Black bug/ 6 white & black striped legs (Coreid bug nymph)

by Summer Davis
(Valdosta, GA)

I found this tiny bug with thorny body, yellow orange head with 6 white and black stripped legs out in my back yard. He was sitting on my wood table outside. Everytime I moved around to take a picture of him he kept moving around to face me Lol!


Comments for Black bug/ 6 white & black striped legs (Coreid bug nymph)

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Coreid bug nymph
by: Moni

Summer
This is the nymph or young of a bug in the Coreidae family of true bugs. In the young stage it is hard to tell which one. This family is known as the squash bug or leaffooted bug family.
Most feed by sucking juices out of plants so tend to be "pests" of the garden.
Most of these also give off an odor if smashed.

thank you soooo much
by: Anonymous

Oh my! Lol! Thank you soooo much for identifying this little guy for me. I have seen two more of his kind the past two days and have really looked forward to getting your response. Thank you so much!

Infrared vision?
by: Rob

Sometimes I wonder if they sense our cameras. I've had bees come straight to me from some distance when filming.
The autofocus devices often use infrared.
Insets also surely recognize eyes and the 'business end' of others .

Beautiful bug!

Coreid bug
by: Moni

Rob
Insects do see lights. Different insects sense different types of light...such as most moths are attracted to porch lights at night. I do not know specifically which insects see which lights...that is for an insect physiologist who studies light attraction. I just work with general garden insects, what they do, and wither they are a good bug or bad bug.
Insects find other insects by many means including light, phermones (specific odors given off), movement, touch, seeing, feeling, smelling, etc.

It is not surprising then that your movement, lights, or something else might attract some insects to your camera.
Thanks for sharing and enjoying the beauty of insects!

Infrared-'vision' bugs
by: Rob H

In David Bodains' "The Secret Garden: Dawn to Dusk in the Astonishing Hidden World of the Garden he describes infrared sensing wasps who 'see' the heat of aphids on leaves to hunt. But the aphids have learned to go to the bottom of the leaf to be harder to spot. (Or so I recall).

Incredible book that should be on everyones tables!

soo neat
by: summer davis

Im glad I posted this picture a while back. I have not seen another one since this little guy but I have seen a lot of different bugs here in ga that I have never seen before lol. Arizona and Georgia are very much different lol

Coreid bug
by: Moni

Summer
Yes, you will find a much different group of insects in the heat and humidity of GA vs AZ!

If you need help with ID send us your photo...if you do not see it already on this website.

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Yellow and Black Cricket (camel cricket)

by Karl Zaker
(Friendship NY, USA)

Found this one legged guy at my cabin. Thought it was odd to find a yellow one

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Camel cricket
by: Moni

Karl
Your photo is of a camel cricket also sometimes called cave crickets, probably the greenhouse camel cricket but not sure without checking it first-hand.
They are light tan to dark brown in color...yours may have been near something more yellow or it could be what it was feeding on.
These are found in cool moist dark places such as piles of logs or boards in basements. They feed on leaf debris or if in a house on paper products or fabric.
They can be a nuisance in basements, but if your cabin is not too moist then it should not be problem.

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black, large, flylike (Dobsonfly, male)

by LINDA HAYNES
(GATESVILLE TX)

IT IS ABOUT 3 OR FOUR INCHES LONG HAS LONG WINGS WITH A TAIL THAT STRETCHES OUT TO ABOUT 2 INCHES LONG

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Dobsonfly, male
by: Moni

Linda
That is a dobsonfly, male. The females do not have the long 'pinchers', but can bite or pinch more effectively than the males.
These insects are found near fast flowing streams so there must be some water near by. The adults come to lights at night. Adults do not feed.

Larvae are aquatic predators, living in streams. Two-three years are spent in larval stage, at end of this time larvae crawl out of stream and form a pupal cell under a log, rock, etc. and then overwinter. Adults emerge spring to summer.

These are found thru out the eastern half of North America.


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black, 6 legs, front pincher claws (Fishfly larvae)

by Amy Jewell Maguire
(Brattleboro, VT)

2 of this insect found together in bark of a tree stump while camping in southern VT. One black, with a hard, beetle like head, caterpillar like body & the other, beige w/ brown markings, had recently shed it's outer black casing ...reveling a softer head (with pinchers) but now with antennae & new wings. They were about the length of my middle finger. Could they be stages of a giant moth type perhaps? Please LMK if you know what these are, we're quite curious!

Comments for black, 6 legs, front pincher claws (Fishfly larvae)

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Fishfly larvae
by: Moni

Amy
Your photos look like they are fishfly larvae...not sure why you found them in the bark of a tree trunk unless that trunk was in or near the water ...was it? The mature larvae crawl out of the water( up to 50') to pupate, so that is perhaps why you found them in the trunk.
The dark larva has not pupated, but as you guessed the light colored one has.

Fishflies and Dobsonflies look a lot alike so yours may be dobsonfly larvae, they are the same family but different genus.

i love these bugs...trout love them
by: KEvin

the name is a helgramite and u can find them mainly under rocks in water. I usually catch dozens of them in connecticut with a net behind me i lift up rocks and let the river pressure push them into a mesh net.

what an interesting little guy
by: Cara & Myles

My boyfriend found this fishfly right near the creek bank in a small circular hole. I have never seen one of these and it appears they originate up further north than NC. It's definitely a bug to be curious about!!! I'm so glad I found out what he was! Thanks!

jack dogs
by: Anonymous

People around here call them jack dogs.

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Black Diving Beetle (Predacious Diving beetle)

by SHARON NICOL
(OWEN SOUND,ONT. CANADA)

DK BROWN OR BLACK ! ABOUT AN INCH AND A HALF LONG AND 3/4 INCH WIDE ! FOUND IT IN THE LONG GRASS! ALMOST RAN OVER IT WITH LAWN MOWER! I LIVE IN OWEN SOUND AND RIGHT BESIDE THE POTAWATOMI RIVER ! FROM ALREADY SEEING YOUR PICS I WOULD SAY IT IS A DIVING BEETLE ? I WASN'T SURE IF IT HAD WINGS BUT CAN SEE A VERY FAINT DIVIDING LINE. THANKS THIS WAS FUN. SHARON

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Water Scavenger Beetle
by: Lin

They are usually found in ponds, shallow lakes and along the shoreline of flowing water, although one subfamily is found in dung. They feed on decaying organic matter. Although some feed on plants. The beetles are not pests but the large species may be noticed.


THANKS LYN
by: Anonymous

I had to sneak 'the wee fellow" down to the river bank when my cats were looking the other way !! Also out of any danger of more grass cutting to-day! My first thought was I wonder what happens when he meets Charolette, the fishing spider. Who would win that battle !? I had many Charolettes last summer. I was not impressed !

Predacious Diving beetle
by: Moni

Sharon
You are correct! The beetle is a predacious diving beetle. They do look much like the giant water scavenger beetles in size and shape, however the diving beetles have the yellowish band along the sides that the scavenger beetle does not.
The adults and larvae eat aquatic insects, young fish, mosquito larvae, and sometimes tadpoles. They do live in mostly ponds but are found in streams and rivers, swimming near the pond plants. So, perhaps you do want the fishing spider to get it!?!

More of the Black Diving Bettles in Owen Sound
by: Nancy

Thank you for your identification! I met one of these guys in the garage last night and two more in the yard today. Having lived at Balmy Beach since 1991 and never having seen one before, I will be looking for more information about them including whether they are native (and have been unnoticed) or are they new to the area.
Thanks again.

PREDACIOUS DIVING BEETLE
by: Moni

Nancy
they are found thru out North America...so like many insects they are there we just have to happen to see them at the right time :-)

Wonderful to Watch!
by: Anonymous

My cat brought me one last year. I happily accepted the (unusually still alive) gift, and took video of it diving in a large glass bowl with various grass & leaves in it. The beetle had flipper-like legs, would dive & swim around, then back up to the water's surface to intake air through its hind parts. Fascinating insect!

Where did the Beetles go ?
by: Anonymous


Sadly ..It is now 2014 and I haven't seen another one of these beauties since I posted the pic .. Nor have I seen any of the Fishing spiders . I wonder if this past winter was a bit too harsh for them ?

PREDACIOUS DIVING BEETLE
by: Moni

Sharon
The winter was very hard on many things across much of North America.
The bad winter could have affect anything near the water, especially if it was a pond or shallow area. Many ponds and bodies of water here in Iowa were frozen so deeply that the fish could not get oxygen and there was a big fish kill in many water areas. This may have been the case many other places. If that happened in your area, the lack of oxygen can also affect the other critters in the water like the diving beetles.
These beetles overwinter as the larval stage in the water.
Given some time and good warm weather they will be back, if not this year then in the future.
Great question!

Named him Ringo
by: A.C. Pitt

7/18/14 Found a "Giant water Scavenger Beetle"(Hydrophilus triangularis Say) Running from a load of Mahogany just off a container from Ghana. Thinking it might be from there, scooped it up and brought it home to avoid any Invasive species issues. Having spent as much of my life as possible in woods, creeks, beaches, and trees, I don't ever recall seeing one before. Now I know. He/She was running off towards the parking lot in the direction of S.F. Bay in Ca. Anyway, put together a nice terrarium for him with odds and ends to climb on and eat. Loves the Avocado, nibbled a little on the chicken, and fresh tomatoes, doesn't seem to care for the corn. We'll let him enjoy the sanctuary for a few days and let him go down by the pond. A.C. Pitt

Mother Nature
by: Anonymous


Thanks Moni ,
Our winter was so harsh ,It was the first time since I was a kid over fifty yrs ago that the river froze over completely . Then when the spring finally came the river had such a force it moved huge logs that had been set in places for years and even a beaver damn was washed away .
The spring always sees the the fish swimming up stream to spawn but usually by the time they do the river is so low the fish are scraping their bellies on the rocks to get where they want to go. This year they had lots of water but I only actually saw one fish jump the falls . But hopefully there were many more in their glory with all the fast water . Again it was more like when I was a kid . Mother Nature is acting very strange lately . I hope she knows what she's doing . :o)

PREDACIOUS DIVING BEETLE
by: Moni

AC
Thanks for cking to see if it was an invasive! We have sure had enough of those!

Interesting the things 'Ringo' is eating...it will be best to let it go near water.
Thanks for being a great steward of Nature!

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black and white beetles mating (Anchor Stink Bug)

by Nancy
(Belchertown MA)

Pair of bettles mating were in my yard and I hope someone will provide identification. Thankyou so much.

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Anchor Stink Bug
by: Moni

Nancy
These are a mating pair of Anchor Stink Bugs. The markings and colors do vary...some are black and white while other adults are red and black.
These are found in the eastern US and Great Plain states.
The adults feed on larvae of beetles, butterflies, and moths. The nymphs or young feed on larvae of the same insects especially the Mexican bean beetle larvae...so this is a beneficial insect to have in your garden.

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black bee-like (Cicada)

by Saul Goldfarb
(Oregon)

Multi-eyed six legged winged insect. w/ yellow and black abdomen thorax and legs

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Someone must know what this is
by: It's me, the author

My only wish is that someone can identify this for me. Good luck.

bee-like
by: Anonymous

Possibly a yellow jacket or deer fly???

Cicada
by: Moni

Saul
Your insect is a cicada. It will not sting or bite. Many kids like to hold them, especially fun when the insect shakes its wings.
The female cicada lays eggs along twigs of trees. Therefore it can be a pest as the slits made for laying the eggs damage and destroy young trees.
Once the nymphs have emerged from eggs, they drop to the ground and burrow into the soil near the trees. The nymphs feed on root juice, using their strong front legs for digging.

When the nymphs are ready to emerge into adults (1-17 years later) they crawl up the tree, split the shell, and emerge as adults....like the one you saw.

Cicadas are the insects that sing a loud song in late summer which gives them another common name 'dog day cicada'.

Wikipedia website has a video of a nymph emerging into an adult that you might enjoy seeing. There are probably more videos on the internet also.

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BIG BLACK GRASSHOPPER-(Eastern lubber grasshopper nymph)

by Samarah
(Houston)

BLACK SUNFLOWER BUGS

BLACK SUNFLOWER BUGS

I live in Houston, Texas. This bug is hanging out on my sunflowers every time I go out to check. It started out by itself but then more appeared. I am wondering whether this pest is responsible for the holes in my sunflower's leaves, or if it is actually a beneficial bug. I want to make sure before I take any further action! Thank you for your help.
THANK YOU SO MUCH!!

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looks like Lubber Grasshopper
by: Meinflorida

He's really big for a bug, right? I've seen these Lubber Grasshoppers slightly over 3 inches long here in central Florida. They likely are responsible for the large holes in your sunflowers' leaves. We nickname them locusts because a dozen of these large grasshoppers can eat up a large plant like a spider lily in a couple of days. They are, unfortunately, hard to kill, but don't often show up in numbers much beyond a dozen. Hand pick them off your plants and smash hard between 2 bricks if there are only a few and you mind them eating your plants.

Eastern lubber grasshopper nymph
by: Moni

Samarah
Meinflorida has it corredt. It is a lubber grasshopper. They do eat a variety of plants so they might eat your sunflowers.

What?
by: Lori

We have huge black and orange ones here in TN.Old timers say they are new to the area.They eat everything!Our cat ate one and we weren't sure she was going to make it.I used canola oil on my Delphians and lillys and they left them alone.Good luck!

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black, flying (Assassin bug - Masked Hunter)

by Sebastian
(Ontario, Canada)

The Bug

The Bug

Hi, some 2cm long (w/o antennas) black insect with wings was flying around in my room in my house on the 2nd floor around 1am; it was rather very noisy, you could hear the wings flap "trk trk trk trk" of some sort. I'm located in Ontario, Canada, and I'm wondering what kind of bug this is (I killed it, so the picture looks a bit smashed).



Thank you!

Please e-mail reply at ThunderSoul97@yahoo.ca

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Assassin bug - Masked Hunter
by: Moni

Sebastian
Tho your insect is a little smashed it is a photo of an assassin bug. I believe it is a Masked hunter not the Corsair bug...they do look similar from a photo.
The Masked hunter adult is in the true bug order and has piercing sucking mouthparts. These insects feed on other insects...tho they can 'bite' humans if mishandled. The masked hunters are known for feeding on bed bugs...so I hope you do not have those? The adults and nymphs do feed on a wide variety of other insects. The nymphs are seen covered with dust, lint, sand and other such debris. Here is another photo of the nymph on the Insect ID site - http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/white-furry-beetle-or-spider-nymph-of-masked-hunter-bug-comments.html
The adults are known to come to lights so that is another way it could have gotten in your house.
These are beneficial insects, so perhaps next time (if you are awake enough) put it outside rather than killing it! :-)

Be CAREFUL They bite and OMG it BURNS!!
by: Anonymous

Found one of these in my house and being a lover of all things BIG or small I decided I would put it outside rather than kill it, I didn't have anything nearby to catch it so I just used my bare hand and within a cpl seconds (while en route to the back door) I got a horrible stinging / buying feeling in my thumb. It didn't break skin or bleed (i'm on blood thinners and bleed rather easily) but it did leave a purplish red mark on my thumb and we'll let's say I dropped it and "accidently" stepped on it. The roads are always paved with GOOD intentions but we warned THESE DO BITE / STING!!

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Black and Yellow insect (Lady beetle larva)

by Ragai Karas
(Dorval, QC, Canada)

I photograph this insect in one of the parks in Montreal.
It was found on a leaf. It has 6 legs. It is black andyellow in clor.

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Could be the very beneficial Ladybug "Mama"?
by: Rob Holland

I'm just guessing but this might be something you'd want in your garden. If it's a Ladybug in a different stage of it's cycle and takes up there it could lay eggs and that's good because they eat lots of aphids and?

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Ragai
This is a lady beetle larva. Rob was almost correct, but being a larva it can not lay eggs...only the adult female does that.
It is a good bug of the garden. It feeds on aphids, caterpillars, and other bad bugs of the garden. There are a few stages of the larva as they grow larger and before they turn into pupae and then into adults. The adult lady beetles are also great helpers in the garden.

Happy to have them here
by: Beatrice

I had a whole bunch of them show up in our yard about three years ago. At first I was freaked out, but somehow made the connection between their colors and an adult ladybug's colors. After looking up "lady bug lifecycle" I realized what it was, and now tell anyone who will listen about it, so they do not get scared and kill them. I don't know which came first, the aphids or the ladybugs, but I'm happy to see these critters each spring.

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blackish fly or moth (Tiger bee fly)

by mary
(harrison twp. mi usa)

what is this??

what is this??

A blackish fly with blue markings that resembles a moth to me

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Tiger bee fly
by: Moni

Mary
Neat photo!
This is a fly - a tiger bee fly to be more precise. This is a large bee fly with a distinctive wing pattern. They are typically found around open areas and meadows.
They are not sure what the flies eat, but the larvae feed on carpenter bees. So for most folks that means it is a good bug! Tho carpenter bees do help with pollination.

Tiger Bee Flies
by: Anonymous

Do Tiger Bee Flies sting? They see to fly like hornets.

Eeeek!
by: Anonymous

Okay so there happens too be one of theses right by my front door. I was wondering do they bite or sting? Are they poisonous?

Tiger Bees Mating
by: Jess

I recently took a photo of an unknown wasp or bee, or fly.... Thanks to you, I now know the two "love bugs" starring in the pic are tiger bee flies.

Saw this same kind of bug August in Michigan
by: Anonymous

Interesting that you say they eat carpenter bee larvae, as I had a problem with carpenter bees earlier in the year. Anyone know if this bug stings?

Sweet little guys
by: Anonymous

Just earlier today I had one of these follow me around my yard. They don't sting of you look closely, because their abdomens don't have stingers. They are a little nosey and will hover around you, possibly because they're curious about you. Every time I have seen one, I have noticed that they are very docile.

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Black Beetle (Giant black water scavenger beetle)

by Jo Atkinson
(Gothenburg, NE USA)

We found this on our farm in central Nebraska early this morning. It was in dirt near a building. It is very shiny and has a triangle marking on its back. I've looked at several photos on the web but have not found one that looks like this one. His antenna seems smaller than most I've seen. We had it in an large ice cream bucket and it flew out of it. Thanks in advance for your help.

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Giant black water scavenger beetle
by: Moni

Jo
Based on the size and keel on the underside, your beetle is the giant black water scavenger beetle. Thanks for all the great photo angles!
Do you have a pond on the farm? These beetles live in weedy ponds or lakes. Since they come to lights at night...it might have flown in to a night light you have near the building?
Water scavengers have keeled sternum - that long narrow pointer that you can see on the underside. They come up for air head first while predaceous diving beetles do not have the keel on the sternum and come up tail first. Also if you could see them swimming the water scavenger swims alternating the hind legs while predaceous diving beetles hind legs go in unison like oars.
These beetles feed on dead decaying aquatic animals - hence scavenger in the name. :-)They help keep the ponds clean!
The larvae are predatory feeding on other insects and small aquatic animals.

Thanks Moni
by: Jo

We have a drainage ditch across the road from our house and a canal several yards behind our house. The canal is used for irrigating and is currently dry. I'm guessing it must have come from the drainage ditch since the other was fresh running water. We had never seen one of these before. I had looked at several sights online and found some that looked kind of like it, but not really like it. Thanks so much for identifying it for us. We did put it in water and it swims just like you said it would.

Central Illinois
by: Anonymous

Just found one in Bloomington, IL. Are they native to the Midwest?

Giant black water scavenger beetle
by: Moni

Central Illinois
Yes they are found over most of North America.

Found One!
by: Stacie

Found one of these monsters while mowing - live in Omaha, Nebraska. This is the second time we've seen one of these this Spring, and we're not even near a body of water. Have never seen these away from water before now.

Wow, big bug!

Omaha Beetle
by: Anonymous

I think this was what was in my lawn this morning - Omaha, NE. No water around here though.

Me too!
by: Anonymous

Found one today in Columbus, Nebraska. Crawling along in the sand, kinda gross.

Found one!
by: Joey

Found one in Missouri about the size of a half dollar. Took a picture of it and can even see myself in the picture!

Black Beetle
by: Gena

We found one of these little fellas in the O'Neill, Nebraska area today. Found in the middle of town so there aren't any bodies of water really close, however there is a creek a couple miles away.
Thank you to Jo for posting the pic and to Moni for identifying it.

Branson, MO
by: Anonymous

Thank you for identifying this amazing beetle! The one we saw was 2 inches long and as shiny as a mirror. It was by a car wash.

Found one in MN
by: CrankyOtter

Found one of these exiting a potted plant in Southern Metro twin cities area of Minnesota. Alarmingly large for a MN bug! But didn't stink. Got a few good pics and caught it but will let it go near the pond.

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Black Beetle ( Broad-necked root borer, female)

by Kevin
(Boone, NC)

This beetle must have been close to 3 inches long. I saw it in my garden and was wondering what kind of beetle this was. would anyone know. Thanks.

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Broad Neck Root Borer
by: Lin

This is a female broad-necked root borer and that scary looking thing on the bum is an ovipositor that she uses to deposit eggs into the the ground.

Thanks
by: Anonymous

Thx Lin.

Broad-necked root borer, female
by: Moni

Kevin
As Lin says, it is a female, Broad-necked root borer and the projection out the rear end is the ovipositor.
It can not sting humans. It is used to put eggs in the soil under debris.
These longhorned beetles are found in eastern N America and are quite common in July in NC.
The adults eat foliage and can damage fruit trees and grape vines. The larva feed on tree and shrub roots for about 3 yrs before turning into a pupa and emerging in the spring.
Thanks Lin for the great ID! Have you seen these?

Kids found one
by: Anonymous

My kids love all insects and found one of these root borers on my hostas last night. It was a fairly large female and they were ecstatic. They handled her and she bit both of them but they still watched her for an hour. Very cool little lady.

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black, beetle or roach (Beetle larva)

by Jason
(Southbridge, MA, USA)

Unidentified bug

Unidentified bug

3 sections with a beatle like head and a roach like back end. Plays dead when touched.

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Common Earwig
by: Lin

Looks like a common earwig, but then again, I don't really know the difference between Common and European from the picture. All I know is that we didn't have any several years ago outdoors, now we are overrun with them. Have no idea where they came from except maybe compost or soil from nursery.

Beetle larva
by: Moni

Jason
The photo is not very clear, but it is not an earwig...they have two distinct pincher looking fork prongs on the rear and smooth abdomen sides.H

My best guess so far is either a ground beetle larva or an aquatic insect.
Here are some photos of the ground beetle larva - http://bugguide.net/node/view/184549/bgimage
Where did you find this? What is nearby...plants? water? habitat?
Was this a recent find?
How long is it?
Thanks for more info so we can better Id it!

Eastern dobsonfly larvae
by: Moni

Jason
We did not get more information from you but have since identified your insect as a dobsonfly larvae - also called a hellgrammite. Because of where you live it would be the eastern dobsonfly.

This stage lives in fast-flowing streams. It is predaceous feeding on other insects,other small arthropods, or very small fish. It lives in the water a couple of years before turning into an adult. The adult only lives a few days...but they are pretty spectacular to see...especially the male with its long pincers.

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fly but long in body (Robber Fly)

by kathy
(BC)

Long black body that is thicker at head end, but narrow at tail end. Body is as long as wings, short antenna, veins in wings, don't move like a normal house fly when something approaches them (like a hand or camera lens). so far likes beet leaves, brocco raab leaves, and here it is on a sweet pea leaf. Easy to catch by hand.

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Robber fly
by: Moni

Kathy
You have a robber fly flying around the garden.
Knowing that it is broader in the shoulders and narrower at the tail end is helpful to ID this fly.
Robber flies are predators on other insects so it is a beneficial or good bug in the garden!
Good to have them around.

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yellow & black 3 inch flying (Mayfly)

by Ce
(Central Pa.)

Winged Beauty

Winged Beauty

Live in Central Pa. Insect was outside on a chair & flew away after about 5 minutes.

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This is such a Beuty!
by: Anonymous

I have never seen anything like that be for! you might need an expert, or a huge book about every type of insect in the world. I live in Pennsylvania too. but i have never encounterd one of these beuties.
Bugs like your location, and you for some reason.

This is such a Beuty!.....
by: Anonymous

I have never seen anything like that be for! you might need an expert, or a huge book about every type of insect in the world. I live in Pennsylvania too. but i have never encounterd one of these beuties.
Bugs like your location, and you for some reason.

Mayfly
by: Moni

Ce
Your photo is of a mayfly...one of the genus Hexagenia. They are one of the largest of the mayflies.
If you notice it looks like this insect only has 4 legs, but it does have 6 - the front two are held together in front ...kind of looking like mouthparts. Mayfly adults do not eat. The nymphs live in ponds, lakes, and streams. They are well known by trout fisherman as this insect if the model for the lures they use called trout flies.
The nymphs in a stream or lake indicate the stream is relatively clean.
Large numbers of adults can emerge at the same time and are known to make bridges or roadways near water to be very slick to drivers.
These adults are known to come to lights at night often far from water.

This is a good bug to see.

THANKS
by: Anonymous

Thank you Moni for identifying the yellow & black mayfly & for the information about it.

Mayflys
by: Lynn

They make good fish bait. I believe has a short life span too.

June bug!
by: Anonymous

In Southern Ontario, this is what they call June bugs or May Flies. Every year from May to July-ish, they come out in the thousands (probably millions). They live 3-5 days and then die. It's horrific...like some kind of plague...heaps of dead, fish-smelling bug corpses piled under all the street lights and store fronts (when I say piled, I mean 3 feet high, in some cases). They swarm to all light sources at night. They line the streets and sidewalks during the day and when you drive or walk on them, they make a disgusting popping sound. Its lovely.

Found All Over?
by: Anonymous

I looked up thin black and yellow bug with wings and a long tail, and to my surprise I actually found a picture of it. I was surprised to learn that the pic was taken in Pennsylvania, because I saw it all the way over in Louisiana!

glad ive found it.
by: Anonymous

I live in the UK. Had one come in the house . Thoughthought it was a huge hornet

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bumble bee

by binda hunt
(sarnia ont ca)

bumbee bee

bumbee bee

bumbee bee bee beetle yellow and black  bumble bee ?

please help me name this bee .. thx so much for your knowledge of insects i am in debted for this .. ms binda hunt sarnia ont ca

Comments for bumble bee

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Bumble bee
by: Moni

Binda
There are many different bumble bees and identifying them is not easy without many photos or better yet...having the insect at hand to examine.

thx moni
by: brinda

i'm reg'd blind here having the time of my life with this camera ...god bless and thx so much for the help ..ms brinda

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black and orange beetle (Green stink bug nymph)

This was taken in upstate NY. It looks like some sort of tortoise beetle. Is it? I can't seem to find this image anywhere. Maybe you can help me identify it.
Thank you MONI....

Comments for black and orange beetle (Green stink bug nymph)

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Green stink bug nymph
by: Moni

This is a late instar (stage) green stink bug nymph.
The green stink bug adult and nymphs feed on plant juices including leaves, fruits, flowers, and seeds. When they feed on fruit or seeds they can be considered a garden pest.
There are 5 stages of nymph development until they turn into the plain green adult. There are 2 generations in the south and one in the north.
These stink bugs are found in most of North America in gardens, meadows, cultivated areas, as well as woodland edges.

Julie
by: Anonymous

Just found this guy in my garden in Upstate NY,too!

Very interesting looking bug NEW
by: Bryan

I found this bug today and was very impressed by the looks. Nature is amazing.

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Black insect with long curled tail (Pelecinid wasp)

by Bradley
(Los Angeles, CA)

Found this on a leaf at a rest stop in Michigan on vacation. It was 2.5 inches long and creepy as hell. Never seen anything like it.

Comments for Black insect with long curled tail (Pelecinid wasp)

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Pelecinid wasp
by: Moni

Bradley
The insect you found was a female pelecinid wasp - males are rare.
They are beneficial as they parasitize insect grubs and wood borers.
This female will push its long ovipositor into the soil to find the host, lay an egg on it, then the when the egg hatches it bores into the grub to feed....killing it.
They are found in eastern and central North America and into the southwestern US, as well as down into central and south America.
They are found in deciduous forests.
Great find!

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Huge black bug with brown stripes (Wingless wood roach)

by Jessica
(York, PA)

I found this guy in my basement walking slowly across the floor. He was huge, about the size of my pinky finger. He didn't have the long antennae like a water bug would, so we were wondering if you could help identify it. We live in central PA and don't typically have insects in our home.

Comments for Huge black bug with brown stripes (Wingless wood roach)

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Wingless wood roach
by: Moni

Jessica
This is a cockroach...not sure which one from your photo. It is probably in the Family Cryptocercidae. These species are wood roaches and feed on rotting logs, and are not a house pest like many other roaches, in fact it might be considered an important recycler of nutrients in decomposing wood.
It may have been attracted to porch lights and inadvertently got in when a door was opened, or come in on fire wood or something like that.
Put it back outside and you will both be happier!

Thank Moni
by: Jessica

Thanks for the identification Moni. I think we saw another one in a pallet of bricks that we had delivered.

mulch bugs?
by: Anonymous

I believe I found one in my bath room. Nearly gave me a heart attack when I got out of the bath. You said it is a wood bug, because the neighborhood I live in had mulch everywhere. Would that be the cause of them.

Wingless wood roach
by: Moni

Anonymous
Assuming you do have the same wood roach as the photo, then yes, the mulch can be the reason there are more wood roaches around.
You can send us a photo for Id if you want to make sure that is what you have.

Help they are in the house!
by: Yolanda

I just found your site by trying to identify this roach! I have/had these in my kitchen cabinets (just had exterminator). The kitchen and dining room have that god awful pine paneling. Even the back of the cabinets, the wall inside the cabinets, has pine paneling. It's the old kind but it's in great shape. I'd have it taken down but it's more than I can afford right now. I can't see anything deteriorating so I can't see a source of food. Any particular insecticide or treatment I should use to get them gone? I am sick. I did find it funny that I didn't find evidence of them in the food cabinet but where spices and bottles of vinegar, etc are kept over the stove vent hood.

cockroach
by: Moni

Yolanda
Your cockroaches may not be wood roaches, but other roaches that do like food particles.
You mentioned you found them over the stove vent...well that is where many oils accumulate when the fan pulls up the vapors from cooking. Those oils are enough to attract many kinds of roaches. Oils and food crumbs also find their way in and around stoves and refrigerators.

You said you had the exterminator out. If they have sprayed then your roach population should be reduced. If you live in the south, they will be back.
You could look for diatomaceous earth...it is a product make from fossils that comes in a powder that can be sprinkled around the baseboards for control of many insects in the house. Please read and check the label to make sure it is labeled for that type of use. It is a relatively safe compound to use, but read the label and be careful not to inhale the dust.
Good luck!

Avain Perches
by: Anonymous

I found a teeny tiny one. It was the size of a flax seed. It was also below my parrot's bird cage and at first I was worried it was a feather mite. If it actually is a wood roach, then maybe it was attracted to my many natural perches in my bedroom around the cages.

aRE THESE ROACHES EASY TO GET RID OF? THEY DON'T REPRO LIKE CRAZY OR ANYTHING?
pLEASE HELP, (opps sorry caps was on lol) I am really worried.

wood roach
by: Moni

Avian perches
Without seeing the roach (and even then they young nymphs are hard to identify) it would be hard to tell you what cockroach you have.

If it is a wood roach it could eat some of the wood on your natural wood perches. If it is only one then would not be worried. If you see more than one then it could be a problem. Just switch out your perches to a fresh hardwood branch. These roaches want soft rotting wood.

It could also be another cockroach that is there feeding on the bird food. Do you have roaches in the kitchen too?

If you send a photo, we could try to Id, but no promises if it is a tiny young nymph...like I said they are hard to tell apart.

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tiny black bug (seed bug)

by Marcia Warwick
(Tucson, AZ)

Tiny black bugs showed up in our kitchen 2 days ago (7/1/10). They are mainly around the sink and window sill. Their wings have an orange outline, which cannot be seen with naked eye. They can fly. We've never seen these before. Thank you for your ID.

Comments for tiny black bug (seed bug)

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Box Elder Bug
by: Carol

It looks like a Box Elder bug. You really don't want them taking up residence in your house. You could end up with a large swarm.

Seed bug
by: Moni

Marcia
Your insect is a seed bug ( Melacoryphus lateralis )with no real common name. It is more closely related to milkweed bugs than boxelder bugs. It is smaller than a boxelder bug.
These insects feed on the seeds of flowering plants. They are not a garden pest.
They are found in southwestern US.
Since they come to lights, if you have your porch light on that is what brought them to your house, but they feed on plants and are not a household pest of any kind.

School
by: Schaffer

We have these all over our school. When school started (8/2/10), there were everywhere. They only come out when it rains, and are usually gone within two months. We spent hours looking up what their names are, and any other information we could get, but these few comments are all we can get. Anyone know anything else about these pests?

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Large Black Beetle (Hermit flower beetle)

by Jonathan
(Brockville, Ontario)

Very slow moving lethargic black beetle. Approximately 2 cm long and 1 1/2 cm wide. Found on my patio in Eastern Ontario.

Comments for Large Black Beetle (Hermit flower beetle)

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Hermit flower beetle
by: Moni

Jonathan
Your beetle is a Hermit flower beetle. The adults feed on fruit juices. They fly at night and do come to lights. They are usually found in woodlands and orchards.
The larvae of these beetles are found in rotten logs where they help decompose the dead wood.
They are found in Northeastern US and Canada.

Ohio
by: Anonymous

I just found one of these in my garage! I live in East Central Ohio. Big beetle!

Hermit flower beetle
by: Moni

Ohio
So glad you got to see one of these! They are cool big beetles!

Huge Beetle
by: Jen

Found one of these in our garage. We live beside n apple orchard. This is the biggest beetle I have seen before. Very cool.

A Junebug
by: Brenda

To me this looks like a classic June bug that will cling to your clothing in early summer evenings. I grew up in NS and they were plentiful there.

Cool Beetle
by: Angelsong82

Just found one on my parents' living room floor, near my dad's hibiscus flowers. Pretty cool little bug. South Eastern Ontario, Quinte region.

toronto islands beetle buddies
by: MeezStephanie

I saw a couple of these on the islands last week. One guy was very 'friendly', visiting our candles and wine. He sat on my hand then flew away. Pretty large -- is 4cm an exaggeration? but harmless and kinda cute.

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Black and Green Spiked Insect (lady beetle larva)

by Ryan Ferguson
(Gaylord, MI, USA)

Found in Northern Michigan. About an inch long. Moved fairly slow. We found it on a pile of corn husks so may be from a different state that grows corn in May.

Comments for Black and Green Spiked Insect (lady beetle larva)

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Another ladybug larvae
by: Kurt

The other day someone posted a similar but different version of this critter. If you google "ladybug larvae" I think you'll agree this is a version of one. I hope you let it live!

Lady beetle larva
by: Moni

Ryan
Kurt is correct it is a lady beetle larva in your corn husks. Lady beetles of several species are found in N MI, but it may also have been eating aphids in the corn that you purchased. It would be great to let it go in your yard so it can eat the aphids that might be around. It also can eat other small soft bodied insects.


Thanks!
by: Ryan Ferguson

I would never have believed that the cute little lady bugs we see once looked like this. I wouldn't the the kids near it because I wasn't sure what it was. Don't worry...we didn't harm it in any way. As a matter of fact we just set the beetle and the corn husks in the woods and let it go on it's way after taking a bunch of pictures. Thanks for the info!

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bug, grey, black, red, and white that flies (Small milkweed bug)

by Melissa
(Mesa, AZ)

I found this bug on my shower curtain this morning. They are all over my yard outside. I think they may eat my garden? I live in AZ and my home is surrounded by oleanders. I find them a lot around plants or on my outside walls. They have 6 legs, antenaes, and are grey, black, and red with a white spot on them. What are they and how do I get rid of them?

Comments for bug, grey, black, red, and white that flies (Small milkweed bug)

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Small milkweed bug
by: Moni

Melissa
Your photo is of the small milkweed bug. The adults and nymphs feed on seeds of a wide variety of plants. They are also known to suck nectar from flowers and have been reported to be predators on other insects.
It is not considered a garden pest. If you feel they are causing a problem you could collect them by hand and put them in a container of soapy warm water.

thank you
by: Melissa

Thank you! I really appreciate you letting me know what they are.

Red and Black Bug
by: Anonymous

I have lots of oleanders and thought that these were milkweed or boxelder beetles. That are neither, but they are not harmless and will eats tomato plants, and other soft juicy fruits and vegetables. I will keep looking for the correct name of this bug.

Is it a milkweed bug?
by: Dee

I also found this site while searching to ID a bug I saw scurrying across the gravel in our yard in Mesa. And mine looked just like the picture that was posted. "Anonymous" claims they are Not boxelder or milkweed bugs. Is there anything else they could be? I'm mainly concerned with creatures that could hurt our chihuahua
Thanks!

small milkweed bug
by: Moni

Dee
The photo is of a small milkweed bug.
Anonymous did not understand that that is what the insect in the photo is or they found a different bug.

As mentioned, the small milkweed bug does feed on many plants. The large milkweed bug (a totally different insect) does only feed on milkweed. Without a photo we can not know what your insect was. Please send a photo so we can help.

If you are sure it looked like this insect then the information about the small milkweed bug is valid for you.

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black and yellow beetle (Fourteen-spotted lady beetle )

by Tina
(Parry Sound)

Checkerboard beetle?

Checkerboard beetle?

black (Lady bug size) with yellow squares.

Comments for black and yellow beetle (Fourteen-spotted lady beetle )

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Fourteen-spotted lady beetle
by: Moni

Tina
Great job with your Id! It is a lady beetle. The 14 spotted lady beetle is also called the Chess-board lady beetle. Even the larva has the checkerboard look.
This lady beetle and its larva like all other lady beetles love to eat aphids.
This is another introduced species (in 1960's from Europe near Quebec City) of lady beetle that is spreading its range. Currently it is found in SE Canada and New England south to Florida then west to the Great Lakes.

very scary
by: Anonymous

I work at a convenience store in GA and we are no where near water but there all over the place I'm terrified of them well any bug really but this one scared the living day lights out of me

black and yellow 14 spots
by: Anonymous

We have these ladybirds ( ladybugs to you ) here in North west of England in the U.K. a common sight and very cute. Plus the black spotted with red back, either 4/6/8 spots, though have counted some with 16.

Fourteen-spotted lady beetle
by: Moni

Northwest England
Not surprised you have this lady 'beetle' [not bug :)]. It came from Europe.

We have over 6000 species of lady beetles here in North America, so in UK you probably thousands also!
Thanks for looking us up!

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Big black bug pincher forelegs (Giant water bug)

by Cookie
(Austin, TX)

Big scarey insect

Big scarey insect

Looks like some sort of borer because of posterior extension. Black roach-shaped body, pincher-like forelegs, very large, found in Southeast Texas

Comments for Big black bug pincher forelegs (Giant water bug)

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Giant water bug
by: Moni

Cookie
Your bug is a giant water bug. They do live in water but are attracted to lights at night. Do you live near a pond or lake?
They do like clean water.
These bugs do feed on aquatic insects,small fish, tadpoles, frogs and even small birds. Once they catch their prey, they inject enzymes that break down the insides so they can suck the liquid out with their beaks.
They can bite, so do not handle or go barefoot in water where they live.

Giant waterbug
by: Ann V

Definitely don't try to pick one up. I tried saving one from being trampled in Boerne, TX and the bite it delivered was one of the most painful I've ever experienced (worse than hornets/wasps). My finger immediately swelled up and turned purple. It took a month to heal and I have a small indentation at the bite site (due to loss of tissue).

giant water bug
by: jennifer

this same bug was just found on our car in huntsville ontario canada north of toronto

big ugly bug
by: missy

I saw one of these bugs last night outside our house in Fargo, nd. Scary looking night. It's huge!

Huge Giant Water Bug
by: Anonymous

I just found one of these outside of my car in Orillia, Ontario (1hr north of Toronto, Ontario). They are huge and absolutely frightening to my 2.5 year old son!!! This one that we saw was 3.5 inches long and 1.5 inches wide!!!!

Creepy Bugs
by: Anonymous

I saw two of these guys at work last night. They are very creepy. When they walk, it looks like their front two legs are arms, as if their dragging their body with them. Crossville, Tennessee.

Eggs
by: Anonymous

I have lived in Texas for a long time and never seen something like this... Most intrigued about it, I looked on here and sure enough there are others that i have seen it as well... I found mine a water pan that collects the rain water, and it was a female.. I know this cause after finding out that it could actually hurt one of my kids i crushed her and green eggs sacks came out. Its May now so I guess there looking for calm clean water to lay there eggs in this time of year.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
Sorry you crushed this insect.
It would only bite if handled...and it only bites in self defense! You tell the kids to not pick it up unless they want bit! :-).
If you had left it alone it would have flown away.
As mentioned they are attracted to night lights so turn off the porch lights and it will fly away.
It wants to live in a pond not a water barrel there is not enough food for its young in a water barrel.

Huge Water Bug
by: Anonymous

I have lived in Texas all my life and have never encountered one of these bugs until last night. My boyfriend and i stopped for gas and if flew in my car. It was so huge i couldnt believe my eyes, we were both screaming and creeped out. It was so hard to get it out of the car because it seemed like it wanted to attack us. It was huge maybe like 3 inches long with pincher looking legs. ive never been so scared in my life and for my life. :D

Giant Water Bug
by: John

I have seen these in last 2 years attending our local high school football stadium in Rockford (Rams), Michigan, in October. I live on lake frontage, and never have seen these in our lakes as yet?
Also, ours show up as a Greenish-Greyish color, and both had been over 3" in length.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

John
They are attracted to lights...and with the bright lights of a football stadium that is why you are seeing them there...perhaps you need brighter lights on at night at home :-)

Giant water bug
by: Anonymous

Wow! I'm so glad I have found another picture of this bug! I have been trying to figure out what it was for a few months now. I live in North Carolina and saw one of these in a food lion parking lot one night. I swear I thought it was some sort of mutated beetle.

found one of these in owego NEW YORK
by: Anonymous

i seen one of these in owego NEW YORK. wer i live i caught it in a bucket. and looked it up on here. says ther from texas. ive never seen one in upstate new york before. but i def found one last night. is this rare to find in owego ny? im really wondering if there supose to be in ny.thing looked liked it was a frog or sumthg the way it was running. can these fly? thing was atleast 3inches long. atleast. never seen anything like it. i really wonder if this thing is supose to be in ny?

Giant water bug
by: Moni

owego NY
Yes they are found in NY...they are found all over North America.
Yes, they can fly. They will fly to lights at night.
See the other info on this at the bottom of the comments section.
Thanks for sharing!

New to Alberta?
by: Mark

Just found one of these under a yard light last night, no water barrels ponds or streams around either? Lived here for 17 years and have never seen these before. This is the biggest bug iv ever seen in person. I'm really wanting to know if they are common or not? Any info would be great!
Ps. there is no roaches in Alberta and this looks really convincing!

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Mark
Yes, they are relatively common in Alberta. There are a million insects out there and most I have not seen...I have seen thousands...but not all of them by a far stretch of the imagination. Sooooo...even tho you have never seen one before - does not mean it has not been right there.

As I wrote below in the first comment at the bottom - "They do live in water but are attracted to lights at night. (Not surprised that you found it under the lignt :) And there is a pond or lake nearby.)
They do like clean water.
These bugs do feed on aquatic insects,small fish, tadpoles, frogs and even small birds. Once they catch their prey, they inject enzymes that break down the insides so they can suck the liquid out with their beaks.
They can bite, so do not handle or go barefoot in water where they live. "

Here is some general info on the Family of giant water bugs (there are 19 species found in North America) - http://bugguide.net/node/view/12796

The only species of giant water bug listed from Alberta is Lethocerus americanus -

Big Black Bug with Claws
by: Angie

i just came back from a night walk with my dog and there happen to be a baseball game on so being at night they had the bright lights on , and right there in front of me coming out of the bush was this big black bug pincher.I thought to myself that it looked like a giant water bug. So when I got home on search right away for a picture and sure enough there it was.Anyway this huge black bug also lives in Ontario. Mean looking thing..

Giant Creepy Bug
by: Tracy

I found one of these in my pond filter box. We are in Clinton Township, Michigan. I have NEVER seen a bug this large or creepy looking! YUCK!

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Tracy
Seems a bit late to see one but so glad you got to see one of North America's largest bugs :)

Giant water Bug
by: Rizwan

I live in Karachi Pakistan, work in cement manufacturing factory. In rainy season this insect appear in thousands. All walkways, passages, and roads were cover with this black gaint bug. Its stomach is like a empty fiber tank.when its fly its wing span extand double from its own size. In street light its flight look like grasshopper flight but size is same as small bat, one this bug stuck with nose and eyes fortuntly due to my quike respond its deattached from my face in fraction of second.... Thanx God...
Now i know how harm ful it is

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Rizwan
So glad to know you have them in Pakistan! That is great. Yes, they are water bugs.

They are NOT harmful, but can bite if you are walking barefoot in the water. They are not poisonous or dangerous. If the water was polluted you would not have them.

Thanks for sharing your story from Pakistan.

Honduras Water Bug
by: Kahl

Currently stationed near a Lagoon on military orders. Saw one of these drop from a security light. Had never seen one before, did not realize they are all over in the states as well. This one was close to 4 inches long, and seemed like he wanted to take my head off. Thanks for the information.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Kahl
Interesting to know they are in Honduras too!

Tropical areas have so many neat bugs and most seem a bit bigger than any we have in the States.

Thanks for sharing and for the work you do in the military!

giant beetle like pincher bug, Massachusetts
by: Anonymous

My wife found one on our pool deck tonight (pool not open yet). I immediately ran outside and picked it up, I do stupid things, didn't think it would bit...Luckily it did not. First time I have ever seen one of these here in New England, I guess I will let it go now...Glad I could find info on it online!

Giant water bug
by: Moni

MA Anonymous
Interesting that you saw one so early that far north, but since they overwinter as adults, perhaps some warm weather brought it out of the mud.
Do you have night lights on near your deck? They are attracted to the lights.

As long as you picked it up carefully you would not get bitten. The biggest problem with a bite is wading in water where they might grab your toe thinking it was dinner :)

Cool find!

Giant water bug
by: Dennis

Found one of these on my sidewalk this morning, alive. Caught it with two pint jars. Does anyone know how extensive their range is? I live in northwestern Wisconsin. I would appreciate any input as to the extent of their range.

Fish bait
by: Chris

Went night fishing and never heard about these type of bugs until today! It hit me in my face then I smacked it off my face to the floor I stepped on it twice and I didn't die so I stabbed it with my hook and used it as fish bait! Loll :D

giant water bug
by: Phil M.

I just found one of these in Adams, Massachusetts at a 7-Eleven parking lot and we're not even around a lake or pond at least for a couple miles. looked exactly like the one in the picture. i managed to save it and am going put it in a display box.

Pretty cool but very creepy and disturbing to look at. I'm not sure if its male or female.

GIANT WATER BUG
by: Anonymous

Just found one in little Ole Fairmont,MN!

Giant Water Bug
by: Janet

My dog and I encountered one of these one morning when I let her out to go potty. I was not aware of it until my dog let out a loud yip and started shaking her head. She had been nosing around a low table and apparently got too close to it. I think she was only pinched on the nose because there was no swelling afterward; she seemed just fine. I trapped the guy in a jar and released it across the street near the pond it presumably lives in.

giant Grey beetle
by: Anonymous

Saw this water beetle at a Fairmont, MN HS Football game!! It just flew down onto the track and freaked a lot of people out!

giant water bug
by: Moni

Anonymous
So glad so many people got to see this cool insect!
They are attracted to lights :)

Hope no one killed it!

Cool Bug!
by: Johnny C

I live in Brantford, Ontario. I saw one of these in a parking lot on my way back home from work. I don't know what it was doing so far from any large body of water. Poor thing must have been lost and hungry.

Giant water bug
by: Moni

Johnny C
So glad you got to see one!!
They are cool!

There may be a pond closer than you think?

FREAKY BUGS
by: Anonymous

I LIVE IN CENTRAL TEXAS AND SAW ONE TONIGHT FOR THE FIRST TIME. I WORK AT A HOTEL AND THEY ARE IN OUR SWIMMING POOL. THE GUESTS WERE FREAKED OUT SINCE THEY CAN SWIM UNTIL 10PM BUT DONT WANT TO BECAUSE THE BUGS WERE FOLLOWING ONE OF THE KIDS. THESE THINGS ARE HUGE AND CREEPY.

Yuck
by: Anonymous

I saw one in my pool. I took it out but it was dead. Then a racoon came and ate it. R.I.P giant water bug

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6 legged small greyish bug (Nymph of Masked Hunter bug0

by ruby
(Monroe. Michigan, U.S)

6 legged small crawling

6 legged small crawling

6 legged small crawling compared to hand cm

State of Michigan- Found crawling on carpet at night, small insect witch curves back and a small head with antennas. (harmful??)

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Nymph of Masked Hunter bug
by: Moni

Ruby
Your insect is the nymph stage of a true bug called masked hunter. This is in the assassin bug family so they are predators on other insects.

Nymphs exude a sticky substance that causes dust, lint, and other small particles to adhere to the surface of their body. This camouflage may help the nymph avoid detection by both predators and prey.These nymphs can bite humans in self-defense when mishandled. The bite is said to be very painful.
Both the adult and nymph are predators. They prefer dry habitats and if found in the house there are never very many. They are said to feed on woodlice(think pillbugs or rolly pollys that do not roll), lacewings, earwigs,and bedbugs.

This is a good bug...it is not harmful to humans but can bite if handled.

they get huge
by: adam mas

these are every where in newport, nh. they are tough and agressive.

Swear I saw one in UT
by: Anonymous

Had no idea what is what but pretty sure I saw a baby one of these in my house in Utah. At first I thought it was a spider until I counted the legs. Covered in dust/dirt stuff. Yuck! Hope I don't see more.

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Tiny borer Charcoal/blue (Springtail)

by Meggin Webb
(Stow,Ohio, US.)

1/8" long dark charcoal blue,looks like bird lice from a distance,Has many legs like caterpillars,soft bodies,bores into the trees,and even cement!!!! does not look like a typical borer!!

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Springtail
by: Moni

Meggin
Your blue insect is a springtail in the Class Collembola. When I was in college they were considered an insect the new classification puts them as an insect relative. Your blue springtail is probably Vertagopus arboreus, known for its blue color, short antenna and segmented abdomen.
It is probably and introduced species from the UK.
These critters are found everywhere in soil, leaf litter, and any area of decaying organic matter.
Some species of springtails can be found even in winter on snow.
Springtails feed on decaying organic matter. So tho they looked like borers, they did not kill the tree or plant they were on...they are only eating what plant parts are starting to decay. Because of this they are considered a good bug, by helping decay compost and other dead plant materials.

Those are good photos and would be nice addition to Bugguide.net photos as well as the fact these have not been documented for Ohio.

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Black, spiny, hook-nose house-dweller (Wheel bug)

black with red antennae

black with red antennae

A black insect, with red antennae and what looks like a long "nose" hooked under its head. It has a black shell with three rows of serrations, with the row across its back having more teeth than the two sides. Abdomen scoops up and shiny, iridescent brown wings fold on top; the abdomen has white spots on the bottom. Seen in Ashburn, VA.

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Found it - it's a Wheelbug!
by: Aric

Thanks for accepting the post but I realized after further searching you already had this one - it's a wheelbug. :) Thank you!

Wheel bug
by: Moni

Aric
Great job!
Yes it is a wheel bug as you found out.
Nice photo!!

New arrival!
by: WVBugGuy

Hey I just saw this bug in Charles Town, West Virginia. We are on the eastern panhandle of the state and it was just found hiding between the 2 panes of our window!

We're calling it the sawback bug! It looks like a giant logging circular table saw!!

Wheel Bug
by: Michael

Had one rideing on my car all day. Pittsburgh, Pa

Me Too!
by: Anonymous

I had one on my windshield, then it flew away!

BE CAREFUL...THESE BUGS BITE BAD! !
by: Dream Chaser

There was one on the pist next to our gate where I usued to live sometime ago.My son put his hand on the post for balance and did not see this bug beforehand. And when he accidentally put his hand on it it bit him very badly!!! His hand swelled up huge and turned blood red!!! And he would not stop screamng from the pain!!! I had to rush him to ER!! Where they administered Benedryl steroud shot etc... and something for the pain!

He was a small boy around 7! And it was very difficult to see as a parent!! Not to mention terrifying!! It stuck with me and I am terrified of them to this day!!!

So be forwarned..THEY DO GIVE VERY POTENT SERIOUS BITES IF TOUCHED!!! MY SON IS STILL TERRIFIED OF THESE THINGS! UGLY TOO!! LOLcorona

What a weird bug!
by: Rin

Hey I saw one of these before, near the side of my old school. It was just standing there, plain as day. If anyone out there could tell me more about this creature, that'd be awesome! It's a rather interesting creature. Wait.... are they poisonous?

Dangerous Bug
by: Anonymous

This bug is referred to as the assassin of the bug world. It penetrates skin with the single hole and causes the flesh to die. Very dangerous bug Do not touch.

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orange and black spikey bug/worm/larva (Lady beetle larvae)

by Jennifer
(Maryland)

These are all over our front door. They are anywhere from .25 to .5 inches, some are really small. When you step on them they look like soy sauce and lots of it! They just crawl around, no hopping or rolling up.

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baby ladybug
by: Mira

Looks like a ladybug larva to me - keep 'em around to eat the aphids!

Lady beetle larvae
by: Moni

Jennifer
As Mira said, you have lady beetle larvae on your door. They are great predators, so leave them alone and they will head to in the garden to eat aphids and other pests. They may be on your door because there are aphids on a plant nearby. They may also have moved off of a plant nearby to pupate on the door. After they pupate they will turn into the adult beetles ready to feed on more aphids and such in your garden.
Don't smash anymore! :-)

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/orange-and-black-gila-monster-like-lady-beetle-larva-comments.html#ixzz1N8EPDLD4

Ladybugs!
by: Timber

Yep, ladybug larvea! Their really cute and helpful. They eat aphids, little bugs that destoy plants, and are great to have around. They brighten up any scenery. Please, please do not kill anymore. It is not cool. Not cool. Thank you for sharing, and take care!

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black insect with triangular head (Leaf-footed bug )

by John bailey
( hutto, tx)

I have no idea what it is.

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Leaf-footed bug
by: Moni

John
Your photo is of a leaf-footed bug. It is one of the true bugs. I believe yours is specifically - Acanthocephala declivis - it does not have a common name. I would need photos of other angles of the insect to be positive.
These bugs are plant feeders - sucking juices from the plants. They can give off an unpleasant odor when handled.

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Long black beetle with stinger (Broad-necked root borer, female)

by james
(Maitland, FL, Orange)

The front and back is superimposed into one image: it's only one bug.

The front and back is superimposed into one image: it's only one bug.

The picture is only one insect, but superimposed front and back merged into one photo. The insect was found dead in a recycling bin in a park environment with lots of trees, grass and bushes in Maitland, Florida, Orange County. Looks like a beetle with a stinger on the back: I've never seen this insect here; similar beetles yes, but not that kind exactly. It is about 1.5 inches long and looks intimidating even when dead: I used gloves to grab it for precaution... just in case if it awoke from death! The stinger on the back was longer and bigger the first day the insect was found; but I didn't photograph it till the second day after it was left on the ground overnight. Surprisingly the ants didn't eat the whole thing overnight... maybe they were scared too.... It is their version of the devil and they dare not approach it. Looked online to search for the name of the bug, and I came up with the name -- Prionid Longhorned Beetle, and the stinger may turn not to be a stinger at all, but an egg-laying organ. Thank you for identifying and discussing. -james

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Broad-necked root borer, female
by: Moni

James
You were very close in the ID...it is the same subfamily. Your beetle looks like a broad-necked root borer. The "stinger" is the egg laying appendage called the ovipositor on the female.
It is good that you were cautious as there are stories of beetles found in water that were not quite dead and gave quite a 'bite' with its strong mandibles. :-)
This beetle can be found in the northeastern US, as well as then west to Minnesota down to Oklahoma and to Florida.
The adults of this beetle feed on foliage of fruit trees and grapes. Larva feed on the roots of those plants.




Cutey!
by: Anonymous

My boys caught one of these today, she is quite a beauty!

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thin black with long stinger (Giant Ichneumon wasp female)

by Shannon Doxsee
(Morristown, NJ)

What Are You?

What Are You?

Yellow head w/ yellow antennas. Black body that is long and very thin. Has black wings with a blue iridescence. It's legs are also orange/yellow color. The stinger is grey and hangs at least a good five inches. It's aggressive.

I live in NJ and I have never seen anything like that before.

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Giant Ichneumon wasp female
by: Moni

Shannon
This is a giant ichneumon wasp female.
These are found in eastern North America in forest areas.
The long tail is the ovipositor - used to lay eggs inside of a tree. The eggs are laid near a host larva of the horntail wasp that bores into wood.
The males do not have the long narrow tail.

Such a cool find! Thanks for sharing it!



Saw one today in Wisconsin
by: Amy

We saw this insect a few weeks back when my family went on a walk in a favorite nature center. Today, we went back to the same tree where we observed them last time. Again, there were several of them. Those stingers are scary! :)

Saw in Portland Maine
by: Tim

I saw this thing a few weeks ago and I tried to describe it to people and they thought I was crazy well I saw it again today in my backyard and took a few blurry pictures how dangerous is this thing

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large flying insect black with yellow stripes (Cicada Killer)

by Katie
(lakeland, Florida )

About the size of a qurter. Found it stuck to the screen porch. I thought it was a wasp or yellow jacket but its too big. Kind of scary with the kids around an that size of a stinger.

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What is it??
by: Lynn

I have a friend who was stung on her leg x 3, during the night. She later found it dead and I've brought it home wanting to identify it for her. The stings were red & itchy for several days.

Yellow Markings
by: Lynn

In addition, the insect that stung my friend was not this big. The yellow stripes were the same.

Is it....?
by: Anonymous

Is it possibly a wood wasp? In Alaska anyway we had those (I've never seen one but hubby had one land on him) and they are freaky large. Good luck...

Scary looking, but pretty much harmless
by: Stuart

Although this critter's size makes it look quite fearsome, these wasps are generally harmless to humans. Your beastie is a cicada killer. Take a look at wikipedia for more information.

idk
by: Anonymous

I think a hornet but not sure. But this still had its long stinger

Cicada Killer
by: Moni

Katie
Those who said Cicada killer were correct and for those who said hornet...it is not a true hornet but is sometimes called a giant ground hornet.
This large wasp will sting cicadas (paralyzes them so the larvae have 'fresh' food ) to put in the underground nest for the larvae to feed on...hence the name - cicada killer. The adults just feed on flower nectar.
These wasps are found east of the Rockies south into Mexico in gardens, wooded areas, and meadow type areas.
Bugguide gives a great description of the life cycle - "In two or three days after egg laying, a wasp larva will hatch from the egg. The larva immediately begins eating the cicada. When the larva finishes the cicada, leaving only the outer shell (about two weeks), it will then spin a coccoon and hibernate until the following Spring.
In the Spring, the larva will leave its coccoon and become a pupa (resting stage). From the pupa, an adult Cicada Killer will hatch. It will dig its way out of the ground and look for a mate.
Male wasps die shortly after mating. Females die after laying all of their eggs.
These wasps would only sting if provoked. Therefore if you see nests, keep the kids away from that area. To prevent nest building, mulch over sandy soil areas, that is probably a challenge in FL :-) The nest is a rather obvious hole in the ground where the sandy has been piled up as the burrow was made.

In Minnesota
by: Anonymous

I am glad to find this posting. Fishing on the banks of the Minnesota River (Southern MN) we watched this insect attack a cicada. I did not realize these insects are located in MN.

Cicada Killer
by: Moni

Anonymous
That must have be interesting to see! I have seen them carrying them but never actually catching the cicada.
Yes they are in MN.

Cicada Killer
by: Sandra

Saw a few Cicada Killers in my lilac bush as I was trimming. They were eating the bark. I found this quite unusual.

Cicada Killer
by: Moni

Sandra
Typically cicada killers would not be 'eating' the bark. However, paper wasps do scrape dry stems (usually perennial stems like dried up stems on daylilies) to make little balls for building their "paper" nests.


So think you wasp might have been a paper wasp and esp may have been the European.

Kentucky
by: Fort Knox

Found this digging in mulch right along side my porch. It is really large, flies and digs. It has the body of a LARGE fly, yellow and black stripes like a bee, and a stinger like a hornet. I'm glad someone knew what it was! Scared the crap out of me.

In Florida
by: Anonymous

I just saw one of these on my porch in Florida. I live in Stuart, that is central east coast.

Flew in for a visit.
by: Anonymous

I was set up at a festival in Humble, Texas when this HUGE bug flew in my booth. It was about 3 inches long. It started digging in the grass right at my feet! I was curious about what this insect was since I had never seen one before. The other vendors and customers near by had no idea what it was either. I chased it off with the lid of my tub since I didn't want it to get too close to me. The stinger looked like it could do some serious damage. I normally don't worry about flying insects but this one was so big I was really freaked out! Thanks for the info.

cicada killer
by: Aine Holder

I stepped bare foot on one of these in Oshawa Ontario Canada and it stung my heal. My whole leg went numb immediately and I had trouble walking back to the house. Good reason for wearing shoes in the garden!

Cicada killer
by: Moni

Aine
So Sorry you were stung! Ouch!

It is fun to be barefoot in the yard, but guess it is not always safe to do so.

Found one
by: Pj

Found this page when searching for what was on my window screen. Have never seen anything like it! I'm allergic to bee stings so was a bit concerned with it resembling a Huge (2 inches long) hornet. Thank you for all the information. Would attach my picture but dont see how.

walker,wv
by: Anonymous

found one on my humming bird feeder thank you for letting me know it was a cicada killer. My husband thought it was a hornet.

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Black and blue flying insect with furry head (Giant robber fly)

by Ingrid M.
(Boulder, Colorado)

I saw this while hiking in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in Boulder, CO. It's about half the length of my index finger, flies (right at me, in fact, making me almost tumble off the path and down the mountain). Such an interesting "face" on this one! I have no clue what it is.

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Robber Fly
by: Anonymous

The insect in your picture looks like a Robber Fly.

Giant robber fly
by: Moni

Ingrid
With that large of a robber fly it may have been the giant robber fly genus Promachus. The adults are predators on bees and wasps.
They have a tiger-striped abdomen. And it is probably a female with the long narrow point of the abdomen.
Robber flies are predatory on other insects. The adults lay eggs in soil or plants where the larvae eat other insects and their eggs in decaying matter.
These flies are found thru out eastern US east of the rockies and into the southwestern states.


yep its a robber fly
by: bennie

i took some last and this year ...just magnificent pic ...


bennie

Thanks...
by: Ingrid

Thanks for all the input — I've learned something new!
He was one of the strangest-looking insects I've seen in a while...

Very cool looking bug
by: Josh

One of these landed on my laptop and I snapped a few good shots and actually was able to pet it's back. It didn't fly off. It was around 2 inches in length. I'd like to share the pics if I could.

Giant Robber Fly found in El Paso, Tx
by: Joshua B.

Found this bad boy on my rock wall in my back yard. Never seen one before and lived the way he looked.

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baby robber fly (Robber fly female)

by mrs dean hunt
(sarnia ont ca)

my girlfriend and i were in the garden and this landed on her hand so she got scared ..it would bite her so she whisked it away ..lol mrs dean hunt

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Robber fly female
by: Moni

mrs dean hunt
Yes, your insect is a robber fly. And from the looks of the pointed abdomen it is a female.
These flies are found thru out North America and actually worldwide. The larvae usually occur in soil or decaying wood feeding on eggs or larvae of other insects. The adults prey on other insects for food so are considered beneficial in the garden.
Baby flies are larvae or worms not flying insects.

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Black/Blue green red wing (Tarantula Hawk wasp)

by Kimberly
(Fort Iwing, California)

black insect with blueish green patches red/orange wings very ant like in the face black eyes mandables 6 legs about the length of a double A battery including the legs biggest insect ive seen found it hiding from my dog in the screen door

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Tarantula Hawk wasp
by: Moni

Kimberly
Your photo is of a tarantula hawk wasp. They are in the spider wasp family...hence the long legs. :-)
They are large wasps and are found in southwestern US...on one species is found in the eastern US.
They live in open areas especially near the desert.

The adults feed on nectar ...they really like milkweed flowers. The female wasp stings tarantulas...which paralyzes them and then puts it in a burrow with an egg. The larvae then feed on the 'fresh' spider.
These wasps are said to have a powerful sting but are not aggressive...you have to agitate it for it to sting.

marvelous pic
by: bennie

love the pic of this TARANTULA HAWK WASP makes life easier when you can see the little critters .. just marvelous pic ..

bennie

Just found one in back yard
by: Caliman21

I just found one in my back yard in Moreno valley, ca. I saw it flying, it looked dangerous so I swiped at it with a fly swatter and killed it. Then at a closer look, it looked just like a huge black wasp. I still have it in a plastic sandwich bag outside. Awesome!!!

Found a Tarantula Hawk
by: Anonymous

We just found a tarantula hawk in our back yard. We also live in Moreno Valley, CA....we had never seen anything like it.

Found near San Diego Boarder
by: Anonymous

The one i found flew like a dragon fly! It was black and orange! 28 years I have lived here never seen one. Flew by me thought it was a small bat. Crashed and caught it a cup and set it free outside. Thought it was some weird mutation. What a trip!

SpoOked by a tarantula hawk wasp
by: Anonymous

I live in surprise az we were just watching tv nd I saw a huge shadow on my bck door I looked outside nd there it was it loOks creepy I never seen something like that o_O

Tarantula Hawk Wasp
by: Woodward

We just found a Tarantula Hawk Wasp in our yard and managed to get it into a plastic baggy (it was on it's last limb so it was easy to capture)...never seen anything like it...we took pictures and had to look it up to see what the heck it was. We live in Desert Hills/Cave Creek Arizona. The little bugger is HUGE and extremely colorful body!! Lots of turquoise.

Tarantula Hawk wasp
by: Moni

Woodward
Hope you let it go once you got the pics and Id!

Here in Mexico
by: Guy

There is one in my garden, here in Bucerias, MX on the Pacific coast. They are truly huge, with scarlet wings and blue-green irridescent bodies. A fabulous creature, so spare them.

tarantula hawk wasp
by: tina

I just found one in my bath room just flying around so u should I'm afraid to go there until my husband comes home so he could get it out...and thank I'm so glad I found this page cause u was wondering what kind of insect was that so this cleaned all up.

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black fly with white spots on tail (Tiger Bee Fly)

by kathy bennett
(atkins, ar, usa)

black fly that has four white spots on tail.

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Tiger Bee Fly
by: Moni

Kathy
Your fly is a Tiger bee fly. These are found in most of North America except the most western states.
They seem to be found in meadow type areas. The adult fly feeds on nectar and pollen, while the larvae is a parasitoid of Carpenter bees genus Xylocopa.
Colorful wings help with the ID.

thanks
by: Anonymous

thank you Moni for the identification. I tore up the internet looking for this fly but to no avail. I'm very glad I found this site. :)

Tiger bee fly
by: Moni

Kathy

Glad you found the site, too! We did not have a photo of that insect and the more photos we have, the more we and others learn about the critters around us! Thanks for the photo!

Are they poisonous?
by: Xiu

This type of bug has been following me for the past few days and i just want to know are they harmful?

Tiger bee fly
by: Moni

Xiu
As said in the first comment I made about this insect it feeds on nectar not humans...it is not harmful.

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Ground wasp i think (Great golden digger wasp)

by Londoe Anderson
(Graytown Ohio United States)

it is black and orange abount 1"long and yellow hair around the facual and forward body areas i have also seen them in a red and black with yellow around the eyes I have seen them carring large flying grashoppers back to there nest witch is in the ground in a driveway screening by a small building that used to be a small garrage i live in farm area in graytown ohio 20 minutes from toledo started seeing these 2 years ago

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Ground Wasp
by: Anonymous

The closest I could come to your picture was a Black and Orange Thread Waisted Wasp. (Order=Podalania).

Greate golden digger wasp
by: Londoe

Thank you very much for posting I have done some more research and found these to be greate golden digger wasp

Great golden digger wasp
by: Moni

Londoe
Yes, great ID work! Your wasp is the great golden digger wasp.
Females dig burrows almost vertically. Cells are dug radiating out from a central tunnel. Larvae are provisioned with crickets, camel crickets and katydids (long-horned grasshoppers). One paralyzed prey is placed in each cell, and one egg is laid on it. One generation per year.
The adult wasps feed on nectar.
These wasps are found in North America.
Since you live in northern OH here is more info from MI.
According to an article from U of MI, the nests of this wasp in MI are... "provisioned with 2-4 Tettigoniidae (katydids) specifically the Sword-bearing Conehead..."

Did some research on alfalfa insects in Oak Harbor about 25-30 yrs ago and living in Toledo area drove thru Graytown often. Thanks for reminding me of those bug chasing days!


North Central Florida
by: Karen

I spent 2 hours watching one carry a large, what I thought was dead, spider over the pool screen looking for a path to it's lair. Never have I seen a bug with such determination! The spider was twice the size. It kept hitting the metal extrusion, then the wood trim and couldn't get around it. Fascinating! Then one got in the screened area. And it was in no mood to be messed with. In reading another site, I understand their sting is something you don't want to experience. Is that so? Do they die off in winter? It does get colder here in North Florida, 6 miles south of the Georgia border.

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black and yellow flyer (Locust or Hickory borer)

by Ken Smith
(Newton, NJ)

black and yellow flyer about 1 inch long. It mostly walks and loves to bore into wood. Its antennae are about the same length as the insect.

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Black and Yellow Flyer
by: Anonymous

It looks very much like the insect we call carpenter wasps. They are very closely related to yellow jackets. They can be aggressive in a group if they are disturbed. If you see a large group of them, it might be a good idea to check with a pest control company. Do get the company to remove them before getting them irritated, because they swarm easily. My 22 stings last year proved that point! I'm not allergic, but I had to rush my little dog to the vet for antihistamines, steroids, and supportive care. Thank goodness he's ok.

Locust Borer Beetle
by: Ali Bee

Not a wasp at all -- this one seems to be a locust borer beetle.

Locust or Hickory borer
by: Moni

Ken
Your beetle is either the Locust or the Hickory borer. They look very similar and without seeing it in person would be hard to tell which. What trees are in your area? Usually the hickory borer beetle comes out in the spring and the locust borer in the fall. Since we are mid summer it could be either...did you just find it.

Hickory borer larvae feed on hickory and pecan while the locust borer feeds on black locust. Previously weakened or damaged trees are often killed by an infestation of the larvae.


YES! A hickory borer!
by: Ken

Moni, I believe that you are right as it was seen after bringing in a load of hickory firewood. Thanks to all for their help.

HICKORY BORER
by: Moni

Ken
Thanks for the follow up...hickory wood is the last clue we needed! Great to know...the locust and hickory borers do look very similar.

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Unknown Yellow and Black Insect (Sand wasp)

by Harry Stone
(El Paso, TX)

1" to 1.25" long.
Yellow and Black Markings
Photographed in a rest area 35 miles east of El Paso, TX
sitting on a wall

Comments for Unknown Yellow and Black Insect (Sand wasp)

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Can anyone identify this insect?
by: Harry Stone

It was on the shady side of the wall ... trying to stay cool?

Sand wasp
by: Moni

Harry
Your insect is one of the sand wasps that I believe is in the genus Stictiella. This group of wasps dig holes in sand to make their nests. They then catch a butterfly, a skipper butterfly from what little information I could find, which they sting to paralyze, put it in the nest, then lay an egg on the butterfly. The 'live' food is there for the larvae to feed on.
Interesting find. Great photo.

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black wasp like digging bug (Great golden digger wasp )

by Cheryl
(Macomb, MI, USA)

We live in northeast Metro Detroit. I found this bug coming out of a large hole in my landscaping. It flies like a wasp. It has black wings, black and orange body and is a very efficient hole digger. Over 1 inch long

Comments for black wasp like digging bug (Great golden digger wasp )

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Wasp Like Digging Bug
by: Miriam

Great Golden Digger Wasp-lay their eggs in the hole that they dig. Can sting but aren't aggressive. Do seem to want to check out humans and pets, though.

Great golden digger wasp
by: Moni

Cheryl
Miriam is correct your wasp looks like the Great golden digger wasp. Cicada killers are similar but the coloration is more like the digger wasp.

Females dig burrows almost vertically. Cells are dug radiating out from a central tunnel. Larvae are provisioned with crickets, camel crickets and katydids (long-horned grasshoppers). One paralyzed prey is placed in each cell, and one egg is laid on it. One generation per year.
The adult wasps feed on nectar.
These wasps are found in North America.

According to an article from U of MI, the nests of this wasp in MI are... "provisioned with 2-4 Tettigoniidae (katydids) specifically the Sword-bearing Conehead..."

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Inch long,black with white behind head ( Assassin bug)

by John
(Tennessee)

(s)he is missing a leg on the rear left. Never seen this bug before, but was hoping it could be identified. Found in Tennessee. Morning. Was on the cement porch.

Comments for Inch long,black with white behind head ( Assassin bug)

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Assassin bug
by: Moni

John
Your bug is Microtomus purcis an assassin bug. These bugs are predators which are good bugs for the garden. They feed on other insects. The red on the hind leg is distinctive for this species.
They are found in the southern states of the US. They hide in bark on trees when not eating.

Information said they can bite so be careful.

THANKS!
by: John

Thanks a ton! I won't touch the poor little thing, but I hope it eats all the bad bugs!

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black and yellow - 4-5inches (Broad-necked Root Borer)

by Mils
(Houston, Texas, USA)

My friend found it dead in his house. We were wondering what it is.

Comments for black and yellow - 4-5inches (Broad-necked Root Borer)

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Broad-necked Root Borer
by: Moni

Mils
It is a female, Broad-necked root borer. The projection out the rear end is the ovipositor.
It can not sting humans. It is used to put eggs in the soil under debris.
These longhorned beetles are found in eastern N America: Quebec, west to Ontario, Minnesota, Oklahoma then south to Florida. They are found around wooded areas.
The adults eat foliage and can damage fruit trees and grape vines. The larva feed on tree and shrub roots for about 3 yrs before turning into a pupa and emerging in the spring.
Cool find!

Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/black-beetle-broadnecked-root-borer-female-comments.html#ixzz1WYKTKmE2

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HUGE BLACK AND BLUE ANT LIKE INSECT (Oil blister beetle)

by dave
(wolcott,ct usa)

saw this in the woods today.it's about a inch long.black and blue.
what is it? a queen ant?
Dave in Connecticut

Comments for HUGE BLACK AND BLUE ANT LIKE INSECT (Oil blister beetle)

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Oil blister beetle
by: Moni

Dave
Your insect is one of the blister beetles in the genus Meloe. These are also called the oil beetles.
They are found thru out North America.
The larvae of these beetles feed on eggs and other food in ground bee nests. Adults feed on leaves and flowers.
There are many stories about how the beetles get the larvae to the nests.
The adult beetles have an oily substance that comes out between leg joints...hence the name.

The blood or fluid in the bodies of these insects contains cantharidin which will cause blisters if gotten on your skin. This is where the family common name of blister beetle comes from.


Blue Beetle
by: Kristy

I found and photographed one of these beetles on May 2,2013 in Allison, New Brunswick, Canada, and wondered what it was. Thankyou for the info on this most peculiar bug!!

Meloe - oily blister beetles
by: Anonymous

I found 4 of these this summer (2014)! I wasn't sure what the were. Now I do! Thanks for the info!! :D

We have 'em near NYC too
by: OF CV

I found one extremely lethargic after a cool evening this October. My guess is that it didn't make it to wherever it winters. My photo has a coin so you get a sense of how big and strange it appears. Sounds like it was a good move to use a 3x5" card to move it around. Thanks for your website...very interesting stuff.

Playing dead
by: Rod Nadeau

These Oil Blister Beetles are really good at playing dead! When disturbed/handled - it will play dead for a minute or so - then get up and run!

Oil blister beetles
by: Moni

Rod
So glad you found one and have seen some of the things insects do to try to keep from being eaten :)
Thanks for sharing that info with others!

Insects are cool!

Thank you so much!
by: britany

I JUST saw one of these for the first time in my life. I grew up playing with all sorts of bugs and creepy crawlers (was not you average little girl lol). In the 29 years of my life I have NEVER seen one. Thanks so much for the information! This was the only thing I found on the internet about it! Such a cool looking bug!! But I'll keep my distance and handle my jumping spiders instead!

My friend just saw one!
by: Victoria

This insect is beautiful! One of my friends just saw one on a hike and noticed it in the middle of the path and about to be stepped on and she kindly moved it. I'm not one for insects but I have to say this one is a gorgeous beetle!

title
by: Sithew

i definitivly saw one of them when i was a kid, i tryed to capture it but it escaped, and since no one has believe that story about the big blue ant... but i saw it...

Oil blister beetle found in Sweden
by: Cornelia Marie

I just saw one outside my house here in Gothenburg Sweden and wondered what it was. So thanks for the info! Now I know :) Wonder how it got here though.

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Big black bug with Orange bumps on head (Blister beetle)

by JudyNV
(Nevada)

Big black bug with Orange bumps on head

Big black bug with Orange bumps on head

Spotted on a walk through Cathedral Gorge State Park (eastern NV), only interested in mining nectar(???) of a plentiful mid-sized bush that was covered in yellow fall flowers, on 9/22/2011, about 11am. Temperature was probably high 80s to mid 90s. Had kind of a beetle look but I didn't know that beetles would go after nectar - if that was what this guy was doing. I would guess it was between 2 and 3 inches long. He seemed top-heavy to be holding on the the tips of these little branches. He didn't pay any attention to me and I was not about to bother him. Have no idea if he jumped or flew up to this perch (about 3 feet of the ground) or if he crawled up. I got tired of waiting to see if he would move to another flower so I continued my hike after taking this picture. Sorry now that I didn't walk around the bush to get more pictures from other angles. The park where I saw this bug was high desert, very dry. But I just found a better picture of these bushes I'd like to post, if that would help you identify the bug, but I'm in edit mode and don't see a way to upload another picture at this point.

Comments for Big black bug with Orange bumps on head (Blister beetle)

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Blister beetle
by: Moni

JudyNV
Your beetle is probably Lytta vulnerata...no common name, tho it is one of the beetles in the blister beetle family Meloidae. Since it has black legs then that is the species I think it has to be.
The adults do eat foliage, flowers, pollen, and fruit, bugguide says in the east they prefer to feed on plants of the family Rosaceae.
My guess is yours is feeding on goldenrod...but not sure. It does not matter for ID. Other angles would have been nice but I found the ID finally!
The larvae of this beetle live in bee nests.

Diversity is greatest of this family in the west. All the blister beetles body fluid contains cantharidin which will cause blisters if it comes in contact with the skin. Ingestion by humans or animals can be fatal.

Cool find! Glad you submitted it! It is a new species for me to ID. Thanks

Blister beetle
by: Moni

JudyNV
Your beetle is probably Lytta vulnerata...no common name, tho it is one of the beetles in the blister beetle family Meloidae. Since it has black legs then that is the species I think it has to be.
The adults do eat foliage, flowers, pollen, and fruit, bugguide says in the east they prefer to feed on plants of the family Rosaceae.
My guess is yours is feeding on goldenrod...but not sure. It does not matter for ID. Other angles would have been nice but I found the ID finally!
The larvae of this beetle live in bee nests.

Diversity is greatest of this family in the west. All the blister beetles body fluid contains
cantharidin which will cause blisters if it comes in contact with the skin. Ingestion by humans or animals can be fatal.

Cool find! Glad you submitted it! It is a new species for me to ID. Thanks

Looks like the plant is called rabbitbush...not goldenrod. There are several kinds found out in your area.

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Black & yellow (Assassin bug)

by Mimi
(Rainsville, Alabama)

Found in Henegar, Alabama, northeast part on state in late summer. It is 1" long.

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Assassin bug
by: Moni

Mimi
Your bug is an assassin bug, Microtomus purcis. It is not a Lygaeidae, but it is in the family Reduviidae.
This assassin bug is found in the southern states under bark usually. It is a beneficial predator of insects like all assassin bugs. And, like most assassin bugs it can inflict a painful bite if mishandled.

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Black , 1/2 inch, hard back, Wings (Dung beetle)

I see about a half dozen of these insects dead in my garage every morning. This is the first year I've ever seen them at my house.

Not sure what is bringing them in the house or why they are just now showing up. I rarely ever see any alive, and moving around outside.

I have to sweep them up every day.

Comments for Black , 1/2 inch, hard back, Wings (Dung beetle)

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Dung beetle
by: Moni

You do not say where you are from or what time of year you are seeing them...assume October?

They look like one of the dung beetles. Without seeing more angles and a close up of the antenna and tarsi or toes it would be hard to ID any further.
Do you live near livestock?

These beetles feed on dung of various animals or on carrion (dead animals). If it is one of the earth-boring scarab beetles they live in burrows in the ground with the larvae doing most of the feeding on dung or carrion.
Since yours looks like it is rather plain black, smooth dung beetle then it might be one of the tumblebugs which roll the dung or carrion into balls where they feed, eggs are laid for rearing their young.

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Blackish with green/orange Cricket? (Truncated true katydid nymph)

by Kristy
(Austin, TX)

What is this?

What is this?

I see these on the back porch of my new house. Should I be scared? What is it?

Comments for Blackish with green/orange Cricket? (Truncated true katydid nymph)

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Truncated true katydid nymph
by: Moni

Kristy
Your insect is a cricket relative called a truncated true katydid. Yours is a nymph or young insect. It is also called the Central Texas Leaf-Katydid, which is a better name for it because it is only found in central TX, tho the official common name is the truncated true katydid.
It is a tree dwelling katydid, usually found in oak-woodlands. They do feed on oaks and if in high numbers can defoliate Post Oak and plateau live oak.
They evidently sing rather loudly and unlike most katydids that sing at night these katydids sing day and night!

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Black Wasp-looking flying insect (Spotted oleander caterpillar moth)

by M. DIANE HODSON
(ST PETERSBURG, FL, USA)

It has a very dark, segmented body, ending in a point, at the tail. However it appears that the very end of the tail has two projections. Some distinct colors on the body--a white spot on the top center of the body, just below the wings, three white dots along each side of the middle of the body, one bluish, irregular spot on the lower segment of the body, with two on either side below that.

Wings are reddish-orange with black shading. Two wings, on each side of body, the lower wing longer that the upper wing, but approximately the same width, with the back edge of all wings having an irregular line, and the front edge having a smooth line. The wings angle back somewhat from the front.

Two black antennas that are thicker, like a moth. It appears to have only two very long, skinny, dark legs on each side. The head is dark and appears to be as wide or wider than the segments of the body which appear somewhat smaller, in diameter.

Comments for Black Wasp-looking flying insect (Spotted oleander caterpillar moth)

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Oleander wasp moth
by: Anonymous

I found the name of this insect. It is an Oleander wasp moth. It comes from the caterpillars that eat up Oleanders. Pretty moth--bad caterpillars.

Spotted oleander caterpillar moth
by: Moni

Diane
Your moth is officially the spotted oleander caterpillar moth. And as anonymous said the caterpillar does feed on oleander. It is a species thought to be introduced from the Caribbean.
It is found in southern Florida.

Although most moths fly at night this one does fly during the day feeding on nectar.
And tho the caterpillar does feed on oleander it does not cause significant damage to warrant control. It is kept in check by beneficial insects. Its close relative the regular oleander caterpillar will cause significant damage to oleander plants.

Thanks for the great description and photos!

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black and grey flying bug (Sculptured pine borer)

by Teersa
(Oklahoma)

Found this flying around. What is it?

Comments for black and grey flying bug (Sculptured pine borer)

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Sculptured pine borer
by: Moni

Teersa
Your insect is a beetle known as the sculptured pine borer. You probably have pine trees nearby.

Larvae feed under bark of pine trees for several years before maturing into adults. They may feed on live or dead pines. The adults feed on the pine foliage. Since this is a large beetle is seems to be seen easily as the adult flies about...and it can be rather noisy as it flies.

They are not considered garden pests as they do not occur in large numbers to cause any major damage.

Thank you
by: Anonymous

Mony,

Thank you so much. I'm so excited to learn about this bug and find out that it's not eating my melons.

Moni
by: Teersa

I meant Moni. Sorry.

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Little black bug found in sisters room (Rustic borer)

by Adam Williams
(Spruce Pine, North Carolina )

small beetle with reddish brown head, black body and yellow markings near tail

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bug
by: Anonymous

It looks like one of the many types of assassin bug. Perfectly harmless.

Rustic borer
by: Moni

Adam
Your insect is one of the longhorned beetles called rustic borer.
It is found in eastern North America around deciduous forests. They are found from April to Oct in NC.
The larvae feed under bark of hickory and other hardwoods as well as pine. The adults are attracted to UV lights.
This insect is considered and invasive species.

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Yellow/Black flying insect with long tail (Giant Ichneumon wasp female)

by Renee
(Alexandria NH)

Scary insect

Scary insect

This large insect came into my yard in NH. I've never seen anything like it before. We all ran inside (after my shot of course). Should we be concerned about it being around? Dangerous? It was about 3-4" long with another maybe 5" tail!

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Giant Ichneumon wasp female
by: Moni

Renee

This is the giant ichneumon wasp female. The long tail is the ovipositor - used to lay eggs inside of a tree. The eggs are laid near a host larva of the horntail wasp that bores into wood.
The males do not have the long narrow tail. See the Insect ID page for photos of the males.
Read more: http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/winged-borer-insect-with-long-antennalike-tail-ichneumon-wasp.html#ixzz0V76Kcgb1

These are found over most of North America in forested areas.

Such a cool find! Thanks for sharing it!

Yellow/Black flying insect
by: Zella

Thanks for clearing up this mistery. My husband and i also saw this wasp in our backyard.

Zella

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Black bug, orange/white markings, flys, (Bagrada bug)

by kim
(Corona, California)

This bug is smaller then a ladybug. I've see a large number of them in my pool and now on my young peach and plum trees. I'm not sure if they are friend or foe to my yard. I am noticing the edges of the leaves on my peach tree are being munched on by something.

thank you to Moni in advance :)

Comments for Black bug, orange/white markings, flys, (Bagrada bug)

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Bagrada bug
by: Moni

Kim
Your insect is the bagrada bug. It was just found in the US (only in southern CA) in June of 2008.
It is known to feed especially on the cabbage family of plants but has been found on other plants as well as papaya, potato, maize, sorghum, cotton, capers, and some legumes. So even if peaches and plums are not listed it is perhaps possible.

Feeding damage from this bug is NOT from eating holes in the leaves...it has a piercing-sucking mouthpart that sucks the juices from the leaves. This looks like white/bleached irregular spots on the leaves. If there is enough feeding then the leave will dry up and die.

These are true bugs in the stink bug family. The adults can fly but not the nymphs/young. Eggs are laid in clusters on leaves or in the soil. Usually all stages can be seen on an infested plant.

These are small 5-7mm bugs that originated in Africa. Tho some are now found in southern Asia and southern Europe besides southern CA and AZ.


Because these are such a new pest there are no products labeled for controlling them. So it would be best to pick off all the bugs and put them in soapy water. Look for the egg clusters which are said to be creamy-white,oval and turn orange as they age. Stink bug eggs tend to be barrel shaped.

Thanks for submitting this and bringing it to the attention of others who might have this pest!

thank you
by: Anonymous

Thank you for all that wonderful information! The bug I trapped for the picture died when I sprayed it with a squirt of malathion. I believe it has attacked my plum tree because the younger lower leaves look so dehydrated and almost leathery with pale green between veins, and then to top it off the edges are crispy. Kind of like it's scorched or sun burned. But it could be any other problem. I do have shot hole I believe.
Again, thanks so much!

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