giant water bug, but there is one species that is also referred to as eastern toe-biter.
These aquatic insects live in ponds and are usually found next to vegetation at the pond edge. They feed on insects, small tadpoles and fish. They inject a digestive enzyme into their prey which liquefies the insides so they can suck up the contents with their beaks.
The adults are attracted to lights, so that is probably why you found it on the grass. They fly around looking for mates.
Cool find!

same found in way down south tx
by: Adan

i found one of these Giant Water Beetle outside the night it rained about 2-3 in long also

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Lauren
Your bug is a giant water bug. They do live in water but are attracted to lights at night. You must have a porch light on that it was attracted to. Do you live near a pond or lake?
They are found thru out North America then down into Mexico.
These bugs hang around the plant material in the clean water where they live and feed on aquatic insects,small fish, tadpoles, frogs and even small birds. Once they catch their prey, they inject enzymes that break down the insides so they can suck the liquid out with their beaks.
These insects are also called "toebiters" for a reason. They can bite, so do not handle or go barefoot in water where they live.

ugly bug
by: Anonymous

i just found one of these gaint water bugs right bye my fire place and its about 3 inches long never seen one before lol

Found in Ontario, Canada
by: Michelle M

This one was found on the bricks of our house right beside our front door. We do live very close to a lake. It's roughly 3 inches long. I got as close as comfortable with a ruler (glad it had big numbers) and it was a little over 3 inches. We didn't know what it was, glad we do now. Time we found it was around 10:30pm.

We live in Sturgeon Falls, (Northern) Ontario, Canada

giant water bud. look like they fly
by: rob

i spotted one in Montericco Guatemala pacific coast, think theyre heading southwards

Found one as well
by: Anonymous

My boyfriend found one right outside of his job. But his job is near a murky lake, not clean. It was about 3-4 inches long. You're best bet if you see one is to leave it be. It does not care that you are there but if you mess with it, it will try to sting you and bite you. So be very cautious with these bugs.

Michigan
by: Anonymous

Found one of these creatures today at the Golf Club. We are surrounded by lakes-lots of water. Our bugs are normally much smaller than this one (3 plus inches long) A little creepy!

big bug
by: Anonymous

my co worker killed one as it was trying to crawl into a grocery store in New Minas Nova Scotia canada. and i dont believe there is a lake or pond near by. it was about 4am when this happened.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
Sorry your co-worker killed it!..It would not have been at the store had the bright lights not attracted it. It is a neat bug...too bad they did not ck what it was before killing it.
Glad you now know so it can be let go away from lights next time. Those front legs can pinch so be careful moving them.

Grossed out!!!!!!
by: Anonymous

Found this in our barn no water in there.Its a good 4 inches long.There is a small pond aways from there.I live in the Pacific North West near the Ocean

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Grossed
They come to lights at night so if you had a barn or night light on that is what attracted it...esp if you have a pond nearby :-) It will head back to the pond.
Cool find!

cool bug
by: Anonymous

Probably dropped by a bird, if the pond is a good ways away.

Giant Water Bug
by: Kaire

My Husband found one in the barn in the grain bag. It was very large and it must have been attracted to the yard light at night to go into there. We live in Southern Alberta, Canada.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Kaire
Cool that he found it...rather strange area to find it but with night lights they will be attracted in to the barn.

Found one in a gas station IN PUERTO RICO!!
by: Oscar C. Perez

I was driving into a gas station on the island and as i was walking in to pay for gas, I saw it on the floor (kinda looked like it was injured) at first i was like man thats the biggest roach ive ever seen...i even took a picture and showed it to the the attendand at the counter and commented that you have a "serious" roach problem..lol afterwards i started searching the web to double check what it was and landed on this site...thanks for clearing what it was!!

Alien Roach
by: Bob

I just found one of these tonight around midnight, freaked me out a bit. Went out side and noticed two of the cats huddled around something. So i went inside to grab a flashlight to see what had their attention. Well i see this alien looking Roach, or roach on roids. I had never seen or heard of these things ever. Also live in a neighborhood that has no open water source, closes source is a very small pond about half mile or so in the woods. Live in south Texas, just want to add my story.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Bob
A small pond about a half mile away is all you need to see them. These adults are attracted to lights and can fly that half mile.
Interesting that you are far enough south that it is warm enough for you to still see them.
Glad you got to see one! :)
Thanks for sharing!

Don't get bitten
by: Scereyaha

I find it surprising that no one has mentioned yet that their bite is very painful. Becuase of the way their saliva dissolves tissue, some of them are known as having one of the most painful bites in the world. Not poisonous or really dangerous, but VERY painful and can leave a terrible scar, and of course there's a decent risk for infection due to all the tissue damage. Best to leave them alone. They are attracted to light near water, so often come in-land, being somewhat confused by man-made light. Really nifty creatures, but you really don't want them on you.

water bug
by: Anonymous

Saw one of these nasty things at work the other day and didnt know what it was. As I got closer to it it tried to jump at me and bite me. So I kicked it and it landed on its back but the cool part is how they can pop theirselves back over. Definitely didnt wana get bitten by it so I left it alone. I live in southeast texas and where I work is surrounded by a big river that is brackish water.

Found one at work.
by: Nick

One of these suckers flew right onto my work bench while I was on nightshift. Definitely was attracted by the lights and all the doors were open (the buildings being quite hot where I work).
I went full defensive mode and got the heck out of there as soon as I could, still had to work for 10 minutes with it causing havoc. I thought of trying to kill it but after staring it down I thought better and evacuated the area asap. Good 3 inches long and beady little devil eyes, friggin' claws.
North eastern alberta.

Thought it was a scorpion at first!
by: Lori

I live in central texas, no where near a pond or river and just found one of these creatures in my carport. Well actually my cat found it first. I caught it to look closer and try to identify. Guess it was attacted to the light in carport. A very scary looking bug! I will relocate it far, far away and hope it doesn't come back!

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Lori
Thanks for taking care of it and not killing it or letting the cat play with it.

They are big but soooo Cool! :)

Giant Water Bug
by: Anonymous

This bug was on our deck late at night with the deck light on. It was the LARGEST bug I've ever seen. Looked just like your picture. The cat was looking at it and I swept it off the deck as fast as I could. We live on a Finger Lake in Upstate New York. I really hope he finds his way back to the water.

Sharing my office
by: Anonymous

I saw one of these guys crawling inside my office in South Florida today and had to jump online to identify. It was half dead when I found it but ended belly up a few hours later. We are near water but I've never seen one of these indoors. It def looks like a prehistoric creature up close and is about the size of a matchbox car.

Found one in AZ!
by: Anonymous

My dog found this at about 3:30 pm right under one of our pine trees in the front yard. It has been raining frequently here in Douglas, Arizona. Looked like the bug was seeking out the moisture underneath the pine needles! I thought he was a carnivorous beelte at first, but it's great to have found out what it was!

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brown beetle (American spider beetle)

by Alanna
(Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada)

I found a number of them in my bed and was wondering what they were.

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American spider beetle
by: Moni

Alanna
This photo was sent earlier and here is the response I gave.
See site at bottom.

It is a beetle that looks like a spider.
This beetle is like larder beetles and pantry moths, being a pest in homes eating grains, leather, and all kinds of pantry crumbs.
Not sure why they are in just your daughters bed unless she is eating crackers under the covers! :-) Perhaps she and her dolls are having a tea party at night! :-)
Rather than writing all the info here please see the following website. It has great info for this beetle.
http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2117.html
If you want more information than this let us know.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/tiny-orange-bug-american-spider-beetle-comments.html#ixzz0kRSVkkRd

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Walking Stick (Walkingstic)

by Marcy
(Austin, Texas)

Location: Central Texas
Measuring around 6 1/2 inches long
Mostly brown with a small amount of green on it's back

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WOW
by: Lin

I've always wanted to see one of those "in person", "live".

Pine Needle ish
by: Pat

I've seen one of these on a door in Northern Michigan and thought certainly it was a pine needle due to the color, the arrangement of the legs at the time, and the antennae. I was amazed when it moved!

Walkingstick
by: Moni

Marcie
Yes that is a walkingstick...good ID job!
These are found on trees and shrubs and do eat foliage of various plants.
They are not considered a pest of the garden.
Cool insect to see!

A Big suprise to see here
by: Don McFadden

These are also in Northeast Arkansas. They grow pretty large.

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Brown Weird bug (Mole Cricket)

by Glenn
(Louisville, KY)

My friend saw this strange looking beetle (?) at the grocery store today

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Weird Bug at the Grocery
by: Anonymous

I have to say that I don't know what this bug is, but it looks like an earwig on Steroids! That's one scary insect.

mole cricket
by: Anonymous

looks like a mole cricket

Kentucky
by: Rich

My wife and I have been searching google earth to find a good BASS fishing area so we may move there, but that bug scares the bajeebas out of me.

weird bug
by: MydMo

Mole cricket is good choice, I used to dig them up next to a small pond.

Mole Cricket
by: Moni

Glenn
Yes, as everyone has suggested this is a mole cricket. It is probably the Northern mole cricket, tho the photo is not quite clear enough to tell.
Mole crickets can be found thru out most of the eastern North America, then south into South America.
They are usually found in moist areas near streams and ponds, but also in gardens and agricultural fields. The adults do come to lights at night, so perhaps that is how it got in the grocery store?
This insect is a herbivore...they feed on plant roots. It takes two years to complete a generation in most of N America. The males do have a call they make to attract females to their burrows, then the female lays her eggs and then guards them thru the second or third stage of life.
Some mole crickets can be pests of turf due to their tunneling..

mole cricket
by: brenda

we found one of these at my friends house last night Aug 31, 2014 it was a weird bug

mole cricket
by: Anonymous

I don't know what kind of bug this is but my son just found one in our house!! I live in Arkansas... no fields or garden.. just house plants.

Western Australia
by: Anonymous

Just found one of these bugs under our laminated floor, there was a gap at the edge of the flooring and out it popped... What a creepy looking insect.

Scared to death
by: Anonymous

I believe I saw one last night. Totally freaked me out. It looked like a roach, grasshopper, and shrimp with battle gear. I have pics and video...it waddles back and forth.

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Brown insect (Brown Stink Bug)

by Ragai Karas
(Dorval, QC, Canada)

I photograph this insect in one of the parks in Montreal.
It was found on a leaf. It has 2 antena and 6 legs. It is brown in color.

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stink bug
by: Anonymous

it's a brown marmorated stink bug.

Brown stink bug
by: Moni

Ragai
Your insect is a brown stink bug. It is in the subfamily Pentatominae...it is probably a stink bug in the genus Euschistus ( http://bugguide.net/node/view/7207/bgimage) not Halyomorpha ( http://bugguide.net/node/view/9806/bgimage) as Anonymous suggests.
Without seeing it, we could not be positive...one photo can't show all the detail needed for positive ID. Just goes to show how difficult ID can be.
With all that said this insect does feed on plant juices, so it can be a pest, especially if it feeds on fruits.
There are many out in the fall feeding on berries and other fruits both flower seed pod fruits as well as fruits we eat. As they feed on the plants juice, this dries out the fruits and also deforms the fruits and damages seeds.
They are found over most of North America.

fabulous pic
by: bennie

love this pic of the brown stink bug ...

bennie :)

Brown Stink Bug
by: Chryslace

These are invasive little boogers. They are constantly intruding in my home and are near impossible to keep out!

Brown stink bug - invasive
by: Anonymous

Kill it. Kill it now. You are under invasion. These stupid things are "stink bugs". Don't suck then up in a vacuum cleaners or your vacuum cleaner with stink when you run it.

In the summer they stay mostly outdoors, but in the fall they will bee line to your Windows doors and attic then flatten themselves to slide through whatever cracks they can find. From there they become active in your home - Buzzing around lights. Landing on you. Very few predators can tolerate the taste of them, and the ones that do (some kind of spiders) are barely preferable. They seem completely impervious to insecticides and they reproduce at an incredibly alarming rate. These came from China, but once in your area they will never go back.

The only thing that will kill them semi smell-lessly is water with dish soap. It breaks the surface tension so they drown. I cannot convey to you how horrible these truly are. Since you've seen one, sooner or later you're going to know all about them first hand. When the weather is warm they move fairly quickly and only occasionally venture inside, but most of the year they prefer to live with you. Once the temperature does down into 50 or 60 degrees they start moving in. At those temperatures they move so slowly and nonchalantly that you wonder if they have any survival instinct art all. You'll soon discover they hardly need one. Within weeks they are legion. Accordingly the individuals hardly care what you do to them. They know they already won.

A good tip is that they are exceedingly stupid, and in order to fly they need to drop down and fall to get some air under their wings. What this means is that you can get your bowl of soapy water ready below them, then "surprise" them by putting a finger or stick 6 inches in front of their face. Ha! Out of harms way and straight into the soapy water, stupid. And you did it to yourself.

That part never gets old, but constantly needing to do it certainly does.

If this is the first one you see, kill it and seek out all it's friends. If successful, you might have bought a little time. Still, if you've seen one, it's probably already too late.

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brown, 3mm swarming (Seed bug nymph)

by Scott
(Midland, TX)

Swarming in multiple columns over the vinyl siding, around 5pm. Masses dissappeared after a few hours, leaving only a few stragglers such as the one pictured. No wings apparent.

Observed several brown-ringed holes in the siding; not certain if they were there before.

Midland, TX

Comments for brown, 3mm swarming (Seed bug nymph)

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Seed bug nymph
by: Moni

Scott
Your photo is of a seed bug family Lygaeidae. It is also probably in the genus Nysius. In the nymphal stage it is hard to ID any closer from a photo.
As indicated by the name this insect, both the adult and nymph feed on seeds. Therefore, if it feeds on garden seeds that you are trying to collect it is considered a pest. If it feeds on weed seeds then it is of no real interest.
It would not bother your siding. The bugs would have crawled onto the siding from some plant.

thanks
by: Scott

Thanks! Glad to hear it.

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Gray/beige beetle with orange legs (Rose chafer)

by Sandy
(Eastern Ontario)

Destructive beetle

Destructive beetle

Very destructive beetle, about 1cm long. Hordes of them found in the Herb Garden of our local Museum gardens this spring (June/10). Location West of Ottawa, ON. There are hundreds of them mating and seem to prefer prefer eating wide leaf plants such as Comfrey, Elecampine and Echinacea. On the Asparagus in the same area, they don't munch it, just hang upside down in mating pairs. Orange secretion when squished (Eww!). We sure would appreciate your expertise in identifying this pest. Thanks a million!

Comments for Gray/beige beetle with orange legs (Rose chafer)

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Rose chafer
by: Moni

Sandy
As you have found out the Rose chafer is a destructive beetle. These beetles eat a wide variety of flowers and foliage in the garden.
The adults are especially active in late June for about 3 weeks. Once the female has laid her eggs then she dies.
Note that the beetle does contain a toxin (cantharadin) that can poison chickens or other birds.
The larvae are grubs that live in the soil feeding on non-crop type roots and are not considered a pest unlike the adult.
This insect is found in eastern North America.
To control the beetles it is best to hand pick and drop them in warm soapy water. Beetles tend to fall when disturbed so putting a bucket of soapy water under the plant they are on and shaking it would collect some. They can fly in from neighboring gardens so you will have to keep on the look out.
Another method of control is to put floating row covers over prize plants and those most attractive to the beetles (then they will fly to the neighbors garden! :-)
Hope that helps...they are a relatively short term pest.

Thank you
by: Sandy

Moni, what would we do without you! Thanks so much for the ID of this pest and your comments are very much appreciated.

HELP!
by: Annika

I am doing a report on the rose chafer and i have a question. Do you know if this speicies could live in Michigan?
Thank you!
Annika

Rose chafer
by: Moni

Annika
Yes it does live in MI. If you google rose chafer in MI you will get several websites of information...like this one - http://www.ipm.msu.edu/woodylandscape/rosechafer.htm
Here is more info on this pest tho not from MI it is basic info - http://ipm.ncsu.edu/AG189/html/Rose_Chafer.HTML

Hope that helps...let us know if you need more info.

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Shades of Brown (Leaffooted bug)

by Ce
(Centrl Pa.)

Barking Up The Wrong Tree

Barking Up The Wrong Tree

Insect was on window screen. Body looks like a piece of tree bark. I thought it may be some kind of stink bug?, but I have not been able to find a picture that looks like this one to confirm.

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Leaffooted bug, Acanthocphala spp.
by: Moni

Ce
Your photo is of a true bug...so when you were thinking stink bug you were in the right order.
It is a Leaffooted bug, Acanthocphala spp. Your bug is in the Family Acanthocphala ... I think it may be Acanthocephala terminalis but without seeing the critter in person to check wing veins and hind leg "leaf" shape, I am not positive.
According to bugguide.net " A. terminalis is the only Acanthocephala species occurring north of North Carolina." , which means since you are in PA this has to be your bug.
Both the adults and nymphs suck juices from plants and are found in deciduous forests or fields Adults are seen from spring on while nymphs from summer until fall.

Here are photos of this family - Let me know what you think? http://bugguide.net/node/view/2718/bgimage

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Brownish Dime length worm looking bug (Dermestid beetle larva )

by Annamae
(Denver, CO)

Non exoskeleton?

Non exoskeleton?

I have no idea what this is. It kind of looks like a super mini centipede/milipede, but I really don't know. It curls into a circle if it is stimulated. I've just found a handful of them randomly in dark places - mostly in my closet. They leave exoskeletons. I have a photo of a lighter colored one - which I believe is the exoskeleton.

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Dermestid beetle larva
by: Moni

Annamae
Your photo is of a dermestid beetle larva.
Your larva is probably a black carpet beetle based on the size, but there are many species. The exoskeletons you see are shed skins of the larvae as they grow. Sounds like you have several.
Dermestids are beetles with the larva and adults feeding on many materials like leather, dander, wools...basically any natural material. If you find the source....throw it away and you will have gotten rid of most of them. If you find anything of value with them in it you can put the article in the freezer for a few days and that will kill them. Vacuum and clean the infested area thoroughly.

Here is a great information site from TX A&M that will tell you more about this family of beetles.

http://insects.tamu.edu/fieldguide/bimg154.html


HELP!
by: Jackie

I have these bugs outside the house. They only come out at night and when it rains they will climb on the house, its very disturbing.I first noticed them in the back yard around my pond. Then one morning after it rained I found them all over the exterior of my house and the neighbors house as well (thank God).I'm so worried they are going to start getting in the house, I'm not a bug fancier so I'll tell you, I'll die! What can I do and what do they do.I want to get rid of them quickly and permanetly, PLEASE HELP!!

Dermestid beetle larva
by: Moni

Jackie
From the description of your bugs they are not the dermestid beetle larva shown in the photo. Dermestid larva and adult beetles feed on materials like leather, dander, wools...basically any natural material. so it does not make sense that this is your critter.
Please send a photo of your critter so we can identify it.
It almost sounds like your critter is a slug. Try putting out a pie pan with beer in it and see if that is what you have. Slugs love beer.
Let us know.



Help!
by: Anonymous

I moved my couch today and found loads of these skeletons under it. They are all dried up and I just hoovered them up but what I want to know is why I can't see any live ones? Where are they? It was under a pile of pots, pans and material bags I first found them and there were a couple of live ones - that was a year ago. Now all these dead ones under my couch. Any clues??

DERMESTID BEETLE LARVA
by: Moni

Anonymous
If you read the first comment I made at the bottom of the comments on this page you will see they eat any protein like material. All our homes have dander, hair, pet hairs, etc besides food crumbs that get in our carpets and floors. If you do not vacuum ALL areas of the carpets on a very regular basis there is food for these critters. And even then we also leave dander, hair and food crumbs on our couches :-) - that is all part of living.
You found the shed skins there because this insects life cycle is egg, larva(many stages with molting of skins each stage), pupa then adult beetle. The skins will be there until you vacuum or another insect eats the skin.
Best control is to vacuum esp under the couch and other covered places as well as crevices and baseboards. If you have a pet it is even more important. Unfortunately you will just have to do a spring cleaning more often if you want them gone.

Thanks but...
by: Anonymous

Thanks Moni.... I understand the cleaning issue and we clean very thoroughly a lot. What I wanted to know was why I can't see any live ones? If these are the skeletons of the larvae where are the adults?

dermestid beetle larva
by: Moni

Anonymous
The reason you may not see adults could be that they are between cycles meaning there are eggs but no larvae to be seen...or they may be feeding some where you do not see them...or you may have vacuumed them all for now. The beetles seem to find a way indoors...thru screens, holes in window frames, coming in at night when lights are on porch and inside entries.
My guess is if you had them once they will show up again.
If you get a picture of the larva or adult beetles send it in...knowing for sure which one you have will help know what life cycle we are talking about...there are many species of dermestid beetles.
Does that help a little? Let me know.

dermestidae
by: Anonymous

Thanks, I found these when I was cleaning out my closet. They were on all the clothes that were on the floor. Creepy. They didn't appear to be alive. It looked like just exoskeletons. I haven't found any live ones yet (fingers crossed) but I was readin in Wikipedia that the larva(e?) do most of the damage, as the adults feed on flowers and shrubs. I still wonder, though, why I haven't seen any adults. Are they sneaking out after dark. The lesson I've learned is to keep everything off the floor. They don't seem to mess with the hanging clothes, as far as I can tell. I hope I'm right about that.

silverfish
by: Ana

the name of the bug you are talking about is called a silverfish..i just looked it up, i had been wondering myself what these little creatures are.I find them in closets in dark moist places and of course bathrooms!! not sure if they are dangerous..hope this helped

Dermestid beetle larva
by: Moni

Ana
No, the beetle in the photo is a dermestid beetle larva, not a silverfish.

If you look at a photo of a silverfish - http://bugguide.net/node/view/400183 you will see there are only 3 tails. While the dermestid larva in the photo has a cluster of hairs on the tail end...much like this one that is a bit clearer photo - http://bugguide.net/node/view/96856/bgimage.

Silverfish are not beetles (order Coleoptera) but a different order called Zygentoma.

tons in my tub
by: Anonymous

I have been finding tons of these exact worm looking things in my tub snd on tge tile floor aroubd my tub. My daughter fojnd some in her bed! I had never swwn a single one until about a week ago afrer about 7 inchesbof rain fell. Ibkilled rhe first few the next day my tub was lirwrally COVERWD in tiny little flea looking things that were pin point in size. Pluz some more worm things. Im so confused that u say they eat wool and cloth and stuff. Why arw they coming in my tub and bathroom floor?? Im freaking out.

Dermestid beetl larva
by: Moni

Anonymous 'tons in tub'
Do not think from your description you have the same insect. The dermestid does not come when there is lots of moisture from rain.
Not sure what you have that would look like fleas and worms... unless they are fleas. Do you have a pet?
Please submit a photo of the insect(s) that you see in your tub.

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yellow brown insect (golden dung fly)

by Scott Young
(Cambridge Ontario Canada)

This is an enlarged version of the original photo it has better detail. I hope this gives you a better view, and thank you Moni for your insight, much appreciated.

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Golden Dung fly
by: Moni

Scott
Your photo is of a golden dung fly.
It may be an adult male since they are bright yellow or golden while females are usually grayer. Both sexes are very hairy on the body and legs.
They are found throughout North America.
The larvae found in/on dung of domestic and wild animals, while the adults are found nearby which can be just about anywhere - pastures, meadows, woodlands, parks, gardens, etc.
Adults prey on other fly species tho will prey on other insects.

Here are images of this fly on bugguide.net
http://bugguide.net/node/view/8320/bgimage

Thanks Moni
by: Anonymous

Thanks for all your help Moni very much appreciated.

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Brown fly (Eutreta noveboracensis)

This is another image of the brown fly i posted a couple of weeks back. Thank you MONI for the help you have given me.

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Eutreta noveboracensis
by: Moni

John
You were correct...a fruit fly. See if you think this looks like your fly... Eutreta noveboracensis.
According to bugguide noveboracensis means "from New York"!
Your fly has the same pattern on the wing, including the white spot on the top part of the wing. Also hair patterns look similar.
See what you think - http://bugguide.net/node/view/83371/bgimage
Let us know!

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brown-orange beetle (Darkling beetle)

by Crystal Gauthier
(Ottawa, Ontario, Canada)

They are like a long & thin beetle (my mother thought they may be young june bugs).

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Darkling beetle
by: Moni

Crystal
Your photo is not of a June beetle. Their bodies are wider in proportion to length and much chunkier.
This beetle is one of the darkling beetles, family Tenebrionidae. It may be a long-jointed beetle, but without seeing the legs, clearer antennal segments, and clearer image of the neck and back, it is hard to know for sure.
This family of beetles feed on decaying plant material.

strange small flying brown bugs
by: Darlene Harper

I have tried all kinds of bug spray so i went to home depot and i took some bugs with me in a bag to show them so they could identify them for me and they could not so they told me that ortho was the best and that would stop them from coming in my house and i would only have to use it was and no more for another year but not they keep flying inside my house and i dont no how they keep getting in. p.s. feed up.

beetle
by: Moni

Darlene
Please take a photo of your critter and send it in on this site so we can help you identify it. Many insects get into our homes and they do not want to be there. They are not pests, but come in where we have holes in windows or doors or dryer vents. It is best to caulk those holes and not spray for something that is not a pest.

Send us a photo so we can help. The big box stores do not have entomologists nor gardeners on staff. Let us help!

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cockroach with pinchers and a tail (Whipscorpion)

Found walking in the kitchen of a house in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Almost three inches long not counting tail and pinchers, if that is what they are.

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whip scorpion
by: Mira

Looks like the arachnid known as a vinegaroon, or whip scorpion. They aren't true scorpions, and that skinny little whip tail has no stinger.

Whipscorpion
by: Moni

Like Mira said your photo is of a whipscorpion. Unlike scorpions, the tail cannot sting, but is used as a sensory organ.
These arachnids are carnivorous, nocturnal hunters feeding mostly on insects and millipedes, but sometimes on worms and slugs. They are beneficial because they eat roaches and crickets. They love dark damp places.

The largest species of this order are known as Giant Vinegaroon and can be up to 3" long...so my guess is that is what you have. It gets its name from a spray it can emit from the base of the tail that is 85% acetic acid/vinegar. The pinching mouthparts can produce a painful bite, tho it is unlikely to attack a human.


omg
by: Anonymous

That would scare the hell out me.

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Brown & black bug, 6 legs, multi-segmented body (American Wood Cockroach)

These bugs are typically between 1/2 and 3/4 inch long, are brown and black, have 6 legs, and have a large front segment, two smaller body segments, and many smaller segments behind them. They are found in dead wood, usually under the bark. What are they called?

Thanks!

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Wood cockroach
by: Moni

You did not say where you were from, but I believe this is the American wood cockroach which would mean you live in CA or the southwestern states. If not it is a wood cockroach of the same Genus.
Since they overwinter as partially grown nymphs, this may be a young male,but is probably a nearly full grown female.

They are found in hollow trees, stumps, under loose bark, wood piles, can be brought inside on pieces of firewood, and may occasionally enter homes in wooded areas.

If found indoors, they do not breed, and will die in a few days due to insufficient moisture.

They feed on decaying organic matter so would be a beneficial insect.
Thanks for sharing it.

Not in California, but...
by: Tracy

I live in Kansas. Does that still apply? If so, then I'm glad they won't multiply inside the house.

My comment did not show up???
by: Jane Brunton

Yay! I thought it looked cockroachish. I even made a comment to that effect and added a nice link to the site with pictures of the various instars.

I don't see that comment here.

This is the second time I have commented on something and it never shows up. I am wondering if I am doing something wrong???

Wood cockroach
by: Moni

Tracy
It is a wood cockroach so it does not multiply in the house. :-)

Jane
by: Tracy

I did see your comment, but then it disappeared. I don't know why. I did look at the link you had posted, but I didn't have time right then to comment. It looked very like that to me, too.

Moni, thanks! So they are in Kansas, too.

Wood cockroach
by: Moni

Tracy
Wood cockroaches are found all over the US and Canada...there are different species found in different states/areas.
Here is more information about them if you are interested. - http://bugguide.net/node/view/31624

on the bottom of that link there are several sites with info esp this one - http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/pennsylvania-wood-cockroaches




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brown, striped flying (Red-headed ash borer)

by Christopher Hoy
(Denver, Colorado)

Reddish brown large ant or bee like. It appears to be using a dying Eastern Redbud as a host. It has bright yellow stripes on its back. Lots of them are mating right now. They are anywhere from 1/4" to 1" long.

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Red-headed ash borer
by: Moni

Christopher
The larvae of the Red-headed ash borer do feed on ashes as well as other hardwood trees.
The adults lay eggs in the spring under the bark of recently dead trees. So, if the redbud is dying then that is what the beetle is looking for.
The adults are attracted to lights, so if you have lights on at night nearby that may also bring them to your trees.

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brown flying bug (Robber fly)

by brinda
(sarnia ont ca)

pit stop for lunch

pit stop for lunch

on my patio early moring this bug came on my belcony I thought it was just it and when i got my camera it shows he caught a large fly

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Robber fly
by: Moni

Brinda
You have caught a robber fly eating breakfast.
Robber flies are predatory on other insects. The adults lay eggs on plant stems where the larvae eat other insects and their eggs.
There are many different species of robber flies in many different colors. You did not give size, but your specimen looks like the giant robber flies, genus Promachus. Here are some photos of them
http://bugguide.net/node/view/3026/bgimage

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Brown Bed Linen Bug (Carpet beetle larva)

by Greg Gorman
(St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada)

Brown Worm/Pest

Brown Worm/Pest

St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada

The little worm like creature is being found in one room of a three bedroom house. It was found on a bed sheet. Others were found - all in the same room.

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Carpet beetle larva
by: Moni

Greg
You have found carpet beetle larvae in your house.
These are in the dermestidae family of beetles. The larvae turn into small beetles that feed on fats and proteins.
This group of beetles can be found in homes as well as on animal carcasses outdoors. They feed on debris in homes such as dander, hair, wool, silk, leather or hide carpets, or other materials with proteins and fats like dog food, dead insects, oils and pantry foods, etc.
Here are a few images of beetles and larva of that family - http://bugguide.net/node/view/6448/bgimage?from=0


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Brown Flying bug (Bumble flower beetle)

by Marilyn
(London, Ontario, Canada)

it's brown with black spots, has wings and is on wood pressure treated deck post

Thanks

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Bumble flower beetle
by: Moni

Marilyn
This is a bumble flower beetle.
They are found throughout North America east of the Rockies.
The adults feed on nectar and pollen, tho can sometimes damage flowers...they are not a pest. They also feed on rotting fruit, sap and other plant juices. The larvae live in decaying wood or plant matter and found on dung.
They get their name from the buzzing sound they make as they fly(like a bumble bee).

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brown "antlike" (Subterranean Termite)

by Tom Kaiser
(St. Petersburg, FL)

Small about 1/8 - 1/4 of an inch, some have wings. Slow moving. We live on a boat in St. Petersburg, Fl. They show up in the evening when it is darker inside. We do not have any plants on board, or pets. I have sprayed malathion in some areas of the boat but I cannot seem to find where they are coming from. Any help you can give me would be appreciated.

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Subterranean Termite
by: Moni

Tom
Unfortunately, your insect is probably a termite. How much wood do you have on your boat?

Subterranean termites work in the dark so that may be why you are seeing them at night...perhaps that is just a flying adult looking for a new home and you do not have an infestation ...perhaps the dock or nearby does have a problem.

If this is your critter, it is a pest and you will want to make sure you do not have any on your boat, as for that you will need professional help to get rid of them. You could take a sample to your local county extension office for verification or call a quality qualified pest control company for verification and an inspection of your boat.

Here are photos on bugguide http://bugguide.net/node/view/71257/bgimage

Hope they are on the dock!!

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small brown spikey insect (Sinea spp. Assassin bug nymph)


(CT)

Small, approximately 1cm long. Covered with spikes. Large front legs.

I found it on my clothes at the end of a walk. I've never seen anything like it before.

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Sinea spp. Assassin bug nymph
by: Moni

CT
Your insect is the young or nymph of an assassin bug. It is probably in the genus Sinea, but nymphs can be tricky to ID. The large front legs with distinct spines is the main characteristic. The adults look much like the nymphs.
This genus is found all over North America.
Most are found on foliage and in fields with flowers.
Assassin bugs are predators on other insects. Since this one is found often on flowers it preys on pollinators. So it is considered a beneficial insect in that it feeds on other insects but we do not like it feeding on our pollinators.
So, it would be OK to find it in a field but not in our gardens. :-)

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brown pointed larva (moth pupa)

by Chris
(Southeast PA)

We cannot identify this black grub/bug/larvae we found in April on the ground near our garden. It just sits there until you grasp it or put any pressure on its body - then the smaller end (on the right in this photo) rotates like it is trying to tunnel.

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Moth pupa
by: Moni

Chris
Your photo is of a moth pupa.
Hard to tell which one in that stage of development....many look like that when in the pupal stage. Keep it in a jar covered with a paper towel or cloth with a slightly moist paper towel on top of the pupa and a stick for it to climb on when it emerges...so it has some thing to cling to, to fill out its wings. Then take a photo and send it in, so we all know what you found!.

Many moths in the family Noctuidae look like that so that would be my guess....but as there are sooooo... many moths with that kind of pupa case...it is a guess.

I found one too!
by: Jennifer

My husband found it burried in the ground, and the pointy part was partially out of the dirt. We put it on the table, and the point started moving in a circular motion. We thought that something was inside it, so I put on gloves and sliced it open with a razor blade. At first I cut the end with no point, and it looked like a giant booger, than as I got closer to the tip it looked like yellow mustard mixed with a white mucas. It moved the whole time, and it stopped moving when I pulled all the mucas stuff out. In the mucas was about 10 baby white worms in it, and each worm had a little black dot on the end that moved. Oh yeah the worms moved too. The worms are about an 1/8 of an inch long. I also took a video of it moving before I cut it, and then I took a video of the mess, and the little worms. I couldn't hold the camera while I was dissecting it.

I keep finding these too.
by: Gabriela

I've been trying to identify this larvae as well. I garden a lot and keep finding them. I'm going to try to keep one to see what it turns into.

moth pupa
by: Moni

Gabriela
Did you send in a photo of your larvae for ID?

little brown creatures
by: Maria

Hi from Greece/Athens, this little brown creature eats my carpets, curtains, pillow cases etc. My country house have many of this. I dont know the name of it but I know for sure that made a lot of damages. How can I throw off these brown larva?

moth pupa
by: Moni

Maria
As I mention in the comment at the bottom of this page, this is NOT a larva, it is a pupa. This pupa will turn into a moth. Pupa do not eat anything. Pupa are a resting/changing stage of an insect. At this point in the insects development it changes from worm to moth.

Since we only have a photo of the pupa....which can NOT be identified any further... we have no idea what it is you want to control.
Please send us a photo of the moth or worm(larva). THEN, perhaps we can help you to throw it off. :-)

Moth pupa
by: Moni

Jennifer
The mucus that you found inside the pupa is all the cells that regroup from the larva stage to the moth...interesting how it turns to mush then reorganizes into a totally different looking critter!
The worms you found while dissecting were from a fly or wasp that was parasitizing the moth pupa. The eggs were probably laid in the larva and hatched sometime between stages.
Would be interesting to see what develops?
The black dot you said was on the end that moved means it was probably fly larvae and those are the mouth parts.
If you have a college with an entomology department nearby, you could take the video there and see if they could tell you more.

Thanks for being so interested that you dissected it to see what was there!

Lots of them
by: rhonda

I found these in my garden and How do I get rid of them? Will they harm my flowers? I found quite a bit this season. Have never seen them before in my garden.

Pupa
by: Moni

Rhonda
As I mention in the comment at the bottom of this page, this is NOT a larva, it is a pupa. This pupa will turn into a moth. Pupa do not eat anything. Pupa are a resting/changing stage of an insect. At this point in the insects development it changes from worm to pupa to moth.

Since we only have a photo of the pupa....which can NOT be identified any further... we have no idea what it is, so we do not know if it is a pest or beneficial or just a moth - which may not do anything as far as our gardens are concerned.

Just leave them alone for now. If you see some kind of damage or an insect of question send us a photo.

Identified
by: Jeremiah Jenkins

This is a female Luna Moth larvae .

MOTH PUPA
by: Moni

Jeremiah Jenkins
FYI - You are not only can't read - see below but are just plain WRONG!

As I mention in the comment at the bottom of this page, this is NOT a larva, it is a pupa. This pupa will turn into a moth. Pupa do not eat anything. Pupa are a resting/changing stage of an insect. At this point in the insects development it changes from worm to pupa to moth.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/brown-pointed-larva-moth-pupa-comments.html#ixzz1NbVHPHI7

Mystery Solved!
by: Allen Adam

I found one myself and there are four of those species here in North America, they are native to the Israeli and Middle Eastern regions! I googled day and night and after searching this article helped.
http://www.silkmoths.bizland.com/hthysbe.htm

Moth Pupa
by: Moni

Allen Adam
Thanks for looking but as I have said...many moth pupae look the same. There is NO way to know which moth that photo is of except to rear it to an adult. Plain and simple truth.

Thank you all somuch for the info
by: Fillup

My wife and I just made an investment and bought our first home. We were excited, however, in the midst of our excitement the insect inspector told us that the house had termites. We got that problem taken care of before moving in. A month after moving in we had a bad rain storm and thought that it would be best to move the blankets in the corner to a higher elevated area so bugs wouldn't nest there from the rain. Underneath the pile I found this little guy. My first thought, rat droppings! But then after relizing the look and shape I thought it to be somekind of termite. But I soon found this post. Thank you so much!!! Rather deal with a moth the termite.

We found one too
by: David and Coady

Me and my friend Coady were out metal detecting and we found metal but on/in the ground next to it we found the same larva in my backyard. The larva is located in Newfoundland, Canada.

It was answered
by: Danielle

Good gravy people. How many times does Moni have to say, it's not a larvae, it's a pupa and we don't know exactly what it is until it emerges because in this stage it could become many different things?

Cockroach Pupa
by: Anonymous

I found one in the ground when pulling a weed and I think it is a cockroach pupa.

Cockroach Pupa
by: Anonymous

Never mind...THANK GOODNESS! Just learned that cockroaches don't go through the stages like larva and pupa and such. Dang! I found one and was going to watch it transform into something and when I thought it was a cockroach I threw it in the trash! oh well.

Brown Pointed Larva (Moth Pupa)
by: Shirley - A Gardener

Followed your advice to cover the large pointed brown pupa with a damp cloth. Its been 13 days since I found the pupa. Today it has opened to reveal a 2 inch darker brown moth. It seems to still be "awakening." I have looked for a photo of it yet can't find it. We are having challenging weather with big storm Hermine so don't know if I should send it out into it or not. Is it okay indoors a little longer? Does it need to eat soon? Or should I send it on its way and trust it will do as it knows to do in a storm. It is not raining now, yet high winds and rain expected again today again in St Petersburg, FL. Thanks for your help. It has been fascinating to have a little science project once again!

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black/brown roach (American cockroach)

by Jennifer Hardesty
(Indianapolis, In, USA)

Have found these randomly in our home the past few years, maybe 12ish. Just as often during the day as night and have not moved fast (due to fear?? or always slow moving bug?). Found most on ground floor crawling on floor, but twice upstairs (bathroom wall and in sons room in a cloth bag). Time of year has not been a factor that I can remember, as this one and another I found were just recently in the cold winter. The main body is about 1/2 to 3/4 an inch in length I think. I am very disturbed and would like to take the proper measures to help keep them out of my home, but need to know exactly what it is!

Comments for black/brown roach (American cockroach)

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harmless insect
by: Anonymous

A harmless little bug. Please don't use insecticide!

CockRoach
by: eyewatcher

It is best to KILL all now before they begin reproducing...then you will have a MAJOR cockroach problem. If u dont want to use the normal spray , they do have organic. I have found Bengal foggers are the BEST. Down here in Louisiana, we have HUGE tree roaches that scurry in the house .....just a normal process...but we have to spray around the perimeter of the yard and the house perimeter about every three weeks. We dont have to spray the interior as long as the exterior is clean.

Cockroach
by: Moni

Jennifer
It is hard to ID to species without personally seeing the insect, but my guess is the American cockroach. It also looks a little like an Oriental cockroach.
Have you seen any with wings?

Usually cockroaches are active at night and move fast. If you came into the room and turned the light on perhaps that is why they are moving slow...not sure otherwise.
American cockroaches develop slowly...it can easily take well over 1yr to 1 1/2 yrs to go from egg to adult. The photo here looks like a nymph and from the size you say it is half grown.

Cockroaches like to eat all kinds of food, grease, garbage, cotton, wool, cardboard, glue and crumbs of all kinds. Sanitation is the first line of control. They live in sewer in big cities and move from house to house thru and cracks or crevices. Even clean homes can have a few come in. Next, there are baits and sticky traps to catch the roaches. These can be found at hardware or similar type stores.
If you know where they are coming from or where most of them live you can sprinkle diatomaceous earth which cuts into their skin and they dry up - follow label directions.

Here is info from Univ of Nebraska that covers cockroaches in the house very thoroughly -
http://lancaster.unl.edu/enviro/pest/factsheets/120-94.htm
Since you are in Indy, you could call Insects Limited, Inc...and ask for recommendations...they work with indoor pests and are a company that I trust to guide you to safe control of cockroaches.

wood eating cockroach
by: Anonymous

I have been finding the same slow moving beetle as well over the past year, I looked it up and best matched it to a cockroach that eats wood. its not the usual house cockroach because they feed off of wood. hope this helps

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Big Brown Long Neck Flying Insect (Dobsonfly, female)

by Tracy
(Gaines, PA)

Found on screen door about 7:15 a.m. July 9th in Gaines, Pennsylvania. He is about 2 1/2 to 3 inches long. Long narrow neck and head with what looks like pinchers a the top of his head. First thought he was a praying mantus but he does not have the correct stance. Can you identify him?

Comments for Big Brown Long Neck Flying Insect (Dobsonfly, female)

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Dobsonfly, female
by: Moni

Tracy
Your insect is a female dobsonfly.
The females do not have the long 'pinchers' that the males do, but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.
These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be one nearby. The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.
Larvae are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two-three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter. Adults emerge spring to summer.
These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/lacey-23-inches-long-brown-female-dobsonfly-comments.html#ixzz0tWCUpRqg

Thank You
by: Tracy

Thank you for identifying the insect in my picture. I had no idea what it was. I had even asked people at work and know one knew what it was. Your work is greatly appreciated. Thank You.

Thanks
by: Anonymous

Found one last night, June 29, 2011 in East TN. Was unsure what it was, glad I found the answer. Thanks

GROSS LOL
by: Samantha

Found on in Troy NY on ceiling of patio at my job. Very large male

7 year old boy
by: Dillon

Thanks for the answer, my son who is 7 found one dead bud fully intact in Charlton , massachusetts and thought we would be rich finding a bug no one has ever seen :).....we had to look it up to find out what it was..;) .Thank you


Dobsonfly
by: Moni

Dillon
So cool that your son found this large and interesting insect. Glad you helped him figure out what it was.

There are many cool insects that are out there, but are not seen in many city situations...once you get out to a park or any place with much vegetation there are so many insects to be found. Glad you are encouraging your son to not only see these critters of nature but to learn more about them.
Thanks!

Found
by: Anonymous

Found one at 10:30 pm in Lewisville indiana

Dobsonfly
by: Moni

Glad you have them in Lewisville, IN! A nice very small town in east central IN on hwy 40, where I have visited often...it should have dobsonflies.

Found one
by: Jeff

Found one on June 26 in Paris, Ontario Canada.

big brown long neck dobsonfly
by: Anonymous

Found on our garage door at 11:00 pm, Columbus Ohio. We live on a lake near a reservoir. Its about 3 inches long. Eww!!!!

dobsonfly, female
by: Moni

Columbus
You must live in the Westerville area near Hoover Reservoir? So glad you got to see one of these neat insects!! Don't remember seeing one when I lived there.

That means the lake is clean!

They do come to lights at night so that may be why you saw it a 11pm?

battle creek, michigan
by: asheley.... Eeewww

Found a male, he's huge! I have a creek that runs throu my back yard. I found him on my lawn furniture while mowing. Glad to know what it is.

Dobsonfly
by: Anonymous

We found a Dobsonfly in Aroma Park Illinois, it was quite the scare to the family, not ever seeing one before. What is the life span of this crazy looking creature?

wester PA male
by: Anonymous

We found one in western PA this afternoon. Oddly, he flew onto the stage our band was playing on and it was about 3pm. Never seeing one before and with the large size of the male...freaked us out since we never saw one before.


California too
by: Anonymous

We have them here in California. We live by a creek.

Northwest New Jersey
by: Bill

We see lots of them at night time Little League
games at a ball field near a stream.They do tend to freak you out a little. Thanks for the I.D.

dobsonfly
by: Moni

Bill
thanks for looking up what they are and not freaking out :)

Dobsonfly
by: Anonymous

Yikes! A male Dobsonfly with huge pinchers seen at 11:20pm in Dayton, Minnesota next to the Mississippi River.

Pleasantville pa
by: Me!

Half awake, let dog out, huge must be male on screen door, slithered out to bravely take pic to identity freaked me out too awake now!

found a very large male newburgh ny
by: Anonymous

had no idea what I had found, it was dead but very intriguing indeed. its pinchers were almost as long as its body

Dobsonfly
by: Anonymous

Have a large male Dobsonfly that has been on the front wall of our apartment building for the last 2 days. Must have been attracted to the front light! Thanks for the identification help.

Fairport, NY

dobsonfly
by: Moni

Fairport
Cool that you got to see the male with the long pincers! They are attracted to lights. Interesting that it stayed for 2 days?

freaked me out.
by: desirae

Found three in upstate NY. Yates county. I have a large stream in my back yard. Have never seen one before. Was sitting outside around midnight and had two crawling on my leg!

seen 6/4/15 in Lombard, IL
by: Mike

Saw this strange bug on the stucco wall outside the community pool about 6:30 pm. It didn't move until I touched it, then it resumed its stationary position. Thanks for identifying it.

Found on in Nova Scotia
by: Ryan

Just found one of these in my house in Nova Scotia! Thanks for identifying!

Creeped us out!!!!
by: John

Found one on the side of our house near the front door at about 9 pm on 07/23/2015. Never seen one before and it did creep us out. It had the large bouncers, so I think it was a male.

found end of July 2015 11pm Montreal Canada.
by: jeff

Yep we found one trying to get on our insect screen.. happy to know what it is.. we live right opposite water.. coming down from St Lauren river.. thanks guys

I remember seeing them in the mountains of Virginia.
by: Jimmy

I used to see the by the rivers in Virginia, they are great bass bait.

Dobson Fly
by: Anonymous

Found one in a garden patch we're working on about 10am in the morning. He was crawling along the ground, looked like he was looking for food. Assume he, since pincers were what I thought was long and he was using them. We're outside Weaverville, NC

Male Dobsonfly in Arkansas
by: Anonymous

It flew into the house from the lighted porch after dark. About 2 1/2 to 3 inches long and with the long pinchers that cross over each other. Beautiful wings. Easy to catch in a jar for identification. So glad to know what it is. We are in the Ozark Mtns with a stream and pond. This is the first time we've seen one. Exciting!

Dobsonfly
by: Anonymous

Found one in holyoke mass and boy did it creep us out

dobsonfly
by: Anonymous

I believe I found one on my deck last night. He looked like he had pinchers but can't be to sure. I have a picture but unable to up load as yet.

No stream near my place.

Male Dobsonfly
by: Anonymous

Found one at Rocky Fork Lake Hillsboro Ohio.

Dodsonfly
by: David

We have lots of Dobsonfly's in Palmer Rapids, Ontario Canada. Our place is right on the Madawaska River, it's common here to see two at a time at night they fly up to the screen door attracted to the light. I found two dead ones together in our BBQ one male one was female.

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brown walking beetle (Broad-nosed Weevil)

by Nathan
(Anaheim, California, USA)

small brown bug

small brown bug

This might be a totally vanilla insect, but nobody here knew what it was or had seen one before. This bug did not fly and was sitting on my patio chair, which is a similar brown color to the bug. I live in Anaheim, California. I took the photo with my phone but tried to enhance the contrast to show the details so hopefully it'll be good enough for you to tell what it is. Thanks!

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Broad-nosed Weevil
by: Moni

Nathan
Your photo looks like a Broad-nosed Weevil. Without more information on size, a clearer photo, and knowing what it eats...it is hard to know which one in this subfamily of the weevil family.
This group of weevils feed on plant foliage.
The larvae live in the soil and feed on plant roots.

room raid
by: domi

i find these all the time in my room and they freak me out. sometimes i see them in other parts of the house but there gross... and i live in british columbia canada

Giant Water Beetle
by: southeast WI

Turned on the garage light and this big guy came walking over to greet me.Looks just like the pic,about 3" long. Warm October evening after sunset. I hope he doesn't have any friends close by.

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Big Brownish Beetle (Giant water bug)

by Lynn
(Canada)

The picture was taken on the tennis court, mid September in Toronto Canada...so the temperatures were low 70 F at the time...the insect is about 2 inches long, appears to have four legs and two long pincers...since we are unaccustomed to large insects we were wondering what it was! Thanks for your help!

Comments for Big Brownish Beetle (Giant water bug)

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Giant water bug
by: Moni

Lynn
Your bug is a giant water bug. They are sometimes called 'Toe biters' for a reason...they do have a painful bite if you are wading without shoes in water where they live. :-)
They live in water but are attracted to lights at night. So perhaps the tennis court is near a pond or lake?
They do like clean water and live in and around the vegetation at the edge of a pond or shallow lake.
The "stinger" looking thing at the end of the abdomen is the snorkel-like breathing tube.
They feed on aquatic insects, snails, small fish, frogs and toads.
These bugs are found across North America into Mexico.


I found one
by: Ryan

I am in Utah there are no ponds or lakes around my area. I found it in Syracuse Utah. It is about 2 inches long as well and looks just like the picture.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Ryan
Perhaps someone has a pond that you do not know about?...farm pond or such. If the streams are still enough they may live there. It just needs to be clean.

I saw one too! Near a tennis court aswell!!
by: Anonymous

I go to Durham College in Oshawa and about a month ago I was walking through the parking lot near the tennis dome - no lights from tennis court but probably in the parking lot...it was more black then brown if I remember correctly but it did look just like the picture. There is Oshawa Creek right near by so the last post makes sense.

found 1 in Cradock , south africa
by: Frank

found this bug in Cradock , the eastern cape of south africa at least 2 inches long

Big Beetle
by: Jessica

I found one in Glencoe Mn. About 600 surface miles away from the one in toronto. the difference is it was only 45 degrees F at 9:15pm.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Jessica
They come out in early spring, so not surprising you saw one. They are so cool! Thanks for sharing.

Biiig Bug!!
by: Dustin

Apon coming home I found my cat batting on of these around the drive way today. Northern Maine. 46 deg F Rainy Day. Dead bug walkin

Weird bug
by: Anonymous

Found one of these in a bucket of water in NorthEast Indiana. We have a pond in the vicinity, as well as a pole night light. These comments explained this strange thing clearly. Thanks, knowing I can rest easily, now that the bug is clearly not that unique.

GIANT WATER BUG
by: Moni

Anonymous from the Hoosier state
Thanks for sharing...glad we could help.
The giant water bug in my collection came from east central Indiana where I grew up on a farm!
Glad to know they are still there!!

its really big
by: Anonymous

found this in the grass, in washington state!

SICK!!!!!!
by: Angela

I found my sick little creature as I was walking through our local penticton ( south western canada) soccer feild. At first,when i saw it fall from the corner of my eye i thought it was a baby bird. Yep... its that big!!! pretty gross, but i caught it anyways, and reminded myself of billy the extermanator while at it :)

Wowzers
by: Anonymous

I came across this mother of a bug on my way home from work when I saw something from the corner of my eye crossing the street near the bus station. This wasn't near any water that I am aware of, but yes, this bug is that big.... I actually kinda was startled because I thought it was a mouse. I was shocked to discover it was actually a beetle...and had never seen one of this size... I was afraid to be near it honestly..

WOAH!
by: Aaron

I Live in Mid-Michigan, and it is early November, temperature 41 degrees. Came home from the store to find my cat staring at the ground. the cat usually runs when I come near and I got right up behind him to see what he was looking at. I FREAKED! This thing was crunching on a dead leaf, absolutely nowhere near water. I'm not a bug person! I looked through a big bug book and couldn't find it. Decided to google it and found this website. Thanks for your help. All of my family and neighbors were baffled about this not-so-tiny bug. Good to know what the heck it was, and that I didn't need to be worried about it ending up in my bed!!!

Big bug!
by: Anonymous

I just saw one at my work. Its night and there are ditches nearby and lights all in the parking lot. Its also rainy spring season where i am (Victoria BC) as we are into april now. I thought it may be a cockroach!

?
by: Christina A.

I work in a shop where we make fire hoses for military, fire companys, and other people. We found one of these insects on a loom that wasn't running. We took pictures and then tried to get it off of the loom and it would not come off. That bug looks exactly like this one, and we aren't around any water anywhere. The closet water to us is Lake Erie, about 4 mies away. Is it possibly a bug from another country? In Fairview, PA.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Christina
Without a photo we could not tell you for sure what it is :-) You could submit your photo.

If you are only 4 miles from Lake Erie...there may also be some farm ponds or sub-development "lakes" around that might host these insects. The water table has to be pretty high in the area, so I am sure there is water nearby somewhere. These bugs do fly to lights at night so if the materials were sitting anywhere near bright lights where insects can get to, then it is probably the same insect, not something foreign.

Googled your area and there are lakes/ponds nearby that could easily host your bug :-) They do not fly 4 miles but can travel perhaps 1/4-1/2 mile.

Big Bug @ College
by: Rick

I just came on this site cause I found the exact same bug outside at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. It was 2 in the morning and under a walkway with lights. The only body of water we have nearby is the Conn. River. About 3/4 of a mile away. I have never seen anything like this and I have lived in New Hampshire most of my life.

Rick

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Rick
So glad you got to see one!
They are attracted to lights, so am sure that is why you saw it there. There are ponds and reservoirs in your area that could be the source were it came from as well as small ponding areas near the river.

Grossssss!
by: Anonymous

Oh My I Never Seen Such A Thing. So Gross And Big.. One Came In My Window. Scared The Sh*t Out Of Me. Good Thing i Found This Site ... Saskatoon Saskatchewan

soooooo gross!!!
by: jay

I seen this bug for the first and last time 10 years ago and i flipped out! I thought it was a mutant roach! I tried killing it and it literally took a bit of strength. These suckers have a really hard shell. There was also a lake near by and i found it under the steet light n my complex. My sisters neighbor just found one and we couldnt figure out what it was called. Im terrified of roachs and this bug freaked me out worse than that!

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Jay
Please do not kill them. It is not their fault the night light is there to attract them. Leave them be and they will be gone soon. Thx

Water Bug
by: Terry Gillmore

my kids found one today while playing on there bikes on our street.it is the 1st ofmay 2013 and
its early spring. this bug scared the crap out of
my 3 kids. I told them no to touch it because I
think they bite.well I read this tonight and see
that they do bite. ugly things but guess theres a
reason there around.
I wouldn't let them kill is so I picked it off the
road on a box lid and placed it into the grass
and made my kids take off away from it.maybe i'll
see it next year and I hope its not the size of a
vw bug by then.. lol
thanks for all the info on this bug. something
we don't need in downtown Toronto... lol

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Terry Gillmore

So Cool! To find one of these in Toronto so early!

Glad your kids got to see it. Must be some water around as well as a night light nearby. So glad you did not kill it. They really do no harm. It is only when wading in the water or miss-handling them that one can get bitten.

Thanks for sharing!

Man!! he's big
by: The Hawk

Just saw this guy in a super market parking lot (north andover ,mass.). 9 pm , 55 degrees. On his back, in distress , wildly flailing legs & pincers. Flipped him over; he scurried around in a big circle & stopped to re-group. I had to leave. Hope he doesn't get run over. This huge parking lot is on the site of what had been a beautiful healthy wetland. We're idiots. Over & out.
p.s. He is just as likely to be she.

Grossed-Out
by: Lora

Just saw one in the parking lot at work this morning in Brooklyn Center, MN. My building is near a small man-made pond, and the parking lot here is well-lit at night. I have lived in Minnesota for decades -- as well as several places around the world -- and this is the first time I've ever seen anything like this. Still grossed-out.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Lora
So glad you finally got to see one! They are so cool!

Your place of work is the perfect spot to see them with the pond and the lights. Hope it gets back to the water before someone steps or drives over it.
You could scoop it up with a cup or paper and put it in the grass. It will find its way back to the pond.
Thanks for sharing!

Alien looking
by: Chris.M

Found this thing outside where I work, in south central Texas. (San Antonio) Scared the crap out of me and friends. We were laughing about it being a alien. We have recently received alot of rain and I mean ALOT.

scary sight
by: IN Houston TX

Found big numbers of these big bugs in houston tx. only during summer time when it feels over 100 degrees. Had to look it up because I wasnt sure what it was exactly. Thankfully it was dead by the time I found it!

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dark brown, greenish head moth (Virginia ctenucha moth)

by Arnie
(Milford,ME USA)

Insect is 1+inch long with dark gray wings tipped in white. Has a shiny blue patch behind it's orange head. Has a probe and was probing a rose.

Comments for dark brown, greenish head moth (Virginia ctenucha moth)

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Virginia ctenucha moth
by: Moni

Arnie
The insect on your rose is a Virginia ctenucha moth. The moths feed on nectar of flowers flying during the day or night. They are attracted to lights at night.
The caterpillars feed on grasses, sedges or iris.
This insect is found all over North America east of the Rockies, but north of Virginia.

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brown robber fly

by brinda
(sarnia ont canada)

robber fly

robber fly

thank you Moni ...I never seen one like this before ...and thanks for the web page for indentifacations on insects .. your expertise is valuable ..brinda from ont canada

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brown flying insect (Dobsonfly, female)

by Kim Norgate
(Dundas, ON. Canada)

This insect had a large body, it looks like wings that were fairly transparent, like a dragon flies, with mandibles. It was about an inch to two inchs long. It's antenea were fairly long and had fine hairs(?) on them. I saved it from a spiders web.

Comments for brown flying insect (Dobsonfly, female)

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Dobsonfly, female
by: Moni

Kim
Your insect is a female dobsonfly.
The females do not have the long 'pincers' that the males do, but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.
These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be one near by. The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.
Larvae are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two-three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter. Adults emerge spring to summer.
These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.
Here are some other photos on bugguide -
http://bugguide.net/node/view/4873/bgimage



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brown bee/scorpion/grub (Jerusalem Cricket)

by Trish D'Andrea
(San Diego, CA)

Found in backyard...kindof looks like a scorpion, bee, grub combo.

Comments for brown bee/scorpion/grub (Jerusalem Cricket)

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Jerusalem Cricket
by: Moni

Trish
Your photo is of a Jerusalem Cricket. These are related to the other crickets, tho they are strange looking critters. They are found in western US states.
They feed on other insects as well as roots and decaying vegetation. Since they also sometimes are found eating potatoes they are commonly called potato bugs, however they are not a pest of the garden.
Jerusalem crickets are active at night and live in burrows under rocks or other covers during the day.
They can bite giving a painful pinch.

seen the same bug
by: Anonymous

In 2009 i have seen the same insect but i had know idea what it was we took a picture of it but i live in British Columbia in the Okanogan for my hole life and have seen many bugs but this was veary strange to come upon any ideas how that got this way

Jerusalem Cricket
by: Moni

Anonymous from BC
Jerusalem Crickets are found thru out the western North America including British Columbia. They come east only to the western edge of the Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.
So, it is not surprising that you found one. :-)

Jerusalem Cricket Grub
by: Bee-in-mi-bonnet

I turn these up often while preparing my garden in Southern California. When they feel threatened, they flip over on their backs so that their big pincher mandibles are pointing up and their soft, vulnerable backs are protected. I was foolish enough to try to move one by hand last month, and it nipped me, drawing blood. Besides the big nippers, the striped abdomen is a distinguishing feature. Thanks for the ID.

Our School Site Insect Discoveries
by: P.L.A.C.E. @ Prescott Elem. School

Our after school science class has been searching for insects that live in our garden areas. Two weeks ago we found this insect that we could not identify...Students thought it looked like a beetle but we found out it is a Jerusalem Cricket. We placed it in a bug container with a magnifying glass top. What a beautiful creature. Today during our search we came upon another JC and it is much, much bigger than the first. Don't know if they are un-
named or unknown to scientists, but we our in West Oakland...How can we send you pictures?

Jerusalem crickets
by: Moni

Insect Discoveries
We would be glad to help you ID the insects you find in your garden area.
To add photos for ID, please see the bottom of this comment page and click on where it says INSECT IDENTIFICATION. On that page you can follow the directions for adding photos. Please just send one insect per question...tho you may add up to 4 photo angles of that insect. You may send as many
insect as you find that you do not see already ID'ed on our website here.
On the Insect ID page you will find links to the several hundred insects already Identified.
What a great project for the science students to do...we love the idea of students learning about gardening and the critters that live in our gardens.
As you will learn most are good bugs while a few are pests.
Thanks for using our site!

Our School Site Insect Discoveries
by: P.L.A.C.E. @ Prescott Elem. School

On Monday, 4/26, we found a much larger Jerusalem Cricket in the garden area...we put it in the same bug container with the smaller one.
This morning we noticed that the smaller one appeared to have died or been killed by the larger one. Was it a mistake to put them in the same container. In our research we read that they were cannablistic. How do they get along together in the same space? Although there is food in the container we will keep watch to see if the larger one will eventually eat the one that died.

JERUSALEM CRICKET
by: Moni

P.L.A.C.E.
When they are out in the garden area they can have their own area/territory and also get away from each other....but in a small jar they have no escape. The big one is stronger and perhaps more mature than the little one...makes sense that it killed the little one.
It is best not to put any more than one insect in a jar. And as your group learned, while it is neat to watch critters in a jar, they can not behave normally. Nature provides food, shelter, water, and so many other things that we humans may not know about. It is best to watch critters in their own habitats and observe as much as possible from what we can see, hear, smell etc. If several students take lots of notes and/or photos and compare what is being seen then a story can be written about the insect. Where it lives...what it eats...how it moves...does it prefer to work in light or dark...etc
Have fun as you observe your garden!

Our School Site Insect Discoveries
by: P.L.A.C.E. @ Prescott

Thanks Moni for your comments...yes, you're right, however, it's really not a jar, but an actual bug container, (7" wide, 5" tall with diameter 4"). We originally thought they were male and female,(hoping they would mate)...in our research we saw the hook for the males at the end of the abdomen and realized they were both males. It happened so fast, (one day)...the students were certainly surprised and sadden by our mistake of putting them in the same bug container. After a few more observations and pictures we will return the one Jerusalem cricket back to his habitat. Again, thanks for the comments and suggestions.

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Grasshopper-like Brown Insect (Greenhouse camel cricket, female)

by Sanews
(Itta Bena, Mississippi)

Grasshopper-like/Mosquito Insect 1

Grasshopper-like/Mosquito Insect 1

Grasshopper-like/Mosquito Insect 1 Grasshopper-like/Mosquito Insect 2 Grasshopper-like/Mosquito Insect 3 Grasshopper-like/Mosquito Insect 4

I saw this insect on the side of my house. It scared me at first, then I took a closer look and it still scared me. I used the zoom on my camera to get closer to take the picture of this strange looking insect. I did not want to get close to it. That is probably why the pictures are not very good. I was afraid that it might jump on me or bite or something, but it did not jump, move, turn or anything and it was gone the next time I looked for it.

I am glad I found this site. I really wanted to know what this insect was. So thanks for helping me identify it.

Comments for Grasshopper-like Brown Insect (Greenhouse camel cricket, female)

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Camelback Cricket
by: Dave Meyer

They like to move into your basement in the winter.

Greenhouse camel cricket, female
by: Moni

Sanews
It is a camel cricket. Looks like from your photo of the face that there is a 'horn' between the antenna, so you have a Greenhouse camel cricket. Your photos of the rear show the 'stinger-like' appendage which is the ovipositor or the egg laying device of this female cricket. They are known to habit moist greenhouses, basements and laundry rooms. They feed on various food stuffs especially organic material dead or alive. They can cause damage in greenhouses by feeding on young plants. These are quite common and were introduced from China.
Here is a website from North Carolina State Univ Entomology Dept about these crickets for more info.
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/ent/notes/Urban/camelcrickets.htm
All the great angles in these photos helped a lot to ID this insect! Thanks!!


camel crickets
by: Anonymous

I have these in my basement, along with centipedes. They hop at me. How do I get rid of them? They really creep me out.

Greenhouse camel cricket
by: Moni

Anonymous
Without a photo we do not know for sure which camel cricket you have...so...
Here is a website from North Carolina State Univ Entomology Dept about these crickets for more info.
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/ent/notes/Urban/camelcrickets.htm

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brown, long feelers, claw tail (Earwig)

by j.c.
(Stafford, VA)

Can someone tell me what these are?

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earwig
by: Anonymous

common earwig

Earwig
by: Moni

JC
It is an earwig - female. The photo is not clear enough to know which one.
The European earwig is a pest, tho others are not necessarily so.
Earwigs like to hide in cool dark places during the day and come out at night. They are found thru-out North America.
The European earwig are good predators on other insects but they also feed on plants and if in the house can be a pantry pest. When earwigs get in the house they can get into everything.
Since European earwigs like moist dark places then to control them keep mulch away from the house and repair any drainage problems near the building.

About the earwig
by: Anonymous

Does anybody know what this earwig larvae looks like? Might have them, aany stripes on back of larvae but it has not legs yet, just one end has a different color looks like head??

Earwig life cycle
by: Moni

Anonymous
Please send a photo of your larvae...they are not earwig young.
Here are what earwig young look like - http://bugguide.net/node/view/360455/bgimage
They are really just miniature adult earwigs.

The life cycle of an earwig is egg, young, adult.

Earwig??
by: Anonymous

Found this exact type pest in my home in the Bay Area, northern California. How do you get rid of them?

earwig
by: Moni

Anonymous
If you have earwigs in the house it usually means there is dampness. Earwigs live in moist areas near organic matter. Clear any mulches away from your house.
Earwigs can be a nuisance and can be beneficial. In the house they would be a nuisance.

If you have one or two in the house, just step on them or pick them up with a tissue or container and put them outside. If you have a moisture problem in the house then it needs to be addressed.

Outside the house, if it is labeled for where you live, you could try using diatomaceous earth...it might even be labeled for indoor use...but please read the label and check for local recommendations at your county extension office before applying anything.

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Lacey, 2-3 inches long, brown (female dobsonfly)

by Andy
(Baltimore, MD, USA)

3 inch mystery insect

3 inch mystery insect

Found on the back deck of my apartment in Baltimore Maryland. It was in the shade as the sun started encroaching upon it. Living here for a few years, never saw anything like it. LONG antennae!

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female dobsonfly
by: Moni

Andy
Your insect is a female dobsonfly.
The females do not have the long 'pinchers' that the males do, but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.
These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be one near by. The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.
Larvae are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two-three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter. Adults emerge spring to summer.
These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.



weird bug
by: Jackie Petell

We found the same bug in Augusta Maine, does anyone know more about it?? I have never seen it before and we were thinking it was here because its been so hot, so if anyone has any info let me know.

dobsonfly
by: Moni

Jackie
I assume you read the comment section of this page. You will also find more information at this website. It also lists some sources for more info. If you live near any clean water...it is not unusual to see this insect in Maine.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/4873

hellgrammite
by: Anonymous

I was born and raised in Pennsylvania, and we had these all over. In PA we just refer to them as hellgrammites. We had these and worm like hellgrammites that were awesome for fishing.

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brown wasp like (Pigeon Tremex , Horntail wasp)

by christina
(utah)

ok so my friend found this in utah it looks kinda like a wasp or yellow jacket to me but we just are not sure it has wings like a drangon fly but a big stinger so really not sure please help us know and is it deadly??

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Pigeon Tremex , Horntail wasp
by: Moni

Christina
It is a wasp known as a horntail wasp, but more specifically the pigeon tremex. These wasps do not sting.
This wasp lays eggs in diseased, cut or dying wood. There the larva bore into and feed in the wood. The most common wood is from oak, maple, hickory, elm, beech, sycamore, apple, pear or hackberry. The larvae have a fungus in their digestive systems to help digest the wood.
They are found thru out North America.

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Brown with Black Spots (Grapevine Beetle)

by Angela
(Michigan)

He's got pretty long legs, hooks at the end. Black underneath. A tannish brown on the back, with black spots. He has a pretty small head, you can barely notice it. Inch + In size

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Spotted Grapevine Beetle
by: Lin

This is what it looks like to me and unless they are numerous, they don't do much harm. They munch on the leaves.

Grapevine beetle
by: Moni

Angela
As Lin suggested your photo is of a grapevine beetle (Pelidnota punctata). The species name means spotted, tho spotted is not used in the common name.
The adults do feed on grape foliage and sometimes the fruit when it is available. But it is not a problem/pest in healthy vineyards. These beetles do come to lights at night.
Larvae of this beetle feed on decaying roots and stumps of trees.

Nicholas county WV
by: Anonymous

I just found one of these on my bathroom.
First one I have ever seen!!!

just found one on my porch
by: Larry

i just found one of these beetles on my front porch where I had left the light on. I live in Massachusetts and have never seen this type of insect before.

Grapevine beetle
by: Moni

Larry
Glad you got to see one. They are really cool big beetles.

They are attracted to lights. Also found one at our local grocery store this week...under the big parking lot lights.

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brown prehistoric dragonfly (Dobsonfly, male)

by Shannon Hethcox
(Jackson, GA USA)

I found this in my pool skimmer. It has wings like a dragonfly, but has 2 pairs of long "horns" that are almost 1" long and very stiff. It is nearly 5" long. The abdomen is also like a dragonfly. But the head and "horns" are more like some sort of beetle. I would love to know what it is and so far....can't find anyone with a clue. Please help. I am a nature freak and love all God's creatures.

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Dobsonfly, male
by: Moni

Shannon
Your photo is of a dobsonfly male. The females do not have the long 'pincers', but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.
These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be one near by. The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.
Larvae are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two-three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter. Adults emerge spring to summer.
These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.
Perhaps you can share it with a local nature center or school for others to see.
Here are some photos of adults and larvae -
http://bugguide.net/node/view/4872/bgimage

Dobsonfly
by: Anonymous

I just found one of these last night. I too, didn't know what it was. I told my son that it looked like something prehistoric. Thanks for the info. I'm going to see if i can find a nature center that wants it.

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brown 14 pairs of legs and fast (House centipede/

by Teresa
(Evansville, IN )

This insect crawled out of the tub drain during a shower & stayed still in the tub for the rest of the shower...after the shower was done, we scooped it into a bowl with a lid & it stayed comatose-like until we started moving it around to take pics of it...then it started being VERY active...we think it looks like a cross between a "cave cricket" & some type of millipede...

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FAST BUG
by: Rick

I BELIEVE THAT LOOKS LIKE A SILVERFISH

silverfish?
by: Anonymous

I've seen these occasionally; can a silverfish be 2 1/2 inches long? VERY scary looking.

Size does matter.
by: teresa

It is'nt 2 1/2 inches... It's only 1 1/4 inches...

sorry!
by: Anonymous

sorry teresa; i meant the one i saw recently crawling very quickly across the living room rug was 2 1/2 inches long and very scary - but otherwise looked exactly like your photo. i really hope someone knows for sure what it is!!!

House centipede
by: Moni

Teresa
Your critter is a house centipede. Centipedes have one pair of legs per body segment...as opposed to 2 pair of legs per body segment that a millipede has... or 4 pair of legs like the spider class and 3 pair of legs like the insect class.
Centipedes seen indoors are found in damp areas such as bathrooms, cellars, and crawl spaces. It will venture beyond these areas and is often seen quickly scurrying across floors or climbing a wall. These relatives of insects are predatory on other arthropods, including cockroach nymphs, flies, moths, bedbugs, crickets, silverfish, earwigs, and small spiders. So, they eat many things you'd probably rather not have in your home.They are beneficial, not a problem other than a nuisance.

For those who think it might be a silverfish. Silverfish are only about 1/2 inch long, are silver, and have 6 legs, antenna, and a three-part tail. Silverfish spend all year indoors; they are active at night and hide during the day avoiding direct light. Silverfish are omnivorous - eating starchy foods, cereals, moist wheat flour, glue on book bindings and wallpaper, starch in clothing made of cotton or rayon fabric; outdoor individuals eat lichens.


harmless house centipedes
by: Mira

After occasional encounters with giant desert centipedes in the past, I've always been happy to run into a harmless house centipede for a change! ;) Their looks remind me of a plume from a feather duster.

Mutant house centipede?
by: Creeped Out

Can house centipedes grow bigger than 1.5"? I have an infestation and these things are a lot bigger than that, likely 3" to 4". I am not exaggerating. I measured one I squished...

i
by: Anonymous

i found one of those and i am trying to identify it, it looks exactly like yours

House centipede
by: Moni

Creeped out
The house centipede adult has 15 pair of legs with the last pair (on adult females) nearly twice the length of the body. The body is 1 to 1 1/2 inches in length. This gives the centipede an overall appearance of being from three to four inches in length (including legs and antennae).

House centipede
by: Moni

Anonymous
If you want it Id'ed then send us a photo :-)

Moni got it :)
by: Anonymous

Moni got it right.. I just had one scurry across my floor and my declawed cat beat it around till it moved on to another life... they are ugly things but they seem to have a pretty good purpose.... one thing that I did find when researching was that it CAN bite if scared and it will feel like a bee sting.. so when killing use protection cause one never knows :S

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small,brown,and white bug (Green lacewing larvae)

by bob taylor 4/11/2011
(las vegas, nevada)

pic taken with bug on paper

pic taken with bug on paper

pic taken with bug on paper

approximately 1/8 of an inch and smaller,brown with white stripe down back,appears to have pincers, bites and leaves bump like a mesquito, no wings, found in clark county las vegas

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Green lacewing larvae
by: Moni

Bob
Your insect is the larvae of the green lacewing. These are very beneficial insects for the garden. The larva eat lots of aphids and other pests like caterpillars on cabbage, potatoes and other plants in the garden.
The adults are lacy looking green flying insects. They also feed on pest insects but do not eat as much as the growing larvae. They can give off an unpleasant odor when handled.
Here are photos of lacewings and larvae - http://bugguide.net/node/view/140/bgimage?from=96


what do you do?
by: Maria Rose Clark

what happens when you get pinched? Cause my friend's mom,Shari,got pinched and my grandma is wondering if it can give you a virus.

Green lacewing larvae
by: Moni

Maria Rose Clark
The lacewing will not give Shari or anyone any virus or other disease or problem...other than it feels like a pinch.
Not a pest at all, just a nuisance if you happen to get bit...all part of being a gardener :-).

Itchy
by: ysibel

I just was outside and got a really painful bite from one of these. I have a problem with being allergic to everything; should I keep an eye on the bite for any allergic reaction? I am still figuring out what I'm allergic to so i just want to make sure.

And awesome site, I'm itching all over now with information.

Green lacewing larvae
by: Moni

Ysibel
To my knowledge no one has had an allergic reaction to this insect...it may bite if mishandled but it does not inject any fluids.

Now having said that...it is always possible that you might be allergic to the insect itself...as it is foreign to your body ;)
Hope all is OK!

found one today in northern utah
by: utah gal

well i live in utah and i found one of these little critters must be a baby sure was small!! i found it in my bird cage on the thing my birds use to sharpen their beak. Should i be worried?! will there be more. i have more pictures but not sure how to add it to your collection.

itchy and swollen
by: Anonymous

My reaction to being bitten by one of these insects was delayed. The day following the bite, a red swollen and itchy area appeared. Currently on day three from the bite and it is still swollen and itchy - treated with hot compresses and a bit of Neosporin, still itchy. Nasty little critter !

Bitten by Green Lacewing Larvae
by: Brad

I was bit by one these odd little guys. My wife took a picture of it, while is was biting me, cause it looked so weird. Result of bite is now going on day 4, and i still have a large red itchy whelp, that is about the size of a dime.

Nasty little critter!

Seems to be eating my pepper plants
by: Anonymous

I have had little holes in my baby green peppers and something has been eating the new foliage. I cut open a pepper with a hole, and this thing was inside the pepper. I have found at least 2 others on the plant itself, near the eaten foliage. I was sure this insect was the culprit, but maybe it was just chasing the real villain!

Green lacewing larvae
by: Moni

Yes, this insect is a good bug and was chasing your villain!
If there is a whole in a pepper it was probably caused by a European corn borer...they are known to borer holes in sweet peppers.

bites
by: Anonymous

I was also bitten by this little guy, twice. The first one I set back in the grass after it bit & then I was bit again. Not sure if it was the same one. Just crawled on me & bit me unprovoked.
I have allergic reactions to pretty much all pest bites (cat fleas, mosquitoes) and I reacted very similarly to these bites. I thought my adverse reaction was to the saliva or whatever else the pest injects that my body is rejecting. so does anyone know how this guy's bite works? I can't believe how swollen & itchy these bites got! careful if you are susceptible to allergic reactions like me

re bites
by: Anonymous

ya so as I mentioned in a previous post, if you are usually allergic to pest bites you'll probably have an adverse reaction to the lacewing larva's bite. turns out they do inject you when they bite. they inject digestive fluids (which dissolve an aphid's insides) hence the reaction. they most likely bite because they are hungry & came across your soft flesh.

Raspberries
by: Anonymous

I found one of these inside a raspberry, I was about to eat it and I saw it, is it possible there were eggs of this bug in other raspberries and I didn't see them? is it dangerous if I ate them by accident?

Lacewing larvae
by: Moni

Anonymous
There are many people in the world that eat insects for food as they are high in protein and fats. The lacewing larva is too small to be of good dietary benefit. However, they are beneficial insects so are better to leave them in the garden than eat them :) They are not toxic to eat.

The eggs of the lacewing are small white oblong and are laid on a very fine clear stalk about 1/2 inch long. These eggs are laid under leaves usually.

Atlanta Ga
by: Anonymous

I found a very similar bug but the coloration is yellow-green and brown with a yellow-green stripe down its back. 1/8' inch in size. It crawled all over me and never stung, but seems to have pincher on its head, just like you said.

strange critter
by: Anonymous

found one in rigby idaho

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Brown spikey bug (Treehopper nymph)

by donna
(Austin, TX)

This is about 1/4" long, I just started my first garden. found a pea plant fallen over, the base was severley weekend and one of these was at that spot. just lost 2 tomato plants, same thing. maybe a coincidence? hmmmmmm....

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Treehopper nymph
by: Moni

Donna
Your critter is the nymph or young of a treehopper. At that stage it is not always easy to know just which treehopper it is.
Only a few species are considered pests...like the keeled treehopper. But your photo does not look like that species....here is the keeled treehopper info - Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/green-leaf-like-insect-keeled-treehopper-comments.html#ixzz1L9nE8AOn

One other item commonly mentioned with this insect is that there are usually ants around them. The ants feed on the "honeydew" or liquid droppings of the treehopper.
Most treehoppers are host-specific meaning they feed on only one type of plant. Since peas and tomatoes are from totally different families that does not fit. Treehoppers in general feed on trees and shrubs, and some on herbaceous plants. Also the main damage is caused when egg laying occurs from punctures damaging stems.

Will keep looking to see if I can find anything else but not sure that is your pest.
Perhaps you have a cutworm that has cut off your pea and tomato plants. They live just beneath the soil surface, and cut the plants off...sometimes eat them sometimes just cut them. Put paper towel "collars" around your other tomato plants. About 1" into the soil, 2" above the soil line.



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long brown-gray bug (Longhorned beetle)

by Virginia Howard
(Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA)

upside down

I have seen 3 of these in the last week in my apartment. Two were well over an inch long. The current captive is 3/4 of an inch. It has short antennae. The underside is gray. The top is a mottled gray-brown. The leg parts closest to the body are thick. I know it's not Hemiptera. It can fly, but apparently prefers not to. My cat thinks they smell bad. I live in New Mexico, in Las Cruces. Thanks for your time and attention.

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Longhorned beetle
by: Moni

Virginia
Your beetle is one of the longhorned beetles in the Family Cerambycidae. Without having the beetle in hand to see other angles to view parts for ID, I do not know any closer what it is.
The beetles of this family feed on nectar of flowers, sap, fruit or bark. The larvae of this family feed in dead, dying or decaying wood. It could be that you have wood furniture they have come out of. They may have been living in the dead wood when it was made into furniture and they have pupated and now emerged in your apartment. Has been known to happen!

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little brown bug (Curculio weevil)

by Mechelle
(Virginia)

little bug that could

little bug that could

please see picture below. I submitted the wrong photo before and I believe this one is of better quality.

A little brown bug found on Sharon's deck in New Castle, VA. About the size of a common house fly.

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Curculio weevil
by: Moni

Mechelle
Your little beetle is one of the nut and acorn weevils in the genus Curculio. The long nose is helpful for ID.
The females of the genus Curculio have snouts longer than their bodies...almost looks that way with your photo, but not sure.
The long snout is used by the female to bore into nuts/acorns to deposit eggs there. The larvae then feed inside the nut until it is ready to pupate at which time it emerges and goes into the soil.

Weevils are known to play dead when they are disturbed. Keep watching and they will start to move. :-)

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2inch brown centipede with black spots (House centipede)

by Jessica
(Lansing, MI. USA)

This is a little zoomed in/cropped

This is a little zoomed in/cropped

This is a little zoomed in/cropped This insect is sitting on  a tan colored towel.. I also enhanced the color on this 1 only

I found this insect in my bathroom. Sometimes it's in the bath tub.. Sometimes it's on the sink.. But it has always been in the bathroom everytime i've seen it! I have lived here for about 10 years, and they've just started coming around for the past 4-5 years.. They seem to only appear during summer, spring, fall and usually only at night.. I live in Lansing, Michigan.. PLEASE HELP!! Are they harmful? Poisoning? How can i get rid of them?!

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Centipede
by: Miriam

This looks like a type of house centipede (Scutigera). They like to live in the dark places of your house like the basement or crevices, and only an occasional one will misdirect itself into the bathroom-perhaps why you see them at night. They eat tiny insects and can bite, but are not considered to be dangerous to people. It is recommended to keep areas around pipes as dry as possible, and not to worry because they don't come up through pipes.

House centipede
by: Moni

Jessica
As Miriam said your critter is a house centipede. Centipedes have one pair of legs per body segment...as opposed to 2 pair of legs per body segment that a millipede has... or 4 pair of legs like the spider class and 3 pair of legs like the insect class.
Centipedes seen indoors are found in damp areas such as bathrooms, cellars, and crawl spaces. It will venture beyond these areas and is often seen quickly scurrying across floors or climbing a wall. These relatives of insects are predatory on other arthropods, including cockroach nymphs, flies, moths, bedbugs, crickets, silverfish, earwigs, and small spiders. So, they eat many things you'd probably rather not have in your home.They are beneficial, not a problem other than a nuisance.



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brown hairy fly eating a smaller bug (robber fly)

by Eric
(Orange city,Fl)

small antenna.big black eyes.Hairy leg.long hairy body that is grayish tan. transparent wings.It was eating another bug on a tree.

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What is this?
by: Eric

Anybody knows what this is?

Brown Hairy fly
by: Anonymous

Looks like a horsefly to me

i am not sure
by: Anonymous

the body seems too long to be an horse fly.. but i am no specialist

not a horse fly
by: Anonymous

I know horse flies and this is not one. But is a good bug. They catch other bugs and eat them. from what I saw anyways. 6.^ I don't know the name but will look it up if Moni doesn't tell you first. ^.^

Robber Fly
by: Anonymous

I have my book out now and found it for ya. It can be found just about anywheres on the globe. It eats other insects that they often catch while flying. Once it catches an insect,the Robber fly holds the prey in it's long legs and sucks it's juices with it's sharp mouth parts. Most robber flies are large and hairy,but others are thin with skinny legs
Robber flys catch bees and other stinking prey,as well as insects bigger than themselves. you can find them on tree trunks or on the tips of twigs .These insects are common and widespread.
Robber flies are a half inch to one inch long. Color are brownish-yellow.They will have tough bristles around it's mouth to protect it from struggling prey.They look like stinging bees to scare off enemies.
I do hope this helps. ^.^

Robber fly
by: Moni

Eric
The last comment made by an Anonymous is correct it is a robber fly. They gave a great description that I do not need to add to.
Thanks Anonymous...leave us your name so we can say thanks in person :-)

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brown and black Insect half bee half fly (Picture-winged fl)

by Jennifer Cantela
(New milford, ct 06776 USA)

Eyes are pinkish red head is orange. Wings are brown with black stripes. Back looks like it has a stinger and its has yellow and black stripes that are across. Body is Black and yellow stripes that are vertical.

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Picture-winged fly
by: Moni

Jennifer
Your fly is one of the picture-winged flies, Idana marginata.
The larvae feed on decaying organic matter.
There is not much other info that I could find except they seem to be seen in the eastern half of the US.
Cool find!

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Big Brown 6 legged bettle (Longhorned beetle )

by kendra lambert
(Inwood, wv, usa)

this is where it looked like a sack was coming out

this is where it looked like a sack was coming out

this is where it looked like a sack was coming out 1 1/2 this is one of it on its tummy so you can see the back

We found this bug on our porch yesterday on the fourth of July. It looks like there was a sack coming out the bottom. Also when I was trying to catch it in the jar it sounded like it hissed at me. It seems to have wings but did not use them. It has a three part body long back then neck and head. It looked like it has "pinchers" on mouth area. I have never seen one before and well I want to know about this one.

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Longhorned beetle
by: Moni

Kendra
Your beetle is one of the longhorned beetles, family Cerambycidae, and actually one in the subfamily Prioninae. The photo is not clear enough to ID further.
As you noted these are large beetles!! They are attracted to lights at night so that is probably why you found it on the porch. The larvae feed on rotting wood that is sitting on the soil.
The 'sack' you see is probably the ovipositor of the female...where the eggs come out.
The jaws or pincers on the female are smaller than on the males of this group and the antenna are also smaller on the females than the males.

The beetle order (coleoptera) of insects have two sets of wings like most insects (except flies)...however the top set of wings are hard and protect the body while the under set of wings is what helps them to fly. Most beetles are not great fliers because of this...but they get around OK.



I saw one too
by: Anonymous

I saw one of these when I was digging through a log for bugs today. I tried to find out what was and I ended up here. I wonder how common they are because I saw a bunch of little beetles that looked similar and a few larvae that were pretty big

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brown robber fly in sarnia ont canada

by bennie
(sarnia ont canada)

hey u got a cup of java??

hey u got a cup of java??

robber fly on mu patio while drink my coffee ...

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Robber Fly
by: Anonymous

What a great photo! This fly looks nasty. Maybe he is after your china instead of your coffee :). Or, he could be a spy sent by Doug to find the best coffee there is...

smiles
by: Anonymous

thx so much i think perhaps u r right bout doug spying for a good cup of java ... hugggs from ont canada..

bennie

Robber fly, female
by: Moni

Bennie
Yes, your insect is a robber fly. And from the looks of the pointed abdomen it is a female.
This looks like a fly in the genus Efferia, but without more information on size and other angles I am not sure. They are found east of the Rockies thru out North America. The larvae usually occur in soil or decaying wood feeding on eggs or larvae of other insects. The adults prey on other insects for food so are considered beneficial in the garden.


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brown/gray bug (Snakefly larvae)

by heidi neil
(springville, utah)

it is as long as a penny as you can see by the picture. looks like a ant/catepillar to me. but i am guessing a beetle larvae. 6 legs black head red middle and brown/ grey body. thank you so much moni for your help. today is july 3 2011 and i found it yesterday in the house.

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found same bug, what is it???
by: Anonymous

I have found the same but in my house in northern california. What is this bug I can not find it on the net?

Snakefly larvae
by: Moni

Heidi
Your insect is a snakefly larva. They do look similar to rove beetle larvae.
Snakeflies are in their own order - Raphidioptera. Here are some photos of the adults and larvae.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/40486/bgimage

The larvae live in soil or debris under bushes and shrubs. Both the adults and larvae feed on other insects. The larvae are known to feed on insect eggs as well. The adults prefer aphids,but will eat other arthropods. Adults have been known to clean themselves after feeding.
These insects are found mostly west of the Rockies.
The larvae have the unusual ability to run both forward and reverse. The adult female has a long ovipositor that looks like it could sting but it does not...they are harmless to humans.
These are an unusual insect...so glad you found one and sent in a photo!

So glad you had this posted
by: Michelle Farley

I found one of these it the bathroom this morning. I was freaking out. Its an interesting looking little insect. I was searching all over for the net to figure this out. Last night there was a crazy flying insect that kept flying into the lights, we were not sure what that was either, until now as it was an adult
So glad you had this posted..

Found Same One, Too
by: Anonymous

We live in Northern California, and I found this page via Google Image Search, after we took a close-up picture of our specimen (found in our toddler's room, in the carpet) and put it into the search engine.

Strange looking, a little alarming . . . I'll post a picture here, as ours is just a little different - the multi-segmented end of the body is more brown.

found one in Eastern Idaho
by: Lisa

So interesting! Thanks for posting, I had never come across any insect like this. Found it in my toddlers room as well. I put it in a jar to observe for a bit. Seems to be able to move by walking with its legs, like an earwig, 'inching' with the body like a caterpillar, but then also 'wriggling' frantically, and curled up like a centipede. And indeed moves both forwards and backwards. Very unappealing in my opinion. ;) but an interesting guy!

Found snakefly larve
by: Anonymous

We just found one in our sons bed in northern ca. Completely freaked us out. Ours had a white body and our son said it shocked him but maybe it bit?

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brown stick Insect (Eupatorium Plume Moth)

by Ce
(Milton, Pa. USA)

Looks like a stick/twig. Off-white primary color w/brown. Six legs, pair of antennae and flies. It was first on the screen of the door & then flew & landed on the siding on the house. Took picture the evening of 7-7-11 @ 10:30pm.

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Brown stick inssect
by: Anonymous

Your insect is exactly what it looks like, a
Walking Stick.

Walking Stick
by: Anonymous

I love him/her. I've never seen one live.

Plume Moth?
by: Ce

I think I goofed. I believe I should have called this a white stick insect because it has more white than brown. I think maybe it is a plume moth, but I am not sure,

Eupatorium Plume Moth
by: Moni

Ce
You are right...it is a plume moth. And from your photo that shows the tufts on the legs, the coloration of the wings and body your plume moth is the Eupatorium plume moth.
The caterpillars feed on Eupatorium species known as Joe Pye weed and Epilobium species known as willowherb. The larvae tend to stay/feed together. They feed by tying together the terminal shoots of the plant with webbing and feeding on them.
Great photo!

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small brown & black flying bug (False blister beetle)

by Daeja
(Coral Gables, Florida)

Live flying beetle/ant brown/black

Live flying beetle/ant brown/black

Live flying beetle/ant brown/black Dead brown/black flying bug

I am in Miami, Florida & a few these bugs showed up a little over a week ago. Last night we had well over 100 on our back door after the sun went down. They are less than a 1/2 inch long (not including it's antennas). They have a light brown/brown body & black wings. They have a "3 part" body: the long body itself, then a "neck" segment, finally the head. They seem to have tiny "pinchers" where the mouth is, with big black eyes & long antennas. A few linger in the daytime but they come in mass at night & are highly attracted to our large double glass doors that lead from our kitchen to the pool patio. A few, (well like 40) got in the house and they "hung out" randomly on the ceiling, but not near any of the lightbulbs. I had sprayed Off on myself before going outside to try to get them off the door that we could barely see through because there were so many, but that did not seem to bother them at all. Many did land on me but they don't seem to bite. I've lived in Florida all my life and have never seen anything like this before, all I know is they are multiplying rapidly. What is this creature?

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Beetle
by: Moni

Daeja
Not sure which beetle you have yet. Will keep looking.
Many beetles are attracted to lights. It is best to just turn off the lights inside in the room that has the outside door. Wait before going outside. It is even better to then turn off the lights outside before going outdoors to prevent them or any insect that is attracted to lights from getting in your house.
This beetle is only attracted to the lights...it does not bite or want to get inside. Best for you and the beetle to leave it outside.
It has to be a seasonal thing. They will probably disappear soon.
Will keep looking for a more precise ID.

Looks to be in th Leaf Beetle Family.
by: Patty

I looks up all sorts of beetles just now and the closest I came to was a leaf beetle. They come in all colors and sizes as well. But not sure.

False blister beetle
by: Moni

Daeja
Yeah! Found it! Your beetle is a false blister beetle Oxycopis suturalis. Although known from New Jersey southward through Florida, and west to Louisiana, it is most common in Florida, especially in the Florida Keys. Adults are found on flowers of papaya, palmetto, and Metopium toxiferum.
Here are other images of your beetle. http://bugguide.net/node/view/283746/bgimage

Adults are found on various flowers feeding on pollen. Larvae develop in the soil. In the soil they probably feed on rootlets and fungal rhizomes.
Like true Blister Beetles, these beetles have toxic chemical defenses, and caution should be exercised in handling them.

They are attracted to lights, and their numbers can be vast at night, especially on the Florida Keys.

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brown/yellow beetle (Firefly)

by DiAnne
(southwestern Ontario)

hi
I found this small beetle on some grasses in a roadside ditch in Southwestern Ontario in July.
I have done numerous searches online, but cannot find an image. Hopefully someone can identify it for me, as it is rather attractive in appearance.
thanks

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Firefly
by: Moni

DiAnne
Your critter is a firefly or lightening bug. We know it so well when they are flashing at night but do not always see their colorful bodies.
This genus of beetles are found in most of North America.
They have a chemical in them that makes them taste bad to spiders and birds. Females of this genus (Photuris) are known to lure in males in order to consume them and obtain this defensive compound.
Males emit a species specific flash pattern which is responded to by females of the same species that are sitting in vegetation. Some species exist, which can be separated only by subtle differences in their flash patterns. They are not easy to ID to species anyway.
Larvae of these beetles feed on garden pests including snails.

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Reddish Black/brown with wings and a pincher (Stag beetle, male)

by Dana
(Cheltenham, Pa)

I live in a suburb just outside of Philadelphia, Pa. I've seen this bug twice outside my home. Both times have been in the early evening. It flew onto my deck and scared the heck out of me. In this picture the bug is just resting on the wood of my deck. What is it?

I appreciate your help, thank you.

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Stag beetle, male
by: Moni

Dana
Your cool beetle is a stag beetle. The male has larger pinchers than the female, so this is a male.
These are found in eastern North America.
The adults feed on tree sap while the larvae live and feed in decaying wood of deciduous trees. They take two years to develop, and pupate in nearby soil.
They are attracted to lights, so that is why you have seen them on your deck.
They are not harmful to vegetation.

Here are photos of this insect - http://bugguide.net/node/view/3107/bgimage

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Large brown fly (Giant Robber fly)

by Carl
(Phoenix, AZ)

Very large horsefly near Flagstaff, AZ, approx 2 to 2 1/2" long overall; long, narrow abdomen and wings, mostly ash gray coloration. Not aggressive, but unafraid, saw at least two individuals while hiking near Lava River Cave in elk habitat, Ponderosa pine forest.

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Robber Fly?
by: Anonymous

It looks more like a Robber Fly than a Horse fly to my eye, but I could be wrong.

Giant Robber fly
by: Moni

Carl
Yes, your fly is a robber fly. Because you said it is so large it is one of the Giant robber flies. Tiger stripping on the abdomen would tell us that for sure, but is not shown in the photo.

Robber flies and larvae are predatory on other insects. These wasps often feed on insects in the bee and wasp group. The eggs are typically laid on the ground near grass roots. Larvae burrow into soil, feed on soil insects, roots, and decaying matter. Pupation is in an unlined cell in the soil.
These are found in eastern US.

Here are photos of this genus - http://bugguide.net/node/view/3026/bgimage


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brown pinch bug (Debris-carrying lacewing larvae)

by Glenn Weber
(New Orleans, La. USA)

Insect Upside down

Insect Upside down

Insect Upside down Another upside down shot

I was working in the garden when I felt a burning sensation on my hand. It looked like an ash ball that fell off of my cigarette and stuck to my hand. I tried to blow it off, but it stuck tight. I flicked it off and it started to crawl. I scooped it up and brought it inside to look at it under a magnifying glass. It was a bug with pincher-type mandibles and it had a "house" built on its back made of tiny specks of debris. It was about the size of a big ant, but light brown. I took some close-up pictures if you would like to see them. These are the insect upside down.

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Insect Identified
by: Glenn

I found out later that this is an aphid lion, or aphid wolf. I did find one other picture of this bug with the debris on it's back, and that was explained to me that it was for camoflage. This information was provided by Phil Pellitteri pellitte@entomology.wisc.edu (a really nice guy).

more
by: Glenn

Oh, yeah, it is the larval stage of the lacewing fly.

Debris-carrying lacewing larvae
by: Moni

Glenn
Thanks for the great photo and the ID!
Yes, it is the debris-carrying lacewing larvae. Amazing the camouflage they use to sneak up on aphids!

These are very beneficial insects for the garden. The larva eat lots of aphids and other pests like caterpillars on cabbage, potatoes and other plants in the garden.
The adults are lacy looking green flying insects. They also feed on pest insects but do not eat as much as the growing larvae. They can give off an unpleasant odor when handled.
Here are photos of lacewing larvae -
http://bugguide.net/node/view/72302/bgimage

Here are photos of the adult lacewings - http://bugguide.net/node/view/140/bgimage?from=0

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brown creeping insect (Crane fly larva?)

by Tom Wells
(St Augustine FL)

found at Viera wetland

found at Viera wetland

Found this on a sandy road at Viera wetlands, east central Florida February 2011. It is about 1-1/2" long. The "head" is on the right. It was moving very slowly to the right and raising its "head" from time to time as if to see where it was going.

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This may have been a caterpillar
by: Anonymous

This looked a bit more like a caterpillar than an insect -sorry for being vague!

Brown insect
by: Moni

Tom
Still trying to find what it is. Some of the insects you have in FL are so different from the rest of the country it can be a challenge...and I have never studied the insects in FL specifically so am at a loss right now.
Do you have any other information or photos that might help??.
It looks a little like a crane fly larva, but they are usually in very wet soil, not on top of the sand.
Do you know what the legs looked like...were there actual legs seen??
Sometimes birds will pick up and insect from one habitat and drop it on the way to the nest to feed young.
Will keep looking.

brown insect
by: Moni

Anonymous
BTW a caterpillar is an insect...just the young or immature stage.

Sorry not much more info
by: Tom

Thanks for the effort to get the ID!

Alas, no more pictures. I didn't notice any legs.

Viera is a water treatment facility, so there is a lot of water on both sides of this road.

Your theory about a bird dropping the insect is a possibility as there are hundreds of birds here for nest building. There are cormorants, blackbirds, ducks of all kinds, herons, ibis and so on...

The insect seemed to be propelling itself more by wriggling than walking.

Creeping worm
by: Moni

Tom
Thanks for the input. Will keep looking....sometimes I find the critters name while looking for other ID's.
It kind of looks like a crane fly larvae, but could not find one with that coloration. The water you talk about would fit as crane fly larvae live in moist locations.
Will keep looking!

Crane fly larva
by: Moni

Tom
Here is a photo of a crane fly larva that looks kind of like yours...in shape and size tho not in coloration.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/92382/bgimage
According to bugguide.net, it is a fly larvae "If it was "worming" along without legs" - which fits your description. This one was also crawling on a sidewalk not in water similar to your larvae.

That may be as close to ID as we get. But as always I will keep looking :-)

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tiny brownish black beetle (Anobid beetle)

by shelly
(san francisco)

i found this tiny bug on my bathroom counter. it has a hard shell, 2 long antennae, 2 short stingers and it's a brownish/gray - black color. it's the only one i've seen so far and i have no idea what it is.it has maybe 4 or 6 legs and it's about the size of a flea. i appreciate any identification. it's the clearest photo i could take.

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Anobid beetle
by: Moni

Shelly
As you said it is small tho your photo is very clear, I would need other angles to see the head, antenna, and side view of the body to better ID.

My guess is one of the beetles in the family Anobiidae, which are the death-watch beetles.
This is a varied group with many tiny brown beetles that might be yours. They are found thru out North America.
The larvae of this family are mostly wood-borers. Tho some adults and larvae in this family feed on dry plant matter, or stored products, or furniture or museum type specimens. Yours is probably one that feeds on stored products like grain, cereals, or other food type products and that is why it was in the bathroom.
Here is a site with many pics of various beetles in that family.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/9391/bgpage?from=0

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Brown Cicada

by Glenn
(New Orleans, La. USA)

I always find the empty shells from the cicada and the flying bugs that emerge from them, but today I found one climbing out of the ground still in his shell. Here's some pictures.

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Cicada
by: Moni

Glenn
Yes, this is the pupa stage of the cicada. If you could have watched it a bit longer you would see the adult cicada emerge by splitting the top back side and coming out.
Cool to find one at this stage crawling!

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brown six-legged bug (Leaffooted bug -Western Conifer Seed Bug)

what is this bug?

what is this bug?

Periodically I find this bug in my house, usually on the second floor. Just half an hour ago I woke up to find it on my pillow. It usually walks although when I take it outside to give it freedom I believe it can fly. At first I thought it might be a chinch bug but it is about an inch long so that seems too large. It walks rather slowly most of the time. Can you identify it? Thanks.

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Bug
by: Anonymous

Stink Bug

Oh NO
by: Anonymous

I have these bugs in and around my house in the Fall also. They fly, slowly. I have crushed a couple and green goo comes out reminds me of the X-files. Look forward for the ID of these bugs.
Tonya

Leaffooted bug -Western Conifer Seed Bug
by: Moni

Your photo is of a leaf-footed bug. It is one of the true bugs. I believe yours is in the genus Leptoglossus and is one of the seed bugs. I would need to know what state you are from and photos of other angles of the insect to ID further (a close up of the hind leg).
Here are some photos of bugs in this genus. http://bugguide.net/node/view/245/bgimage?from=0
These bugs are plant feeders - sucking juices from the plants.

With that said - it is probably the Western Conifer Seed Bug. This particular bug is now found all across North America. Nymphs and adults use their piercing-sucking mouthparts to feed on sap from green cones, twigs, seed pulp, and sometimes needles of several species of pine, plus hemlock, spruce, and Douglas-fir. The adults are known to come indoors in the fall looking for shelter for the winter :-)
Here are photos of this species - http://bugguide.net/node/view/3393/bgimage

These bugs cannot bite/sting/infect people or pets, damage houses or household items, or even reproduce indoors.
They can give off an unpleasant odor when handled or smashed.

brown bug
by: Anonymous

I live in western New York State -- Chautauqua County. Will attempt to take more photos next time I find one. My back yard is full of large tall evergreens...

Western Conifer Seed Bug
by: Moni

This bug is found in NY so I am pretty sure that is the Western conifer seed bug...esp if you have evergreens nearby :-)

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Brown 2 inch spider or ? (Wheel bug)

by Corrine
(Havre de Grace, MD)

This was found in the bottom of a garbage can that was outside on my deck in Maryland. I just bought the house and am horrified to find this thing at my house. It is quite large, I'd say at least 2 inches. Notice how the head kind of protrudes from what looks like another head, so wierd. It also has what looks like thorns on the sides of its head. Can't tell if those are wings or just part of its body but it looks as though there are gold specks in it. I would appreciate it if you could tell me what it is and hopefully that it is not harmful.

Thank you,
aquarius20@live.com

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Beetle Juice.
by: yet another tim

Spiders have 8 legs. Its a beetle. It looks simular to a squash beetle but doesn't have the red spot on the back that the ones around here have. (Central U. S.) Where you are it may be a wood beetle. If its your version of a squash beetle then the best thing to do with it is to squash it. (at least if you plan to have a garden with any type of squash or pumpkins in it)

Wheel bug
by: Moni

Corrine
This is the adult wheel bug. These are one of the true bugs also known as assassin bugs. Like the name suggests they are known as such since they hunt down their prey to attack and 'kill' them for food. They have a large strong beak to pierce the prey to suck the juices out. All stages prey upon other insects - caterpillars, aphids, bees, sawflies etc. Therefore they are considered beneficial.
Great to have in the garden!
Wheel bugs overwinter as adults.

CAUTION: Do not handle, as the adult wheelbug is reported to inflict a very painful bite.

Adult Wheel Bug
by: Don Rucker

Moni, I can assure you,the adult Wheel Bug has a very painful bite.

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Brown, 1 inch (Western Conifer Seed Bug)

by Dan
(Waterford Michigan U.S.A.)

it is mostly brown with random white spots along its sides and about 1 inch long. it is on a rubbermaid garbage can outside of my house in Waterford Michigan.

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Western Conifer Seed Bug
by: Moni

Dan,
Your photo is of a leaf-footed bug. It is one of the true bugs. I believe yours is in the genus Leptoglossus and is one of the seed bugs. There is a little variability in the patterns of this species, but it is probably the Western Conifer Seed Bug. This particular bug is now found all across North America. Nymphs and adults use their piercing-sucking mouthparts to feed on sap from green cones, twigs, seed pulp, and sometimes needles of several species of pine, plus hemlock, spruce, and Douglas-fir. The adults are known to come indoors in the fall looking for shelter for the winter :-)
Here are photos of this species - http://bugguide.net/node/view/3393/bgimage

These bugs cannot bite/sting/infect people or pets, damage houses or household items, or even reproduce indoors.
They can give off an unpleasant odor when handled or smashed.

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brown crazy bug (Adult Wheel Bug)

by Mary
(Orlando, FL, 32818)

Brown, large about 4in., six legs, long antenna, raised pointed center line on back like a dinosaur, and looks and sounds like it had a hard body. Moved slowly. Didn't stink...

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Wheel bug adult
by: Moni

Mary
This is the adult wheel bug. Note the wheel spokes you saw on the back gives them their name.
These are one of the true bugs also known as assassin bugs. Like the name suggests they are known as such since they hunt down their prey to attack and 'kill' them for food. They have a large strong beak to pierce the prey to suck the juices out. All stages prey upon other insects - caterpillars, aphids, bees, sawflies etc. Therefore they are considered beneficial. Great to have in the garden!
Wheel bugs overwinter as adults.
CAUTION: the adult wheelbug is reported to inflict a very painful bite.

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Brown Wire worm (Millipede)

by Diane
(Hants Co., NS)

I am beset with these critters, even finding them so far this Winter, in my house! Did they come inside with the flowers I brought into the house for the Winter, or are they on the wood for the wood burning stove?
They are locally called "wire worms" as are usually found curled into a circular form, much like the curly cord going to your telephone hand piece. They appear dark black until one looks more closely. They are dark, reddish brown, appearing much like some kind of centipede.
I had few the first year of my garden. However, by last Summer, they ate away at the veggies like carrots, parsnips, potatoes, etc. They decimated one particular type of potato I had planted. Thought it was the Potato Bugs at first, until I dug the potatoes in the Fall. I did not find any larvae inside the few potatoes I did harvest, nor the carrots. The attached image of the potato is not mine, but an accurate picture all the same.
I have gardened organically since starting my garden patch from a spot that had been overgrown on the property I moved to 4 years ago. The spot is sunny, has 2 old apple trees providing shade only early mornings. I have tilled in peat moss and manure to lighten the clay soil to a lovely loan state. Really dread the thought of either spraying or not having a veggie garden this coming season.
Thank you in advance for your expertise and time, Moni.
Thank you Doug for this site and your generous time and sharing of experience.

Comments for Brown Wire worm (Millipede)

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Millipede
by: Moni

Diane
Your critters are millipedes. They are related to insects but are not an insect. They have 2 pair of legs per body segment versus 1 pair of legs per body segment like centipedes versus 6 legs of an insect.
Millipedes are found in moist organic locations. They feed on mostly decaying plant matter but can feed on fruits that come in contact with the soil like strawberries, tomatoes, potatoes or carrots. They are not considered an economic pest. Tho they may take a bite or two from your potatoes there is probably other diseases or insects feeding on them.
Potato tuberworm, wireworms, grubs or potato stalk borers could be responsible for the damage on your potatoes.

Millipedes are considered beneficial as they break down organic matter...which sounds like you have lots of...which is great for the garden.
Control of millipedes in the garden if needed would be to dry out the soil...perhaps by cultivating.

Millipedes do sometimes come indoors when soils are wet. They do no damage and can be picked up and thrown outside or vacuumed. Be careful handling millipedes as they do give off a smelly scent.

Brown Wire Worm
by: Gene

We have been beset by the little creatures since it has been recently wet in our area. Moved here to Central Texas in December and did not see them until last several weeks, when ground is wet and we have tried to start a garden. Have some success, but they love the inside of the house and vegetables. Is there any control for them?

millipede
by: Moni

Gene
Not sure if your question is for control in the house or in the garden...but both are answered in the comment directly before your question.
If you have more precise question let us know.

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Brown Cross between a grass hopper and wasp (Jerusalem Cricket)

by Sam
(San Leandro, CA)

I found this thing in our laundry room under a pile of clothes which had been sitting on the ground for about 4 days.

This on the floor.

It looks like a new born bug because it shiny and fragile looking - but it's rather large. Body is about 1 cm and head is 1/3 size of the body.

This is the one of these I've found in our house in the last 1 year.
The first one was found in the washer - dead. It was larger than this one pictured.

It's not clear yet if this an indoor bug that got in or an indoor bug period.

Please help.

Comments for Brown Cross between a grass hopper and wasp (Jerusalem Cricket)

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Jerusalem cricket
by: Moni

Sam
Your photo is of a Jerusalem Cricket. These are related to the other crickets, tho they are strange looking critters. They are found in western US states.
They feed on other insects as well as roots and decaying vegetation. Since they also sometimes are found eating potatoes they are commonly called potato bugs, however they are not a pest of the garden.
They are a favorite food of bats, skunks, foxes and other nocturnal animals.
Jerusalem crickets are active at night and live in burrows under rocks or other covers(like your laundry) during the day. Sometimes they wander to the surface at night. To produce their sound they strike the ground with their abdomen to produce a drumming pattern.
They can bite giving a painful pinch.

Not sure how it got in your laundry room, that is not where it wants to be..just put it outside...carefully...and you will both be happier :-)

jerusalem cricket
by: michael

Wow Moni....everything you said about the jerusalem cricket is right on!...you took the words right out of my mouth...they can vary in size from as small as a bee to maybe 3 inches in length...and yes they can inflict a pinch like bite if one gets a hold of your finger...to me, they are just about the ugliest insect i have ever laid eyes upon..but if you are like me and spend any time in the garden digging, you will at one time or another encounter one of these creatures.

Jerusalem Cricket
by: Moni

Michael
Would love to see one but would have to be further west than where I garden. Perhaps when I visit out west I will find one...would be nice to see in person.
Thanks

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Tan/Brown caterpillar on front porch (Cutworm)

by Jay
(Boulder City, Nevada)

evening visitor to front porch

evening visitor to front porch

Found in evening, May 10th, on front porch siding, which is near olive, mulberry, juniper, privet and mock orange landscape plants.

Length 4 cm.

Color grading from dark head and darker brown overall at nose, to lighter brown at tail.

Comments for Tan/Brown caterpillar on front porch (Cutworm)

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Cutworm
by: Moni

Jay
Your worm is one of the cutworms. Without photos from more angles and even then it is hard to id for sure, because so many of the cutworms are variable in color and many look similar. You would have to rear it to the moth to be positive.

My best guess is that it is the large yellow underwing - one of the many cutworms. Here are photos of caterpillars and moth. http://bugguide.net/node/view/9821/bgimage?from=48

Cutworms are found all over North America. The larvae feed on a variety of plants including vegetables. When in our vegetable gardens they can be considered a pest.

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